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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Volume VII, No. 16 Saturday, 21 April 1956


Grass Fire Burns 20 Acres In Cuzco


Beach Magazine Area Monday

A grass fire believed to have started from a carelessly handled cigarette charred an area of approximately 20 acres in the Cuzco Beach magazine area. The fire started in. the vicinity of the Marine guard house at the entrance to the magazine area and spread north and west.

According to J. C. Pinckard, Base Fire Chief, the fire was reported to his department at 1143 and had been burning about two minutes before the call was received. The.:call was phoned in by A.-L. Broughton who was working in the guard house area.


All vailable men from the different: commands on the Base were rushed to the area. The Provost Marshal says that all commands are to be congratulated for their spontaneous response in supplying men and aid.
The closest the fire came to the magazines was 500,yards. The Fire Chief said that the magazines were luckily on the windward side of the fire.

The fire department had a false alarm during the same time of the grass fire. A truck was dispatched to Victory Hill, but no fire.

Approximately 350 fighters were at the scene of the fire along with three bulldozers and three fire trucks. By 1902 the fire was reported completely out.
Throughout Monday night and Tuesday, the fire department had
(Continued on Page Three)


INDIAN Photo


Uruguayan Seaplane

Lands In Harbor

A Uruguayan PBM-5 navy seaplane plowed into the waters of Guantanamo Bay harbor at 3:00 p.m., Saturday, April 14. Why the plane landed in Gtmo was not disclosed.
The plane, whose former home base is NGP Corpus Christi, Texas, was reportedly given by the United States government to Uruguay under the Mutual Defense Pact entered -into between the two countries.
It left Gtmo Wednesday morning, April 18, for Montevideo, Uruguay. Piloting the seaplane was LCDR Sarmandi Araujo of the Uruguay Navy. Also aboard the plane were three Uruguayan naval officers and nine crewmen.


Adm Cooper Presents Base Essay Checks To Winners, Chief Is First


INDIAN Photo
In RADM Cooper's office for the presentations of awards are the winners in the Base essay contest. Left to right: R. L. Heitzinger, CT1; R. D. Lakie, PNA 3; W. J. Koraska; W. A. Houston, SOC; RADM Cooper,


and L. Koraska, FPC.

Winners of the Base essay contest entitled "Why the United States Needs a-Navy" were announced this week by RADM W. G. Cooper, Commander Naval Base and sponsor of the contest. The first place prize of a $50 check went to W. A. Houston, SOC, of Fleet Training Group.

Other winners in the contest which ended April 7 were R.L. Hertzinger, CT1, of Radio Range, who took second place and won himself a $25 check; R.D. Lackie, PN3, of VU-10, took third place and a $10 check.
W. J. Koraska, sophomore in the Base high school, walked off with the best dependent essay. Koraska is the son of L. Koraska, FPC. He was awarded a $25 check for his winning article.
The contest was open to all Base enlisted personnel and their dependents. RADM Cooper told an INDIAN reporter that he planned on having another Base-wide contest in the future.

Page five of this week's INDIAN has the winning essays-all four of them.

Judges for the contest were CAPT G.L. Kohr, Commanding Officer Naval Air Station; CAPT W. B. Moore, Chief of Staff, Fleet Training Group; CDR G.E. Krouse, Base Legal Officer, and CDR W. G. Barton, Executive Officer, Naval Station.


Santiago Archbishop

Holds Confirmation

On Sunday April 29
Archbishop Enrique Perez Serantes of Santiago de Cuba will make his annual official visit to the Base during the coming weekend.
While here he will administer confirmation on approximately 15 children and a few adults. The sacrament will be administered immediately after the 9:00 a.m. Mass on Sunday, April 29.
The Holy Name Society of the Base will sponsor a formal luncheon at the CPO Club in honor of the Archbishop. It will be held Saturday, April 28, at 12:30 p.m.
The Archbishop, while on his annual tour of this section of Cuba has for some years made Guantanamo Bay an official stop.


Fleet Reserve Assoc.

To Sponsor Contest

For Navy Wife Of '56
The navy-wide Fleet Reserve association is sponsoring a contest to select the wife of an enlisted man as an outstanding navy wife and to designate her as Mrs. U. S. Navy 1956.
All commands have been authorized by the Secretary of the Navy to cooperate with the Fleet Reserve association to insure the success of the contest.
Correspondence in regard to the contest should be addressed to Fleet Reserve association, Contest headquarters, Wilton Hotel, Long Beach, Calif.





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IlIarda . 21 A ril 195


THE INDIAN
The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba.
CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba.
Editorial Staff
LTJG D. G. LaCasse ------------------------------Officer-Advisor
G. L. Henderson, JOC ------------------------------------Editor
J. C. Curren, JOSN -----------------------------Managing Editor
E. U. Orias, JO3 ---------------------------------Feature Editor
D. D. Hinton, JOSN ------------------------------ Staff Reporter
THE INDIAN is publishel weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit.
All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


The Chaplain's Corner

WHEN SANITY IS CALLED MADNESS
In the records of Seville Cathedral in Spain, dated July 8, 1401, are these words of its founder, "Let us build a church so great that those who come after us may think we are mad to have attempted it." To this day the structure stands as "That stone fabric of man's imagination.'
Long before the year 1401, the Roman ruler Festus had cried out, "Paul, you are mad; your great learning is turning you mad." Later the great apostle confessed, "We are looked upon as fools for Christ's sake."
A crazy man may consider everyone else insane. A person whose light is darkness looks upon true light as utter opaqueness. To individuals who live selfish, washed lives, it seems madness for a good man so to live as to get himself crucified as a ptiblic enemy. When with tenacity we hold wrong ideas, those who contradict us are considered unsound.
In the New Testament, the world, the flesh, and the devil are denounced as enemies of the good life. Self-centeredness in pursuit of its own gain is recognized as standing over against God-centeredness aneager desire to do His holy will in needs of loving kindness. Little wonder that the challenge still resounds: "Be not conformed to this world."
Let us today that God will grant to each of us grace, mercy and peace. Let us beseech His forgiveness for our lukewarmness in responding to His love, and for the feebleness of our efforts. God is a kind and loving God, let us today prove ourselves to Him.
Charles C. Gaston
Chaplain, USNR


Sunday, 22 April 1956 CATHoLIC MASSES Sunday, 7000-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri.-1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 1900
-2000, and daily before Mass PROTESTANT SERVICES Sunday: 0930-Divine Worship (MCB-1 Chapel)
0930-Sunday School
0980-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship( Naval
Base Chapel)
1100-Divine Worship
LLwd. Pt.)
1980-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday-1900-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST 1000-Bible Study 1045-Worship Service CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday-1000-Naval Base Library LATTER DAY SAINTS Sunday-1100-Naval Station Library Chaplains at this activity
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LTJG C. C. Gaston, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)


Calendar of Events
Monday, April 23
O.E.S. Charter Meeting-Community Auditorium-7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, April 24
Fleet Reserve Assn.-Special MeetingNomination for Branch Officers8:00 p.m.
Wednesday, April 25
Toastmasters' Club-Officers' Club6:30 p.m.
Thursday, April 26
Fellowcraft Club 1078-Community Auditorium-7:30 p.m.


