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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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1~


NAS Airman Leaves For Basic Flight Training In Pensacola Fla.


Archbishop Arrives This Morning;


Luncheon Today, Confirmation Sun.

Archbishop Enrique Perez Serantes of Santiago de Cuba arrived on the Base this morning for a two day visit.
Guantanamo Bay is an official stop during the Archbishop's annual tour of this section of Cuba.


INDIAN Photo
Leroy Mark Horning, AN, of the Naval Air Station Aerology office, on the left, gets a ('despedida') handshake from CAPT Kohr, NAS Commanding Officer. Horning has been ordered by BuPers to report for officer aviation training at Pensacola, Florida.


A transfusion of a young Navy blood from the Naval Air Station Aerology office to the Chief Naval Air Basic Training in Pensacola, Florida, will get underway on Monday, April 30.
Eighteen year old Leroy Mark Horning, AN, USNR, who has been with the Naval Air Station since December 26, 1955, has been ordered by the Chief of Naval Personnel to report to the Pensacola Naval Air Station for an 18-month cadet training course under the Navy's Aviation Officer program.
While attached to the Active Reserve Unit at Willow Grove Naval Air Station in Pennsylvania. H o r n i n g demonstrated a

(Continued on Page Three)


Warm Temps Ahead

With Afternoon Rains

In a summary of the weather conditions in and around the Guantanamo Bay area, LTJG A. M. McCalnont, NAS Aerology Officer, said that next week it will be slighty warmer.
It was also reported that a very small increase in humidity will be felt during the week but an increase of thundershower activity in the late afternoons will be evident.
LTJG McCalmont also said that next week will be generally warmer in the evenings with no noticeable cooling until about 1:00 a.m. and that winds are expected to remain easterly at about 15 knots with higher gusts.


Pa. Gov. Visits


Base Past Week
Governor G. M. Leader of Pennylvania and six state and military officials arrived on the Base Tuesday evening. The group went aboard the USS RANDOLPH Thursday night and headed for the States.
Wednesday morning the group was briefed by RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase, on Guantanamo Bay and the Base's functions. Then on Thursday they spent the day in Port Au Prince, Haiti. Included in the Governor's party were D.V. Randall, the Governor's secretary; Maj. Gen. A. J. Drexel Biddle, Jr., Adjutant General of Pa.; Brig. Gen. J. H. La Brum, Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce, and RADM E. H. Von Heimberg, ComFour.


-- "U






m

COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Volume VII, No. 17 Saturday, 28 April 1956


PTA Will Elect '56-'57 Officers At Next Meeting, Tuesday, May 1


The last meeting of the Guantanamo Bay Parent-Teachers association will be held on Tuesday evening, May 1, at 7:30 p.m. in the school assembly hall.
Highlight of the program will be the election of officers for the new school year, 1956-57.

The list of candidates includes: For president-LCDR E. Kubicki, NAS; LT J.P. Marron, NavSta, and LCDR J. F. Bayer, NSD; for vice-president - W. A. Schnake, civ., NavSta, and Chief Huff. FTG; for secretary-Mrs. W.H. Smith, Mrs. M. C. Schoonderwoerd and Mrs. E. Riley; for treasurer-LT D. Dooling, NAS; H.T. Albright, civ., NavSta, and Chief Nici, NAS.
Acocrding to the PTA, it is of utmost importance that all parents of school-age children be present to elect capable officers for the coming year.


1956 Tags For Dogs

Available On May 5

1956 tags for the dogs innoculated in the recent pet vaccination drive will be available Saturday morning, May 5, at 9:00 a.m. at the Villamar lyceum.
Vaccination facilities will be provided for anyone who did not have their pet innoculated or any newcomer to the Base who has a pet that should be vaccinated.
All residents of the Base who own pets are urged by the Villamar/Bargo Council to have their pets vaccinated in ord-r to protect all residents of the Villamar/Bargo communities.


At 12:30 p.m. today, the Archbishop will be the guest of honor at a luncheon sponsored by the Holy Name Society of Guantanamo Bay. The Caribbean Room of the CPO Club will be the site of the luncheon with 250 guests expected to attend.
At the luncheon the Archbishop will be the main speaker and will be introduced by Norman Huddy, president of the Holy Name Society.
Special guests and members of the Arckbishop's party will include the American Consul of Santiago, Mr. Oscar Guerra and his wife and Capt. M. Rubio, Chief of the Naval District of Oriente, and his wife.
Also, at the luncheon there will be an official representative of each Base command.
On Sunday, April 29, immediately following the 9:00 a.m. Mass, the Archbishop will administer confirmation to 16 children and 14 adults.
The Archbishop and his party are scheduled to leave the Base on Monday afternoon, April 30.


Cast Changes Made

In 'Silver Whistle'

Preparations for the Little Theater's next production "The Silver Whistle," go on.
Joyce Stephenson, director of the play reports that in the past two weeks several people have been forced to drop from the cast of the play due to various reasons.
Joanne Dickson has replaced Flo Schnake as Miss Tripp, Ross Fegley replaces Roane Lytle as Emmet and Pat Moe replaces Sylvia DiMaggio as Mrs. Gross.
Rehearsals for the play will be held every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, beginning Monday night, May 30.
At the monthly meeting on Tuesday, May 8, the Little Theater group will hold an open house in an effort to acquire new members who are interested in any phase of the theater.


Books Are Needed

The Hospital Service Volunteers have issued a plea for donations of used paper-bound, pocket books for distribution to patients in the Base Hospital.. Anyone with books they wish to donate should bring them to the Red Cross office where Mrs. Bowler will give them to the Volunteers.









Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 28 April 1956


THE, INDIAN

The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba.
CAPT G.M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba.
Editorial Staff
LTJG D. G. LaCasse ------------------------------Officer-Advisor
G. L. Henderson, JOC ------------------------------------- Editor
J. C. Curren, JOSN -----------------------------Managing Editor
E.U. Orias, J03 ---------------------------------Feature Editor
D. D. Hinton, JOSN ------------------------------ Staff Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit.
All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


Something Can Be Done About It!

CAPT C.T. Caufield, Commander U. S. Naval Training Center, San Diego, Calif., has promulgated a policy for that training center in regard to improving the attitude of the publiz toward the navy.
Here's some of the thinking of CAPT Caufield:
"In the first place we've got to make the kids enjoy their tour of duty in the navy. We've got to make them prefer excitement, adventure and hard work to their humdrum, boring and secure lives ashore. This is a challenge to our leadership. My seniors, have made the navy exciting for me. If I can't do the same for my kids, I ought to have my pants kicked.
"In the first place, we have to be good. The kids can't be proud of a mediocre outfit, even if you feed them ice cream three times a day. Then we've got to eliminate unnecessary inconveniences and annoyances. Thoughtlessness and stupidity cause most of these. For instance, a careless administration can make life hell for the crew merely by allowing the public address system to be used continuously. 'Now the following named men lay up to the ship's office . . . . ' Plus various restrictions and 'Thou shalt nots,' which serve no useful purpose.
"In addition to the negative approach of eliminating unnecessary inconveniences, there has to be a positive approach-seeing where improvements are needed and getting them made-all the way from new and improved ship types and weapons to swimming pools and functional arrangements of mess lines.
"Even... if you have the best navy in the world people won't like it if others are continually talking it down. So we've got to talk it up. We've got to tell our men, we've got to tell each other, and we have to tell the public what a wonderful navy it is we have ...
"In talking it up to outsiders, we might have a tendency to distort the facts. This should be avoided. Our navy-with all its hardships and all its problems-is still wonderful enough to be sold on its own merits. Anyhow, lies will backfire on you.
"Speaking of backfires, there is nothing that backfires quicker or with a more resounding bang than a broken promise. We must lean over backward to see that a promise, made or implied, by anybody in authority in the navy is scrupulously kept.
Another thing we must not try to cover up errors. If we made a mistake, we have to say so, do our best to rectify it and try to avoid repeating the mistake . .
CAPT Caufield then went on to list some steps that were being taken to improve the atmosphere at the San Diego training center.


Calendar of Events
Saturday, April 28
Square and Circle Club-Phillips Park7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 1
Villamar/Bargo Council- Meeting-Conference Rm. (Admin. Bldg.)-7 :30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 2
Toastmaster's Club-Officer's Club6:30 p.m.


Rifle and Pistol Club-Comm. Hall7:30 p.m.
Fleet Reserve Association Auxiliary-Girl
Scout Hut-8:00 p.m.
Thursday, May 3 Navy Wives ClubChapel Hill Aud.-8:00 p.m.
Feliowcraft Club 1078-Comm. Aud.7:30 p.m.
Friday, May 4 CPO Wives Club-Family Rm.
(CPO Club)-8:00 p.m.


The Chaplain's Corner


AS A MAN THINKETH
An eminent speaker made the statement that very few people are real thinkers. The average person thinks only when confronted with an emergency or crisis. The rest of the time is spent in day dreaming and drifting. There is unquestionably a great dealof truth in this man's observation.
There is, however, ample evidence that thousands when confronted with an emergency turn to worrying instead of required thinking. There is a vast difference between these two. Frequent worrying is dissipating and destructive, but right thinking strengthens and offers' a remedy. Constant brooding over troublesome conditions actually kills millions on the installment plan. Worrying will not change circumstances anymore than wishing will change the tide. Our value to this world is greatly lessened when we look at life thru dark glasses of gloom.
Thoughts make or mar our life. Their influence and their power is beyond calculation. Sooner or later we fall to the level of that which we are thinking about. The body and the soul react to the working of the mind. Every habit, every act, every destiny has its beginning IN and its foundation on thoughts. The truth is we are no better than our thoughts.
Our mind may be likened unto a garden. Each of us is the gardener of his or her individual soul. We are responsible for what grows there. It is entirely up to us to keep down the weeds that constantly seek to find root in our mental gardens. It may not always be possible to prevent the seeds of unwholesome thoughts from entering our minds, but it is possible by exercising our will power to direct our attention to more worthwhile subjects so that the seed does not mature. Martin Luther once said: "You may not be able to keep a bird from lighting on your head, but you need not allow it to build a nest in your hair."
Prayer is a tested weed eradicant. The word of God is a good plant food. "Whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if these be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.
Karl G. Peterson
Chaplain, USN


The right to vote-like all other rights guaranteed by the Constitution-also implies a duty.
Basially, we servicemen are in uniform to protect our democratic way of life against communist encroachment. With so many nations of the world now under totalitarian rule, it follows that we should have our voting rights more deeply impressed in our minds than ever before.
The right to choose between candidates for a public office is a precious thing. The communists-like the fascists before them-know this. Almost immediately upon obtaining control of a country, they choke off this most direct expression of the people's will. The one-party ballot becomes the order of the day.
Simply marking a ballot, however, does not complete our obligation. We must endeavor to vote intelligently. To do this, we must try to be as informed as possible about election issues.
Only by casting an informed vote can you exercise your right and duty completely. (AFPS)


Sunday, 29 April 1956
CI ATnOLIC MASSES Sunday, 7000-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri.-1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 1900
-2000, and daily before Mass PROTESTANT SERVICES Sunday: 0930-Divine Worship (MCB-1 Chapel)
0930-Sunday School
0930-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship( Naval


Base Chapel)
1100-Divine Worship
CLwd. Pt.)
1930-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday- 1900-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST 1000-Bible Study 1045-Worship Service CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday-1000-Naval Base Library LATTER DAY SAINTS Sunday-HD00-Naval Station Library Chaplains at this activity
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHO, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LTJG C. C. Gaston, CHO, USNR
(Protestant)


m


THE INDIAN


Page Two


Saturday, 28 April 1956






go


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 28 April 1956


Damage Controlman finishes Amateur Radio Knights Of Columbus 11 Wj-O C Contest Mav 19 Initiates.22 At Gtmo


L L Y.dIfI I ~ ~.A~~VI'I ~PL'~~ -- - - - - - - -


INDIAN Photo
A man with plenty of navy correspondence courses already under his belt signs for another at the Naval Station Information and Education office. D. F. Heckbert, DC1, on the left, is a familiar sight to 0. L. Spencer, YN3, who works at the I and E office. Heckbert is now working on his thirteenth course.
by Ely U. Orias
The singular distinction of having logged the greatest number of navy correspondence courses among the enlisted personnel on the Base, goes to Donald F. Heckbert, damage controlman first. A perusal of his service record, along with those of others revealed that he has taken and completed 11 courses and that he is currently working on two more.
Heckbert, who is presently attached to AFDL 47, started to refresh his consummate thirst for knowledge in January, 1942, when, while serving on board the USS DENEBOLA (AD-3), he took out his first course


in carpenter's mate third, a rate equivalent to the present navy's damage controlman third.
"A person like me with but ten years of educational training," says Heckbert, "must admit that he has a limited knowledge on almost anything. I decided to start this correspondence safari at the first opportunity in an effort to improve myself so that I may be of credit to my, own name, to my family and to the service."
Among the 11 courses, Heckbert found Naval Orientation most interesting of all. This course deals with the history of the U.S. Navy, the accomplishments of the immortal forerunners of the Navy from John Paul Jones on down, NavRegs of 1948, amphibious warfare, naval customs and courtesies, Uniform Code of Military Justice, etc.
"I say it is the most interesting of all the courses that I have taken," says Iteckbert, "because it not only broadens the man's knowledge on the entire naval system but it also, in my estimation, instills good leadership qualities in top-grade petty officers."
"My correspondence safari," declared Heckbert, "was at all times cream and peaches until I got entangled with Theoritical Damage Control." "The course," explains Heckbert, "had a terrific amount of mathematics. It involved in-


clining experiments and stability and trim of vessels and their buoyancy. It also dealt with highly complicated theories of shipboard firefighting evolution. But with my GED high school equivalence to work on," assured Heckbert, "I came out victorious in the end with a 3.8 mark."
Entered Navy in 1941
The 34 year old bluejacket who enlisted in the Navy in December, 1941, is a veteran with 14 years of unbroken service. This correspondence enthusiast holds the hope of getting a collarbrass in the near future. "I took the chief's examination for damage control last February," says Heckbert. "If I pass it," he continued, "I will strive to hit the Warrant grade in June."
As soon as he finishes his last course in Standard First Aid, he plans to take out the first year college GED test.
A career man that he is, Heckbert expects to do a minimum of 20 years in the Navy or "it may be even more than that."
Heckbert, who is a native of Medford, Mass. is married to the former Virginia C. Kelly of Winthrop, Mass. They have three children, Donald Jr., 9, Paula Ann, 8 and James Arthur, 5. The family who has been in Gtmo for a good while now says that the place is "wonderful!"


