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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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Brazilian Officers Columbus Sailed Into Gtmo


View FTG Oper.

Last Sunday, April 29, four Brazilian naval officers arrived on the Base to view operations of the Fleet Training Group.
Members of the four man party were CDRs C.R.P. Paquet, A.A.P. Guimarae, M. P. Montiers, A. Bar cellos of the Brazilian Navy. The men are from the Brazilian General Staff (CNO Office), Rio de Janeiro.

They are viewing the operations of Fleet Training Group to see if the Brazilian Navy can use a similar system in training their men.

The group, after leaving. Gtmo today, May 5, will travel to Norfolk and Little Creek, Virginia, to view operations at those naval installations.


IF



COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Volume VII, No. 18 Saturday, 5 May 1956


Granadillo, Caravella Housing Proj.


Scheduled For Comp. By May 12
LTJG H. E. Adams Jr., representative of the Base Officer in Charge of Construction, has announced that 86 family housing units in the Granadillo and Caravella housing areas have already been completed.
According to LTJG Adams, 60 units on Granadillo will be occupied by married enlisted personnel and the 26 units on Caravella will be tenanted by married officers.
The Caravella housing, it was
reported, is broken up into two areas. One area which is composed P. W . Paves Streets of ten units is situated off Sherman Avenue. The other area which is comprised by 16 units is located In ous gAreas further out on Caravella Point.
He also disclosed that 14 more
Granadillo and Caravella housing units for married officers are sched- Graad an Craeli hos uled to be completed by May 12. areas by the Base Public Works These units are situated on West department is well under way. Bargo. According to Public Works, comCredited with having placed the pletion of the project will be in sidewalks, yard top-soil and the about three weeks. preparation of driveways, streets and parking areas for paving on The serious dust problem enboth Granadillo and Caravella countered by the residents of those Points is Mobile Construction Bat- housing areas spurred the PWD talion One. The Seabees, it was to undertake the job and press for said, have also mounted protective a speedy conclusion. fences around the bluff on both Grassing, seeding and the planthousing areas as a possible 'check ing of shrubbery is also underway on children playing near the areas' at the two areas. Grass seed was steep embankments. flown in from Miami.
It was also reported that the
seeding, grassing and paving of The PWD is also working on both housing areas will be handled similar projects at the new Base by the Public Works Department. hospital site.


*0'


On his second voyage of exploration, Columbus commanded 17 ships, carrying about 1,000 colonists, all men, to the New World. This "handsome fleet,as the deceased admiral dubbed it, sailed from Cadiz, Spain, on September 25, 1493, called at the Canaries and made the oceancrossing expedition in the excellent time of 21 days. They reached the West Indies on November 3, 1493, on an island Columbus has named after his flagship Mariagalante.
The fleet passed Doininica, Guadaloupe, Antigua, Nevis, St. Kitts, St. Croix, the Virgins, Puerto Rico and other islands. In three weeks' sailing, they reached Cape Haitien. All the men Columbus had left there the previbus Christmas had been killed by the Indians, whom they had mistreated. When Columbus heard this sad news, he turned eastward and founded Isabella, the first European colony in the New World.
Leaving his brother, Diego, in charge of the colony, he took the NINA and two other small caravels and explored the southern coast of Cuba during the early spring of 1494. While Columbus was navigating the Cuban waters, he set the course for NINA and the two tiny vessels to Guantanamo Bay.
Historians logged Columbus' arrival in Gtmo Bay which, to Columbus, was Puerto Grande (big port), on April 30, 1494.


Haitian Dignitaries

Aboard Base Friday
Six Haitian government officials and the American Ambassador to Eaiti, Roy T. Davis, spent Friday, May 4 aboard the Naval Base. While here they were given a briefing by RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase, and conducted on a tour of the Base.
, In the group of visiting officials were Col. S. S. Riddle Jr.; Mr. Charlesi Haitian Foreign Minister; Gen. Levelt, Haitian Chief of Staff; Daniel Theard, Chief of Protocol, and Major Stores.


August PO Test


Washington (AFPS) - The Navy has released dates and details of fleet-wide promotion exams to be held this August for sailors in three pay grades.
Third class petty officer tests will be given Aug. 14; second class, Aug. 21, and first class, Aug. 28, the Bureau of Personnel said.
Eligible personnel in all rates will be examined with the exception of printers and aviation electronicsman. Men in those rates will be permitted to take tests for lithographer and aviation electronics technician.
Change of rate exams will also be given to those desiring to switch over to guided missileman, aviation guided missileman, and aviation fire control technician.
The bureau said that seamen attached to commands having photographer's mate third class allowances may compete for that rating if qualified in all other respects.
The CAA certificate normally required for advancement to all pay grades in the air controlman rating will be waived in the August exams for those not assigned to control tower duties.
As announced earlier, stenographic performance tests for first class petty officers in the yeoman rate will no longer be waived.
However, all methods of taking dictation, including stenomask, will be acceptable, the bureau said.


Archbishop At-CPO Club Luncheon


INDIAN Photo
Archbishop Enrique Perez Serantes, of Santiago de Cuba rises to deliver the main address at the luncheon held in his honor, Saturday, April 28, at the CPO Club, Caribbean Room. Also at the head table were left to right, Osc.r Guerra, American consul of Santiago, Chaplain J. J. Sullivan, the Archbishop, CAPT W. R. Caruthers, C.O. NavSta, and Norman Huddy, President of the Holy Name Society.


462 A'ors 4go Last Monday Dates Published
Exactly 462 years ago-w Mondy, April 30, Christopher Columbus, F
discoverer of America, seaman and navigator, dropped anchor in Guan- or3 Grades tanamo Bay and remained overnight.








Page Two


Saturday, 5 May 1956


THE INDIAN
The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba.
CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba.
Editorial Staff
LTJG D. G. LaCasse ------------------------------Officer-Advisol
G. L. Henderson, JOC ---------------------- --------------Editor
J. C. Curren, JOSN -----------------------------Managing Editor
E. U. Orias, JO3 ---------------------------------- Feature Editor
D.D. Hinton, JOSN -------------------------------- Staff Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit.
All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


Money Doesn't Grow On Trees!!

There's an old saying that money doesn't grow on trees. The ancient Greeks had fables to the contrary however. In 1956 the American sailor has a place where he can "grow" money and it isn't a Greek fable either.
Money grows when placed in trust with the U. S. government. This month all of the branches of the armed services are conducting a campaign to help the enlisted man help himself by calling attention to the fifteenth anniversary of Series E U.S. savings bonds.
If this campaign succeeds in reminding the serviceman that he can buy a savings bond, he'll have four dollars in 1966 for every three dollars he invests now.
,Civilian and uniformed personnel of the Army, Navy and Air Force invested $343,486,016 in Series E bonds during 1955. There is no reason why :their wisdom should not be duplicated this year.
Five hundred and ninety-six Gtmo Bay enlisted men were advanced in rate on April 16. These promotions were accompanied by an increase in pay. With an extra $20-plus per month there's more money in the pocket and more money to spend. It wouldn't take long to squander that added money on "nothing."
But what about the future? Use a little foresight and you'll have a large sum of money accumulated over a period of years. If you don't get that extra cash in your hand each pay day, you won't spend it.
Let the disbursing office set it aside carefully for you in the Navy Payroll Savings Plan, a system where Navy personnel can have savings bond allotments taken from their pay automatically. Through this plan, a certain amount is set aside each pay day and mailed to whatever address desired in the form of savings bonds.
Think it over; you may be glad you did it in ten years hence.


Sunday, 6 May 1956
CATHOLIC MASSES Sunday, 7000-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday 1280-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Frj.-1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 1900
-2000, and daily before Mass PROTESTANT SERVICES Sunday: 0930-Divine Worship (MCB-1 Chapel)
0930-Sunday School
0930-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship( Naval
Base Chapel)
1100-Divine Worship
(,Lwd. Pt.)
1930-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday-1900-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST 1000-Bible Study


I .1
Thursday 10 May 1956 is
the Feast of the Ascension, q
a Holy day of Obligation
for Catholics. Masses in the I Base Chapel at 1200 noon I
and at 5 p.m. Confessions one hour before each Mass.
[ Jerome J. Sullivan i


1045-Worship Service
Community Auditorium CHRISTI AN SCIENCE Sunday--1000Naval Base Library LATTER DAY SAINTS Sunday-1100-Naval Station Library Chaplains at this activity
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LTJG C. C. Gaston, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)


The Chaplain's Comer

THE RIGHT PURPOSE OF FAITH,
When John Wesley was a young man he was deeply troubled by the fact that-he was afraid to die. The full consciousness of his plight became startingly clear during an ocean voyage to England from the American Colonies, where he had been serving as a missionary. In the midst of a heavy storm, he noticed that a group of moravian Christians were unafraid and gave courage to all by their singing of hymns and their prayers. He, on the other hand, was terrified by the prospect of imminent disaster. Later he came to see that faith means complete trust in God for every experience of life.
In the long ago, when Jesus calmed the waves of an angry sea and quited the terror of his disciples who had been struggling with a stormtossed fishing boat, he did not ask them to have faith that God would deliver them from physical danger. Jesus knew that everyone must meet such perils sooner or later in life. But he did ask them to have faith in God's love and care, and therefore be unafraid in the midst of the storm or in the face of death itself.
Today, let us ask for a deeper understanding of the love of God, and a clearer vision of the true purpose of faith in his unfailing care of us. Let each of us realize that He is With us every day and let our very lives reflect the love of God and the salvation that is offered through Jesus to all the world.

Charles C. Gaston
Chaplain, USN



Take Advantage Of Your Vote ! !

The Bill of Rights-the first 10 amendments to the Constitution-became the law of the land in 1791. Today, 165 years later, they remain what they were then-an expression of the American mind.
When Congress drafted these rights, its members could recall the indignities many of them had suffered in foreign lands. Even on these very shores the denial of these rights was instrumental in leading them to revolt.
To ensure that future Americans would not be similarly mistreated, Congress outlined the basic freedoms that the government could not deny. Those included the freedoms of religion, press, speech, assembly and petition, the right to be secure in their homes from unreasonable search and seizure, the right to a speedy trial by jury, the right to be informed of the charge and to face those testifying against them.
Today, in totalitarian states, citizens still do not enjoy these rights. We know that a Russian, a Hungarian or a Pole may be hauled from his home in the middle of the night and tossed into jail to await "trial" for his "crimes against the state." We know that thousands of Chinese have had their hands tied behind them and a bullet triggered into their brains because they were deemed "enemies" of the "People's Republic." We know that a Czech editor prints only what the state allows him to print.
Like our ancestors 165 years ago, we look to the Bill of Rights as an outline of what men may expect from their governments. Because men throughout the world are still denied these rights, we cherish them even more.
But to cherish is not enough. We must actively defend these rights. That is why we are in uniform.
Another positive means of defense is to exercise our duties as citizens. An intelligent vote is one of our basic duties. Because we are away from home the services have taken great pains to make it easy for us to vote. Let's make use of this opportunity. Freedom and obligation go hand in hand. (AFPS)


Calendar of Events
Monday, May 7
Teenage Advisory Group-Teenage Club7:00 p.m.
Supervisor's Association -NavSta, Training Office-7:00 p.m.
Tuesday, Way 8
Little Thiater-Little Theater Building7:30 p.m.
Fleet Reserve Association-Community Au-


ditorium-8:00 p.m.
Hospital Service Volunteers Medical Library, Hospital-10:00 a.m.
Wednesday, May 9
Toastmaster's Club-Officers' CluL6:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 10
Navy Wives Club-Se-wing Club (Villa.
Qtrs., 204)-1:00 p.m.
Felloweraft Club 1078-Community Auditorium-7:30 p.m.