Notice

A farewell party will be held for the departing members of the Navy Wives Club, on April 27 at 7:00 p.m.
The occasion will be held at the Staff NCO Club. Reservations may be had by calling 9219 .


Admiral's Appreciation Letter
RADM William G. Cooper, Commander Naval Base, advised that the months of January, February, and March of this year have been of historic significance to the Navy and to the Guantahamo Naval Base. The constant stream of important visitors has given the Navy a prominent place in the public eye throughout the United States. The individual efforts of each and every Navy man and civilian concerned in extending the hand of hospitality have contributed in no small way to the success of this massive public relations enterprise.
During the month of March alone the Base has welcomed thirty-four separate groups of dignitaries, including the Secretary of the Navy, seventy-six members of the House and Senate, approximately one hundred representatives of the press, and a group of high ranking Cuban officials. This influx of guests, the greatest in the history of the Na7 Base, has placed unprecedented demands upon those personnel called upon to assist.
The BOQs have been jammed to capacity throughout the entire period. The Naval Air Station has been beseiged with traffic comparable t La Guardia Field. The Officers Club has smashed all previous attendance records and has handled capacity crowds continuously. The official sedan drivers have been dispatched incessantly at all hours throughout the day and night. The Public Works Transportation Pool has ably augmented the repeatedly heavy transportation demands.
An interesting sidelight is the fact that LCDR G. R. Ferrell, Naval Station Ordnance Officer, advised that funds for the supply of powder for the saluting batteries had been grossly overexpended during the early phases of the VIP migrations. It seemed as though the batteries had hardly time to cool before the next VIP arrival. 'Special mention goes to L. G. Cates, BM1, and to his indefatigable crew of VIP drivers from the Bay Hill Master-at-Arms shack. These men have cheerfully and diplomatically performed a great service to the Base and to the Navy with a minimum of men and equipment.
The Naval Base Band, under the leadership of R. 0. Van Black, 1VI nC, is now recuperating from a heavy schedule of honors, ceremonies, a%.1 official functions. The Marine Barracks Honor Guard, commanded b' A PT J. J. Swords and at other times by LT J. W. Mann and LT J. A. DoN .IS earned a "Well Done" for its frequent and peerless performances.
No -fire department has ever been more instantly responsive as the Flag Boat Crew under the able guidance of N. E. Olson, BMC. Olson himself has earned an enviable reputation as Guide extraordinary and will always be remembered by our important guests for his expeditious and thorough diplomatic services. CWO J. A. Hould of the Naval Air Station and the men of the NAS Boat Shed provided some excellent and rapid transportation when it was necessary to use the Crash Boats to facilitate some of the tight VIP schedules. Their response was a distinct credit to the Navy.
The NAS Line Crew, headed by L. B. Dixon, AEC, set an excellent example of service by handling the vast quantity of VIP aircraft in addition to their regular aircraft duties. J. M. Mansapit, SDC, G. Delacruz, SD1, L. C. DeLeon, SD3, and S. Nedera, SD3, have been the busiest men on the base while providing unexcelled hospitality to the guests on behalf of the Base Commander.
There have been distinct rumblings at the Guest House, BOQ 90, the headquarters for the majority of our distinguished guests. 0. T. Butler, SDC, has presided over the many comings and goings with the able assistance of TN's H. W. Brown, J. S. Terry, and R. Williams. There are many others who have distinguished themselves during this very active period. These men have been fully aware of the fact that they themselves are the Navy, and that no quantity of FORRESTALS or BOSTONS can reflect the personality of the 1956 Navy better than they can in their dealings with the public.
Admiral Arleigh Burke, Chief of Naval Operations, expressed his appreciation for the services rendered during the visit of the members of Congress in a letter to the Base Commander dated 5 April 1956. The letter is quoted herein.
From: Chief of Naval Operations
To: Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Subj: Services rendered during Congressional visit; appreciation of
1. During the period 21-24 March 1956, the Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, was placed in charge of the overall arrangements for the visit of approximately 75 members of Congress to the Guantanamo Bay area during demonstrations aboard USS BOSTON and USS FORRESTAL.
2. These arrangements-which included housing of male member:: afloat and female members ashore; a reception for members of Congrrs by the Secretary of the Navy; various details of the demonstrations which were completed by shifts of personnel from ship to ship, and from ship to shore and ieturn; and the unscheduled return trip via Havana by one-third of the Congressmen-called for careful planning and ingenuity in meeting unforseen emergencies.


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THE INDIAN








Saturday, 21 April 1956


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THE INDIAN


Cinemascope Lyceum

For Leeward Point
A new lyceum is under construction over at Leeward Point. The lyceum, the NAS Special Services office said, has been located within the immediate vicinity of the EM barracks.
A cinemascope screen, according to the NAS Special Services Officer, will be one of the special features of the new Leeward Point lyceum. It was also reported that the lyceum is expected to be completed in late June.
The Naval Air Station Special Services office also announced that ten new TV sets have been received. The same source said that the sets are to be installed in the enlisted men's barracks and EM clubs of both the Naval Air Station and Leeward Point.
The NAS Special Services office also revealed that the foundation and pillars for the new EM beer garden at Leeward Point have already been erected. The building, it was reported, will be completed prior to June 80, 1956.