The Army, Navy and Air Force will be co-sponsors of an Armed Forces Day, May 19, program for the participation of all amateur radio operators. A CW receiving competition will feature a message from the Secretary of Defense.
A certificate of merit will be issued to each participant who makes perfect copy. Transmissions will be at 25 words per minute on numerous Armed Forces schedules.
Details of the contest may be obtained by studying OPNAV Notice 5720, dated April 2, 1956.
There will also be included in the contest a radioteletypewriter receiving competition. Transmission in this phase of the contest will e at 60 words per minute on a varied schedule.
Copies of contest transmissions taken by amateur operators should be mailed to the Armed Forces Day Contest, Room BE1000, The Pentagon, Washington 25, D. C. Time, frequency and call letters of the station copied should be indicated.


Twenty-two Roman Catholic men from the Base were initiated into the First Degree of the Knights of Columbus by the LaSalle Council of Guantanamo City on April 15.
The exemplification was made in Guantanamo City as Grand Knight Victor Vijil Pando relinquished his office to CDR K. Skadowski of Fleet Training Group who conducted the initiation ceremony in English. This was unique in that the LaSalle Council mcetings have always been held in Spanish.
This was only the second time in the 50 year history of the K of C in Cuba that the exemplification has been in English. The first K of C council on the island was formed by Americans in Havana.
Base personnel who took part in the affair were BMC Gugliemo of FTG, AKC Mello of NAS, J. Huges of Public Works and CDR J.J. Sullivan, pastor of the Catholic parish on the Base. Chaplain Sullivan was also initiated in the First Degree.


Counts Don't Count As Such When


Navy Calls For Daily Swab Details
There's a count who doesn't count when it comes to performing the duties of a seaman apprentice aboard the attack carrier USS RANDOLPH (CVA-15) which is now in Guantanamo Bay.
Count Andre P. Orlowski, youngest son of Count Stanislaw Orlowski, takes it in stride-like any other
seaman apprentice in the navy.
Is a Draftee NAS Airman


The young French immigrant with a title that goes back more than 100 years is a 21-year-old draftee.
He previously attend the University of Arizona where he majored in romance languages and studied economics and political science.
The direct descendant of five generations of French and Italian bluebloods, Andre speaks French, Spanish and English fluently and eventually hopes to secure attache duty in Europe as an official interpreter for the navy.
Came To U.S. in 1950.
Andre first came to the United States in 1950 and originally intended to study at an American college and return to France. However, he liked the country so much that he decided to stay and become an American citizen.
Aboard the RANDOLPH, which is here on a shakedown cruise, Andre is striking for storekeeper in the supply department. When the ship goes to the Mediterranean later this year, the count's knowledge of foreign languages will


(Continued from Page One)
strong motivation to fly. Possessed with potential officer-like qualities and having met the 120 grade in GCT and arithmetic combined and with over 58 points in mechanics, his immediate officers lost no time in recommending him for aviation training. On the strength of this recommendation, he was then allowed to take the examination required under the program.
A native of Pennsylvania, Horning is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Horning of 942 Jackson st., Norristown, Pa. After his graduation from high school, Horning went to Valley Forge Airport outside Norristown and took student pilot apprenticeship.
A reserve on active duty since November 29, 1955, Horning has had the aerial experience of flying balloons that determine the conditions of the atmosphere within the navigable air.

prove useful to the supply department. He can act as interpreter in negotiating contracts for provisions and other supplies.


mW
Page Three








Pace Tour


Saturday, 28 April 1956


F T 6 Bulletin
The sun was shining on the sea Shining with all its might The Captain did his very best, To make the future bright And this was not so odd, because Gtmo was in sight.

The Captain and the Exec Were walking close at hand They wept like anything to see The bareness of the land If this was only Chesapeake Bay, They said, it would be grand.

The time has come the Captain,
said
To talk of many things Of guns, and planes, and surface
tracks
And seamanship, and slings. And why the engineers are not
so hot
And why the sonar pings.

A lot of training, the Captain said Is what we chiefly need. Services and instruction besides. Are very good indeed Now if everthing is ready We can start to bleed.

With help from us, the riders said, Thinking all the while What a wonderful thing it will be To make that Captain smile. The crew is fine the riders said But it will take a while.

It seems a shame the Captain said The crew will work till dark, After they have worked so much What will provide the spark, The riders said, nothing butYou're not here for a lark,

Two more weeks followed by and still they learned galore, And thick and fast the training
came
And more and more and more The ship came through in a blaze They got a real good score.

0 riders, said the ship's Exec You've given us a run Is now the time to depart? But answer came there none, And this was scarcely odd because They were riding another one.


CPO Wives
by Ellen Van Cleef
The regular monthly business meeting will be held in the CPO Family Room on Friday, May 4. All new members may register at this time. Hostesses at this meeting will be Mary Hewitt, Emily Trapp and Mary Shelton.
Members and their husbands attended a Farewell Party and Social at the Family Room on April 20. Our first member to leave for the states, Helen Walters, was presented with a gift by Pres. Jane Whited with the best wishes from all the members. The door prize winner was Loretta Craver.


NSD Supply Line
April 25 was a red-letter day for Win. J. Devaney Jr. SK3, who re-enlisted that day for a period of six years Devaney plans to leave the second of May for a thirty day leave to visit his father who resides at 702 Maple St., Carrollton, (Saginaw), Michigan. After his leave he will return here for duty. Devaney is a former member of the U.S. Coast Guard and served in both the Pacific and Mediterranean with that service.
LT E. J. Hynes, Stock Control Division Officer, took a few days leave this week to welcome his family and get them settled in their new quarters. Mrs. Hynes, with their three children, arrived on the JOHNSON Monday from Shiresmantown, Pennsylvania. Immediately following their arrival, Mrs. C. C. Allen gave a morning 'coffee' at her home in honor of Mrs. Hynes.
LTJG Dick Kezer was also on hand at the JOHNSON to greet his wife Valerie and daughter Sandra who were returning from a three week visit at their home in Glenridge, New Jersey.
A. W. Bell, SK2, returned to this command from the Naval Station recently to resume duty with the Naval Supply Depot. He was formerly a member of the Base Police Force. Glad to have you back.
Mrs. Mary Nichols of Wilmington, Delaware has been visiting with her son, E. M. Nichols, Storage Branch Supervisor, Material Division, and his family for the past two weeks. She plans to leave April 28 for her return to Wilmington.
LCDR J. P. McFadden, Fuel Division Officer, has received orders for transfer to the Fuel Supply Office in Washington, D. C His reporting date is July 30, 1956.


Teenage Roundup
by Betty and Sharon
As you all know the JOHNSON docked once again and left Gtmo with a new sophomore boy. He's Vic Buehlman and he hails from Pensacola, Fla. Here's hoping you enjoy your stay in Cuba.
What's this we hear about a dinner? The cheerleaders gave the basketball team and guests a dinner April 25. It started at Dee Dee's, then went to Melba's and finally the main course was at Bobbie Stone's home. From there the party progressed to Pat Fojt's.
Have you ever been on a swimming party? The one held last Thursday night was a real ball. Most everyone tried for a "moon tan."
Que Pasa?
Dee and Sylvia fishing, but only catching a sunburn! Eunice's love for bookkeeping-which is which, debit or credit? Everyone in typing


VU -10 Prop Blast
by 0. A. Porter, Jr.
"A hearty Mallard "Welcome, Aboard" to CDR Joseph Buehlman, who arrived on board this week from Pensacola, Florida. CDR Buehlman is reporting from the U. S. Naval School, Pre-Flight, where he served as Engineering Instructor, and will relieve CDR Charles C. Stamm as Executive Officer.
During his naval career CDR Buehlman has served with VR-32, the Naval Air Station, San Diego, and in the Canal Zone. He and Mrs. Buehlman have a son, Victor and a daughter, Kathryn, and are currently residing at Paola Point. We know that you will enjoy your tour at Guantanamo Bay.
Although the Mallard's record out in the ball pasture hasn't been too impressive to date, there's a lot of spirit and hustle in the team and we think that you can look forward to a tight race for the remainder of the season. It's always a good game when the Mallards take the field.


The Medic
by J. F. Bertone & R. J. McNight
Newborn News
The Stork returned from leave and delivered Lundee Marie to CWO and Mrs. Henry Leimas; a boy to SD2 and Mrs. Nesbitt; a girl to EN3 and Mrs. Michael Flynn.
Departures
Hasta la vista is extended to Donald E. Lapp, HM3; Charles E. Edrington, HM3, and Howard Pincus, HN, who departed via the JOHNSON to go to RecSta, Brooklyn, for separation. Also departing via JOHNSON was LT. Ruth Struble, who is going to USNH, Jacksonville, for duty.
The Medics' Reviews
By the way "Mario", when you want your car pushed, it would go better with the key turned on and the brake released. What Corpsman almost cried when Gtmo liberty was cancelled? Was it '"D.W.K."? What man pulled a shady deal when selling cameras? Was it 'P.R.H."? It seems we have a new Hopalong Cassidy at our hospital, "Hopalong Nothing." It seems Congratulations are extended to Bilbo on his great dancing performance given in JR. QTRS.

class working for a party by Mrs. Davis?
The great performance of the H.M.S. Pinafore, it was GREAT!
Mary Alice getting most athletic of G. A. A.-Congrats! !
Hey Anita, smile for the birdie!


MARINE MUSINGS
On April 23 the Staff NCO's and their wivies welcomed aboard TSgt and Mrs. Rozier. TSgt Rozier reported as P.X. Steward, relieving MSgt Inman who will report to Camp Lejeune N. C. TSgt Rozier reported aboard from Marine Barracks, Indian Head, Maryland where he was serving as P. X. Officer and Steward. Welcome to Gtmo, TSgt Rozier and we hope you enjoy your present tour.
It was mentioned that the Marine Barracks rifle team won first place in the last NRH rifle shoot. The Marine Team made up of Sgt Major Allen, SSgt Stadlez, Sgt Sanspree, and Cpl Patton were awarded Gold Belt Buckles for outshooting the other teams in the 30 Caliber match. Sgt Major Allen won a medal for first high expert aggregate.
SSgt Stadler walked off with two medals, one for first place small bore and one third place high aggregate. Sgt Sanspree got a medal for firing second place 30 caliber rifle. The NRA ruled that MSgt Zemaitis could not fire on the Marine Team so he entered the matches as an individual shooter and won 1st place for the .30 cal Rifle and first high aggregate.
The team won a plaque for the Barracks for winning the .30 cal Rifle matches. The Barracks came in second place in the 22 matches but didn't enter the pistol matches. Captain Swords and MSgt. Zemaitis have another pistol detail in the field. From all reports, this ib going to be an excellent detail. We would all like to see more expert pistol shooters.
Cpl. Matranga and Pfc. Rubio reported aboard Monday and were assigned duty with the Security Section. Cpl. Matranga reported in from MarBks, Crane, Indiana and Pfc. Rubio came from 2MarDiv., Camp Lejeune.
Our Marine Barracks Baseball team collects more supporters every game. Given a few more games and the khaki will outnumber the white in the stands. That's as it very well should be-a good team rates good support-so Marines, get hot!
The troops at the Barracks rate a well done. Of the 60 troopers that took the promotion tests for Cpl., Sgt., and Staff Sgt., only 11 failed. That's a marked improve. ment over the last testing period. The promotions will be made during this quarter. .

A town is really small when they have to widen the main street to put the white line down the middle.

One thing is sure about living in Russia-you'd never lose an election bet.

Two finishes for automobiles-lacquer and liquor.


THE IAN









Saturday, 28 April 1956 THE INDIAN Pare ~fve


Dancing Students Present Colorful Revue; Mrs. Stagner's Last Recital


INDIAN Photo
Three members of the dance revue sponsored by Mrs. W. D. F. Stagner present her with a gift of appreciation from the entire cast. The revue held last Monday and Tuesday evenings, April 23 and 24, marked Mrs. Stagner's final efforts with instruction in tap and ballet. Pictured left to right are: Stephanie Stoll, Mrs. Fay Payne, Mrs. Stagner, Judy Harrison and Sharon Tippler.
A colorful recital was presented Monday and Tuesday evenings in the Community Auditorium by the dancing pupils of Mrs. W. D. F. Stagner.
This was the last revue to be produced and directed by Mrs. Stagner who is completing her second and final year as a dancing instructor on the Base. Mrs. Stagner said, "I wish to congratulate the children on their enthusiasm and I want to express my appreciation for the continued cooperation of their parents."
The first section of the dancing revue featured children of all ages "In an Old Fashioned Garden" scene with members of each age group dressed as various flowers. The older girls provided the choral background and also performed in their own well-executed number, "The Swan."
Act Two was comprised of the boys' dancing class in two snappy numbers. In the final act, each class returned again with its own specialty number, all of which were remarkable for their smooth precision and skillful maneuvering.
During the finale on Monday evening, Mrs. Stagner was presented with a gift by her pupils. At that time she introduced Mrs. Fay Payne, her assistant, and Mrs. June Beiland, the accompanist.