THE INDIAN


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'Saturday, 5 May 1056


THE iNDIAN


ICDR Bayer Elected PTA. Pres.;


School Sponsors Summer Program

At the last meeting of the year of the Parent-Teachers association of Guantanamo Bay, officers were elected for the school year 1956-57.
LCDR J. F. Bayer was elected president, Chelec R. B. Abbott was ...
named vice-president, Chief Nici and Mrs. E. Riley were elected treasurer..............................


and secretary respectively.
The new officers were welcomed and the retiring executive body was thanked for a year of successful service to the P.T.A.
A musical skit, "When Granny Was A Girl" was presented by Mrs. Brown's third grade class.
Also on the agenda for the evening, was the presentation of the Poppy Day Poster Awards, which were made by Mrs. Liveakos. The awards were given to students from the upper elementary and Junior high school levels, who showed talent in designing posters significant of Poppy Day.
A report on the Summer Recreation program was given. It was announced that the program will be sponsored by the Naval Base School and will be directed by J. E. Brown.
Attendance awards were presented to Mrs. Bayer, Mrs. Moschella, and Mrs. Blakeman for the Kindergarten and Nursery School.


Little Theater


Will Hold Open


House On May 8

The Guantanamo Bay Little Theater will sponsor an open house, Tuesday evening, May 8, at 7:30 p.m., at the Little Theater building. An invitation is extended to everyone interested in Little Theater activities.
Many have read of the Little Theater's activities and have seen the plays produced by the organization; but do all know of the many and varied jobs that prodUcing a play consists of? It is not all acting.
Primarily, the Gtmo Little Theater is an organization comprised by a group of volunteers from every command, and from every community on the Base. The purpose of the Little Theater is to present plays for the enjoyment of 4ll Base personnel.
The Little Theater is at present in vital need of members who will participate actively in the casting and production of future plays. Amateur interior decorators are supplied with ample opportunity to expend their talents with set decoration. Costume designing is another wide open field. Lighting and the technical aspects of producing a play are also to be considered.


Boy Scout Committee

Has Business Meeting
Members of the boys scout troop committee met Wednesday, May 2, to discuss the scouting program and the duties of troop committee members.
Next Wednesday, May 9, at 4:00 p.m., a meeting of vital importance to the Gtmo scout movement 'will I-e held in the Board Room, Administration Building. The purpose of the meeting will be to select .i chairman and members of the troop committee.
Some of the positions are already filled, but there are others still open. The big one to be filled is the chairman. His duties are to preside at the regular and special committee meetings of the Troop, etc.
Wednesday, May 23, there Will be a Court of Honor to be held at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will first be opened with a covered dinner for all parents and scouts.
Chief L. B. Dickson, Scoutmaster has made inquires and has received information on the Snapper Creek Scout Camp near Miami, Florida. Efforts are being made to make the camp available for Gtmo scouts for two weeks this summer.


What's On' Stateside
There will be much more doing stategide in 1975.
A population of 228 million persons *ill jam the U.S. by that year, 4c&0ding to U.S. News and World Report. A study by the magazine based on U.S. Census Bureau data predicted that many of the country's remaining wideopen spaces will be gone by 1975 as the population increases by 63 million of 38.5 per cent in the next 19 years.
Californians, still smarting from the raps they have taken since the San Francisco Seals took their baseball team to Florida for spring practice this year, got a pick-meup from the magazine report. In 1975 their state will be No. 1 in the nation populationwise, replacing New York.
All states will grow with Califbrnia, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, Arizona, New Maxico and Florida leading the parade.
The 'd have to re-draw the boundary lines, however, to quell the Texan's boast that his country is the largest, area-wise, in the U.S.


UI


INDIAN Photo
At the opening of the art exhibit in the Naval Station Library Monday evening CAPT W. R. Caruthers, C.O. NavSta, was presented with an original painting done by a member of the Base Art Studio. dAPT Caruthers and Mrs. Gloria Stanul, Club President, stand beside a painting by Mrs. Marcia Fitch which will be given to RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase. The exhibit ends tomorrow.


Aerology Takes Part

In Hurricane Study

The Naval Air Station Aerology Office which is a part of the key stations on the hurricane belt, has been called upon to participate in the National Hurricane Research Project, beginning May 1, through October, 1958.
According to LTJG A. M. McCalmont, NAS Aerology Officer, the Navy, Air Force, Weather Bureau, CAA and various private weather organizations will form the research group.
"The mission of the hurricane research project," he said "is to gather data on hurricanes, prediction of hurricane directions and their intensities, and perhaps, in the distant future, the possibility of controlling them."


Ship's Dept. Goes On

Fishing Excursion

5-M division went on a fishing excursion aboard the WANDERER Thursday, April 26.
J. V. Latwiss, SA, won a $10 prize for catching the largest fish, a three foot, six inch Barracuda. Runner-up with the next largest fish was L. E. Maddox, EN1, who snagged a two foot, four inch Barracuda.
Other would-be fisherman on the trip were E. H. Edwards, MRC; H. L. Wallings, ENC; H. D. Morrison, BT1; H. Schoonover, BT2; V. J. Valenti, MR2; L. W. Lien, SN; R. J. Desanto, FA; J. L. Locke, FN; H. G. Moon, FN; R. Dewy, SN; D.A. Mack, FP3; R. Bonowicz, YNSN, and WO R.B. McLaughlin, division0fficer.


T
It is with deep regret that i I annuonce to the naval establishment the death en 30 i April, 1956 of the Honorable
Alben William Barkley, U.S. i = Senator from Kentucky and ' former Vice-President of the
United States. With his passiing the Naval establishment, I has lost an esteemed and devoted friend.
= Secretary of the Navy i



Exchange Personnel

Head For Windmill

On 'Free' Tuesday
Taking advantage of the NavSta Navy Exchange and Sports Shop's inactivity last Tuesday, May 1, the stores' civilian and military employees took to Windmill Beach for an afternoon "sea-breeze party."
The party began at 2!60 p.m. and ended circa 6:00 p.m. Among the Exchange and Sports Shop sea-breeze. hedonians were: LTJG J. L. Johnston, assistant Navy Exchange Officer; Mrs. Carolyn E. LeClare, Navy Exchange Cashier; Jim LeClare, a guest; Pat Horning, SHI, senior Sports Shop salesman; Charles Johnson, SH2, and his wife Shirley and John W. Sackett, SH2, and his wife Jean.
Also present at the party were: A.J. Gillis, SH2; Win. R. Mulville, SH3; Albert Perry, SH3; Pete Petinak, SH3; Ely U. Orias and many others.
Three GI cans of cold beer, 20 boxes of soft drinks, two basihfful of potato salad, 50 lbs. -of hamburger and an assortment of condiments tossed the party into a lively whirligig.


i


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Page Three








Pdoa rour


Saturday, 5 May 1956


MARINE MUSINGS
Marine Barracks, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, pleasant, comfortable barracks; large cool swimming pool;, friendly well stocked EM Club, large Post Exchange; well equipped Hobby Shop; free fishing gear; bait and outboard motor boats-all this set in a tropical atmosphere with near p e r f e c t weather. Sounds like an ideal rest camp for the FMF gravel crunchers, but it isn't.
The specific mission of this command is broken down into six overlapping duties. This command must provide an interior guard to guard and protect such vital installations as magazines and fuel storage areas, pipelines and water works. Marines must also provide surveillance' of the station land boundaries and the beaches. Anyone who has gone into Cuba through the North East Gate has been stopped and checked by the Marine Sentry. Part of the Marine mission is to control and supervise the entry and exit of personnel and vehicles from the land area of the Base.
The operation and administration of the Naval Brig is another Marine duty. Then we must provide our own security for the Marine Barracks installations. Last but not least important is the duty of a mobile infantry reverse for emergencies.
It all sounds like a pretty good sized job for only 200 Marines. But that isn't all. Additional Missions are assigned the Barracks. Providing Special Guards as requested; providing instructors as required for shore training of ships landing forces; providing quarters and messing of facilities for transit Marines; providing quarters and messing facilities for SeaGoing Marine detachments when required are all additional missions.
Then there's that choice duty, the most squared away marine, the sharpest and outstanding Marine is assigned as Chauffeur Orderly for the Commander, U. S. Naval Base.
Don't forget the Honor Guards and other ceremonies of a strictly military nature. Marines have always been called upon to perform military honors and ceremonies and the Barracks at Gtmo falls out with spit and polish regularly.
And then we must accomplish the Mission of all Marines through out the world. Every Marine must be trained to fill a billet in the FMF on a moment's notice. In other words, every Marine must be trained to drop that typewriter or that monkey wrench or that white gear and spit and polish and pick up his Ml rifle and join a fire team or machine gun section and shoot to kill.
To keep the Marines prepared for the FMF required continuous training day after day, week after


GTMO SPORTING CHIPS

by C. C. Drumright
SHANK .... It is with deep regret we announce a post-ponement of our match with the AFB, Ramey Field and the social that was to have been held in conjunction with their visit. Tentative plans at present indicate the curtain will rise on this event the first week of June, so things aren't a total loss.
The Marines Landed with Control . . . . Cpl. P. E. Patton invaded our local links April 28, 1956 and the situation was doubtful until he reached the number 6 Teeing ground, at this stage by the use of a hand calculator and other dubious methods, Patton figured the 30 to 40 knots of wind, the roll of the green, distance etc. . He then took a gun ( number 7 iron) and rifled the ball right into the cup with one shot from the standing position (We Think). Assistant range finders present were Mr. Joe Bland, and Mr. Earl Castellow. Our hats are off to you, Mr. Patton.
Our Liberal Arts Department. If a ball is putted or chipped and stops on the lip of the cup and the opponent does not concede the next shot and during the delay the ball drops into the cup, the player is considered as having holed out on the preceeding shot, however when the opponent does not concede, the player should putout or mark the ball without delay. Note: The above conditions prevail when it is definite the ball's motion has stopped.
Rimming the Cups around the 19th. . . . A piece of scratch paper blew over the bar which said something to the effect there will be a golf committee meeting at the Club House at 0900, 8 May. Some read-no comprendo-attend meeting very early. Jim Dempsey's leaving makes him a dangerous man-very hungry, inquire around. We see through the suds that Rothenburg and wait a moment, yeap a new name, ADC Roberts from J. P. are leading at the clutch stage of our ringer tournament.
Jubilant members of last Sunday's scotch foursomes as observed at the tea counter were: Tom Drace & Miss Upp-Low Gross, Mr. & Mrs. Upp & Mr. & Mrs. Brotherton-Low Net Tie, Low Putting honors went to Mary Goolsby & Hugh Bush, again Mr. Drace & Miss Upp for long drive. Nearest 2nd shot to hole on #18-The Wares & The Upps Tied, and of course the Club putting champion knocked in the longest putMr. Red (Fire Ball) Adams. As I look up the page-was this a match or a benefit? Our new instructor on the putting green-CAPT Caruthers
-Charge-approximately 10 cents a hole.