Payday .Routes


Are Changed

Charges on the military payday schedule involving what commands or units are to be covered at a certain time on paydays have been released by the- Disbursing Office. The changes will commence next payday.
Three separate disbursing teams, it was revealed, will cover all the various commands, two teams to go out on the field and one team to stay at the Supply Depot to take care of its own personnel and stragglers from the different commands.
One team will cover VU-10 and NAS from 7:45-9:10; NAS galley from 9:15-9:30 and Leeward Point from 10:00 to 11:30.
The other team will take charge of YW from 7:15-7:25; Marines from 7:30-7:45; Post Office and Registered Publications from 7:508:00; Naval Station from 8:108:55; Dental Clinic from 9:00-9:05;
Print Shop from 9:10-915; NavSta Drydock from 9:20-9:40; NavSta Ad Bldg. from 9:45-10:15 and Hospital from 10:20-11:15.
The third team, according to the Disbursing Office, will stay at the Naval Supply Depot. This team, it was reported, will take care of the depot's early pay line which commences at 7:00 and closes at 8:00. Ordnance; Ships' Repair and Electronics shops will be paid at the depot from 9:30 to 10:00.
Stragglers from all commands, under the new schedule, will be paid at the Naval Supply Depot from 1300 to 1330 of the same day.


Chilean Schooner Stops At Gtmo On World Wide Training Cruise


INDIAN Photo
The Chilean schooner "Esmeralda", reputed to be one of the largest and most beautiful schooners in the world, docked at Gtmo's Pier Baker Wednesday morning, April 11.
On a good will visit as part of her second instruction cruise program, the Esmeralda complement enjoyed two days of Gtmo's unfailing Naval hospitality! The ship left Friday evening, April 13.
The schooner is the sixth ship of the Chilean Navy that has earned the Esmeralda name. She was reportedly built with the object of training crews and midshipmen of the Chilean Navy.
The period in which the glorious name of Esmeralda came into being dates back to the years of 1818 through 1820, when the National Navy of Chile was first organized. The official birth of the Chilean Navy, it was disclosed, was marked by the completion of its first ship that took the name of Esmeralda.
This present Esmeralda was built and completed in the shipyards of Cadiz, Spain on June 15, 1954. It has a rigging of four-masted brig, with a displacement of 3,500 tons. The ship is of steel hull construction, 108 meters in length, a beam of 13 meters and a horse power diesel of 1,500.
The schooner is commanded by CAPT Jorge Swett. Second in command of the vessel is CAPT Horacio Bobillier. The ship has a total complement of 18 officers and 56 men.


Local Art Show


Begins April 30

Guantanamo Bay's first local
Art Show will begin Monday, April 30, at the Naval Station Library at 8:00 p.m.
RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase and CAPT W. R. Caruthers, will open the show. It will consist of some 35 paintings executed here on the Base by Navy and civilian personnel and their dependents.
All Base residents are invited to the show. The paintings will be on display throughout the week of April 30 to May 6, during regular Library hours.
The show will have two major divisions, still life and landscapes. Some of the paintings will be availI


Fi re . . .
(Continued from Page One)
men standing fire watches in the area and Base Police made an inspection of the area every half hour.
Bay Hill galley supplied the fire fighters with sandwiches and cold drinks during the afternoon.
Last year at about this same time there was another such grass fire in the golf course area. It burned approximately the same area-20 acres.

able for purchase. A description of each painting and the price will be given on the information sheets which the Studio Committee will prepare for visitors.
Artists submitting paintings are instructed to have them framed and wired for hanging. All paintings are due at the Studio not later than April 24.


Base School Girls

Take Up Bowling

The bowling alleys at the Fleet Recreation Center have been mighty busy during the past four weeks!
Girls, girls and nothing but girls under the tutelage of Mrs. A. Tillman, Physical Education Director f r girls of the local school, have been plundering and pillaging the center's shiny lanes. No destruction however was reported. Their intention is to learn the game!
"Bowling," says Mrs. Tillman, "is one of the nine sports listed under the physical education program of the school." "The object of the program," explains Mrs. Tillman, "is not only to bring about skill but it also creates an interest or incentive among the girls to do such other things having to do with character development."
One more week to go, the girls' bowling practice classes will come to an end. Then a bowling intramural among them on their own free time will follow. "This bowling intramural," says Mrs. Tillman, "will be one among the sports yardsticks to be employed in determining who, among the girls, has shown brilliant performance on all the sports combined under the individual point system."
An Athletic Letter award will be given by the Girls' Athletic Association to the winner during the school's field day festivities to be held on the second to the last day of the school's academic year.


Ladies Golf Shots
Last Wednesday the lady golfers played for low net and low putts. Results were as follows: First and Second Flight First Low Net-Bea Kohr Second Low Net-Lavaria Butler Third Low Net-Evelyn Leach Low Putts-Tie--Edie Ware Mary Goolsby
Third FlightFirst Low Net-Kay Barton Second Low Net--Bucky Pierce Low Putts-Lucy Upp The Goat Tournament continues for 1st and 2nd flight. Officially, it was over Friday, April 13. Due to some last minute challenges there is a three way tie for second place which must be played off to determine the winner. Third flight finished on schedule with no ties. Millie Kuba finished in 1st place and Margaret Wall in 2nd place. Full report of all winners will appear next week.


Notice

The Fleet Reserve Association will hold a special meeting Tuesday night, April 24, at the Community Auditorium at 8:00 p.m. for the nominations of all branch officers. All members are urged to attend.


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.Page Four


THE INDIAN


M


Dance Classes To Put NSD Supply Line


On Revue Mon. Night

The dancing classes, under the direction of. Mrs. W.D.F. Stagner, will present a dance revue Monday, April 23 and Tuesday, April 24, at 7:30 p.m., in the Community Auditorium, Marina Point.
Monday night's presentation will be for parents of the pupils plus as many guests as can be seated in the auditorium. Tuesday night will be open to the general public.
The revue will consist of a ballet, "In An Old Fashion Garden," and a group of novelty and tap numbers.
Children taking part are ages four through 14. No admission will be charged.


MARINE MUSINGS
Last Friday was record day for 57 Marines from Barracks. Private Roof was high shooter of the detail with an expert score. He was the only expert rifle shot. Nine other Marines fired a sharpshooter score. This wasn't the best detail we've ever put in the field but it was satisfactory.
Sunday evening Sgt. Tyrone and Cpl. Griffin flew back to the Big' Island. Both Marines will report to Camp Lejeune for the pistol and rifle matches and then assignments for their next duty station. The Barracks lost two good Marines but we wish them luck in their match firing.
On March 20 we lost 16 more Marines. They boarded ship for the big ride Stateside. Most of the troops are reporting to 2nd MarDiv. Camp Lejeune. We are always sorry to see these Marines leave but we watch them go with some degree of envy.