Navy Wives Club
The Navy Wives Club of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, extends an open invitation to everyone on the Naval Base to attend the installation of new officers at the Chapel Hill Auditorium at 8:00 p.m. on May 3. Refreshments will be served immediately following the installation exercises.
Last night, the members and their husbands attended a Farewell Party at the Staff NCO Club for several of the members who will be leaving for stateside duty soon.
We also extend an invitation to all the women on the Base to attend our Bingo Parties held on a Thursday afternoon, once a month. The date this month is May 17 at 1:30 p.m. at the Villamar Lyceum.


5 Base Marines Are

Promoted To Cpl.
Five marines from the Marine Barracks were promoted recently from Pfc. to Cpl. The men received their Corporal warrants from Lt. Col. W. C. Esterline, Executive Officer of Marine Barracks.
The new Corporals are Phillip E. Patton, Earl G. Castellow Victor C. Rieter, Steven P. Kavulic and Richard L. Hood. They won t h e i r promotions meritoriously through outstanding proficiency and outstanding performance of duty.

"The bopster left a psychiatrist's office and met a friend. "How'd it go ?" asked the chum. "The doc's one of us," answered the bopster. "He said I was real crazy."


NAS Scuttlebutt
Wednesday night all hands were able to see television in the barracks for the first time. They all agree that they have been missing some very good shows but will no longer miss any in the future. Also arrived are baseball bats galore and other sporting equipment.
At the Ordnance area, word has been given out that a new house is being built at the Pistol Range. Two able carpenters now working on the project are R. Ploeckelmann and L.D. Ward. Dedication of the new house will be made in the near future.
At the Photo Lab, some of the fellows have been working on certain phases of photography for their practical factors. A. A. Adams, PH3, has been working on Movies; P. J. Anerine, PHG2, has been working on photography coloring; A. W. Maskell, PH3, has been working with Adams on microscopic photography. Several of the fellows agree that A. A. Adams is one of the most exceptional #RD Class PO's of the Photography field. Keep up the good work Adams. A new member from Leeward Point to the staff is Richard Sosnoski, AN.
No, the supply building is not on fire. The smoke you see pouring from 'Behind the Bins" is nothing but steam caused by the men working fast getting everything squared away before summer and the hot season gets here.
You're wrong, it's not a cue ball. It's Chasez with a haircut. He came "From Behind the Bins" and took a couple days of leave in Jacksonville to visit his wife. Rumors are that his wife went on the warpath and scalped him.
It's very seldom that Corpsmen get to tell their troubles to anyone, maybe this column is the answer.
A. J. "Alfredo Sheva, HM1, honorary Mayor of Guantanamo City, tops the list this week. Looking over towards the Hospital we see him flat on his back recuperating from his recent operation. It's a pain in the "neck" ain't it Al? Hope you are feeling good soon so you can resume your duties, both here at the Dispensary and in the City.
A few others are sick too, not physically, but because they didn't get advanced to the next higher pay-grade.
For most of them there will be another time, better luck then.
Leeward Point-A lot of guys over here were very happy when the rates came back. Seems we have a lot of fellows to stand Shore Patrol now as quite a few of the men who had taken the test for Third Class and on up the line seemed to be successful as I have heard that the test wasn't easy. Leeward Point will lose a few


Wives Attend


NavCat Lecture

The Naval Air Station Career Appraisal Team has reported that nine service wives attended the CAT's presentation class held last Thursday evening, April 12, at the Team's presentation room situated on the main floor of the NAS Ad building.
Facts concerning survivors' benefits, reenlistment bonus, rights and privileges of enlisted personnel, information about the Navy's retirement program were among the general topics discussed auring the presentation.
The presentation started at 8:00 p.m. and ended 45 minutes later. After the presentation, questions were fired upon the Team by the wives with the survivors' benefits being the bone of contention.
The nine ambitious wives, it was revealed, took turns on the question platform for a period of two hours and 15 minutes.
Meanwhile, the NAS NavCat has announced that anyone desiring to attend the Team's presentation classes may contact the CAT office in person or by calling 8571


Savings Bond Drive

To Begin Next Week
A concerted effort will be made sometime next week in an effort to bring home to all Base employees and military personnel the investment opportunities of the Pay Roll Savings Bond program.
"The program," explains LT B. J. Hammett, NavSta Savings Bond Officer, "calls for a substantial investment of a part of each payday which is considered the easiest and surest method of insuring one's future security." . The Savings Bond Officer said that due to the abounding facilities on the Base that call for just a very low cost, it follows that surplus funds are consequently realized either by a family or a single military man at a given period.
"In a situation like this," says LT Hammett, "the Pay Roll Savings Bond program stands to be one of the best, if not the best, way to forestall the dwindling of surplus funds to the limbo of nothingness."

men as FASRON-6 is trying to break up. Some of the men will stay here and a few of them will go to VU-10. To all you men going to the other side, drop back over and see us again when you get the chance.
A woman is like man's best friend-the Dog.
At times she barks rather loudly and sometimes she can bite,
But still she is a great companion and nice to have around.


I


Saturday, 2S April 1956


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page lvv


THE INDIAN







Page Six


GTMO SPORTING CHIPS
by C. C. Drumright
Events of the Future . . . A buffet dinner is scheduled at the club house for our guests from Ramey AFB on May 5 at 1800. All Club members are cordially invited, those desiring to attend will please leave their names with the course manager. Note: Special uniform.
Qualifying play for the men's club championship begins at sunrise May 6 and closes at sunset May 13. First round play to coaimence on May 14. Rules governing this tournament are posted.
Our Liberal Arts Department . . . The USGA method of pairings for a match play tournament are as follows: 32 qualifiers-The upper half pairings are 1 vs 17, 9 vs 25, 5 vs 21, 13 vs 29, 3 vs 19, 11 vs 27, 7 vs 23 and 15 vs 31. Lower half pairings: 1 vs 18, 10 vs 26, 6 vs 22, 14 vs 30, 4 vs 20,, 12 vs 28 and 8 vs 32. Ties in qualifying rounds other than those for last place shall be decided by a blind draw. Practice Ground. Where there is no regular practice areas, the committee shall designate such areas on any day of competition, during stroke competition such area will not include any hazard or putting green of the course to be used
Rimming the Cups around the 19th . . . After two weeks of play the leaders in our ringer tournament are CDR Rothenberg and Delgado, SN, who are tied for first place with neat nets of 67, keeping the pressure on with nets of 59 each are Mrs. Goolsby and CDR Stowe. It was numored you can stop using dirt T's; store bought kind are available. A certain fisherman (Dollar sine Drace) is trying to keep the putting green open
7 days . .. Why?
Special Notes: The course is due for its annual face lifting (topdressing of the greens, some heavy work on fairways, etc) so all members will try and keep in mind these irritating things of today will give us much satisfaction later on. Our local driving range has an abundance of good balls and is open evenings till 2100, contact the course manager. Instructions are available day or night.


Ladies Golf Shots
Last week the lady golfers played a Hickey tournament. In this tournament a bogie counts one point, a par three points, a birdie five points and an eagle counts eight points. Full handicaps were used. Golf balls went to the following winners.
First and Second FlightFirst place-Cynthia Holley
Second place-Edie Ware
Third place-TieAnnette Forester
Lois Cooper
Third FlightFirst place-TiePatty Patterson
Bucky Pierce
Second place-Kay Barton
The Goat tournament ended on Friday, April 13. The nine hole tournament found Millie Kuba the winner with a collection of six goats. Margaret Wall, the runnerup, was close behind with four goats. Lavaria Butler amassed seven goats without much trouble to practically walk away as the winner of the 18 hole handicap Tournament, leaving a few goats equally distributed among Marian Caruthers,' Cynthia Holley and Chris Whitton.
Cynthia Holley emerged the victor of the three way tie, but only after beating Marian Caruthers, who played her next best game, an 86, and Chris Whitton who played her best game-a 95. Incidentally, Cynthia Holley played her best game, almost broke 100.
Congratulations to the winners. Condolences to the losers. The Tournament Chairman wishes to thank all for their participation


What's oin' Stateside
Young foot-stompers got a nottoo-gentle kick-in-the-teeth from a leading American psychiatrist recently.
When 11 teenagers were arrested at Hartford, Conn., for causing disturbances at a local theater, Dr. Francis J. Braceland, head of the Institute for Living, branded the present rock-and-roll craze as a "cannibalistic and tribalistic" form of music.
The doctor linked the youngsters' fixation on the new music form with "ducktail" haircuts and zootsuits as signs of insecurity and adolescent rebellion. He added that the disease is "commuicable."
The prairie states and part of the Southwest were the scene of turbulent dust storms recently that reminded older residents of the twisters of the 30's.
Wheat, barley and other crops were ripped from the soil. Colorado, Wyoming, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas were hit hard. Gusts up to 80 miles an hour were recorded at Denver and other localities. Schools closed and highways were blocked.

and cooperation.
The Ladies Spring Championship tournament, open to any woman residing on the Base, is scheduled for the first two weeks of May. Qualifying rounds will be played Wednesday, May 2. Those who are in school or are working may make arrangements to play Saturday, May 5. All interested entrants please sign up at the clubhouse.


Voting Office Has Absentee Ballot Information For Military, Civilians


LT B. J. Hammett, Naval Station Voting Officer, has announced once again that his office is open to all military and civilian peronnol attached to the Naval Statfon desiring to apply for the absentee ballot.
The NavSta Voting Officer pointed out that consultation on abs'ntre voting is indispensable to those intending to invoke the privilege.
"This voting by absentee process," says LT Hammett, "applies primarily to persons who, by virt'ie of their duty or service with the department or agencies of the United States Government, will be absent from their legal voting places come election time." "in the states," explains LT Hammett, "an elector may vote at the last moment. But this absentee


NAS Pool, Hobby

Shop Hours Changed
Changes in the hours of operation of both the Naval Air Station hobby shop and swimming pool have been released by the NAS Special Services office.
Effective April 30, the hobby shop will be open from 0800 to 1600 daily. The same source however said that the hobby shop workroom and photo laboratory will remain open until 2100, daily.
The swimming pool, it was reported, will be open from 0930 until 2100, daily, beginning May 1.
In another vein, the NAS Special Services office said that shipments of leather and leather tools for the hobby shop are expected in the next few weeks.
It was also reported that some hook rug kits are now on sale .at the hobby shop on a ten percent discount.


process requires that he has to have an application docketted with the cognizant Voting Officer who, in turn, makes the necessary recommendations for its approval should he find the application meritorious. And this system," cautioned LT Hammett, "takes plenty of time."
Meanwhile, the NavSta Voting Officer has disclosed a personal observation about "some evidence' of apathy with regard to voting," which according to him, "is not too unusual since many people fail to realize the importance of their voting franchise." " In a government like ours," continued LT Hammett, "'where sovereignty resides in the people and-upon whom all government authority emanates, the doctrine of 'people's supremacy' could best be achieved if those of us who are qualified to vote will exercise the privilege freely."


14 Base Employees

Receive Service Pins
In a ceremony held at the Naval S t a t i o n administration building last Friday, April 20, 14 Base employees received 20-year or 30-year Length of Service awards for Federal service.
RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase, made the awards presentation consisting of a lapel emblem and a certificate.
In recognition of their faithful service, Admiral Cooper has expressed his pleasure to the honored employees while presenting them their awards.
It was reported that the 14 employees have an aggregate length of service representing more than 330 years.


Art Exhibit Begins

Mon. At N. S. Library
The Art Studio opens its first art show in the Naval Station Library Monday evening, April 30 at 8:00 p.m. RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase, and CAPT W. R. Caruthers, C. 0. NavSta, will open the show.
Paintings will be presented to RADM Cooper and CAPT Caruthers. The exhibit which will consist of approximately 35 paintings will continue until May 6. The show will have two major divisions, still life and landscapes. Some of the paintings will be available for purchase.


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 28 April 1956









Saturday, 28 April 1956 1THE INDIAN Page Seven


THE SCOREBOOK


MCB-1 Makes Comeback By Walloping NAS 15-1 And Tripping Marines Byi4-3


by Joe Duffy
Feasting on a king-size ration of basehits, the slugging Marine team has assumed the role of league leaders with three wins against no defeats after the second week of league play. The Marines completed their first circuit without a league defeat when they turned back the Naval Base Indians Thursday night, giving them a win over each of their league competitors. The word league is injected in the foregoing sentence to circumvent the setback the Leathernecks suffered at the hands of the visiting firemen from MCB-1 on Monday night.
The Seabees, playing a temporary role in the intercommand competition, dropped their first contest to VU-10, then came back to defeat both the Marines and Naval Air Station, the latter game being a real shellacking. Led by a couple of solid mound performers, Tony Civitelli and "Hawk" Cigainero, the MCB-1 club fields a hard-hitting lineup topped by Jack Unruh, Terry Dolan, Doc McCormack and Dale Carr. The feeling is that, if the Bees could have stayed with us, the All-Gtmo team this year would have been "Big League".