VU -10 Prop Blast
by 0. A. Porter Jr.
"It's with a great deal of regret that we must say Goodbye to CDR Charles C. Stamm, who will leave Gtmo next week to assume new duties in the Bureau of Aeronautics in Washington. During his tour here CDR Stamm not only served as Executive Officer of VU-10, but was also quite active in Naval Air Station and Naval Base affairs. Good luck to you, Commander, from all your many Guantanamo friends.
This month will also see other changes. LCDR Robert E. Orcutt, formerly attached to ComCruDiv 2, will relieve LT Walter M. Halentic as Maintenance Officer. LT Halentic has received orders to ComUtWingLant in Norfolk. LCDR Robert B. Hogan will relieve LCDR Leonard W. Zaborski as Administrative Officer. LCDR Hogan reported from Natchtracen, NAS, Jax. LCDR Zaborski will

week. In duty, of the type pulled at Gtmo, this FMF training must be squeezed in at odd hours whenever time is available. Sometimes the training falls in the early hours of morning before sunrise or sometimes after normal working hours. But it's always held and always to good advantage.


NSD Supply Line
CAPT R. A. Williams returned Thursday April 26th proudly exhibiting his certificate of graduation from the Industrial Relations Institute in Washington, D. C Xe brought with him answers to nu-merous questions put forth by various officers of NSD before his departure. Mrs. Williams, who had been with CAPT Williams in Washington visiting friends, returned Monday via Cubana Airlines.
W. G. Geihm, DK3, has gone on leave to visit relatives in St. Petersburg, Florida. J. D. Boston, SN, left last Thursday for the Receiving Station in Brooklyn, N. Y. and discharge from the Navy.
The family of CWO C. Womble, Assistant Disbursing Officer, arrived Monday night by Flaw from their home in Douglas, Georgia. Mr. Womble's former duty station,.

assume new duties with VC-12.
LTJG 0. A. Porter Jr,, former Supply Officer of VW-2, has relieved LTJG Milton J. Merz, who will be released from the service in July to enter the retailing industry.
ENS Joe C. Vanderhoof and ENS Frank L. Curry both reported on board recently from the Training Command. Good luck to you in your VU-10 tour."


F T G Bulletin
The month of May seems to be the au revoir, hasta la vista, or just plain old so long time in FTG. CDR P.C. Gardner is leaving after more than three years on our pleasant shore. He is to be Officer-in-Charge of the Naval Reserve Training Unit at N'wark, N.J.
LCDR J. M. Mickey is going to the Naval Station, San Juan P. R., LCDR E. L. S. Noga is walking down the hill to NSD and both LTJG A. J. Hoyt and LTJG Tr C. Clark are returning to civilian life.
Not only are five officers leaving but nine enlisted men are also to be detached in May:
Lee, J. C. Jr., RD3
Stacy, J. L., GMC Foley, R. D., FT1
O'Brien, F. H., TMC Hamm, W. I., BMC Green, D. F., BMC
Crockett, V. B., BMC
Grabowski, E. S., RMC
Green, A. R., GMC

With departures so plentiful, there are bound to be some eventual arrivals as replacements. Ben W. Smith, BTC, reported aboard last week and was assigned'to the Engineering department, he is a West Virginian and reported to FTG from USS SHENANDOAH (AD 26). He had previously served in the following ships: USS GRAYSON DD435, USS RUSH DD714, USS FISKE DD842, USS PORTER DD800, and USS SPERRY DD697.
LCDR Ruch, LT Yelton and LT Flack eagerly awaited the USNS PVT. JOHNSON last week. Their wives and children were aboard and: all are now enjoying the wonder of Gtmo.

was Charleston, South Carolina. His wife and two children, however, have been staying in Douglas while awaiting housing here.
Congratulations are in order for LT J. W. Carleson, Disbursing Officer, and LT P. D. Larson, Material Division Officer. Both Mr. Carleson and Mr. Larson received notice from the Secretary of the Navy last Monday of their appointments to LCDR. LCDR Carleson's appointment is retroactive to 1 August 1955 and LCDR Larson's appointment became effective as of
1 March 1956.
Flo Francz, Fiscal Department, resigned May 2 in preparation for her departure for the States. Flo's husband, Jim, has received orders to report to the tender Yo-Yo now based at Newport, Rhode Island. They expect to leave May 7 by Flaw.

The best way to kill time is to work it to death.

A man is always as young as he feels but seldom as important.


THE INDIAN'


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Saturday, 5 May 1956


THE INDIAN


THE SCOREBOOK


Marines On Way To League Title; MCB-1 Plays Last Game, Squad Heads For R. I.


by Joe Duffy
Mike Magas's mighty Marines racked up two important wins this past week to continue on their way to the league title. Led by curveballer Phil Patton, and clutchhitting Joe Bland, the Leathernecks are putting plenty of daylight between themselves and the rest of the league. The only competition shown the Marines so far has been Chief Jackson's MCB-1 club, and they are packed and ready for the big trip stateside.
Jackson's club rated the top contender's role mainly because it possessed the winning combination of strength down the middle, also attributed to the Marine nine.
Naval Base 6, MCB-1 5
Two errors and successive singles by Wolf, Ianiero and McCafferty produced three runs and sent Naval Base into a 5-3 lead in the sixth inning. The Indians added another run in the eighth on a single, bunt sacrifice and Ianiero's double that stood to be the winning margin when the Seabees came back to push across two runs in the final inning.
Scholl, Ianiero and McCafferty each collected two hits to account for six of the Indian's seven total, with McCafferty's 300-foot drive to right field clearing the fence by inches for a fifth-inning home run. Weingarten gained the pitching win although he issued 12 walks in going the route. It was the lefthander's first win of the season, while Civitelli took the loss, his second against one win. MCB-1 002 010 002- 5 6 4 NavBase 010 013 01x- 6 7 2 Civitelli, Smith (6) and Stutzman; Weingarten and Wakeman, Ianiero (4).
Marines 4, VU-10 3
Earl Castellow doubled and came in to score the winning run when Joe Bland poked a basehit through the infield in the ninth inning with one away, as the Marines kept a clean slate in league play. The payoff blow broke up a tie ball game, and established the Marines firmly in first place.
The Leathernecks held a 3-0 lead as a result of three hits and six Mallard errors until the eighth inning when the Mallards plated three runs to knot the count at 3-all. Two of the Mallard tallies came as Jim Postal connected for a basehit bringing in Swartz and Morris from third and second; the third marker crossed the plate on a wild pitch.
Joe Bland kept up his hit bar-


rage, tabbing two singles in four appearances, while Phil Patton racked up his second pitching win of the campaign. Patton struck out nine while walking two, while Montgomery whiffed ten batsmen although walking seven to suffer the loss, his first in two decisions. VU-10 000 000 030- 3 5 6 Marines 000 012 001- 4 6 2 Montgomery and M. Smith; Patton and Duncan.
Naval Base 12, NAS 8

The Indians tallied an unearned run in the sixth inning to snap a tie, and then sewed it up with three more in the seventh to register their second win in four games and move into second place behind the league leading Marine club.
Paced by centerfielder Bob Eells, who rapped out three singles, the Indians rang up a total of 14 basehits, eight of which came in the first two innings to send them into a commanding 6-2 lead. The Flyers made up ground in the fourth when they bunched four of their hits to push across three runs, highlighted by a slashing double off the bat of Bob Waldrop that was good for two markers.
Twelve of the Indian 14 hits came off starter Jack Jones who gave way to relieve McCalmont in the fifth. The Indians could only get two hits off McCalmont, but five Flyer errors in the meantime cost him the game. Coleman, pitching in relief of George Bailey, gained credit for the win. NAS 200 303 000- 8 10 7 NavBase 420 021 30x-12 14 5 Jones, McCalmont (5) and Ransom; Bailey, Coleman (4) and laniero.
Seabees 8, Mallards 1
The Seabees banged out thirteen hits in scoring an 8-1 win over the VU-10 Mallards last Wednesday night to celebrate their departure from the Gtmo athletic picture.
Don Blankenship led the onslaught with a double and two singles in four appearances, while Date Carr, Moe Moser and Cigainero each connected for two safeties. Cigainero's first of two singles produced the first Seabees run in the second inning. MCB-1 020 022 020- 8 13 3 VU-10 000 010 000- 1 5 5
Cigainero and Stutzman; Streigle, King and M. Smith.
Marines 13, Naval Base 8
The Marines exploded for five big rpns in the top of the twelfth


a.


inning Thursday night to defeat the Naval Base Indians in the first extra-inning game of the season 13 to 8. The Indians put together four hits and three Marine errors in ,the fourth inning to take a comfortable 8-4 lead, but the Leathernecks bounced right back in the fifth to tie the count and set the stage for a scoreless skein of 6 frames as Dowd and Coleman, pitching in relief, matched inning for inning.
In the deciding, twelfth, Dowd opened with a single and scored the tie breaker when Kavolic layed a bunt that turned into a threebase error as the throw went wide of the bag. Hunter doubled to send Kavolic across, and later scored the third run when Bland came through with a single. Sivilli walked and scored with Bland when Duncan drove a single to right for the final two tallies and the ball game.
The victory put the Marines three games ahead of the second place Indians, who lost a chance to gain some valuable ground. Despite their eight errors, the Indians executed some tremendous plays in the field, and the game was much closer than the score indicates.
Marines 310 040 000 005-13 15 4 NavBase 010 700 000 000- 8 9 8 Furtney, Patton, Dowd (5) and Duncan; Shiller, Coleman (5) and Ianiero.
NOTES ON THE MARGIN ....
A cloud of confusion draped around home plate in the eighth inning of the Mallard-Seabee game Wednesday night when Peakus, VU-10 centerfielder, started for first base on a pitcher's balk, with the count 1-2 on him. Cigainero dropped the ball as he started his windup. Umpire Gugliemo waved him back.
Conceding that a balk does not entitle the batter to a base, Peakus then insisted that he rated a balltwo count. Actually, when a balk is committed with the bases unoccupied it is considered as "no pitch" and no penalty is inflicted.
Standings
Marines 5 0 Naval Base 2 3 3 Naval Air Station 1 3 3 VU-10 1 3 3
Schedule
Sun 6 May, 1430 Marines vs NAS Mon 7 May, 1900 NavBase vs VU-10
Wed 9 May, 1900 VU-10 vs NAS Mon 14 May, 1900 NavBase vs Marines
Tue 15 May, 19G0 NAS vs VU-10