The baseball team needs more grandstand support so, Marines, lets get with it. Get out there and give the players some support. We're world-wide famous for our Esprit de Corps so let's show some.

What is Esprit de Corps? There have been articles, essays and books written,: trying to put the true meaning of Esprit de Corps down in black and white in an effort to teach it and instill it in units of men-usually with little or no success.
But the Marines have it. It's pride in our outfit and in the Marine Corps. Esprit de Corps is the secret force that keeps Marines going in the impossible situation and always succeeding. It's the force that makes Marines start swinging at any slurring remark about our Corps. Marines have esprit de corps, have always had it and will always have it as long as we know we are the best and will always be the best.


The E. M. Garretts were a happy family last Monday night when Mrs. Garrett, with their three children, arrived by Flaw from Greencove Springs, Florida. Seems it can be pretty lonely in Cuba or the States when the better half is away.
Spring is rushing in and with it, the baseball season, which is now getting underway. Under the management of CPO Tony Maniscalco, the newly consolidated Naval Base Team, consisting of men from FTG, Naval Station, the Hospital, Dental Clinic and NSD, played their first game of the season Wednesday night, 18 April, against the Naval Air Station. Naval Supply gave two men to the team, Bary E. Wakeman, SN and Bob Eeels EK3. Gary will be catching for the team and Bob will be playing the outfield. We'll be cheering for you and a lucky season, boys!
More happy news in the family department this past week, when Axel Heimer's wife Delia presented him with a seven and a half pound girl. The baby, who has been named Cora Lynn, was born April 13th at the Guantanamo City Clinic, and is the second child of the Heimers.
Disbursing Clerk 2nd Class Melvin C. Duncan reported in this week from the destroyer USS RICH, where he served approximately sixteen months. Being a married man with a lovely 3 year old daughter, he's now awaiting their arrival from their home in Denver, Colorado. Welcome from all of us, Melvin.

The personnel office has received word of the promotion of Lee P. Lusk of the Boat Crew from FN to EM3. The letter was received from the USS LEYTE, Lusk's former duty station.



Teenage Roundup
First off we want to welcome two new arrivals - Nancy and Doris Lewis -who came to Gtmo from Norfolk, Va. They came on the JOHNSON last Friday. Nancy is a junior and Doris is a sophomore. Everyone wishes them happiness during their stay on the Base.
Pearls of Wisdom
Sharon, have you found your tooth yet? ... Ronnie got left out Sat. afternoon! . . . Ruben wearing dark glasses . . . the crowds and crowds of people at the Teenage club ... The roof with the hole in the middle, real gone.
Don McQuarrie and his "boattowing service" . . . The chemistry class taking up scribbling; going to become geniuses . . . Have you heard Dee R. says I'm too


F T G Bulletin
CWO and Mrs. Henry C. Leimas are the proud parents of a baby girl, Lyndee Marie, born 14 April is their first child. Congratulation to both. The father was taking 5 to 1 odds on a boy. Imagine having to pay for a girl.
Floyd R. Rittenhouse, SOC, and William L. Dennis, Jr., EN3, reported on board. Rittenhouse was assigned to the A/S department is married and has three children. He reported from Key West, Fla. and has served on the U.S.S. MARTS (DE-174) and U.S.S. BACHE (DDE-470). The Chief is from Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. Dennis was assigned to the Engineering department. He is originally from Gaston, South Carolina, is married and has two children. Dennis repotred from U.S.S. LAKE CHAMPLAIN (CVA-39).

FTG lost their three Chief Hospital corpsmen recently to the Base hospital as part of a personnel cut recently levied by BuPers. Chiefs Martin, Curry, and Trimble were transferred last Friday. FTG will miss Martin's trusty pitching arm when the softball season rolls around. Let's hope, at least, that he doesn't pitch against us.

Congratulations are in order for the below listed FTG personnel who were advanced in rating last week.


Name
Pierce, R. A. Acevedo, J. A. Spicer, R. L. Lee, H. C., Jr. Holt, H. P. Marris, J. P. Murabito, A. C. Zukas, J. R. Johnson, P.D.


From YN3 SN SN SN RMSN RMSN RMSN RMSN ET3


To
YN2 MN3 PNA3 RD3 RM3 RM3 RM3 RM3 ET2


lazy to dream, how about that! ... Speaking of dreams, Anita and Bobbie Q. are the original "horror dreamers".


The Medic
by 3. F. Bertone & R. J. McNight
Newborn News
Since the Stork is on leave, no deliveries of new babies were made this week.
New Recruit
John P. Filiberti, HM3, reported in from Physical Therapy School, NMS, Bethesda, Md. Welcome aboard!
Promotions
Smiling faces, and also cigars being passed out were seen around the Hospital this past week, due to notice of the new advancements. Advanced to HM1, were the following men: C. R. Barrow, J. W. Caddy, W. L. Helton, C. E. Ryan. Advanced to HM2, were the following: J. F. Bertone, W. E. Behling, R. W. Gingell, W. J. Marsh, J.M. Shaw, T. E. Schmidt, F. Sparks, W. F. Wilson.
Advanced to HM3, were A. C. Ball, J. Doody, W. A. Dal, R. A. Frederick, B. C. Green, B. R McCormick, R. J. McKnight" L. J. Medford, J. C. McMillan, J. R. McCullough, J. H. Nunn, P. Ouzounan, G. F. Rogina, G. J. Wozniak.
The Medic's Reviews
It seems that "KING" was placed on the "Fleet Marine" draft. News has come up that "P.R.H." is going to be a "June Bride". P.R. Haberstroh, is it true you got skunked in ping pong, and by whom ? I see Barrow that your sad story didn't work. It seems that the "Baldheaded" delegate from Arkansas is,-leaving shortly. Who's the fisherman, who always goes fishing, but never catches anything? Could it be P.R.H.?



What's Doin' Stateside
The farmer puts in the longest work week while the laborer toils the shortest, according to a recent report by the Census Bureau.... The bureau said that farmers and farm managers were reported working an average of 57.2 hours a week .... Average work weeks among other people ranged from 30 to 45 hours .... The report also indicated that a long-term trend toward a shorter work week had influenced all major occupations.
Surveys by the Agriculture Dept. showed 53 per cent of American women smoke cigarettes daily. The department also found a connection b6tween income and rate of smoking. Cigarette smoking an:cng males was 39 per cent in the lowest income bracketbelow $1,000 a year-and 55 to 60 per cent among groups earning more than $2,000 annually. The age group where cigarette smoking is highest, the reports said, was between 25 and 44. The department predicted cigarette output would exceed last year's 412.5 billion.