NAS 10, VU-10 1
The Flyers connected for nine hits, including a double by Pearson and triple by Waldrop, and capitalized on eight Mallard errors to take a 10 to 1 league win, their first win in three contests. Jack Jones hurled 5-hit ball, striking out six in the process, to take the pitching victory.
The Flyers broke a 1-1 tie in the fourth inning when Sandblom reached first on an error, took second and later scored on subs'auent errors as the Mallard defense fell apart. They then added two more markers in the fifth and sixth to turn the game into a rout and drive starter Streigle to cover. Montgomery relieved in the eighth, and after a hitless inning, ran into trouble in the ninth as the Flyers again erupted for four big runs when Ransom walked, Jones and Rhodes singled and Waldrop unloaded the bases with a booming triple to right center. VU-10 001 000 000- 1 5 8 NAS 100 122 04x-10 9 3 Streigle, Montgomery and M. Smith Jones and Ransom
MCB-1 4, Marines 3
The Seabees bunched four of their nine hits in the sixth inning to score all their runs and turn back the Marines in a closely fought ball game. Trailing by 2-0, Unruh opened the sixth with a slashing triple to the far reaches of the outfield.
Stutzman bounced out, third to first and McCormack fanned, then with two out the Seabees made their move. Bannon walked, and Carr followed with a single to drive in the first run from third. Blankenship and Cigainero followed with successive singles to pro-


duce three more runs and enough to sew up the victory.
Cigainero did another fine job on the the mound, striking out 13 batters while silencing the opposition's bats; especially in the final three innings when he allowed just one man to reach base, that being Castellow who floundered on second in the eighth. MCB-1 000 004 000-4 9 3
MARINES 010 011 000-3 4 1 Cigainero and Stutzman; Crosby and Duncan
VU-10 10, NavBase 3
The Mallards combined two singles, a double and an error to tally three runs in the seventh and take a 5-3 lead that meant the ball game. In the fruitful inning Postal and Smith connected for successive singles with one away, and came in to score on Montgomery's second double of the game. Montgomery added the insurance run when he crossed the plate as Murphy bobbled Swartz's ground ball at second.
In the ninth inning, the Mallards exploded for five big runs to increase their lead and put the game on ice as the VU-10 hurler, Streigel, who relieved in the third inning, held complete command.
The Indians only scoring splurge came in the third inning when they bunched an error and four consecutive walks to push. across two runs without the benefit of a basehit, and go into an early 3-2 lead that held up until the decisive seventh.
Streigel gained credit for the pitching win, while starting hurler Schiller took the loss. VU-10 002 000 305-10 13 4 NAVBASE 102 000 000- 3 3 5


King, Streigel and M. Smith Schillej, Barnsfather and laniero
MCB-1 15, NAS 1
The Seabees, sporting new uniforms, broke out in a rash of tasehits to back up Tony Civitelli on the mound as he breezed through the Flyer lineup to give the MCB-1 club their second win in a row. Tony scattered five hits, walked three and struck out eight over the route, while the Seabee batsmen clobbered the Flyer's starter, Falzarano, for nine hits and thirteen runs in the first four innings.
Unruh and McCormack each connected for three hits in the onslaught, with Carr, Stutzman and Unruh hitting for extra bases. The Flyer's lone run came in the fourth to avert a shutout when Tanzi singled, stole second and advanced the rest of the distance on infield outs.
NAS 000 100 00- 1 5 7 MCB-1 307 311 00x-15 12 2
Falzarano, King and Ransom; Civitelli and Stutzman
Marines 15, NavBase 5
Castellow and Hunter each connected for home runs as the league leaders ran up a total of 14 hits to defeat the Indians 15-5. Castellow's blow came in the first inning with one on to start the scoring, while Hunter's blast was good for two runs in the seventh.
The Marines kept up a barrage of basehits, going hitless only in the second frame, to completely overwhelm the Indians and preserve their league record of three wins in as many games. Chuch Hunter led the hit attack for the winner with a triple and two singlcs addition to the four-master in five trips to the plate. The Indian's Scholl went 2 for 3 to establish the batting lead in the league with a
7 for 11 mark so far. Young and Fortney combined on the mound for the Marines, with the win going to reliefer Fortney. NAVBASE 020 000 030- 5 6 5 MARINES 202 320 24x-15 14 0 Coleman, Walgamuth, Schiller and Ianiero
Youngs, Fortney (3) and Duncan
The Schedule
Sunday 1430 MCB-1 vs NavBase Monday 1900 VU-10 vs Marines Tuesday 1900 NAS vs NavBase Wednesday 1900 MCB-1 vs VU-10 Thursday 1900 Marines vs Nav Base
The Standings
Won Lost GB
Marines 3 0 NavBase 1 2 2 Naval Air Sta. 1 2 2 VU-10 1 2 2


( N


The Fish Tale(s)
by Pat Aldridge
Chief M. Wertlby, Sanitation, one of the best fishermen around here, has been pulling in the big ones, per usual for Wertley, around the CB dump. Snapper, every bit as big as that, and Jaek even bigger. He does his best, so it seems, just before sundown while others, like Chief Manticipit, fishing in the same area near dawn, are bringing up large Grouper.
Fair size Red and Gray Snapper are still being taken from the Coastguard Pier, a spot where amateurs should learn one prime rule of fair play. When a lot of lines are cast out from one, small dock, heads up when the lucky me gets a strike!
The rest of you should reel in immediately in order that the fightin' fish hooked doesn't foul everybody and the fighting fisherman ends up losing his catch. Maebelle Clay had herself a mighty Tarpon near that same dock the other day and might have landed him if not concerned about those aforementioned lines.
Ted Stumo of FTG isn't telling everybody where but there's snook to be had in spots other than the Gtmo river as can be attested to by the near twenty pounder Stumos' boat borught in last weekend. Bait? A trolled fresh herring. That was the second Snook for Stumo within the week, the other having been taken in the river on a trolled seven spoon. The river is yielding again, at long last, with the "hot spots" hotter than ever. Tom Jenkins, DTC, has been another lucky Snooker with a near twenty pounder as proof.
Dr. Pete Wells was down right disappointed when threatened political trouble prevented-him from participating in the sailboat races in Santiago last weekend.
Speaking of sailboats, the converted Seagull now being rented by the Sailboat Locker, with a fifteen horse outboard, at four dollars for an eight hour period, is well worth the price.
This sixteen footer seems stable as a yacht and throttles down just right for slow trolling. Comfortable, too, for those long stretchs for she has a seven foot beam with just the right length thwarts for flakin' out and takin' it easy while waitin' for the giant to strike.
It won't be long now until the annual base fishing tourney gets under way. Gosh, that time all ready! Seems only yesterday Chief Roberts won last years' tournament with a hundred and fifty some odd pound Grouper and ended up with the twenty five horse outboard offered as first prize. Soon as the chit is okayed the date will be announced by Ron Seagle.


,


Saturday, 28 April 1956


THE INDIAN


-Page Seven








Saturday, 28 April 1956


THE INDIAN


Navy-DPPO-1OND-Gtmo.-3441


TV Tele Talk
Don't miss Dean Martin singing the new hit sensation "It must be True" as he joins Jerry Lewis on the Colgate Variety Hour Saturday. Mystery surrounds the remainder of the show. Both Dean and Serry feel that any information regarding the show would place it in jeopardy.
There's good variety on Toast of the Town Sunday. You'll be able to see Eddie Fisher, England's Mr. Pastry, the Mariners, Irene Dunne, Fred Astaire, and a host of 15 other stars. Following that the Goodyear TV Theater presents the "Last Boat From Messina". A girl is stuck on Ellis Island facing deportation charges because of escape during World War II.

French singer Line Renaud and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. are the guest stars on the Bob Hope Show Monday. The Show originates in London. Bob Hope also presents one of England's favorite musical and TV comedy stars, Tommy Trinder.
Walt Disney brings another rise of one of his stars to the TV screen Tuesday. Disneyland presents the character responsible for Disney's fame. It's the Mickey Mouse story along with pictures of the new Disneyland in Hollywood.
Tuesday night Red Skelton starts a whole new modern art form, with Basil Rathbone as guest artist on the Red Skelton Show. Sir Robert (Skelton) is acclaimed by critics for conception composition, feeling for form, and striking symbolism on his first effort, a bit of surrealism whipped up in blind desperation.
The U.S. Steel Hour brings you "Papa is All". It's the story of an English-German speaking farm family where Papa is ruler.
Wednesday night the Kraft TV Theatre has the story of an overworked girl who gets TB. Her drunken father doesn't help matters nor do her kid-brothers and sisters. The name of the play is "The Straw".
Friday night Dumont Boxing presents a return bout between welterweights Gene Poler and Carmine Flore. Their first match was a 10 round draw. Poler Who hales from Niagara Falls, New York, has had 19 pro bouts while Flore has had 72, winning 48 of them.


WGBY
Saturday April 28 4:00-Con'test Carnival 4:30-Topper 5:00-Victory at Sea 5:30-Beat the Clock 6:00-Red Buttons 6:30-Life Begins at 80 7:00-People are Funny 7:30-Big Story 8:00-Colgate Hour 9:00-Here's the Show 9:45-Justice
Sunday. April 29 4:00-Roy Rogers 4:30-Ding Dong School 5:00-Ozzie & Harriet 5:30-Names the Same 6:00-Our Miss Brooks 6:30-What's My Line 7:00-Loretta Young 7:30-Hallmark Hall 8:00-Toast of the Town 9:00 Goodyear Playhouse
Monday, April 30


Television
5:30-News Parade 5:45-Jane Froman 6:00-I & E Time 6:30-December Bride 7:00-Ray Milland 7:30-Medic 8:00-Stop The Music 8:30-Rock King 9:00-Bob Hope
Tuesday, May 1 5:30-News Parade 5:45-Jo Stafford 6 :0--Disneyland 7:00-Phil Silvers 7:30-Danger 8:00-Red Skelton 8:30-Lineup 9:00-U.S. Steel Hour
Wednesday, May 2 5:30-News Parade 5:45-Robert Q. Lewis 6:00-I & E Time 6:30 Joan Davis 7:00 I've Got a Secret


Cinema - Scoop
by D.D.H.
By no means has the Cinemascope process revolutionized the picture making industry; some of your best entertainment is still being released in the conventional screen, black and white process.
To further back up that statement, learned the other day that Hollywood must have some of the same ideas for the '56 production schedules call for more small screen, black and white pictures than in the last couple of years.
The "wide-screen" process will be featured in outdoor, musical and spectacular type pics while many with the best story material and some that demand it will be shot in black and white.
Here are a few of the top pictures that are scheduled for release this year: "High Society," (Bing Crosby, Grace Kelly and Frank Sinatra), "Proud and Profane," (Deborah Kerr and Bill Holden), "Moby Dick," (Gregory Peck), "King and I," (Deborah Kerr and Yul Brynner) ,"Bus Stop," (Marilyn Monroe), "Giant," (Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson and James Dean), and "Teahouse of the August Moon," (Glen Ford and Marlon Brando).
It's really a line-up of top stars and pictures. Let's hope Gtmo gets its share!
Drumbeat (W.B.) ... Alan Ladd and Audrey Dalton . . . and outdoor picture set in the West of the late 1860's . . . fair.
Three For the Show (Col., in


FROM:


Program
7:30-Millionaire 8:00-Masquerade Party 8:30-Stage 7 9:00-Kraft Theater
Thursday, May 3 5:30-News Parade 5:45-Coke Time 6:00-Those Whiting Girls 6:30-You Bet Your Life 7:00-That's My Boy 7:30-Bob Cummings 8:00 Crusader 8:30JDragnet 9:00-Milton Berle
Friday, May 4 5:30-Newg Parade 5:45-Perry Como 6:00-I & E Time 6:30-Truth or Consequences 7:00-Life of Riley 7:30--Dollar a Second 8:00-Foreign Intrigue 8:30--Star Stage 9:00-Boxing


color), played the base circuit last fall. A musical comedy starring Betty Grable, Jack Lemmon and Marge and Gower Champion. You'll enjoy it, perhaps for the second time, if you like this type of picture.
Five Against the House (Col)
* . . Guy Madison, Kim Novak and Brian Keith . . . crime with an intellectual twist . . . good entertainment for this type of picture.
This Island, Earth (U.I., in color) . . . Jeff Morrow and Faith Domergue ... good science fiction.
Escape to Burma (RKO, in color) . . . Barbara Stanwyck and Robert Ryan . . . average, definitely not befitting the talents of Stanwyck.
Indestructible Man (A.A.) . . . Lon Chaney and Casey Adams... dead man is restored to life and becomes indestructible . . . What? This one I've got to see just out of curiosity.
Red Sundown (U.I., in color) ... Rory Calhoun, Martha Hyer, Lita Baron and Dean Jagger . . . horse opera, in the same old pattern . . . Head for the Hills, oops, I mean movie lyceum.


9 cent stamp


You're looking at Automn Russell, a girl as pretty as her name. She's one of the adornments in Paramount's "Anything Goes."


Send
the Indian
Home


a


Saturday, April 28 NavSta-Drumbeat-107 min. NAS-Smoke Signal-100 min. Mar. Site-The Detective-96 min. Villa.-Bullet For Joey-93 min. Lwd. Pt. Bamboo Prison-96 min. MCB-1 Country Girl-104 min.
Sunday, April 29
NavSta-Three For the Show-100 min. NAS-Drumbeat
Mar. Site-Captain Lightfoot-104 min. Villa.-The Detective Lwd. Pt.-Bullet For Joey MCB-1-Bamboo Prison
Monday, April 30
NavSta-Five Against the House-90 min. NAS-Thiee For the Show Mar. Site Smoke Signal Villa.-Captain Lightfoot Lwd. Pt.-The Detective MCB-1-Bullet For Joey
Tuesday, May 1
NavSta-This Island, Earth-106 min. NAS-Five Against the House-90 min. Mar. Site-Drumbeat Villa.-Smoke Signal Lwd. Pt.-Captain Lightfoot MCB-1-The Detective
Wednesday, May 2
NavSta-Escape to Burma-105 min. NAS-This Island, Earth Mar. Site-Three For the Show Vifla.-Drumbeat
Lwd. Pt.-Smoke Signal MCB--Captain Lightfoot
Thursday, May 3
NavSta-Indestructible Man-106 min. NAS-Escape to Burma Mar. Site-Five Against the House Villa.-Three For the Show Lwd. Pt.-Drumbeat
MCB-1-Smoke Signal
Friday, May 4
NavSta-Red Sundown-102 min.
NAS-Indestructible Man Mar. Site-This Island, Earth
Villa.-Five Against the House Lwd. Pt.-Three For the Show MCB-1-Drumbeat



Book - Nook

Here's an extraordinary novel which has rapidly zoomed to the top of the bestseller list lately. "THE LAST HURRAH," by Edwin O'Conner, is a good story about politics and politicians and the central character is patitly modeled on James Michael Curley of Boston. The book catches rather well the excitement which surrounds "smoke-filled rooms," election year campaigning, and the national conventions.
In honor of the 250th anniversary of Benjamin Franklin's birth, which the nation celebrated recently, Carl Van Doren has gotten out a new biography of this great American statesman. For people who like to read history as it is reflected in the life of one great personage, this is just the book.
"H.M.S. ULYSSES," by Alistair MacLean, is a well-written seagoing thriller which is the British counterpart to our own "CAINE MUTINY." The "Ulysses run during the dark days of World War II, and the attempt of its crew to mutiny makes for absorbing fiction. The ending is much better than "Caine," too.