Ladies Golf Shots
The monthly Scotch Foursome was held Sunday, April 29. Selective drives and alternate shots were the features this month. Winners were as follows:
Low GrossFirst-LT Drace and Miss Upp Second-CAPT and Mrs. Ware
Third-TieCWO Bush and Mrs. Goolsby Monte, QMC and Mrs. Griffin Adams, RM1 and Mrs. Larson Low NetFirst-TieLCDR and Mrs. Brothertou
Mr. and Mrs. Upp
Third-Corliss, DCC and Mrs. Adams
Fourth-Mr. Buck and Miss Cooper
Fifth-Bland, GMC and
Mrs. Greenfield
Low Putts-CWO Bush and Mrs. Goolsby Long est Drive on #17-Men-Lt. Drace Women-Miss Upp Closes to pin on second shot on #ISTie-CAPT and Mrs. Ware
Mr. and Mrs. Upp
Longest Putt on #18--Adams, RMI
The weekly event of the Ladies Golf Association was a Flagstick Tournament. The stroke on which the flagstick is planted is determined by adding the individual handicap to par. Winners were:
First and Second FlightFirst place-Evelyn LeachFlagstick on 19th green.
Second place-Marian CaruthersFlagstick in 18th hole.
Third place-Mary GoolsbyFlagstick 4 feet from 18 hole. Third FlightFirst place-Bucky PierceFlagstick 80 yds. from 10th hole.
Second place-Kay BartonFlagstick 85 yds. from 10th hole.
Following the weekly event on Wednesday Edie Ware, Tournament Chairman, presented the prizes to the winners of the Goat Tournament. A beautiful pitcher went to Lavaria Butler as winner of the first and second flight, and a Sterling compote to Cynthia Holley as runner-up. The presentation of a Sterling sandwich plate was made to Millie Kuba as winner of the third flight and a Sterling compote to Margaret Wall as runner-up.


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Saturday, 5 May 1956 THE INDIAN Navy-DPPO-1OND-Gtmo..3441


Cinema - Scoop
by D.D.H.

And away we go! Couple of columns ago, made a reference to the fact that the "Pony Express" arrived late, depriving us of some of the movies that we should be seeing.
I was right and wrong, part of the lowdown being, some of the films can be shown only on projection equipment equipped with the Cinemascope lens.
Four new ones and three old ones this week, and a pretty good line-up at that!
Gentlemen Marry Brunettes (U. A.,, in color), the story of two show-girl sisters who are lured to Paris by their agent Scott Brady. The two girls happen to be Jane Russell and Jeanne Crain! Music and Comedy, that's the whole picture. Rudy Vallee, you old folks remember him, is in the picture too! Falling short in sports, the movie in general is light and gay fare!
White Christmas (Para. -in color), is one of the old ones, but well worth seeing again. Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, Rosemary Clooney and Vera-Ellen star! Lots of good music and productions numbers adding up to 120 minutes of enjoyment.
Purple Mask (U.I., in color) ... Tony Curtis and Colleen Miller ... 18th Century France and Curtis' Bronx accent ... Blah! Teen-Age Crime Wave (Col.) ... Tommy Cook and Sue England... one I've never heard of and know absolutely nothing of ... you'll just have to go see it!
Sincerely Yours (W.B., in color), is Liberace's first movie and one that proved a box-office dud, compared to his popularity on TV and the concert stage. A music-drama of a popular young pianist who becomes deaf. Joanne Dru, Dorothy Malone, Alex Nicol and Lori Nelson are featured.
I'll Cry Tomorrow (MGM), is the best of the week, by a mile! Susan Hayward stars as Lillian Roth, from whose best selling book, the movie was made. For this role, Miss Hayward won the "Look" magazine award for best actress of 1955.;Miss H., was also a nominee for the best actress in the Oscar derby!
Miss Roth's story of early stardom, then alcoholism, and her fight to the top again adds up to a memorable motion picture. Jo Van


WGBY
Saturday, May 5 4:00-The Big Top 5:00-Victory At Sea 5:30 Beat the Clock 6:00-Red Buttons 6:30-Life With Father 7:00-People Are Funny 7:30-Damon Runyon


Television
5:30-News Parade 5:45-Gary Moore 6:00-Conquest of Space 7:00-Talent Scouts 7:30-Burns and Allen 8:00-College Press 8:30-Star Stage 9:00-Robert Montgomery


8:00 Colgate Variety Hour Presents 9:00-Stage Show Tuesday, May 8
9 :30-Justice 5:30-News Parade
Sunday, May 6 5:45-Bob Crosby
4:00-Winky Dink and You 6:00-Two for the Money 4:30-Ding Dong School 6:30-Our Miss Brooks 5:00-Mama 7:00-Chance of A Lifetime 5:30-Jamie 7:30-Big Story 6:00-Frontiers of Faith 8:00-Red Skelton 6:30-You Asked For It 8:30-Whistler 7:00-You Are There 9:00-Sid Caeser 7:30-What's My Line Wednesday, May 9 8:00-Toast of the Town 5:30-News Parade 9:00-Loretta Young 5:45-Robert Q. Lewis 9:30-Appointment With 6:00-I & E Time
Adventure 6:30-I've Got A Secret
Monday, May 7 7:00-Eddie Cantor


Here's Mitzi! One thing for sure, Mitzi Gayner certainly knows how to wear a bathing suit. In "Anythink Goes" Mitzi stars with Bing Crosby, Donald 0' Conner and Jeanmaire.

Fleet, Ray Danton, Richard Conte and Eddie Albert support Miss Hayward. Miss Van Fleet is outstanding in the role of Lillian's ambitious mother! SEE IT!
Three Ring Circus (Para, in color) . . . Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis, Joanne Dru and Zsa Zsa Gabor... been here before, you probably remember it . . . goodl


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Program
7:30-This Is Your Life 8:00-Cameo Theater 8:30-Hit Parade 9:00--Goodyear Playhouse
Thursday, May 10 5:30-News Parade 5:45-Coke Time 6:00-Prof. Father 6:30-Life Is Worth Living 7:00-You Bet Your Life 7:30-Bob Cummings 8:00-Stage 71
8:30-Dragnet 9:00-Godfrey and his
Friends
Friday, May 11 5:30-News Parade 5:45-Perry Como 6:00-Masquerade Party 6:30-Truth or Consequences 7:00-Life of Riley 7:30-Dollar a Second 8:00-Danny Thomas 8:30-Crusader 9:00-Boxing


TV Tele Talk
Monday night, you can see "The Officer's Conference." It's the story of the conquest of space and brought to you from Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama.
Paul Douglas and Polly Bergen appear in starring roles in "White Night" on Star Stage. Its the story of a taxi driver, a late night, and a peculiar passenger.
Raymond Massey stars in "Tender Leaves of Hope" on Robert Montgomery Presents. A doctor is called upon to utilize all the skill at his command as his own patient.
Barber Red Skeleton is joined by guest stars John Garradine, Jackie Coogan, and Billy Gilbert to form the Hot Towel Harmony Four on the vaudeville circuits on the Red Skeleton Show.
The Big Story comes to you from Oregon City, Oregon, and the Enterprise Courier. The story began with a walk down the street and a city seen through new eyes, the eyes of a convict.
The time is tomorrow when a visitor from another galaxy makes his call to earth in "Visit to a Small Planet" on the Goodyear TV Playhouse.
Anna Maria Alberghetti will star in "Song of Rome" on thg Loretta Young Show. She will portray an 18 year old singer who meets her "foster plan" father and is about to go to America with him to further her career, but love of Rome makes her change her mind.
Boxing from St. Nicks Arena brings you a rematch between middleweights Roy Calhoun, undefeated in 17 fights, and Angelo Defless with a 12-13 record. A six round preliminary between Johnny Gorman, 140 lbs, and Fredrico Estalario, 146 lbs.

It's not the minutes you put in at the table that make you fat, it's the seconds.

A good way to etarve your own tombstone is to chisel your way through traffic.


Saturday, May 5
NavSta-Gentlemen 'Marry Brunettes11 min.
NAS-Red Sundown-102 min. Mar. Site--Escape to Burma-105 min. Villa.-This Island, Earth-106 min. Lwd. Pt.-Five Against the House-90 min. MCB-1-Three For the Show-100 min.
Sunday, May 6
NavSta-White Christmas-120 min. NAS-Gentlemen Marry Brunettes Mar.Site-Indestructible Man-106 min. Villa.-Escape to Burma Lwd. Pt.-This Island, Earth MCB-1-Five Against the House
Monday, May 7
NavSta-Purple Mask-103 min. NAS -White Christmas Mar. Site-Red SundownVilla.-Indestructible Man Lwd. Pt.-Escape to Burma MCB-1-This Island, Earth
Tuesday, May 8
NavSta-Teen-Age Crime Wave-100 min. NAS-Purple Mask Mar. Site-Gentlemen Marry Brunettes Villa.-Red Sundown Lwd. Pt.-Indestructible Man MCB-1-Escape to Burma
Wednesday, May 9
NavSta-Sincerely Yours-27 min. NAS-Teen-Age Crime Wave Mar. Site-White Christmas Villa. Gentlemen Marry Brunettes Lwd. Pt. Red Sundown MCB-l-Indestructible Man
Thursday, May 10
NavSta--I'll Cry Tomorrow-110 min. NAS-Sincerely Yours Mar. Site-Purple Mask Villa.-White Christmas Lwd. Pt.-Gentlemen Marry Brunettes MCB-1-Red Sundown
Friday, May 11
NavSta-Three Ring Circus-104 min. NAS-I'll Cry Tomorrow Mar. Site--Teen-Age Crime Wave Villa.-Purple Mask Lwd. Pt.-White Christmas MCB-1-Gentlemen Marry Brunettes



Book - Nook

Winning all sorts of prizes and being chosen by numerous book clubs as a current selection is Pearl Buck's latest-"IMPERIAL WOMAN." This durable writer returns, still talking about China, with a grand-scale novel based on the life of Tzu Hsi, last Empress of China. The story of the girl who rose from court concubine to "Empress of the East" is bound to be interesting with Pearl Buck's name on the cover.
A small novel from Brazil by Erico Verissimo, eminent novelist of that nation, looks like first-rate reading. "NIGHT" is a psychological novel about a man who loses his memory and walks the streets of a nameless city trying to find the answers.
The anonymous insertions in an English "agony" column have prompted J. M. Scott to pen "SEAWYF." When three men and a woman started corresponding about their adventures as castaways on a desert island, he spotted a story and worked up this book as a result. It's a fresh approach to an old story,-and well worth looking into.