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Saturday, 21 April 1956







Saturday, 21 April 1956


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THE INDIAN


Very few persons today question the United States policy of maintaining strong armed forces. Therefore any comment on why the United States needs a navy really brings forth a question: "have modern scientific advances, and tactics utilized by other branches of our armed forces, made the navy obsolescent?" Unfortunately, there are people, even in our own navy, who believe this is true.
By conscientiously asking ourselves a few questions, stating a" few facts, and attempting to analyze these facts, we can determine if this belief is justified.
Question: Can we win a. war
by air power alone?
Fact: Germany was completely
devastated by bombing during the last war. Although this
undoubtedly affected their ca- W. A. Houston, SOC
pacity to wage war, it took
a land army finally to con- First Place Winner
quer this determined enemy. It took the United States Navy to place the United States Army in a position where this could be
'accomplished.
Question: Does our greatest potential enemy believe that sea power
is obsolescent?
]Fact: Soviet Russia, since World War II, has built a navy second in
size only to our own. They have built a huge submarine force, far larger than Germany had at the beginning of World War II.
Question: Can Atomic Bombs, or Ballistics Missiles alone win any
future war?
Fact: It is possible that Atomic Bombs might not be used in any future
war for fear of retaliation. In any event, land armies would have to be moved in after any bombing to insure complete victory. Any ballistics missile we have available at the present time would probably have to be delivered by a naval vessel, because of the comparatively short range of present weapons. In addition, a movirg launching site would be much more difficult to locate than a permanent land based installation.
Final Analysis: Wars,. in the future, as in the past, will have to be won by land armies, utilizing modern weapons to soften up the enemy. Our potential enemy must realize that if she has any hope of a permanent victory in any future war she must prevent us from landing troops and equipment on her shores. In order to accomplish this, she must first gain control of the seas. This is why Russia has built the world's largest submarine fleet.
The only thing that will insure that we will be able to place ortroops on our enemy's shores, or prevent their forces from landing on ours, is a powerful Navy.
All through history the Lnited States Navy has protected our shores from invasion and defended our rights in foreign ports. Our Navy has stood as a symbol of our strength wherever its ships may be.
With the coming of the airplane the Navy has lost its importance in the eyes of many. It has never ocurred to these people that in World War II had it not been for the Navy the planes never would have reached Japan, or Doolittle's raid would not have been possible if a Navy Carrier had not gotten his planes within range. It was Navy guns that softened the beach at Guadalcanal for Marine landings, and it was Navy guns that held it.
In case of Atomic war or sneak W. J. Koraska attack upon the United States by Russia before heavy bombers could Winning Dependent get there, Navy missile carriers like BOSTON could sneak in from Japan fire their missiles and clear out, also Navy Carriers could launch fighters as escorts to the heavy bombers.
Why The United States Needs A Navy, can be answered without all the preceeding, the answer is simple: To Protect and Defend our country and to take offense if need be.


'Why The U S Needs A Navy';


Contest Winning Essays Printed
Since World War II the TInited States has become leader, mainstay, and crutch of all the remaining free countries. in the world. .. The United States has mutual assistance pacts with countries as remotely located from us as Formosa, Japan, Germany, England, France, Thailand, Burma, Korea, and many others. We are protectors to Japan, the Phillipines, to Cuba, and to Western Germany to mention just a few. An overt act of aggression against any of these countries would inevitably push us into war.
For the United States successfully to prosecute a war in Europe or Asia our Navy would be needed to move troops into combat areas. The sea lanes would have to be kept open by force so that these troops could be safely moved. R. L. Heitzinger, CT1 Without a strong navy an enemy could keep us from moving the Second Place Winner necessary forces to prosecute their aggression.
Our Navy is also necessary to prevent enemy forces from obtaining a foothold in the United States. Atomic bomb or no, before any country can seize another they must be able to neutralize and overcome the forces and government of the interior. In short: they must occupy. To prevent enemy forces from ever landing on U. S. soil, our Navy-a strong navy-would be sorely needed.
Without our Navy, how could we have stemmed the tide of aggression in Korea? What power of persuasion could we continue to use in the Formosa Straits to convince the Communist thugs we mean business? What power, other than a strong, mobile, potent striking force-which indeed is what our Navy is?
Defensively and offensively, to protect and to punish, to bargain and to deter; our Navy-a strong navy-is needed today perhaps more than at any other time in the history of our United States!

Historically, the United States Y Navy has been our "First Line of Defense" against potential enemies. There is no reason this is not true today.
An adequate national defense program demands a modern navy. Atomic-powered submarines, Forrestal-type aircraft carriers, and our vast guided missile program are evidence that the U.S. Navy is vigorously attaining a state of preparedness vital to averting or winning World War III. The Korean War proved that today's navy is not "out-doted." Carrier air strikes and incessant X shore bombardment wrought devastation upon 'the enemy. Who would argue that the 7th Fleet's role in the Formosan Straits doesn't provide the biggest deterR. D. Lackie PNA3 rent against Red China in the Far East?
Third Place Winner In a possible global war, a powerful, mobile navy could launch immediate retaliation upon the aggressor. Our power to strike back is probably the major cause for peace of the world today.
A third reason for needing a navy is for protection of the gigantic movement of men and materials necessary for the execution of modern war. Russia's hundreds of submarines demand a strong U.S. Navy for the safety of these convoys.
No, the U.S. Navy is not an antique of former wars, but a decisive weapon in America's arsenal. We've never needed a navy more than we need one today!


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Page Five







Page Six


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Trading Post Sells Used-Not-Abused Items, Profits Spent On Community


INDIAN Photo
Mrs. W. R. Caruthers, Trading Post chairman, on the left, and Mrs. 0. B. Murphy, Assistant Trading Post chairman, discuss some of the problems of the Trading Post. Among the matters brought about was the problem of filling the critical need for sewing machines.
by Ely U. Orias
An activity on the Base that is probably unheard of by the many residents of Guantanamo Bay but which is doing a public humanitarian service, is the Base Trading Post.
Hardly seen from Sherman Avenue due to the colonnade of palm tress that surround it, the Trading Post is located between the Naval Station library and the Sports Shop.