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NAS Airman Leaves For Basic Flight Training In Pensacola Fla. Archbishop Arrives This Morning; Luncheon Today, Confirmation Sun. Archbishop Enrique Perez Serantes of Santiago de Cuba arrived on the Base this morning for a two day visit. Guantanamo Bay is an official stop during the Archbishop's annual tour of this section of Cuba. Pa. Gov. Visits Base Past Week Governor G. M. Leader of Pennylvania and six state and military officials arrived on the Base Tuesday evening. The group went aboard the USS RANDOLPH Thursday night and headed for the States. r Wednesday morning the group was briefed by RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase, on Guantanamo Bay and the Base's functions. Then on Thursday they spent the day in Port Au Prince, Haiti. Included in the Governor's party were D. V. Randall, the Governor's secretary; Maj. Gen. A. J. Drexel INDIAN Photo Biddle, Jr., Adjutant General of Leroy Mark Horning, AN, of the Naval Air Station Aerology office, on Pa.; Brig. Gen. J. H. La Brum, the left, gets a ('despedida') handshake from CAPT Kohr, NAS CoiPhiladelphia Chamber of Commanding Officer. Horning has been ordered by BuPers to report for merce, and RADM E. H. von officer aviation training at Pensacola, Florida. Heimberg, ComFour. A transfusion of a young Navy blood from the Naval Air Station Aerology office to the Chief Naval Air Basic Training in Pensacola, Florida, will get underway on Monday, April 30. Eighteen year old Leroy Mark Horning, AN, USNR, who has been with the Naval Air Station since December 26, 1955, has been ordered by the Chief of Naval Personnel to report to the Pensacola Naval Air Station for an 18-month cadet training course under the Navy's Aviation Officer program. While attached to the Active Reserve Unit at Willow Grove Naval Air Station in Pennsylvania. H o r n i n g demonstrated a (Continued on Page Three) Warm Temps Ahead With Afternoon Rains In a summary of the weather conditions in and around the Guantanamo Bay area, LTJG A. M. McCal'nont, NAS Aerology Officer, said that next week it will be slighty warmer. It was also reported that a very small increase in humidity will be felt during the week but an increase of thundershower activity in the late afternoons will be evident. LTJG McCalmont also said that next week will be generally warmer in the evenings with no noticeable cooling until about 1:00 a.m. and that winds are expected to remain easterly at about 15 knots with higher gusts. COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Volume VII, No. 17 Saturday, 28 April 1956 PTA Will Elect '56-'57 Officers At Next Meeting, Tuesday, May 1 The last meeting of the Guantanamo Bay Parent-Teachers association will be held on Tuesday evening, May 1, at 7:30 p.m. in the school assembly hall. Highlight of the program will be the election of officers for the new school year, 1956-57. The list of candidates includes: For president-LCDR E. Kubicki, NAS; LT J. P. Marron, NavSta, and LCDR J. F. Bayer, NSD; for vice-president -W. A. Schnake, civ., NavSta, and Chief Huff. FTG; for secretary-Mrs. W. H. Smith, Mrs. M. C. Schoonderwoerd and Mrs. E. Riley; for treasurer-LT D. Dooling, NAS; H. T. Albright, civ., NavSta, and Chief Nici, NAS. According to the PTA, it is of utmost importance that all parents of school-age children be present to elect capable officers for the coming year. 1956 Tags For Dogs Available On May 5 1956 tags for the dogs innoculated in the recent pet vaccination drive will be available Saturday morning, May 5, at 9:00 a.m. at the Villamar lyceum. Vaccination facilities will be provided for anyone who did not have their pet innoculated or any newcomer to the Base who has a pet that should be vaccinated. All residents of the Base who own pets are urged by the Villamar/Bargo Council to have their pets vaccinated in ord-r to protect all residents of the Villamar/Bargo communities. At 12:30 p.m. today, the Archbishop will be the guest of honor at a luncheon sponsored by the Holy Name Society of Guantanamo Bay. The Caribbean Room of the CPO Club will be the site of the luncheon with 250 guests expected to attend. At the luncheon the Archbishop will be the main speaker and will be introduced by Norman Huddy, president of the Holy Name Society. Special guests and members of the Archbishop's party will include the American Consul of Santiago, Mr. Oscar Guerra and his wife and Capt. M. Rubio, Chief of the Naval District of Oriente, and his wife. Also, at the luncheon there will be an official representative of each Base command. On Sunday, April 29, immediately following the 9:00 a.m. Mass, the Archbishop will administer confirmation to 16 children and 14 adults. The Archbishop and his party are scheduled to leave the Base on Monday afternoon, April 30. Cast Changes Made In 'Silver Whistle Preparations for the Little Theater's next production "The Silver Whistle," go on. Joyce Stephenson, director of the play reports that in the past two weeks several people have been forced to drop from the cast of the play due to various reasons. Joanne Dickson has replaced Flo Schnake as Miss Tripp, Ross Fegley replaces Roane Lytle as Emmet and Pat Moe replaces Sylvia DiMaggio as Mrs. Gross. Rehearsals for the play will be held every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, beginning Monday night, May 30. At the monthly meeting on Tuesday, May 8, the Little Theater group will hold an open house in an effort to acquire new members who are interested in any phase of the theater. Books Are Needed The Hospital Service Volunteers have issued a plea for donations of used paper-bound, pocket books for distribution to patients in the Base Hospital. Anyone with books they wish to donate should bring them to the Red Cross office where Mrs. Bowler will give them to the Volunteers.

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Saturday, 28 April 1956 THE INDIAN THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Editorial Staff LTJG D. G. LaCasse --------------------------------Officer-Advisor G. L. Henderson, JOC __-------------------------------Editor J. C. Curren, JOSN -------------------------------Managing Editor E. U. Orias, JO3 03----------------------------Feature Editor D. D. Hinton, JOSN ----------------------------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. Something Can Be Done About It! CAPT C. T. Caufield, Commander U. S. Naval Training Center, San Diego, Calif., has promulgated a policy for that training center in regard to improving the attitude of the public toward the navy. Here's some of the thinking of CAPT Caufield: "In the first place we've got to make the kids enjoy their tour of duty in the navy. We've got to make them prefer excitement, adventure and hard work to their humdrum, boring and secure lives ashore. This is a challenge to our leadership. My seniors have made the navy exciting for me. If I can't do the same for my kids, I ought to have my pants kicked. "In the first place, we have to be good. The kids can't be proud of a mediocre outfit, even if you feed them ice cream three times a day. Then we've got to eliminate unnecessary inconveniences and annoyances. Thoughtlessness and stupidity cause most of these. For instance, a careless administration can make life hell for the crew merely by allowing the public address system to be used continuously. 'Now the following named men lay up to the ship's office ....' Plus various restrictions and 'Thou shalt nots,' which serve no useful purpose. "In addition to the negative approach of eliminating unnecessary inconveniences, there has to be a positive approach-seeing where improvements are needed and getting them made-all the way from new and improved ship types and weapons to swimming pools and functional arrangements of mess lines. "Even .if you have the best navy in the world people won't like it if others are continually talking it down. So we've got to talk it up. We've got to tell our men, we've got to tell each other, and we have to tell the public what a wonderful navy it is we have. ... "In talking it up to outsiders, we might have a tendency to distort the facts. This should be avoided. Our navy-with all its hardships and all its problems-is still wonderful enough to be sold on its own merits. Anyhow, lies will backfire on you. "Speaking of backfires, there is nothing that backfires quicker or with a more resounding bang than a broken promise. We must lean over backward to see that a promise, made or implied, by anybody in authority in the navy is scrupulously kept. ..Another thing we must not try to cover up errors. If we made a mistake, we have to say so, do our best to rectify it and try to avoid repeating the mistake ." CAPT Caufield then went on to list some steps that were being taken to improve the atmosphere at the San Diego training center. Calendar of Events Saturday, April 28 Square and Circle Club-Phillips Park7:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 1 Villamar/Bargo Council Meeting-Conference Rm. (Admin. Bldg.)--7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 2 Toastmaster's Club-Officer's Club6:30 p.m. Rifle and Pistol Club-Comm. Hall7:30 p.m. Fleet Reserve Association Auxiliary-Girl Scout Hut-8:00 p.m. Thursday, May 3 Navy Wives ClubChapel Hill Aud.-8:00 p.m. Felloweraft Club 1078-Comm. Aud.7:30 p.m. Friday, May 4 CPO Wives Club-Family Rm. (CPO Club)-8:00 p.m. The Chaplain's Corner AS A MAN THINKETH An eminent speaker made the statement that very few people are real thinkers. The average person thinks only when confronted with an emergency or crisis. The rest of the time is spent in day dreaming and drifting. There is unquestionably a great deal of truth in this man's observation. There is, however, ample evidence that thousands when confronted with an emergency turn to worrying instead of required thinking. There is a vast difference between these two. Frequent worrying is dissipating and destructive, but right thinking strengthens and offers a remedy. Constant brooding over troublesome conditions actually kills millions on the installment plan. Worrying will not change circumstances anymore than wishing will change the tide. Our value to this world is greatly lessened when we look at life thru dark glasses of gloom. Thoughts make or mar our life. Their influence and their power is beyond calculation. Sooner or later we fall to the level of that which we are thinking about. The body and the soul react to the working of the mind. Every habit, every act, every destiny has its beginning IN and its foundation on thoughts. The truth is we are no better than our thoughts. Our mind may be likened unto a garden. Each of us is the gardener of his or her individual soul. We are responsible for what grows there. It is entirely up to us to keep down the weeds that constantly seek to find root in our mental gardens. It may not always be possible to prevent the seeds of unwholesome thoughts from entering our minds, but it is possible by exercising our will power to direct our attention to more worthwhile subjects so that the seed does not mature. Martin Luther once said: "You may not be able to keep a bird from lighting on your head, but you need not allow it to build a nest in your hair." Prayer is a tested weed eradicant. The word of God is a good plant food. "Whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if these be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things. Karl G. Peterson Chaplain, USN The right to vote-like all other rights guaranteed by the Constitution-also implies a duty. Basically, we servicemen are in uniform to protect our democratic way of life against communist encroachment. With so many nations of the world now under totalitarian rule, it follows that we should have our voting rights more deeply impressed in our minds than ever before. The right to choose between candidates for a public office is a precious thing. The communists-like the fascists before them-know this. Almost immediately upon obtaining control of a country, they choke off this most direct expression of the people's will. The one-party ballot becomes the order of the day. Simply marking a ballot, however, does not complete our obligation. We must endeavor to vote intelligently. To do this, we must try to be as informed as possible about election issues. Only by casting an informed vote can you exercise your right an.' duty completely. (AFPS) Sunday, 29 Aprl 1956 CATHOLIC MASSES Sunday, 7000-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri.-1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 1900 -2000, and daily before Mass PROTESTANT SERVICES Sunday: 0930-Divine Worship (MCB-1 Chapel) 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship( Naval Base Chapel) 1100-Divine Worship (Lwd. Pt.) 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday-1900-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST 1000-Bible Study 1045-Worship Service CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday-1000-Naval Base Library LATTER DAY SAINTS Sunday-1100-Naval Station Library Chaplains at this activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LTJG C. C. Gaston, CHO, USNR (Protestant) 6 Page Two