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Saturday, 5 May 1956


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THE INDIAN




Full Text

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Brazilian Officers Columbus Sailed Into Gtmo View FTG Oper. Last Sunday, April 29, four Brazilian naval officers arrived on the Base to view operations of the Fleet Training Group. Members of the four man party were CDRs C.R.P. Paquet, A.A.P. Guimarae, M. P. Montiers, A. Bar cellos of the Brazilian Navy. The men are from the Brazilian General Staff (CNO Office), Rio de Janeiro. They are viewing the operations of Fleet Training Group to see if the Brazilian Navy can use a similar system in training their men. The group, after leaving Gtmo today, May 5, will travel to Norfolk and Little Creek, Virginia, to view operations at those naval installations. 462 Ve'ars Ao Last Monday Exactly 462 years ago int Monday, April 30, Christopher Columbus, discoverer of America, seaman and navigator, dropped anchor in Guantanamo Bay and remained overnight. On his second voyage of exploration, Columbus commanded 17 ships, carrying about 1,000 colonists, all men, to the New World. This "handsome fleet", as the deceased admiral dubbed it, sailed from Cadiz, Spain, on September 25, 1493, called at the Canaries and made the oceancrossing expedition in the excellent time of 21 days. They reached the West Indies on November 3, 1493, on an island Columbus has named after his flagship Mariagalante. The fleet passed Dominica, Guadaloupe, Antigua, Nevis, St. Kitts, St. Croix, the Virgins, Puerto Rico and other islands. In three weeks' sailing, they reached Cape Haitien. All the men Columbus had left there the previous Christmas had been killed by the Indians, whom they had mistreated. When Columbus heard this sad news, he turned eastward and founded Isabella, the first European colony in the New World. Leaving his brother, Diego, in charge of the colony, he took the NINA and two other small caravels and explored the southern coast of Cuba during the early spring of 1494. While Columbus was navigating the Cuban waters, he set the course for NINA and the two tiny vessels to Guantanamo Bay. Historians logged Columbus' arrival in Gtmo Bay which, to Columbus, was Puerto Grande (big port), on April 30, 1494. COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Volume VII, No. 18 Saturday, 5 May 1956 Granadillo, Caravella Housing Proj. Scheduled For Comp. By May 12 LTJG II. E. Adams Jr., representative of the Base Officer in Charge of Construction, has announced that 86 family housing units in the Granadillo and Caravella housing areas have already been completed. According to LTJG Adams, 60 units on Granadillo will be occupied by married enlisted personnel and the 26 units on Caravella will be tenanted by married officers. The Caravella housing, it was reported, is broken up into two areas. One area which is composed of ten units is situated off Sherman Avenue. The other area which is comprised by 16 units is located further out on Caravella Point. He also disclosed that 14 more units for married officers are scheduled to be completed by May 12. These units are situated on West Bargo. Credited with having placed the sidewalks, yard top-soil and the preparation of driveways, streets and parking areas for paving on both Granadillo and Caravella Points is Mobile Construction Battalion One. The Seabees, it was said, have also mounted protective fences around the bluff on both housing areas as a possible check on children playing near the areas' steep embankments. It was also reported that the seeding, grassing and paving of both housing areas will be handled by the Public Works Department. P. W. Paves Streets In Housing Areas The paving of streets in the Granadillo and Caravella housing areas by the Base Public Works department is well under way. According to Public Works, completion of the project will be in about three weeks. The serious dust problem encountered by the residents of those housing areas spurred the PWD to undertake the job and press for a speedy conclusion. Grassing, seeding and the planting of shrubbery is also underway at the two areas. Grass seed was flown in from Miami. The PWD is also working on similar projects at the new Base hospital site. Haitian Dignitaries Aboard Base Friday Six Haitian government officials and the American Ambassador to Eaiti, Roy T. Davis, spent Friday, May 4 aboard the Naval Base. While here they were given a briefing by RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase, and conducted on a tour of the Base. In the group of visiting officials were Col. S. S. Riddle Jr.; Mr. Charles; Haitian Foreign Minister; Geri. Levelt, Haitian Chief of Staff; Daniel Theard, Chief of Protocol, and Major Stores. August PO Test Dates Published For 3 Grades Washington (AFPS) -The Navy has released dates and details of fleet-wide promotion exams to be held this August for sailors in three pay grades. Third class petty officer tests will be given Aug. 14; second class, Aug. 21, and first class, Aug. 28, the Bureau of Personnel said. Eligible personnel in all rates will be examined with the exception of printers and aviation electronicsman. Men in those rates will be permitted to take tests for lithographer and aviation electronics technician. Change of rate exams will also be given to those desiring to switch over to guided missileman, aviation guided missileman, and aviation fire control technician. The bureau said that seamen attached to commands having photographer's mate third class allowances may compete for that rating if qualified in all other respects. The CAA certificate normally required for advancement to all pay grades in the air controlman rating will be waived in the August exams for those not assigned to control tower duties. As announced earlier, stenographic performance tests for first class petty officers in the yeoman rate will no longer be waived. However, all methods of taking dictation, including stenomask, will be acceptable, the bureau said. Archbishop At CPO Club Luncheon INDIAN Photo Archbishop Enrique Perez Serantes, of Santiago de Cuba rises to deliver the main address at the luncheon held in his honor, Saturday, April 28, at the CPO Club, Caribbean Room. Also at the head table were left to right, Oscar Guerra, American consul of Santiago, Chaplain J. J. Sullivan, the Archbishop, CAPT W. R. Caruthers, C.O. NavSta, and Norman Huddy, President of the Holy Name Society. S1