Chartered in February, 1953, as a Navy Relief Thrift Shop, it later became a local organization and consequently, was named as the Gtmo Trading Post.
Headed by Mrs. W. R. Caruthers, wife of the Naval Station's commanding officer, the Trading Post has an executive committee composed of service wives from the various component commands of ComNavBase. Each command is represented by two wives in the Post's executive committee. Chairman of the committee is Mrs. W. G. Cooper, wife of the Base Commander.
From the time the store was converted into a local entity, the Trading Post has functioned chiefly on the sale of "used-but-notabused" necessities in life and/or household materials such as clothing, small electrical appliances, toys and various notions which are either donated to the Post or brought by individuals for sale on commission.
Has Rental Service
Aside from the sale service that the Trading Post offers to the public, the organization also boasts of its rental service as a subsidiary function. Household equipment available for rent at the Trading Post are cribs, playpens, high kiddie chairs, sewing machines, ironing boards, irons and vacuum


cleaners.
The Trading Post's hours of operation are from 9:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Monday through Friday. Mrs. Caruthers assuredly said that the Post has always been open to everyone residing on the Base, including Cuban employees.
"Profits from the Trading Post," declares Mrs. Caruthers, "are spent for the upliftment of the community." Reciting the many contributions made by the Trading Post, Mrs. Caruthers started with the $300 worth of slides that are now being "used and enjoyed" by the school children at the Villamar school playground. She also mentioned the $80 TP donation to the school ban6 uniform fund; $900. for the purchase of two pianos to be given to the church and the school.
Donated Community Clock
"And, do you see the $600.00 community clock erected in front of the Drive Inn restaurant?," interposed Mrs. Caruthers. "As you cruise along Sherman Avenue, especially during the night," says Mrs. Caruthers, "the illumined clock will not only tell you of the correct time but it will also give a message as being a Trading Post donation."
This group of hardworking and civic-minded wives are never out of work. When an MSTS ship


GTMO SPORTING CHIPS

by C.C. Drumright
With pleasure we introduce' G. A. Babcock, DC1, who tooled that little 1.680 inch ball into a 4.250 inch hole from a distance of 130 yds, with one, repeat one. stroke. This event came to pass on our local links at approximately 1020 April 14, 1956. The hole-No. 2, The club usedA number 6 iron. Witnesses were R. Newman, RMI, and W. A. Salisbury, AM1. It is believed by the observers from the groans and clangs issued from the depths of Ole No. 2 and the position of the ball in the cup, that the ball entered the hole on the fly. A hearty well done to you, Mr. Babcock, but go easy on the flagsticks.
Our Library Arts Department. . . . A players ball strikes an opponents ball in match play-No Penalty. The displaced ball shall be placed as near as possible fts original position before subsequent strokes are made. Note: in the event an opponent's ball knocks a player's ball into the cup, tne player is considered to have holed out on his last shot. In stroke play a player's ball is hit by. an opponent's ball, when both balls lie xvthin 20 yds., of the hole, neither ball in a hazard, a 2 stroke penalty shall be incurred by the person striking the opponent's ball, his ball being played as it lies and the moved ball being immediately replaced at its original position. Note: When the ball being played comes to rest in the exact position of the displaced ball, the player of the displaced tall shall have his opponent play his shot first, then replace the displaced ball.
Rimming the Cups around the 19th. . . Tis said Capt. Kohr's putting technique is the greatest thing since the wheel. Leaders in our red hot ringer tournament after the initial sight settings are: 1st-Sea Dog Bland, 2nd CDR Rothenberg (persistence showing up) and a two way tie for third between El Ropo Goolsby and mighty mouse Delgado. There remains four weeks for anyone desiring to enter this tournament, full handicaps are being used and the tax is a pittance.
The word is around that all present would appreciate it if people, who ride scooters or wear wings of navy gold would please settle all golf debts at time incurred.
It's a fact that the sale of MT golf balls is way up-we wonder why? ? ? ? ? We have been informed a certain first T artist one day last week-end birdied #8, #9, #10 and #11-then reveille CAPT Murphy defeats laughing boy Wilson in the FTG ladder play-Wilson claims default, family assistance. Best wishes to a new player, CAPT Holley, in learning to hit them far and straight.
An invoice has just been received in our S.S. dept. from NoAqua Mesa, Arabia for 26 Tons of sand that is to be used for trapping No. 8 green, but until all facts and figures are in and checked, you may continue to T up on any rock within two clubs-just don't hit it fat boy, don't hit it fat. Not Original. . . . Definition of a Handicap-A Plea, very petiful in tone, most generally heard around the number one teeing ground.



Gtmo Rifle and Pistol Club Cops

Team Honors At Recent Base Match

At the Caribbean Area Rifle and Pistol match on the Base last Saturday and Sunday, April 14-15, the Guantanamo Bay Rifle and Pistol club won three out of four team matches over representatives from the local Marinc Barracks, and NavSta Coco Solo, Canal Zone.


The local rifle and pistol team entry defeated the marines in the small bore team match, shattered the Coco Solo team in the .22 cal pistol match and again rolled back the marines in the .45 cal pistol match. The marines however garnered the .30 cal team match pennant over the club shooters.
Individual honors went to MSgt

comes along our shores, they swing into high gear to assume babysitting jobs so the mothers can either rest or go for a sight-seeing jaunt on the Base. At this time, they are known as the Trading Post Transport Volunteers.


Zemaitis for winning the .30 cal match, LCDR Minard for winning the small bore match and Chief Schoonderwoerd who upset the experts by defeating LCDR Minard who was runner up in the Pistol Grand Aggregate match.
The day was complete for the Schoonderwoerds when Mrs. Schonderwoerd copped both the ladies' events in the pistol and rifle matches.
MSgt Zemaitis won the Grand Aggregate for rifle with LCDR Minard nipping at his heels for a close second.
The day of the pistol matches was quite windy with the result that no record breaking scores were fired.