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Saturday, 28 April 1956 THE INDIAN 4m Page Three Damage Controlman finishes Amateur Radio Knights Of Columbus 11 Correspondence Courses INDIAN Photo A man with plenty of navy correspondence courses already under his belt signs for another at the Naval Station Information and Education office. D. F. Heckbert, DC1, on the left, is a familiar sight to 0. L. Spencer, YN3, who works at the I and E office. Heckbert is now working on his thirteenth course. by Ely U. Orias The singular distinction of having logged the greatest number of navy correspondence courses among the enlisted personnel on the Base, goes to Donald F. Heckbert, damage controlman first. A perusal of his service record, along with those of others revealed that he has taken and completed 11 courses and that he is currently working on two more. Heckbert, who is presently attached to AFDL 47, started to refresh his consummate thirst for knowledge in January, 1942, when, while serving on board the USS DENEBOLA (AD-3), he took out his first course in carpenter's mate third, a rate equivalent to the present navy's damage controlman third. "A person like me with but ten years of educational training," says Heckbert, "must admit that he has a limited knowledge on almost anything. I decided to start this correspondence safari at the first opportunity in an effort to improve myself so that I may be of credit to my own name, to my family and to the service." Among the 11 courses, Heckbert found Naval Orientation most interesting of all. This course deals with the history of the U.S. Navy, the accomplishments of the immortal forerunners of the Navy from John Paul Jones on down, NavRegs of 1948, amphibious warfare, naval customs and courtesies, Uniform Code of Military Justice, etc. "I say it is the most interesting of all the courses that I have taken," says $eckbert, "because it not only broadens the man's knowledge on the entire naval system but it also, in my estimation, instills good leadership qualities in top-grade petty officers." "My correspondence safari," declared Heckbert, "was at all times cream and peaches until I got entangled with Theoritical Damage Control." "The course," explains Heckbert, "had a terrific amount of mathematics. It involved indeclining experiments and stability and trim of vessels and their buoyancy. It also dealt with highly complicated theories of shipboard firefighting evolution. But with my GED high school equivalence to work on," assured Heckbert, "I came out victorious in the end with a 3.8 mark." Entered Navy in 1941 The 34 year old bluejacket who enlisted in the Navy in December, 1941, is a veteran with 14 years of unbroken service. This correspondence enthusiast holds the hope of getting a collarbrass in the near future. "I took the chief's examination for damage control last February," says Heckbert. "If I pass it," he continued, "I will strive to hit the Warrant grade in June." As soon as he finishes his last course in Standard First Aid, he plans to take out the first year college GED test. A career man that he is, Heckbert expects to do a minimum of 20 years in the Navy or "it may be even more than that." Heckbert, who is a native of Medford, Mass. is married to the former Virginia C. Kelly of Winthrop, Mass. They have three children, Donald Jr., 9, Paula Ann, 8 and James Arthur, 5. The family who has been in Gtmo for a good while now says that the place is "wonderful!" Contest May 19 The Army, Navy and Air Force will be co-sponsors of an Armed Forces Day, May 19, program for the participation of all amateur radio operators. A CW receiving competition will feature a message from the Secretary of Defense. A certificate of merit will be issued to each participant who makes perfect copy. Transmissions will be at 25 words per minute on numerous Armed Forces schedules. Details of the contest may be obtained by studying OPNAV Notice 5720, dated April 2, 1956. There will also be included in the contest a radioteletypewriter receiving competition. Transmission in this phase of the contest will e at 60 words per minute on a varied schedule. Copies of contest transmissions taken by amateur operators should be mailed to the Armed Forces Day Contest, Room BE1000, The Pentagon, Washington 25, D. C. Time, frequency and call letters of the station copied should be indicated. Counts Don't Count As Such When Navy Calls For Daily Swab Details There's a count who doesn't count when it comes to performing the duties of a seaman apprentice aboard the attack carrier USS RANDOLPH (CVA-15) which is now in Guantanamo Bay. Count Andre P. Orlowski, youngest son of Count Stanislaw Orlowski, takes it in stride-like any other seaman apprentice in the navy. Is a Draftee The young French immigrant with a title that goes back more than 100 years is a 21-year-old draftee. He previously attend the University of Arizona where he majored in romance languages and studied economics and political science. The direct descendant of five generations of French and Italian bluebloods, Andre speaks French, Spanish and English fluently and eventually hopes to secure attache duty in Europe as an official interpreter for the navy. Came To U.S. in 1950 Andre first came to the United States in 1950 and originally intended to study at an American college and return to France. However, he liked the country so much that he decided to stay and become an American citizen. Aboard the RANDOLPH, which is here on a shakedown cruise, Andre is striking for storekeeper in the supply department. When the ship goes to the Mediterranean later this year, the count's knowledge of foreign languages will NAS Airman ... (Continued from Page One) strong motivation to fly. Possessed with potential officer-like qualities and having met the 120 grade in GCT and arithmetic combined and with over 58 points in mechanics, his immediate officers lost no time in recommending him for aviation training. On the strength of this recommendation, he was then allowed to take the examination required under the program. A native of Pennsylvania, Horning is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Horning of 942 Jackson st., Norristown, Pa. After his graduation from high school, Horning went to Valley Forge Airport outside Norristown and took student pilot apprenticeship. A reserve on active duty since November 29, 1955, Horning has had the aerial experience of flying balloons that determine the conditions of the atmosphere within the navigable air. prove useful to the supply department. He can act as interpreter in negotiating contracts for provisions and other supplies. 11 Initiates 22 At Gtmo Twenty-two Roman Catholic men from the Base were initiated into the First Degree of the Knights of Columbus by the LaSalle Council of Guantanamo City on April 15. The exemplification was made in Guantanamo City as Grand Knight Victor Vijil Pando relinquished his office to CDR K. Skadowski of Fleet Training Group who conducted the initiation ceremony in English. This was unique in that the LaSalle Council meetings have always been held in Spanish. This was only the second time in the 50 year history of the K of C in Cuba that the exemplification has been in English. The first K of C council on the island was formed by Americans in Havana. Base personnel who took part in the affair were BMC Gugliemo of FTG, AKC Mello of NAS, J. Huges of Public Works and CDR J. J. Sullivan, pastor of the Catholic parish on the Base. Chaplain Sullivan was also initiated in the First Degree.

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m Page Four Saturday, 28 April 1956 F T G Bulletin The sun was shining on the sea Shining with all its might The Captain did his very best, To make the future bright And this was not so odd, because Gtmo was in sight. The Captain and the Exec Were walking close at hand They wept like anything to see The bareness of the land If this was only Chesapeake Bay, They said, it would be grand. The time has come the Captain, said To talk of many things Of guns, and planes, and surface tracks And seamanship, and slings. And why the engineers are not so hot And why the sonar pings. A lot of training, the Captain said Is what we chiefly need. Services and instruction besides. Are very good indeed Now if everthing is ready We can start to bleed. With help from us, the riders said, Thinking all the while What a wonderful thing it will be To make that Captain smile. The crew is fine the riders said But it will take a while. It seems a shame the Captain said The crew will work till dark, After they have worked so much What will provide the spark, The riders said, nothing butYou're not here for a lark, Two more weeks followed by and still they learned galore, And thick and fast the training came And more and more and more The ship came through in a blaze They got a real good score. O riders, said the ship's Exec You've given us a run Is now the time to depart? But answer came there none, And this was scarcely odd because They were riding another one. CPO Wives by Ellen Van Cleef The regular monthly business meeting will be held in the CPO Family Room on Friday, May 4. All new members may register at this time. Hostesses at this meeting will be Mary Hewitt, Emily Trapp and Mary Shelton. Members and their husbands attended a Farewell Party and Social at the Family Room on April 20. Our first member to leave for the states, Helen Walters, was presented with a gift by Pres. Jane Whited with the best wishes from all the members. The door prize winner was Loretta Craver. NSD Supply Line April 25 was a red-letter day for Wm. J. Devaney Jr. SK3, who re-enlisted that day for a period of six years Devaney plans to leave the second of May for a thirty day leave to visit his father who resides at 702 Maple St., Carrollton, (Saginaw), Michigan. After his leave he will return here for duty. Devaney is a former member of the U.S. Coast Guard and served in both the Pacific and Mediterranean with that service. LT E. J. Hynes, Stock Control Division Officer, took a few days leave this week to welcome his family and get them settled in their new quarters. Mrs. Hynes, with their three children, arrived on the JOHNSON Monday from Shiresmantown, Pennsylvania. Immediately following their arrival, Mrs. C. C. Allen gave a morning 'coffee' at her home in honor of Mrs. Hynes. LTJG Dick Kezer was also on hand at the JOHNSON to greet his wife Valerie and daughter Sandra who were returning from a three week visit at their home in Glenridge, New Jersey. A. W. Bell, SK2, returned to this command from the Naval Station recently to resume duty with the Naval Supply Depot. He was formerly a member of the Base Police Force. Glad to have you back. Mrs. Mary Nichols of Wilmington, Delaware has been visiting with her son, E. M. Nichols, Storage Branch Supervisor, Material Division, and his family for the past two weeks. She plans to leave April 28 for her return to Wilmington. LCDR J. P. McFadden, Fuel Division Officer, has received orders for transfer to the Fuel Supply Office in Washington, D. C His reporting date is July 30, 1956. Teenage Roundup by Betty and Sharon As you all know the JOHNSON docked once again and left Gtmo with a new sophomore boy. He's Vic Buehlman and he hails from Pensacola, Fla. Here's hoping you enjoy your stay in Cuba. What's this we hear about a dinner? The cheerleaders gave the basketball team and guests a dinner April 25. It started at Dee Dee's, then went to Melba's and finally the main course was at Bobbie Stone's home. From there the party progressed to Pat Fojt's. Have you ever been on a swimming party? The one held last Thursday night was a real ball. Most everyone tried for a "moon tan." Que Pasa? Dee and Sylvia fishing, but only catching a sunburn! Eunice's love for bookkeeping-which is which, debit or credit? Everyone in typing t VU -10 Prop Blast by O. A. Porter, Jr. "A hearty Mallard "Welcome. Aboard" to CDR Joseph Buehlman, who arrived on board this week from Pensacola, Florida. CDR Buehlman is reporting from the U. S. Naval School, Pre-Flight, where he served as Engineering Instructor, and will relieve CDR Charles C. Stamm as Executive Officer. During his naval career CDR Buehlman has served with VR-32, the Naval Air Station, San Diego, and in the Canal Zone. He and Mrs. Buehlman have a son, Victor and a daughter, Kathryn, and are currently residing at Paola Point. We know that you will enjoy your tour at Guantanamo Bay. Although the Mallard's record out in the ball pasture hasn't been too impressive to date, there's a lot of spirit and hustle in the team and we think that you can look forward to a tight race for the remainder of the season. It's always a good game when the Mallards take the field. The Medic by J. F. Bertone & R. J. McNight Newborn News The Stork returned from leave and delivered Lundee Marie to CWO and Mrs. Henry Leimas; a boy to SD2 and Mrs. Nesbitt; a girl to EN3 and Mrs. Michael Flynn. Departures Hasta la vista is extended to Donald E. Lapp, HM3; Charles E. Edrington, HM3, and Howard Pincus, HN, who departed via the JOHNSON to go to RecSta, Brooklyn, for separation. Also departing via JOHNSON was LT. Ruth Struble, who is going to USNH, Jacksonville, for duty. The Medics' Reviews By the way "Mario", when you want your car pushed, it would go better with the key turned on and the brake released. What Corpsman almost cried when Gtmo liberty was cancelled? Was it "'D.W.K."? What man pulled a shady deal when selling cameras? Was it "'P.R.H."? It seems we have a new Hopalong Cassidy at our hospital, "Hopalong Nothing." It seems Congratulations are extended to Bilbo on his great dancing performance given in JR. QTRS. class working for a party by Mrs. Davis ? The great performance of the H.M.S. Pinafore, it was GREAT! Mary Alice getting most athletic of G. A. A.-Congrats! Hey Anita, smile for the birdie! MARINE MUSINGS On April 23 the Staff NCO's and their wivies welcomed aboard TSgt and Mrs. Rozier. TSgt Rozier reported as P. X. Steward, relievirg MSgt Inman who will report to Camp Lejeune N. C. TSgt Rozier reported aboard from Marine Barracks, Indian Head, Maryland where he was serving as P. X. Officer and Steward. Welcome to Gtmo, TSgt Rozier and we hope you enjoy your present tour. It was mentioned that the Marine Barracks rifle team won first place in the last NRH rifle shoot. The Marine Team made up of Sgt Major Allen, SSgt Stadler, Sgt Sanspree, and Cpl Patton were awarded Gold Belt Buckles for outshooting the other teams in the 30 Caliber match. Sgt Major Allen won a medal for first high expert aggregate. SSgt Stadler walked off with two medals, one for first place small bore and one third place high aggregate. Sgt Sanspree got a medal for firing second place 30 caliber rifle. The NRA ruled that MSgt Zemaitis could not fire on the Marine Team so he entered the matches as an individual shooter and won 1st place for the .30 cal Rifle and first high aggregate. The team won a plaque for the Barracks for winning the .30 cal Rifle matches. The Barracks came in second place in the 22 matches but didn't enter the pistol matches. Captain Swords and MSgt. Zemaitis have another pistol detail in the field. From all reports, this is going to be an excellent detail. We would all like to see more expert pistol shooters. Cpl. Matranga and Pfc. Rubio reported aboard Monday and were assigned duty with the Security Section. Cpl. Matranga reported in from MarBks, Crane, Indiana and Pfc. Rubio came from 2MarDiv., Camp Lejeune. Our Marine Barracks Baseball team collects more supporters every game. Given a few more games and the khaki will outnumber the white in the stands. That's as it very well should be-a good team rates good support-so Marines, get hot! The troops at the Barracks rate a well done. Of the 60 troopers that took the promotion tests for Cpl., Sgt., and Staff Sgt., only 11 failed. That's a marked improve ment over the last testing period. The promotions will be made during this quarter. A town is really small when they have to widen the main street to put the white line down the middle. One thing is sure about living in Russia-you'd never lose an election bet. Two finishes for automobileslacquer and liquor. '7 THE fIDIAl