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a6 THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Editorial Staff LTJG D. G. LaCasse --------------------------------Officer-Advisor G. L. Henderson, JOC _----------------------------------Editor J. C. Curren, JOSN -------------------------------Managing Editor E. U. Orias, J03 ------------------------------------Feature Editor D. D. Hinton, JOSN ---------------------------------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. Money Doesn't Grow On Trees !! There's an old saying that money doesn't grow on trees. The ancient Greeks had fables to the contrary however. In 1956 the American sailor has a place where he can "grow" money and it isn't a Greek fable either. Money grows when placed in trust with the U. S. government. This month all of the branches of the armed services are conducting a campaign to help the enlisted man help himself by calling attention to the fifteenth anniversary of Series E U.S. savings bonds. If this campaign succeeds in reminding the serviceman that he can buy a savings bond, he'll have four dollars in 1966 for every three dollars he invests now. Civilian and uniformed personnel of the Army, Navy and Air Force invested $343,486,016 in Series E bonds during 1955. There is no reason why their wisdom should not be duplicated this year. Five hundred and ninety-six Gtmo Bay enlisted men were advanced in rate on April 16. These promotions were accompanied by an increase in pay. With an extra $20-plus per month there's more money in the pocket and more money to spend. It wouldn't take long to squander that added money on "nothing." But what about the future? Use a little foresight and you'll have a large sum of money accumulated over a period of years. If you don't get that extra cash in your hand each pay day, you won't spend it. Let the disbursing office set it aside carefully for you in the Navy Payroll Savings Plan, a system where Navy personnel can have savings bond allotments taken from their pay automatically. Through this plan a certain amount is set aside each pay day and mailed to whatever address desired in the form of savings bonds. Think it over; you may be glad you did it in ten years hence. Sunday, 6 May 1956 CATIOLIC MASSES Sunday, 7000-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri.-1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 1900 -2000, and daily before Mass PROTESTANT SERVICES Sunday: 0930-Divine Worship (MCB-1 Chapel) 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship( Naval Base Chapel) 1100-Divine Worship tLwd. Pt.) 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday-1900-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST 1000-Bible Study Thursday 10 May 1956 is the Feast of the Ascension, I a Holy day of Obligation for Catholics. Masses in the Base Chapel at 1200 noon and at 5 p.m. Confessions one hour before each Mass. Jerome J. Sullivan 1045-Worship Service Community Auditorium CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday-1000-Naval Base Library LATTER DAY SAINTS Sunday-1100-Naval Station Library Chaplains at this activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LTJG C. C. Gaston, CHO, UStNR (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner THE RIGHT PURPOSE OF FAITH When John Wesley was a young man he was deeply troubled by the fact that he was afraid to die. The full consciousness of his plight became startingly clear during an ocean voyage to England from the American Colonies, where he had been serving as a missionary. In the midst of a heavy storm, he noticed that a group of moravian Christians were unafraid and gave courage to all by their singing of hymns and their prayers. He, on the other hand, was terrified by the prospect of imminent disaster. Later he came to see that faith means complete trust in God for every experience of life. In the long ago, when Jesus calmed the waves of an angry sea and quited the terror of his disciples who had been struggling with a stormtossed fishing boat, he did not ask them to have faith that God would deliver them from physical danger. Jesus knew that everyone must meet such perils sooner or later in life. But he did ask them to have faith in God's love and care, and therefore be unafraid in the midst of the storm or in the face of death itself. Today, let us ask for a deeper understanding of the love of God, and a clearer vision of the true purpose of faith in his unfailing care of us. Let each of us realize that He is with us every day and let our very lives reflect the love of God and the salvation that is offered through Jesus to all the world. Charles C. Gaston Chaplain, USN Take Advantage Of Your Vote !! The Bill of Rights-the first 10 amendments to the Constitution-became the law of the land in 1791. Today, 165 years later, they remain what they were then-an expression of the American mind. When Congress drafted these rights, its members could recall the indignities many of them had suffered in foreign lands. Even on these very shores the denial of these rights was instrumental in leading them to revolt. To ensure that future Americans would not be similarly mistreated, Congress outlined the basic freedoms that the government could not deny. Those included the freedoms of religion, press, speech, assembly and petition, the right to be secure in their homes from unreasonable search and seizure, the right to a speedy trial by jury, the right to be informed of the charge and to face those testifying against them. Today, in totalitarian states, citizens still do not enjoy these rights. We know that a Russian, a Hungarian or a Pole may be hauled from his home in the middle of the night and tossed into jail to await "trial" for his "crimes against the state." We know that thousands of Chinese have had their hands tied behind them and a bullet triggered into their brains because they were deemed "enemies" of the "People's Republic." We know that a Czech editor prints only what the state allows him to print. Like our ancestors 165 years ago, we look to the Bill of Rights as an outline of what men may expect from their governments. Because men throughout the world are still denied these rights, we cherish them even more. But to cherish is not enough. We must actively defend these rights. That is why we are in uniform. Another positive means of defense is to exercise our duties as citizens. An intelligent vote is one of our basic duties. Because we are away from home the services have taken great pains to make it easy for us to vote. Let's make use of this opportunity. Freedom and obligation go hand in hand. (AFPS) Calendar of Events Monday, May 7 Teenage Advisory Group-Teenage Club7:00 p.m. Supervisor's Association-NavSta, Training Office-7:00 p.m. Tuesday, May 8 Little Theater-Little Theater Building7:30 p.m. Fleet Reserve Association-Community Auditorium-8:00 p.m. Hospital Service Volunteers -Medical Library, Hospital-10:00 a.m. Wednesday, May 9 Toastmaster's Club-Officers' Club6 :30 p.m. Thursday, May 10 Navy Wives Club-Sewing Club (Villa. Qtrs., 204)-1:00 p.m. Felloweraft Club 1078-Community Auditorium-7:30 p.m. al Page Two e6 Saturday, 5 May 1956 THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 5 May 1956 L CDR Bayer Elected PTA Pres.; School Sponsors Summer Program At the last meeting of the year of the Parent-Teachers association of Guantanamo Bay, officers were elected for the school year 1956-57. LCDR J. F. Bayer was elected president, Chelec R. B. Abbott was named vice-president, Chief Nici and Mrs. E. Riley were elected treasurer and secretary respectively. The new officers were welcomed and the retiring executive body was thanked for a year of successful service to the P.T.A. A musical skit, "When Granny Was A Girl" was presented by Mrs. Brown's third grade class. Also on the agenda for the evening, was the presentation of the Poppy Day Poster Awards, which were made by Mrs. Liveakos. The awards were given to students from the upper elementary and Junior high school levels, who showed talent in designing posters significant of Poppy Day. A report on the Summer Recreation program was given. It was announced that the program will be sponsored by the Naval Base School and will be directed by J. E. Brown. Attendance awards were presented to Mrs. Bayer, Mrs. Moschella, and Mrs. Blakeman for the Kindergarten and Nursery School. Little Theater Will Hold Open House On May 8 The Guantanamo Bay Little Theater will sponsor an open house, Tuesday evening, May 8, at 7:30 p.m., at the Little Theater building. An invitation is extended to everyone interested in Little Theater activities. Many have read of the Little Theater's activities and have seen the plays produced by the organization; but do all know of the many and varied jobs that producing a play consists of? It is not all acting. Primarily, the Gtmo Little Theater is an organization comprised by a group of volunteers from every command, and from every community on the Base. The purpose of the Little Theater is to present plays for the enjoyment of all Base personnel. The Little Theater is at present in vital need of members who will participate actively in the casting and production of future plays. Amateur interior decorators are supplied with ample opportunity to expend their talents with set decoration. Costume designing is another wide open field. Lighting and the technical aspects of producing a play are also to be considered. Boy Scout Committee Has Business Meeting Members of the boys scout troop committee met Wednesday, May 2, to discuss the scouting program and the duties of troop committee members. Next Wednesday, May 9, at 4:00 p.m., a meeting of vital importance to the Gtmo scout movement will be held in the Board Room, Administration Building. The purpose of the meeting will be to select s chairman and members of the troop committee. Some of the positions are already filled, but there are others still open. The big one to be filled is the chairman. His duties are to preside at the regular and special committee meetings of the Troop, etc. Wednesday, May 23, there will be a Court of Honor to be held at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will first be opened with a covered dinner for all parents and scouts. Chief L. B. Dickson, Scoutmaster has made inquires and has received information on the Snapper Creek Scout Camp near Miami, Florida. Efforts are being made to make the camp available for Gtmo scouts for two weeks this summer. What's Doin' Stateside There will be much more doing stateside in 1975. A population of 228 million persons Will jam the U.S. by that year, according to U.S. News and World Report. A study by the magazine based on U.S. Census Bureau data predicted that many of the country's remaining wideopen spaces will be gone by 1975 as the population increases by 63 million of 38.5 per cent in the next 19 years. Californians, still smarting from the raps they have taken since the San Francisco Seals took their baseball team to Florida for spring practice this year, got a pick-meup from the magazine report. In 1975 their state will be No. 1 in the nation populationwise, replacing New York. All states will grow with Califbrnia, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, Arizona, New Maxico and Florida leading the parade. They'd have to re-draw the boundary lines, however, to quell the Texan's boast that his country is the largest, area-wise, in the U.S. INDIAN Photo At the opening of the art exhibit in the Naval Station Library Monday evening CAPT W. R. Caruthers, C.O. NavSta, was presented with an original painting done by a member of the Base Art Studio. CAPT Caruthers and Mrs. Gloria Stanul, Club President, stand beside a painting by Mrs. Marcia Fitch which will be given to RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase. The exhibit ends tomorrow. Aerology Takes Part In Hurricane Study The Naval Air Station Aerology Office which is a part of the key stations on the hurricane belt, has been called upon to participate in the National Hurricane Research Project, beginning May 1, through October, 1958. According to LTJG A. M. McCalmont, NAS Aerology Officer, the Navy, Air Force, Weather Bureau, CAA and various private weather organizations will form the research group. "The mission of the hurricane research project," he said "is to gather data on hurricanes, prediction of hurricane directions and their intensities, and perhaps, in the distant future, the possibility of controlling them." Ship's Dept. Goes On Fishing Excursion 5-M division went on a fishing excursion aboard the WANDERER Thursday, April 26. J. V. Latwiss, SA, won a $10 prize for catching the largest fish, a three foot, six inch Barracuda. Runner-up with the next largest fish was L. E. Maddox, EN1, who snagged a two foot, four inch Barracuda. Other would-be fisherman on the trip were E. H. Edwards, MRC; H. L. Wallings, ENC; H. D. Morrison, BT1; H. Schoonover, BT2; V. J. Valenti, MR2; L. W. Lien, SN; R. J. Desanto, FA; J. L. Locke, FN; H. G. Moon, FN; R. Dewy, SN; D. A. Mack, FP3; R. Bonowicz, YNSN, and WO R. B. McLaughlin, division officer. It is with deep regret that I annuonce to the naval establishment the death on 30 April, 1956 of the Honorable = Alben William Barkley, U.S. Senator from Kentucky and former Vice-President of the = United States. With his passing the Naval establishment has lost an esteemed and de_ voted friend. Secretary of the Navy I Exchange Personnel Head For Windmill On 'Free' Tuesday Taking advantage of the NavSta Navy Exchange and Sports Shop's inactivity last Tuesday, May 1, the stores' civilian and military employees took to Windmill Beach for an afternoon "sea-breeze party." The party began at 2:00 p.m. and ended circa 6:00 p.m. Among the Exchange and Sports Shop sea-breeze hedonians were: LTJG J. L. Johnston, assistant Navy Exchange Officer; Mrs. Carolyn E. LeClare, Navy Exchange Cashier; Jim LeClare, a guest; Pat Horning, SH1, senior Sports Shop salesman; Charles Johnson, SH2, and his wife Shirley and John W. Sackett, SH2, and his wife Jean. Also present at the party were: A. J. Gillis, SH2; Wm. R. Mulville, S113; Albert Perry, SH3; Pete Petinak, SH3; Ely U. Orias and many others. Three GI cans of cold beer, 20 boxes of soft drinks, two basinful of potato salad, 50 lbs. of hamburger and an assortment of condiments tossed the party into a lively whirligig. 0 m THE INDIAN Page Three