THE INDIAN


m
Saturda. 21 Auril 1956












RADM Cooper Tosses First Ball To Open The Fish Tale(s)
by P. J. Aldridge


'56 Gtmo Baseball Season; Marines Win


by Joe Duffy
RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase, threw out the first ball on Monday night and the 1956 Naval Base intercommand baseball league was underway. Following the short ceremonies, the Marines under the managership of Sergeant Mike Magas, took the field to oppose the Naval Air Station Flyers, skippered by LTJG Arnie McCalmont.
The Marines who, finished third last season in a six-team league, figure to be strong contenders for the title this year, but will meet with stiff opposition from the other contenders from VU-10, Naval Base Comp, and NAS. MCB-1 is working into the schedule for the first two weeks of the season, but since they are due to leave this area, their games will not figure into the standings.
Chief A.J. Jackson of the Compound, has a good Seabee club that should improve with competition, especially on the strength of the pitching they have shown so far. VU-10 is managed by LTJG Charlie King, who guided the Mallards to last year's tournament championship, and took the All-Gtmo team to the Southeastern AllNavy finals in Pensacola last year. The newly formed Naval Base club is managed by Chief Maniscalco, who last year led the Naval Station softball club to a successful campaign.
The Scorebook

Marines 7, NAS 6
The Marines started the scoring in the third inning when Duncan, and Patton singled then scored on Dowd's double. Hunter then singled across Dowd, and advanced on a safe bunt by Castellow.
A wild peg by the catcher scored Hunter and advanced Castellow to second from where he scored on Bland's base knock to complete the merry - go - round with the Leathernecks ahead 5-0. The Marines added another in the fourth inning when Patton opened with a single, his second of three, and scored when Dowd and Kavolic followed suit.
That was all for the Flyer pitcher Gustafson, as McCalmont relieved to strike out Young and end the inning. The Flyers notched their first marker in the sixth when Pearson singled, advanced on an infield out and scored on a fielding error.
Kavolic scored the Marine's final run from second. Hunter punched out a double to send the Leathernecks into a 7-1 lead. Waldrop opened the Flyer's ninth inning with a walk to start the five-run uprising featured by McCalmont's


double, singles by Williams and Pearson and a second walk to Rhodes woven around three Leatherneck errors, but the rally fell one short and the Marines took the inaugural win by the 7-6 score. NAS 000 001 005-6 7 1 MARINES 005 100 01x-7 11 5
Batteries:
Gustafson, McCalmont and Tanzi; Patton and Duncan.
VU-10 8, MCB-1 0
VU-10 broke the game wide open in the fourth when the Bee's hurler, Civitelli, who had been hit with a pitch in the previous inning while at bat, lost his effectiveness and had to withdraw after Morris singled and Postal walked. Cigainero relieved on the mound only to bear the'blunt of the attack as the Seabee's infield defense collapsed.
Six runs crossed the plate before Cigainero threw a third strike pass Colombani to end the inning. In the eight inning Leroy Smith drove a pitch over the left field fence to score Postal ahead of him for the Mallard's final runs and the
-eason'' first home run.
The Mallard's Montgomery duplicated the feat by retiring the side on strikes in the ninth after Guinn opened with a pinch-hit single. The triple whiff act gave Cigainero a total of 12 and Montgomeiy 15, while Civitelli set down five as the batters were stirring up a breeze with their bats.
The Mallard pitcher hurled hitless balls for 6-1/3 innings before Banjoff punched a single off the bat handle between first and second for the Bee's first hit, but any semblence of a threat died as McCormack hit into a double play. to end the inning. VU-10 000 600 020-8 5 2 MCB-1 000 000 000-0 2 3
Batteries: Montgomery and M. Smith; Civitelli, Cigainero and Stutzman.
NavBase 9, NAS 8
Successive singles by McCaffrey, Bailey and Eells in the ninth inning gave the newly formed Naval Base club a 9-8 win over the winless Flyers. The Indians collected 13 hits and were helped by 7 Flyers, miscues, as NAS manager McCalmont shuffled his defense in vain effort to provide a stopgap.
Bob Eeels opened the Indians attack with a lead-off triple in the first frame to score the first of three runs, but the Flyers came back in their half of the inning to push across four runs and drive Weingartner, the Indians, starter,


from the mound.
The NAS defense sieve was responsible for two Indian runs in both the third and fourth and a singleton in the sixth for a 8-4 lead. The Flyers tied it up in the eighth inning with a tying marker after having pushed across three in the seventh, but Naval Base took the win with their final rally good for one and the decision. Naval Base 302 201 001-9 13 3 NAS 400 000 310-8 5 7
Batteries: Weingarten, Coleman, Bailey and Ianiero, Wakeman.
McCalmont and Tanzi, Ransom.
Marines 9, VU-10 5
Joe Bland's big bat propelled the Marines to their second win of the campaign Thursday night as they came from behind in the last inning to push across seven runs and sew up the victory. Bland opened the inning with a slashing double to start the winning rally. Before the inning was over he made a second appearance at the plate with the bases full, and rapped a country-mile triple to drive in the final three runs of the inning.
Charlie King started on the mound for the Mallards, but gave way to Streigle in the ninth, a victim of costly errors rather than the base hit. Dowd's two-hit hurling in the final three innings earned him the pitching win in relief of starter Fortney. Marines 020 000 007-9 4 3 VU-10 100 030 100-5 10 2
Batteries: Fortney, Dowd and Duncan; King, Streigle and M. Smith.
The Schedule
Sunday VU-10 vs NAS Monday MCB-1 vs Marines Tuesday VU-10 vs NavBase Wednesday NAS vs MCB-1 Thursday NavBase vs Marines
The Spotlight
Although the Naval Base team is wearing last year's Naval Station uniforms, recognition is due to the other commands that are represented in the league by-contributing players to make up the composite club. In addition to Naval Station, the roster is made up of personnel from Supply Depot, Fleet Training Group, Naval Hospital and Dental Corps.
Anyone for Tennis??? John Nici, SKC, of Leeward Point would like to know how many men are interested in organizing a tennis tournament. John says the facilities are excellent on the Base and more personnel should take advantage of the opportunity to get organized in a real tennis goaround.