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Saturday, 28 April 1956 THE INDIAN Page rive Dancing Students Present Colorful Revue; Mrs. Stagneres Last Recital INDIAN Photo Three members of the dance revue sponsored by Mrs. W. D. F. Stagner present her with a gift of appreciation from the entire cast. The revue held last Monday and Tuesday evenings, April 23 and 24, marked Mrs. Stagner's final efforts with instruction in tap and ballet. Pictured left to right are: Stephanie Stoll, Mrs. Fay Payne, Mrs. Stagner, Judy Harrison and Sharon Tippler. A colorful recital was presented Monday and Tuesday evenings in the Community Auditorium by the dancing pupils of Mrs. W. D. F. Stagner. This was the last revue to be produced and directed by Mrs. Stagner who is completing her second and final year as a dancing instructor on the Base. Mrs. Stagner said, "I wish to congratulate the children on their enthusiasm and I want to express my appreciation for the continued cooperation of their parents." The first section of the dancing revue featured children of all ages "In an Old Fashioned Garden" scene with members of each age group dressed as various flowers. The older girls provided the choral background and also performed in their own well-executed number, "The Swan." Act Two was comprised of the boys' dancing class in two snappy numbers. In the final act, each class returned again with its own specialty number, all of which were remarkable for their smooth precision and skillful maneuvering. During the finale on Monday evening, Mrs. Stagner was presented with a gift by her pupils. At that time she introduced Mrs. Fay Payne, her assistant, and Mrs. June Beiland, the accompanist. Navy Wives Club The Navy Wives Club of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, extends an open invitation to everyone on the Naval Base to attend the installation of new officers at the Chapel Hill Auditorium at 8:00 p.m. on May 3. Refreshments will be served immediately following the installation exercises. Last night, the members and their husbands attended a Farewell Party at the Staff NCO Club for several of the members who will be leaving for stateside duty soon. We also extend an invitation to all the women on the Base to attend our Bingo Parties held on a Thursday afternoon, once a month. The date this month is May 17 at 1:30 p.m. at the Villamar Lyceum. 5 Base Marines Are Promoted To Cpl. Five marines from the Marine Barracks were promoted recently from Pfc. to Cpl. The men received their Corporal warrants from Lt. Col. W. C. Esterline, Executive Officer of Marine Barracks. The new Corporals are Phillip E. Patton, Earl G. Castellow Victor C. Rieter, Steven P. Kavulic and Richard L. Hood. They won their promotions meritoriously through outstanding proficiency and outstanding performance of duty. "The bopster left a psychiatrist's office and met a friend. "How'd it go?" asked the chum. "The doc's one of us," answered the bopster. "He said I was real crazy." NAS Scuttlebutt Wednesday night all hands were able to see television in the barracks for the first time. They all agree that they have been missing some very good shows but will no longer miss any in the future. Also arrived are baseball bats galore and other sporting equipment. At the Ordnance area, word has been given out that a new house is being built at the Pistol Range. Two able carpenters now working on the project are R. Ploeckelmann and L. D. Ward. Dedication of the new house will be made in the near future. At the Photo Lab, some of the fellows have been working on certain phases of photography for their practical factor s. A. A. Adams, PH3, has been working on Movies; P. J. Anerine, PHG2, has been working on photography coloring; A. W. Maskell, PH3, has been working with Adams on microscopic photography. Several of the fellows agree that A. A. Adams is one of the most exceptional #RD Class PO's of the Photography field. Keep up the good work Adams. A new member from Leeward Point to the staff is Richard Sosnoski, AN. No, the supply building is not on fire. The smoke you see pouring from 'Behind the Bins" is nothing but steam caused by the men working fast getting everything squared away before summer and the hot season gets here. You're wrong, it's not a cue ball. It's Chasez with a haircut. He came "From Behind the Bins" and took a couple days of leave in Jacksonville to visit his wife. Rumors are that his wife went on the warpath and scalped him. It's very seldom that Corpsmen get to tell their troubles to anyone, maybe this column is the answer. A. J. "Alfredo Sheva, HM1, honorary Mayor of Guantanamo City, tops the list this week. Looking over towards the Hospital we see him flat on his back recuperating from his recent operation. It's a pain in the "neck" ain't it Al? Hope you are feeling good soon so you can resume your duties, both here at the Dispensary and in the City. A few others are sick too, not physically, but because they didn't get advanced to the next higher pay-grade. For most of them there will be another time, better luck then. Leeward Point-A lot of guys over here were very happy when the rates came back. Seems we have a lot of fellows to stand Shore Patrol now as quite a few of the men who had taken the test for Third Class and on up the line seemed to be successful as I have heard that the test wasn't easy. Leeward Point will lose a few Wives Attend NavCat Lecture The Naval Air Station Career Appraisal Team has reported that nine service wives attended the CAT's presentation class held last Thursday evening, April 12, at the Team's presentation room situated on the main floor of the NAS Ad building. Facts concerning survivors' benefits, reenlistment bonus, rights and privileges of enlisted personnel, information about the Navy's retirement program were among the general topics discussed during the presentation. The presentation started at 8:00 p.m. and ended 45 minutes later. After the presentation, questions were fired upon the Team by the wives with the survivors' benefits being the bone of contention. The nine ambitious wives, it was revealed, took turns on the question platform for a period of two hours and 15 minutes. Meanwhile, the NAS NavCat has announced that anyone desiring to attend the Team's presentation classes may contact the CAT office in person or by calling 8571 Savings Bond Drive To Begin Next Week A concerted effort will be made sometime next week in an effort to bring home to all Base employees and military personnel the investment opportunities of the Pay Roll Savings Bond program. "The program," explains LT B. J. Hammett, NavSta Savings Bond Officer, "calls for a substantial investment of a part of each payday which is considered the easiest and surest method of insuring one's future security." .The Savings Bond Officer said that due to the abounding facilities on the Base that call for just a very low cost, it follows that surplus funds are consequently realized either by a family or a single military man at a given period. "In a situation like this," says LT Hammett, "the Pay Roll Savings Bond program stands to be one of the best, if not the best, way to forestall the dwindling of surplus funds to the limbo of nothingness." men as FASRON-6 is trying to break up. Some of the men will stay here and a few of them will go to VU-10. To all you men going to the other side, drop back over and see us again when you get the chance. A woman is like man's best friend-the Dog. At times she barks rather loudly and sometimes she can bite, But still she is a great companion and nice to have around. I Saturday, 28 April 196 page ]vive THE INDIAN

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Page Six GTMO SPORTING CHIPS by C. C. Drumright Events of the Future ...A buffet dinner is scheduled at the club house for our guests from Ramey AFB on May 5 at 1800. All Club members are cordially invited, those desiring to attend will please leave their names with the course manager. Note: Special uniform. Qualifying play for the men's club championship begins at sunrise May 6 and closes at sunset May 13. First round play to co:.nence on May 14. Rules governing this tournament are posted. Our Liberal Arts Department ...The USGA method of pairings for a match play tournament are as follows: 32 qualifiers-The upper half pairings are 1 vs 17, 9 vs 25, 5 vs 21, 13 vs 29, 3 vs 19, 11 vs 27, 7 vs 23 and 15 vs 31. Lower half pairings: 1 vs 18, 10 vs 26, 6 vs 22, 14 vs 30, 4 vs 20,, 12 vs 28 and 8 vs 32. Ties in qualifying rounds other than those for last place shall be decided by a blind draw. Practice Ground. Where there is no regular practice areas, the committee shall designate such areas on any day of competition, during stroke competition such area will not include any hazard or putting green of the course to be used Rimming the Cups around the 19th ...After two weeks of play the leaders in our ringer tournament are CDR Rothenberg and Delgado, SN, who are tied for first place with neat nets of 67, keeping the pressure on with nets of 59 each are Mrs. Goolsby and CDR Stowe. It was numored you can stop using dirt T's; store bought kind are available. A certain fisherman (Dollar sine Drace) is trying to keep the putting green open 7 days ...Why? Special Notes: The course is due for its annual face lifting (topdressing of the greens, some heavy work on fairways, etc) so all members will try and keep in mind these irritating things of today will give us much satisfaction later on. Our local driving range has an abundance of good balls and is open evenings till 2100, contact the course manager. Instructions are available day or night. Ladies Golf Shots Last week the lady golfers played a Hickey tournament. In this tournament a bogie counts one point, a par three points, a birdie five points and an eagle counts eight points. Full handicaps were used. Golf balls went to the following winners. First and Second FlightFirst place-Cynthia Holley Second place-Edie Ware Third place-TieAnnette Forester Lois Cooper Third FlightFirst place-TiePatty Patterson Bucky Pierce Second place-Kay Barton The Goat tournament ended on Friday, April 13. The nine hole tournament found Millie Kuba the winner with a collection of six goats. Margaret Wall, the runnerup, was close behind with four goats. Lavaria Butler amassed seven goats without much trouble to practically walk away as the winner of the 18 hole handicap Tournament, leaving a few goats equally distributed among Marian Caruthers,' Cynthia Holley and Chris Whitton. Cynthia Holley emerged the victor of the three way tie, but only after beating Marian Caruthers, who played her next best game, an 86, and Chris Whitton who played her best game-a 95. Incidentally, Cynthia Holley played her best game, almost broke 100. Congratulations to the winners. Condolences to the losers. The Tournament Chairman wishes to thank all for their participation What's Ioin' Stateside Young foot-stompers got a nottoo-gentle kick-in-the-teeth from a leading American psychiatrist recently. When 11 teenagers were arrested at Hartford, Conn., for causing disturbances at a local theater, Dr. Francis J. Braceland, head of the Institute for Living, branded the present rock-and-roll craze as a "cannibalistic and tribalistic" form of music. The doctor linked the youngsters' fixation on the new music form with "ducktail" haircuts and zootsuits as signs of insecurity and adolescent rebellion. He added that the disease is "commuicable." The prairie states and part of the Southwest were the scene of turbulent dust storms recently that reminded older residents of the twisters of the 30's. Wheat, barley and other crops were ripped from the soil. Colorado, Wyoming, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas were hit hard. Gusts up to 80 miles an hour were recorded at Denver and other localities. Schools closed and highways were blocked. and cooperation. The Ladies Spring Championship tournament, open to any woman residing on the Base, is scheduled for the first two weeks of May. Qualifying rounds will be played Wednesday, May 2. Those wlo are in school or are working may make arrangements to play Saturday, May 5. All interested entrants please sign up at the clubhouse. 41 Voting Office Has Absentee Ballot Information For Military, Civilians LT B. J. Hammett, Naval Station Voting Officer, has announced once again that his office is open to all military and civilian per-onnl attached to the Naval Staton desiring to apply for the absentee ballot. The NavSta Voting Officer pointed out that consultation on abntce voting is indispensable to lose intending to invoke the privilege. "This voting by absentee process," says LT Hammett, "applies primarily to persons who, by virt-e of their duty or service with the department or agencies of the United States Government, will be absent from their legal voting places come election time." "in the states," explains LT Hammett, "an elector may vote at the last moment. But this absentee SCUTTLEBUTT NAS Pool, Hobby Shop Hours Changed Changes in the hours of operation of both the Naval Air Station hobby shop and swimming pool have been released by the NAS Special Services office. Effective April 30, the hobby shop will be open from 0800 to 1600 daily. The same source however said that the hobby shop workroom and photo laboratory will remain open until 2100, daily. The swimming pool, it was reported, will be open from 0930 until 2100, daily, beginning May 1. In another vein, the NAS Special Services office said that shipments of leather and leather tools for the hobby shop are expected in the next few weeks. It was also reported that some hook rug kits are now on sale at the hobby shop on a ten percent discount. process requires that he has to have an application docketted with the cognizant Voting Officer who, in turn, makes the necessary recommendations for its approval should he find the application meritorious. And this system," cautioned LT Hammett, "takes plenty of time." Meanwhile, the NavSta Voting Officer has disclosed a personal observation about "some evidence of apathy with regard to voting," which according to him, "is not too unusual since many people fail to realize the importance of their voting franchise." In a government like ours," continued LT Hammett, "'where sovereignty resides in the people and upon whom all government authority emanates, the doctrine of 'people's supremacy' could best be achieved if those of us who are qualified to vote will exercise the privilege freely." 14 Base Employees Receive Service Pins In a ceremony held at the Naval S t a t i o n administration building last Friday, April 20, 14 Base employees received 20-year or 30-year Length of Service awards for Federal service. RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase, made the awards presentation consisting of a lapel emblem and a certificate. In recognition of their faithful service, Admiral Cooper has expressed his pleasure to the honored employees while presenting them their awards. It was reported that the 14 employees have an aggregate length of service representing more than 330 years. Art Exhibit Begins Mon. At N. S. Library The Art Studio opens its first art show in the Naval Station Library Monday evening, April 30 at 8:00 p.m. RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase, and CAPT W. R. Caruthers, C. 0. NavSta, will open the show. Paintings will be presented to RADM Cooper and CAPT Caruthers. The exhibit which will consist of approximately 35 paintings will continue until May 6. The show will have two major divisions, still life and landscapes. Some of the paintings will be available for purchase. n Saturday, 28 April 1956 w THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 28 April 1956 THE INDIAN Page Seven THE SCOREBOOK MCB-1 Makes Comeback By Walloping NAS 15-1 And Tripping Marines By 4-3 by Joe Duffy Feasting on a king-size ration of basehits, the slugging Marine team has assumed the role of league leaders with three wins against no defeats after the second week of league play. The Marines completed their first circuit without a league defeat when they turned back the Naval Base Indians Thursday night, giving them a win over each of their league competitors. The word league is injected in the foregoing sentence to circumvent the setback the Leathernecks suffered at the hands of the visiting firemen from MCB-1 on Monday night. The Seabees, playing a temporary role in the intercommand competition, dropped their first contest to VU-10, then came back to defeat both the Marines and Naval Air Station, the latter game being a real shellacking. Led by a couple of solid mound performers, Tony Civitelli and "Hawk" Cigainero, the MCB-1 club fields a hard-hitting lineup topped by Jack Unruh, Terry Dolan, Doc McCormack and Dale Carr. The feeling is that, if the Bees could have stayed with us, the All-Gtmo team this year would have been "Big League". NAS 10, VU-10 1 The Flyers connected for nine hits, including a double by Pearson and triple by Waldrop, and capitalized on eight Mallard errors to take a 10 to 1 league win, their first win in three contests. Jack Jones hurled 5-hit ball, striking out six in the process, to take the pitching victory. The Flyers broke a 1-1 tie in the fourth inning when Sandblom reached first on an error, took second and later scored on subsenuent errors as the Mallard defense fell apart. They then added two more markers in the fifth and sixth to turn the game into a rout and drive starter Streigle to cover. Montgomery relieved in the eighth, and after a hitless inning, ran into trouble in the ninth as the Flyers again erupted for four big runs when Ransom walked, Jones and Rhodes singled and Waldrop unloaded the bases with a booming triple to right center. VU-10 001 000 0001 5 8 NAS 100 122 04x-10 9 3 Streigle, Montgomery and M. Smith Jones and Ransom MCB-1 4, Marines 3 The Seabees bunched four of their nine hits in the sixth inning to score all their runs and turn back the Marines in a closely fought ball game. Trailing by 2-0, Unruh opened the sixth with a slashing triple to the far reaches of the outfield. Stutzman bounced out, third to first and McCormack fanned, then with two out the Seabees made their move. Bannon walked, and Carr followed with a single to drive in the first run from third. Blankenship and Cigainero followed with successive singles to produce three more runs and enough to sew up the victory. Cigainero did another fine job on the the mound, striking out 13 batters while silencing the opposition's bats; especially in the final three innings when he allowed just one man to reach base, that being Castellow who floundered on second in the eighth. MCB-1 000 004 000-4 9 3 MARINES 010 011 000-3 4 1 Cigainero and Stutzman; Crosby and Duncan VU-10 10, NavBase 3 The Mallards combined two singles, a double and an error to tally three runs in the seventh and take a 5-3 lead that meant the ball game. In the fruitful inning Postal and Smith connected for successive singles with one away, and came in to score on Montgomery's second double of the game. Montgomery added the insurance run when he crossed the plate as Murphy bobbled Swartz's ground ball at second. In the ninth inning, the Mallards exploded for five big runs to increase their lead and put the game on ice as the VU-10 hurler, Streigel, who relieved in the third inning, held complete command. The Indians only scoring splurge came in the third inning when they bunched an error and four consecutive walks to push across two runs without the benefit of a basehit, and go into an early 3-2 lead that held up until the decisive seventh. Streigel gained credit for the pitching win, while starting hurler Schiller took the loss. VU-10 002 000 305-10 13 4 NAVBASE 102 000 0003 3 5 King, Streigel and M. Smith Schille1, Barnsfather and laniero MCB-1 15, NAS 1 The Seabees, sporting new uniforms, broke out in a rash of 1 asehits to back up Tony Civitelli on the mound as he breezed through the Flyer lineup to give the MCB-1 club their second win in a row. Tony scattered five hits, walked three and struck out eight over the route, while the Seabee batsmen clobbered the Flyer's starter, Falzarano, for nine hits and thirteen runs in the first four innings. Unruh and McCormack each connected for three hits in the onslaught, with Carr, Stutzman and Unruh hitting for extra bases. The Flyer's lone run came in the fourth to avert a shutout when Tanzi singled, stole second and advanced the rest of the distance on infield outs. NAS 000 100 001 5 7 MCB-1 307 311 00x-15 12 2 Falzarano, King and Ransom; Civitelli and Stutzman Marines 15, NavBase 5 Castellow and Hunter each connected for home runs as the league leaders ran up a total of 14 hits to defeat the Indians 15-5. Castellow's blow came in the first inning with one on to start the scoring, while Hunter's blast was good for two runs in the seventh. The Marines kept up a barrage of basehits, going hitless only in the second frame, to completely overwhelm the Indians and preserve their league record of three wins in as many games. Chuch Hunter led the hit attack for the winner with a triple and two singles addition to the four-master in five trips to the plate. The Indian's Scholl went 2 for 3 to establish the batting lead in the league with a 7 for 11 mark so far. Young and Fortney combined on the mound for the Marines, with the win going to reliefer Fortney. NAVBASE 020 000 0305 6 5 MARINES 202 320 24x-15 14 0 Coleman, Walgamuth, Schiller and laniero Youngs, Fortney (3) and Duncan The Schedule Sunday 1430 MCB-1 vs NavBase Monday 1900 VU-10 vs Marines Tuesday 1900 NAS vs NavBase Wednesday 1900 MCB-1 vs VU-10 Thursday 1900 Marines vs Nay Base The Standings Won Lost GB Marines 3 0 NavBase 1 2 2 Naval Air Sta. 1 2 2 VU-10 1 2 2 The Fish Tale(s) by Pat Aldridge Chief M. Wertley, Sanitation, one of the best fishermen around here, has been pulling in the big ones, per usual for Wertley, around the CB dump. Snapper, every bit as big as that, and Jack even bigger. He does his best, so it seems, just before sundown while others, like Chief Manticipit, fishing in the same area near dawn, are bringing up large Grouper. Fair size Red and Gray Snapper are still being taken from the Coastguard Pier, a spot where amateurs should learn one prime rule of fair play. When a lot of lines are cast out from one, small dock, heads up when the lucky me gets a strike! The rest of you should reel in immediately in order that the fightin' fish hooked doesn't foul everybody and the fighting fisherman ends up losing his catch. Maebelle Clay had herself a mighty Tarpon near that same dock the other day and might have landed him if not concerned about those aforementioned lines. Ted Stumo of FTG isn't telling everybody where but there's snook to be had in spots other than the Gtmo river as can be attested to by the near twenty pounder Stumos' boat borught in last weekend. Bait? A trolled fresh herring. That was the second Snook for Stumo within the week, the other having been taken in the river on a trolled seven spoon. The river is yielding again, at long last, with the "hot spots" hotter than ever. Tom Jenkins, DTC, has been another lucky Snooker with a near twenty pounder as proof. Dr. Pete Wells was down right disappointed when threatened political trouble prevented him from participating in the sailboat races in Santiago last weekend. Speaking of sailboats, the converted Seagull now being rented by the Sailboat Locker, with a fifteen horse outboard, at four dollars for an eight hour period, is well worth the price. This sixteen footer seems stable as a yacht and throttles down just right for slow trolling. Comfortable, too, for those long stretchs for she has a seven foot beam with just the right length thwarts for flakin' out and takin' it easy while waitin' for the giant to strike. It won't be long now until the annual base fishing tourney gets under way. Gosh, that time all ready! Seems only yesterday Chief Roberts won last years' tournament with a hundred and fifty some odd pound Grouper and ended up with the twenty five horse outboard offered as first prize. Soon as the chit is okayed the date will be announced by Ron Seagle. Saturday, 28 April 1956 THE INDIAN Page Seven