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Pag Pour MARINE MUSINGS Marine Barracks, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, pleasant, comfortable barracks; large cool swimming pool; friendly well stocked EM Club, large Post Exchange; well equipped Hobby Shop; free fishing gear; bait and outboard motor boats-all this set in a tropical atmosphere with near p e r f e c t weather. Sounds like an ideal rest camp for the FMF gravel crunchers, but it isn't. The specific mission of this command is broken down into six overlapping duties. This command must provide an interior guard to guard and protect such vital installations as magazines and fuel storage areas, pipelines and water works. Marines must also provide surveillance of the station land boundaries and the beaches. Anyone who has gone into Cuba through the North East Gate has been stopped and checked by the Marine Sentry. Part of the Marine mission is to control and supervise the entry and exit of personnel and vehicles from the land area of the Base. The operation and administration of the Naval Brig is another Marine duty. Then we must provide our own security for the Marine Barracks installations. Last but not least important is the duty of a mobile infantry reverse for emergencies. It all sounds like a pretty good sized job for only 200 Marines. But that isn't all. Additional Missions are assigned the Barracks. Providing Special Guards as requested; providing instructors as required for shore training of ships landing forces; providing quarters and messing of facilities for transit Marines; providing quarters and messing facilities for SeaGoing Marine detachments when required are all additional missions. Then there's that choice duty, the most squared away marine, the sharpest and outstanding Marine is assigned as Chauffeur Orderly for the Commander, U. S. Naval Base. Don't forget the Honor Guards and other ceremonies of a strictly military nature. Marines have always been called upon to perform military honors and ceremonies and the Barracks at Gtmo falls out with spit and polish regularly. And then we must accomplish the Mission of all Marines through out the world. Every Marine must be trained to fill a billet in the FMF on a moment's notice. In other words, every Marine must be trained to drop that typewriter or that monkey wrench or that white gear and spit and polish and pick up his M1 rifle and join a fire team or machine gun section and shoot to kill. To keep the Marines prepared for the FMF required continuous training day after day, week after GTMO SPORTING CHIPS by C. C. Drumright SHANK. ...It is with deep regret we announce a post-ponement of our match with the AFB, Ramey Field and the social that was to have been held in conjunction with their visit. Tentative plans at present indicate the curtain will rise on this event the first week of June, so things aren't a total loss. The Marines Landed with Control ...Opl. P. E. Patton invaded our local links April 28, 1956 and the situation was doubtful until he reached the number 6 Teeing ground, at this stage by the use of a hand calculator and other dubious methods, Patton figured the 30 to 40 knots of wind, the roll of the green, distance etc. .He then took a gun ( number 7 iron) and rifled the ball right into the cup* with one shot from the standing position (We Think). Assistant range finders present were Mr. Joe Bland, and Mr. Earl Castellow. Our hats are off to you, Mr. Patton. Our Liberal Arts Department. If a ball is putted or chipped and stops on the lip of the cup and the opponent does not concede the next shot and during the delay the ball drops into the cup, the player is considered as having holed out on the preceeding shot, however when the opponent does not concede, the player should putout or mark the ball without delay. Note: The above conditions prevail when it is definite the ball's motion has stopped. Rimming the Cups around the 19th. ...A piece of scratch paper blew over the bar which said something to the effect there will be a golf committee meeting at the Club House at 0900, 8 May. Some read-no comprendo-attend meeting very early. Jim Dempsey's leaving makes him a dangerous man-very hungry, inquire around. We see through the suds that Rothenburg and wait a moment, yeap a new name, ADC Roberts from J. P. are leading at the clutch stage of our ringer tournament. Jubilant members of last Sunday's scotch foursomes as observed at the tea counter were: Tom Drace & Miss Upp-Low Gross, Mr. & Mrs. Upp & Mr. & Mrs. Brotherton-Low Net Tie, Low Putting honors went to Mary Goolsby & Hugh Bush, again Mr. Drace & Miss Upp for long drive. Nearest 2nd shot to hole on #18-The Wares & The Upps Tied, and of course the Club putting champion knocked in the longest putMr. Red (Fire Ball) Adams. As I look up the page-was this a match or a benefit? Our new instructor on the putting green-CAPT Caruthers -Charge-approximately 10 cents a hole. VU -10 Prop Blast by O. A. Porter Jr. "It's with a great deal of regret that we must say Goodbye to CDR Charles C. Stamm, who will leave Gtmo next week to assume new duties in the Bureau of Aeronautics in Washington. During his tour here CDR Stamm not only served as Executive Officer of VU-10, but was also quite active in Naval Air Station and Naval Base affairs. Good luck to you, Commander, from all your many Guantanamo friends. This month will also see other changes. LCDR Robert E. Orcutt, formerly attached to ComCruDiv 2, will relieve LT Walter M. Halentic as Maintenance Officer. LT Halentic has received orders to ComUtWingLant in Norfolk. LCDR Robert B. Hogan will relieve LCDR Leonard W. Zaborski as Administrative Officer. LCDR Hogan reported from Natchtracen, NAS, Jax. LCDR Zaborski will week. In duty, of the type pulled at Gtmo, this FMF training must be squeezed in at odd hours whenever time is available. Sometimes the training falls in the early hours of morning before sunrise or sometimes after normal working hours. But it's always held and always to good advantage. NSD Supply Line CAPT R. A. Williams returned Thursday April 26th proudly exhibiting his certificate of graduation from the Industrial Relations Institute in Washington, D. C. le brought with him answers to numerous questions put forth by various officers of NSD before his departure. Mrs. Williams, who had been with CAPT Williams in. Washington visiting friends, returned Monday via Cubana Airlines. W. G. Geihm, DK3, has gone on leave to visit relatives in St. Petersburg, Florida. J. D. Boston, SN, left last Thursday for the Receiving Station in Brooklyn, N. Y. and discharge from the Navy. The family of CWO C. Womble, Assistant Disbursing Officer, arrived Monday night by Flaw from their home in Douglas, Georgia. Mr. Womble's former duty station. assume new duties with VC-12. LTJG 0. A. Porter Jr., former Supply Officer of VW-2, has relieved LTJG Milton J. Merz, Who will be released from the service in July to enter the retailing industry. ENS Joe C. Vanderhoof and ENS Frank L. Curry both reported on board recently from the Training Command. Good luck to you in your VU-10 tour." F T G Bulletin The month of May seems to be the au revoir, hasta la vista, or just plain old so long time in FTG. CDR P. C. Gardner is leaving after more than three years on our pleasant shore. He is to be Officer-in-Charge of the Naval Reserve Training Unit at Newark, N. J. LCDR J. M. Mickey is going to the Naval Station, San Juan P. R., LCDR E. L. S. Noga is walking down the hill to NSD and both LTJG A. J. Hoyt and LTJG TI'C. Clark are returning to civilian life. Not only are five officers leaving but nine enlisted men are also to be detached in May: Lee, J. C. Jr., RD3 Stacy, J. L., GMC Foley, R. D., FT1 O'Brien, F. H., TMC Hamm, W. I., BMC Green, D. F., BMC Crockett, V. B., BMC Grabowski, E. S., RMC Green, A. R., GMC With departures so plentiful, there are bound to be some eventual arrivals as replacements. Ben W. Smith, BTC, reported aboard last week and was assignec to the Engineering department, he is a West Virginian and reported to FTG from USS SHENANDOAH (AD 26). He had previously served in the following ships: USS GRAYSON DD435, USS RUSH DD714, USS FISKE DD842, USS PORTER DD800, and USS SPERRY DD697. LCDR Ruch, LT Yelton and LT Flack eagerly awaited the USNS PVT. JOHNSON last week. Their wives and children were aboard and all are now enjoying the wonder of Gtmo. was Charleston, South Carolina. His wife and two children, however, have been staying in Douglas while awaiting housing here. Congratulations are in order for LT J. W. Carleson, Disbursing Officer, and LT P. D. Larson, Material Division Officer. Both Mr. Carleson and Mr. Larson received notice from the Secretary of the Navy last Monday of their appointments to LCDR. LCDR Carleson's appointment is retroactive to 1 August 1955 and LCDR Larson's appointment became effective as of 1 March 1956. Flo Francz, Fiscal Department, resigned May 2 in preparation for her departure for the States. Flo's husband, Jim, has received orders to report to the tender Yo-Yo now based at Newport, Rhode Island. They expect to leave May 7 by Flaw. The best way to kill time is to work it to death. A man is always as young as he feels but seldom as important. S Saturday, 5 May 1956 m THE INDIAN

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eo Saturday, 5 May 1956 THE SCOREBOOK Marines On Way To League Title; MCB-1 Plays Last Game, Squad Heads For R. I. by Joe Duffy Mike Magas's mighty Marines racked up two important wins this past week to continue on their way to the league title. Led by curveballer Phil Patton, and clutchhitting Joe Bland, the Leathernecks are putting plenty of daylight between themselves and the rest of the league. The only competition shown the Marines so far has been Chief Jackson's MCB-1 club, and they are packed and ready for the big trip stateside. Jackson's club rated the top contender's role mainly because it possessed the winning combination of strength down the middle, also attributed to the Marine nine. Naval Base 6, MCB-1 5 Two errors and successive singles by Wolf, laniero and McCafferty produced three runs and sent Naval Base into a 5-3 lead in the sixth inning. The Indians added another run in the eighth on a single, bunt sacrifice and laniero's double that stood to be the winning margin when the Seabees came back to push across two runs in the final inning. Scholl, laniero and McCafferty each collected two hits to account for six of the Indian's seven total, with McCafferty's 300-foot drive to right field clearing the fence by inches for a fifth-inning home run. Weingarten gained the pitching win although he issued 12 walks in going the route. It was the lefthander's first win of the season, while Civitelli took the loss, his second against one win. MCB-1 002 010 0025 6 4 NavBase 010 013 01x6 7 2 Civitelli, Smith (6) and Stutzman; Weingarten and Wakeman, laniero (4). Marines 4, VU-10 3 Earl Castellow doubled and came in to score the winning run when Joe Bland poked a basehit through the infield in the ninth inning with one away, as the Marines kept a clean slate in league play. The payoff blow broke up a tie ball game, and established the Marines firmly in first place. The Leathernecks held a 3-0 lead as a result of three hits and six Mallard errors until the eighth inning when the Mallards plated three runs to knot the count at 3-all. Two of the Mallard tallies came as Jim Postal connected for a basehit bringing in Swartz and Morris from third and second; the third marker crossed the plate on a wild pitch. Joe Bland kept up his hit barrage, tabbing two singles in four appearances, while Phil Patton racked up his second pitching win of the campaign. Patton struck out nine while walking two, while Montgomery whiffed ten batsmen although walking seven to suffer the loss, his first in two decisions. VU-10 000 000 0303 5 6 Marines 000 012 0014 6 2 Montgomery and M. Smith; Patton and Duncan. Naval Base 12, NAS 8 The Indians tallied an unearned run in the sixth inning to snap a tie, and then sewed it up with three more in the seventh to register their second win in four games and move into second place behind the league leading Marine club. Paced by centerfielder Bob Eells, who rapped out three singles, the Indians rang up a total of 14 basehits, eight of which came in the first two innings to send them into a commanding 6-2 lead. The Flyers made up ground in the fourth when they bunched four of their hits to push across three runs, highlighted by a slashing double off the bat of Bob Waldrop that was good for two markers. Twelve of the Indian 14 hits came off starter Jack Jones who gave way to relieve McCalmont in the fifth. The Indians could only get two hits off McCalmont, but five Flyer errors in the meantime cost him the game. Coleman, pitching in relief of George Bailey, gained credit for the win. NAS 200 303 0008 10 7 NavBase 420 021 30x-12 14 5 Jones, McCalmont (5) and Ransom; Bailey, Coleman (4) and laniero. Seabees 8, Mallards 1 The Seabees banged out thirteen hits in scoring an 8-1 win over the VU-10 Mallards last Wednesday night to celebrate their departure from the Gtmo athletic picture. Don Blankenship led the onslaught with a double and two singles in four appearances, while Date Carr, Moe Moser and Cigainero each connected for two safeties. Cigainero's first of two singles produced the first Seabees run in the second inning. MCB-1 020 022 0208 13 3 VU-10 000 010 0001 5 5 Cigainero and Stutzman; Streigle, King and M. Smith. Marines 13, Naval Base 8 The Marines exploded for five big runs in the top of the twelfth inning Thursday night to defeat the Naval Base Indians in the first extra-inning game of the season 13 to 8. The Indians put together four hits and three Marine errors in the fourth inning to take a comfortable 8-4 lead, but the Leathernecks bounced right back in the fifth to tie the count and set the stage for a scoreless skein of 6 frames as Dowd and Coleman, pitching in relief, matched inning for inning. In the deciding, twelfth, Dowd opened with a single and scored the tie breaker when Kavolic layed a bunt that turned into a threebase error as the throw went wide of the bag. Hunter doubled to send Kavolic across, and later scored the third run when Bland came through with a single. Sivilli walked and scored with Bland when Duncan drove a single to right for the final two tallies and the ball game. The victory put the Marines three games ahead of the second place Indians, who lost a chance to gain some valuable ground. Despite their eight errors, the Indians executed some tremendous plays in the field, and the game was much closer than the score indicates. Marines 310 040 000 005-13 15 4 NavBase 010 700 000 0008 9 8 Furtney, Patton, Dowd (5) and Duncan; Shiller, Coleman (5) and Ianiero. NOTES ON THE MARGIN .. A cloud of confusion draped around home plate in the eighth inning of the Mallard-Seabee game Wednesday night when Peakus, VU-10 centerfielder, started for first base on a pitcher's balk, with the count 1-2 on him. Cigainero dropped the ball as he started his windup. Umpire Gugliemo waved him back. Conceding that a balk does not entitle the batter to a base, Peakus then insisted that he rated a balltwo count. Actually, when a balk is committed with the bases unoccupied it is considered as "no pitch" and no penalty is inflicted. Standings Marines Naval Base Naval Air Station VU-10 5 2 1 1 3 31/2 31/2 0 3 3 3 Schedule Sun 6 May, 1430 Marines vs NAS Mon 7 May, 1900 NavBase vs VU-10 Wed 9 May, 1900 VU-10 vs NAS Mon 14 May, 1900 NavBase vs Marines Tue 15 May, 1903 NAS vs VU-10 Ladies Golf Shots The monthly Scotch Foursome was held Sunday, April 29. Selective drives and alternate shots were the features this month. Winners were as follows: Low GrossFirst-LT Drace and Miss Upp Second-CAPT and Mrs. Ware Third-TieCWO Bush and Mrs. Goolsby Monte, QMC and Mrs. Griffin Adams, RM1 and Mrs. Larson Low NetFirst-Tie-LCDR and Mrs. Brotherton Mr. and Mrs. Upp Third-Corliss, DCC and Mrs. Adams Fourth-Mr. Buck and Miss Cooper Fifth-Bland, GMC and Mrs. Greenfield Low Putts-CWO Bush and Mrs. Goolsby Long est Drive on #17-Men-Lt. Race Women-Miss Upp Closes to pin on second shot on #18Tie-CAPT and Mrs. Ware Mr. and Mrs. Upp Longest Putt on #18-Adams, RM1 The weekly event of the Ladies Golf Association was a Flagstick Tournament. The stroke on which the flagstick is planted is determined by adding the individual handicap to par. Winners were: First and Second FlightFirst place-Evelyn LeachFlagstick on 19th green. Second place-Marian CaruthersFlagstick in 18th hole. Third place-Mary GoolsbyFlagstick 4 feet from 18 hole. Third FlightFirst place-Bucky PierceFlagstick 80 yds. from 10th hole. Second place-Kay BartonFlagstick 85 yds. from 10th hole. Following the weekly event on Wednesday Edie Ware, Tournament Chairman, presented the prizes to the winners of the Goat Tournament. A beautiful pitcher went to Lavaria Butler as winner of the first and second flight, and a Sterling compote to Cynthia Holley as runner-up. The presentation of a Sterling sandwich plate was made to Millie Kuba as winner of the third flight and a Sterling compote to Margaret Wall as runner-up. SCUTTLEBUTT 'How about using paper plates?' a THE INDIAN Page Five

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Sf Saturday, 5 May 1956 THE INDIAN Navy-DPPO-10ND-Gtmo.-3441 Cinema -Scoop by D.D.H. And away we go! Couple of columns ago, made a reference to the fact that the "Pony Express" arrived late, depriving us of some of the movies that we should be seeing. I was right and wrong, part of the lowdown being, some of the films can be shown only on projection equipment equipped with the Cinemascope lens. Four new ones and three old ones this week, and a pretty good line-up at that! Gentlemen Marry Brunettes (U. A., in color), the story of two show-girl sisters who are lured to Paris by their agent Scott Brady. The two girls happen to be Jane Russell and Jeanne Crain! Music and Comedy, that's the whole picture. Rudy Vallee, you old folks remember him, is in the picture too! Falling short in sports, the movie in general is light and gay fare! White Christmas (Para. in color), is one of the old ones, but well worth seeing again. Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, Rosemary Clooney and Vera-Ellen star! Lots of good music and productions numbers adding up to 120 minutes of enjoyment. Purple Mask (U.I., in color) Tony Curtis and Colleen Miller .18th Century France and Curtis' Bronx accent ...Blah! Teen-Age Crime Wave (Col.) Tommy Cook and Sue England one I've never heard of and know absolutely nothing of ...you'll just have to go see it! Sincerely Yours (W.B., in color), is Liberace's first movie and one that proved a box-office dud, compared to his popularity on TV and the concert stage. A music-drama of a popular young pianist who becomes deaf. Joanne Dru, Dorothy Malone, Alex Nicol and Lori Nelson are featured. I'll Cry Tomorrow (MGM), is the best of the week, by a mile! Susan Hayward stars as Lillian Roth, from whose best selling book, the movie was made. For this role, Miss Hayward won the "Look" magazine award for best actress of 1955. Miss H., was also a nominee for the best actress in the Oscar derby! Miss Roth's story of early stardom, then alcoholism, and her fight to the top again adds up to a memorable motion picture. Jo Van WGBY Saturday, May 5 5:30-News Parade 4:00-The Big Top 5:45-Gary Moore 5:00-Victory At Sea 6:00-Conquest of Space 5:30-Beat the Clock 7:00-Talent Scouts 6:00-Red Buttons 7:30-Burns and Allen 6:30-Life With Father 8:00-College Press 7:00-People Are Funny 8:30-Star Stage 7:30-Damon Runyon 9:00-Robert Montgomery 8:00-Colgate Variety Hour Presents 9:00-Stage Show Tuesday, May 8 9:30-Justice 5:30-News Parade Sunday, May 6 5:45-Bob Crosby 4:00-Winky Dink and You 6:00-Two for the Money 4:30-Ding Dong School 6:30-Our Miss Brooks 5:00-Mama 7:00-Chance of A Lifetin 5:30-Jamie 7:30-Big Story 6:00-Frontiers of Faith 8:00-Red Skelton 6:30-You Asked For It 8:30-Whistler 7:00-You Are There 9:00-Sid Caeser 7:30-What's My Line Wednesday, May 9 8:00-Toast of the Town 5:30-News Parade 9:00-Loretta Young 5:45-Robert Q. Lewis 9:30-Appointment With 6:00-I & E Time Adventure 6:30-I've Got A Secret Monday, May 7 7:00-Eddie Cantor Here's Mitzi! One th Mitzi Gayner certainly to wear a bathing sui think Goes" Mitzi star Crosby, Donald 0' Jeanmaire. Fleet, Ray Danton, Ri and Eddie Albert su Hayward. Miss Van F standing in the role ambitious mother! SE Three Ring Circus ( or) ...Dean Martin,. Joanne Dru and Zsa Z been here before, y remember it ...good FROM: TO: Send the Indian Home Television TV Tele Talk Monday night, you can see "The OffiCer's Conference." It's the story of the conquest of space and brought to you from Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. Paul Douglas and Polly Bergen appear in starring roles in "White Night" on Star Stage. Its the story of a taxi driver, a late night, and a peculiar passenger. Mynond Massey stars in "Tender Leaves of Hope" on Robert \\ Montgomery Presents. A doctor is called upon to utilize all the skill at his command as his own patient. Barber Red Skeleton is joined by guest stars John Garradine, Jackie Coogan, and Billy Gilbert '.to form the Hot Towel Harmony aFour on the vaudeville circuits on the Red Skeleton Show. The Big Story comes to you from Oregon City, Oregon, and the Ente"prise Courier. The story hogan with a walk down the street and a csty seen through new eyes, the ing for sure, eyes of a convict. knows how The time is tomorrow when a t. In "Anyvisitor from another galaxy makes s with Bing his call to earth in "Visit to a Conner and Small Planet" on the Goodyear TV Playhouse. Anna Maria Alberghetti will star in "Song of Rome" on the Loretta chard Conte Young Show. She will portray an ipport Miss 18 year old singer who meets her fleet is out"foster plan" father and is ahout of Lillian's to go to America with him to O IT! further her career, but love of Pare, in colRome makes her change her mind. Jerry Lewis, Boxing from St. Nicks Arena sa Gabor .brings you a rematch between midou probably dleweights Roy Calhoun, undefeated in 17 fights, and Angelo Defless with a 12-13 record. A six round preliminary between Johnny Gor3 cent man, 140 lbs, and Fredrico Estalstamp arie, 146 lbs. It's not the minutes you put in at the table that make you fat, it's the seconds. A good way to carve yoor own tombstone is to chisel your way through traffic. Program 7:30-This Is Your Life 8:00-Cameo Theater 8:30-Hit Parade 9:00-Goodyear Playhouse Thursday, May 10 5:30-News Parade 5:45-Coke Time 6:00-Prof. Father 6:30-Life Is Worth Living 7:00-You Bet Your Life 7:30-Bob Cummings 8:00-Stage 7 8:30-Dragnet 9:00-Godfrey and his me Friends Friday, May 11 5:30-News Parade 5:45-Perry Como 6:00-Masquerade Party 6:30-Truth or Consequences 7:00-Life of Riley 7:30-Dollar a Second 8:00-Danny Thomas 8:30-Crusader 9:00-Boxing a Saturday, May 5 NavSta-Gentlemen Marry Brunettes11 min. NAS-Red Sundown-102 min. Mar. Site-Escape to Burma-105 min. Villa.-This Island, Earth-106 min. Lwd. Pt.-Five Against the House-90 min. MCB-1-Three For the Show-100 min. Sunday, May 6 NavSta-White Christmas-120 min. NAS-Gentlemen Marry Brunettes Mar.Site-Indestructible Man-106 min. Villa.-Escape to Burma Lwd. Pt.-This Island, Earth MCB-1-Five Against the House Monday, May 7 NavSta-Purple Mask-103 min. NAS--White Christmas Mar. Site-Red SundownVilla.-Indestructible Man Lwd. Pt.-Escape to Burma MCB-1-This Island, Earth Tuesday, May 8 NavSta-Teen-Age Crime Wave-100 min. NAS-Purple Mask Mar. Site-Gentlemen Marry Brunettes Villa.-Red Sundown Lwd. Pt.--Indestructible Man MCB-1-Escape to Burma Wednesday, May 9 NavSta-Sincerely Yours-127 min. NAS-Teen-Age Crime Wave Mar. Site-White Christmas Villa.-Gentlemen Marry Brunettes Lwd. Pt.-Red Sundown MCB-1-Indestructible Man Thursday, May 10 NavSta--I'll Cry Tomorrow-110 min. NAS-Sincerely Yours Mar. Site-Purple Mask Villa.-White Christmas Lwd. Pt.-Gentlemen Marry Brunettes MCB-1-Red Sundown Friday, May 11 NavSta-Three Ring Circus-104 min. NAS-I'll Cry Tomorrow Mar. Site-Teen-Age Crime Wave Villa.-Purple Mask Lwd. Pt.-White Christmas MCB-1-Gentlemen Marry Brunettes BookNook Winning all sorts of prizes and being chosen by numerous book clubs as a current selection is Pearl Buck's latest-"IMPERIAL WOMAN." This durable writer returns, still talking about China, with a grand-scale novel based on the life of Tzu Hsi, last Empress of China. The story of the girl who rose from court concubine to "Empress of the East" is bound to be interesting with Pearl Buck's name on the cover. A small novel from Brazil by Erico Verissimo, eminent novelist of that nation, looks like first-rate reading. "NIGHT" is a psychological novel about a man who loses his memory and walks the streets of a nameless city trying to find the answers. The anonymous insertions in an English "agony" column have prompted J. M. Scott to pen "SEAWYF." When three men and a woman started corresponding about their adventures as castaways on a desert island, he spotted a story and worked up this book as a result. It's a fresh approach to an old story, -and well worth looking into.


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