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S Saturday, 28 April 1956 THE INDIAN Navy-DPPO-10ND-Gtmo.-3441 TV Tele Talk Don't miss Dean Martin singing the new hit sensation "It must be True" as he joins Jerry Lewis on the Colgate Variety Hour Saturday. Mystery surrounds the remainder of the show. Both Dean and Jerry feel that any information regarding the show would place it in jeopardy. There's good variety on Toast of the Town Sunday. You'll be able to see Eddie Fisher, England's Mr. Pastry, the Mariners, Irene Dunne, Fred Astaire, and a host of 15 other stars. Following that the Goodyear TV Theater presents the "Last Boat From Messina". A girl is stuck on Ellis Island facing deportation charges because of escape during World War II. French singer Line Renaud and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. are the guest stars on the Bob Hope Show Monday. The Show originates in London. Bob Hope also presents one of England's favorite musical and TV comedy stars, Tommy Trinder. Walt Disney brings another rise of one of his stars to the TV screen Tuesday. Disneyland presents the character responsible for Disney's fame. It's the Mickey Mouse story along with pictures of the new Disneyland in Hollywood. Tuesday night Red Skelton starts a whole new modern art form, with Basil Rathbone as guest artist on the Red Skelton Show. Sir Robert (Skelton) is acclaimed by critics for conception composition, feeling for form, and striking symbolism on his first effort, a bit of surrealism whipped up in blind desperation. The U.S. Steel Hour brings you "Papa is All". It's the story of an English-German speaking farm family where Papa is ruler. Wednesday night the Kraft TV Theatre has the story of an overworked girl who gets TB. Her drunken father doesn't help matters nor do her kid-brothers and sisters. The name of the play is "The Straw". Friday night Dumont Boxing presents a return bout between welterweights Gene Poler and Carmine Flore. Their first match was a 10 round draw. Poler who hales from Niagara Falls, New York, has had 19 pro bouts while Flore has had 72, winning 48 of them. WGBY Television Saturday April 28 4:00-Contest Carnival 4 :30-Topper 5:00-Victory at Sea 5:30--Beat the Clock 6:00-Red Buttons 6:30-Life Begins at 80 7:00-People are Funny 7:30-Big Story 8:00-Colgate Hour 9:00-Here's the Show 9:45-Justice Sunday. April 29 4:00-Roy Rogers 4:30-Ding Dong School 5:00-Ozzie & Harriet 5:30-Names the Same 6:00-Our Miss Brooks 6:30-What's My Line 7:00-Loretta Young 7:30-Hallmark Hall 8:00-Toast of the Town 9:00-Goodyear Playhouse Monday, April 30 5:30-News Parade 5:45-Jane Froman 6 :00-I & E Time 6:30-December Bride 7:00-Ray Milland 7:30-Medic 8:00-Stop The Music 8:30-Rock King 9:00-Bob Hope Tuesday, May 1 5:30-News Parade 5:45-Jo Stafford 6:00 Disneyland 7:00-Phil Silvers 7:30-Danger 8:00-Red Skelton 8:30-Lineup 9:00-U.S. Steel Hour Wednesday, May 2 5:30-News Parade 5:45-Robert Q. Lewis 6:00-I & E Time 6:30-Joan Davis 7:00-I've Got a Secret Cinema -Scoop by D.D.H. By no means has the Cinemascope process revolutionized the picture making industry; some of your best entertainment is still being released in the conventional screen, black and white process. To further back up that statement, learned the other day that Hollywood must have some of the same ideas for the '56 production schedules call for more small screen, black and white pictures than in the last couple of years. The "wide-screen" process will be featured in outdoor, musical and spectacular type pies while many with the best story material and some that demand it will be shot in black and white. Here are a few of the top pictures that are scheduled for release this year: "High Society," (Bing Crosby, Grace Kelly and Frank Sinatra), "Proud and Profane," (Deborah Kerr and Bill Holden), "Moby Dick," (Gregory Peck), "King and I," (Deborah Kerr and Yul Brynner) ,"Bus Stop," (Marilyn Monroe), "Giant," (Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson and James Dean), and "Teahouse of the August Moon," (Glen Ford and Marlon Brando). It's really a line-up of top stars and pictures. Let's hope Gtmo gets its share! Drumbeat (W.B.) .Alan Ladd and Audrey Dalton ...and outdoor picture set in the West of the late 1860's ...fair. Three For the Show (Col., in FROM: Program 7:30-Millionaire 8:00-Masquerade Party 8:30-Stage 7 9:00-Kraft Theater Thursday, May 3 5:30-News Parade 5:45-Coke Time 6:00-Those Whiting Girls 6:30-You Bet Your Life 7:00-That's My Boy 7:30-Bob Cummings 8:00-Crusader 8:30-Dragnet 9:00-Milton Berle Friday, May 4 5:30-News Parade 5:45-Perry Como 6:00-I & E Time 6:30-Truth or Consequences 7:00-Life of Riley 7:30--Dollar a Second 8:00-Foreign Intrigue 8:30--Star Stage 9:00-Boxing color), played the base circuit last fall. A musical comedy starring Betty Grable, Jack Lemmon and Marge and Gower Champion. You'll enjoy it, perhaps for the second time, if you like this type of picture. Five Against the House (Col) .Guy Madison, Kim Novak and Brian Keith ..crime with an intellectual twist ..good entertainment for this type of picture. This Island, Earth (U.I., in color) ..Jeff Morrow and Faith Domergue .good science fiction. Escape to Burma (RKO, in color) ...Barbara Stanwyck and Robert Ryan ...average, definitely not befitting the talents of Stanwyck. Indestructible Man (A.A.) ... Lon Chaney and Casey Adams dead man is restored to life and becomes indestructible ...What? This one I've got to see just out of curiosity. Red Sundown (U.I., in color) Rory Calhoun, Martha Hyer, Lita Baron and Dean Jagger ...horse opera, in the same old pattern ... Head for the Hills, oops, I mean movie lyceum. 8 cent stamp TO: Send the Indian Home You're looking at Automn Russell, a girl as pretty as her name. She's one of the adornments in Paramount's "Anything Goes." a Saturday, April 28 NavSta-Drumbeat-107 min. NAS-Smoke Signal-100 min. Mar. Site-The Detective-96 min. Villa.-Bullet For Joey-93 min. Lwd. Pt.-Bamboo Prison-96 min. MCB-1-Country Girl-104 min. Sunday, April 29 NavSta-Three For the Show-100 min. NAS-Drumbeat Mar. Site-Captain Lightfoot-104 min. Villa.-The Detective Lwd. Pt.-Bullet For Joey MCB-1-Bamboo Prison Monday, April 30 NavSta-Five Against the House-90 min. NAS-Three For the Show Mar. Site-Smoke Signal Villa.-Captain Lightfoot Lwd. Pt.-The Detective MOB-1-Bullet For Joey Tuesday, May 1 NavSta-This Island, Earth-106 min. NAS-Five Against the House-90 min. Mar. Site-Drumbeat Villa.-Smoke Signal Lwd. Pt.-Captain Lightfoot MCB-1-The Detective Wednesday, May 2 NavSta-Escape to Burma-105 min. NAS-This Island, Earth Mar. Site-Three For the Show Villa.-Drumbeat Lwd. Pt.-Smoke Signal MCB-1-Captain Lightfoot Thursday, May 3 NavSta-Indestructible Man-106 min. NAS-Escape to Burma Mar. Site-Five Against the House Villa.-Three For the Show Lwd. Pt.-Drumbeat MCB-1-Smoke Signal Friday, May 4 NavSta-Red Sundown-102 min. NAS-Indestructible Man Mar. Site-This Island, Earth Villa.-Five Against the House Lwd. Pt.-Three For the Show MCB-1-Drumbeat Book -Nook Here's an extraordinary novel which has rapidly zoomed to the top of the bestseller list lately. "THE LAST HURRAH," by Edwin O'Conner, is a good story about politics and politicians and the central character is patqptly modeled on James Michael Curley of Boston. The book catches rather well the excitement which surrounds "smoke-filled rooms," election year campaigning, and the national conventions. In honor of the 250th anniversary of Benjamin Franklin's birth, which the nation celebrated recently, Carl Van Doren has gotten out a new biography of this great American statesman. For people who like to read history as it is reflected in the life of one great personage, this is just the book. "H.M.S. ULYSSES," by Alistair MacLean, is a well-written seagoing thriller which is the British counterpart to our own "CAINE MUTINY." The "Ulysses run during the dark days of World War II, and the attempt of its crew to mutiny makes for absorbing fiction. The ending is much better than "Caine," too. 4