All right, so I told a big fat fib! At least that's what the fish are trying to make it look like. At any rate, there are now literally schools of fish in the Bay. Snapper up to eight pounds are being taken at the Coast Guard Pier, using mullet or fresh herring as bait.
If you have the initiative, you can get a pass from the Base Police and go back into the Granadillo area after dark. There, snapper up to and including twenty pounds are being taken, same bait as mentioned before. While they are never the tremendous fish that all fisherman like to land, and brag about, the croaker are alot of fun on a light rig and when biting, keep you as busy as the proverbial cat.
Strings of croaker, thirty or more, are being brought in nightly by those who don't care for too much sun or haven't the time during the day.
All of your fresh herring, by the way, come from the efforts of Ben Pavila, who nightly plays the ancient art of the throw net. You try to "fan out" a 16' diameter net so that it settles evenly over a school of very elusive herring. And speaking of this Pavila fella, he and Special Services got together and now he has his boat all rigged for deep sea fishing.
Yep, at last you have a way to get out there. And the amberjack are running like Speedy Gonzales! All you need is to call 9545 for reservations. They will tell you when to bring your cold fried chicken, potato salad, beer, and portable radio (for those ballgame men). Oh yes, last but not least, bring $3.50 for each person going. They can take six, day or nite.
The subject being boats; the Sea Gull type sailboats have been converted to almost luxury fishing boats, 16' long, wide comfortable beam, and plenty of room, even for six people. Now you can take the wife and kiddies anywhere in the bay with one of these boats and a little common sense. $4.00 for eight hours of comfortable fishing from a large boat, powered with brand new 15 horse Johnsons.
Have the charter boat all booked up for one night this week, in company with some of the more avid fisherman here on the base and I hope to have a lot of good news for all of you Issac Waltons next week. They tell me that the large yellowtail snappers and wahoo, not to mention amberjack and dolphin, are running around like so many flies outside. Last year a fellow brought in a black marlin, a supposed rarity in these waters, 80 libs. he was.


Page Seven


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 21 April,1956







SAturday, 21 April 1956


THE INDIAN


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Navy-DPPO-10ND-Gtmo.-3441


WGBY Television Program


Saturday, April 21 NavSta-Last Frontier-101 min. NAS-Lawless Street-97 min. Mar. Site-World In My Corner-101 min. Villa.-Houston Story-90 min. Lwd. Pt.-King Dinosaur-S9 min. MCB-1-I Died A Thousand Times121 min.
Sunday, April 22 NavSta-Country Girl-104 min. NAS-Last Frontier Mar. Site-At Gunpoint--5 min. Villa.-World In My Corner Lwd. Pt.-Houston Story MCB-1-King Dinosaur
Monday, April 23 NavSta-Bamboo Prison-96 min. NAS-Country Girl Mar. Site-Lawless Street Villa.--At Gunpoint Lwd. Pt.-World In My Corner MCB-1-Houston Story
Tuesday, April 24
NavSta-Bullet For Joey-93 min. NAS-Bamboo Prison Mar. Site-Last Frontier Villa.-Lawless Street Lwd. Pt:-At Gunpoint MCB-1-World In My Corner
Wednesday, April 25 NavSta-Detective--96S min. NAS-Bullet For Joey Mar. Site-Country Girl Villa.-Last Frontier Lwd. Pt.-Lawless Street MCB-I-At Gunpoint NavSta-Captain Lightfoot--104 min.
Thursday, April 26 NAS-Detective
Mar. Site-Bamboo Brison Villa.-Country Girl Lwd. Pt.-Last Frontier MCB-1-Lawless Street
Friday, April 27
NavSta-Smoke Signal-100 nin. NAS-Captain Lightfoot Mar. Site-Bullet For Joey Villa.-Bamboo Prison Lwd. Pt.-Country Girl MCB-l-Last Frontier



Book - Nook

An excellent "picture book" it "A PICTORIAL HISTORY OF AMERICAN PRESIDENTS," compiled by John and Alice Durant. The book is composed of 300 pages of easy-to-read text, hundreds of prints and pictures, and several famous political cartoons. This is another good way to study history as it was made by our presidents from Washington to Eisenhower.
The library has a new mystery by Agatha Christie---"HICKORY DICKORY DEATH," and also a new installment in the "Rivers of America" series-this time, "THE COLUMBIA."

Marguerite Higgins, the petite blonde reporter who won fame in Korea as a war correspondent, has been to Russia. "RED PLUSH AND BLACK BREAD" is the result of her fact-finding trip. Miss Higgins is still an experienced newspaperwoman and her journalistic talents have enabled her to pierce the glowing front which the Soviets are parading these days in order to get the -true picture of the conditions in Russia.


Saturday, April 21 4:00-Contest Carnival 4:00 Paul Winchell 5:00-Beat the Clock 5:30- Victory At Sea 6:00 Disneyland 7:00-Eddie Cantor 7:30 This Is Your Life 8:00 Colgate Variety 9:00-George Gobel 9:30-Appointment With Adventure
Sunday, April 22 4:00 Roy Rogers 4:30-Jamie 5:00-Mama 5:30-Frontier of Faith 6:00--You Are There 6:30-Rcaders Digest 7:00-What's My Line 7:30-Hallmark Hall of Fame 8:00-Shower of Stars 9:00-Philco Playhouse
Monday, April 23 5:30-News Parade 5:45-Jane Froman 6:00-I & E Time 6:30-December Bride 7:00-I Love Lucy 7:30-Liberace 8:00-Studio One 9:00-Boxing
Tuesday, April 24 5:30-News Parade


Cinema


" Scoop


by D.D.H.
Well, the Navy's "Pony Express" didn't come ,through in time this week and we find ourselves faced with nothing but pictures that have been shown here before, with one exception.
Last Frontier (Col.; in color) Victor Mature, Anne Bancroft, Guy Madison and Robert Preston cowboys and Indians . . . dull . . this one is the above mentioned exception.
Country Girl (Para.), is a movie all should welcome back to the Base with the greatest enthusiasm. Bing Crosby, Bill Holden and Grace Kelly (who gives her oscar winning performance in this one), scar. The story of a has-been actor, turned drunk and his long suffering wife. One of '54's best and winner of at least two Oscars.
Bamboo Prison (Col.) . . . Rob-


5:45 Jo Stafford 6:00-Disneyland 7:00-Phil Silvers 7:30-Big Town 8:00-Red Skelton 8:30-Warner Presents 9:30-Four Star Playhouse
Wednesday, April 25 5:30-News Parade 5:45-Robert Q. Lewis 6:00-I & E Time 6:30-Pantomine Quiz 7:00 I Married Joan 7:30-Mr. & Mrs. North 8:00 Milton Berle 9:00-Kraft Theater
Thursday, April 26 5:00 News Parade 5:45 Coke Time 6:00 Prof. Father 6:30-Truth or Consequence 7:00-Daymon Runyon 7:30-Bob Cummings 8:00-You Bet Your Life 9:00-Climax
Friday, April 27 5:30-News Parade 5:45-Dinah Shore 6:00 I & E Time 6:30-Life of Riley 7:30-Playhouse of Stars 8:00-Meet Millie 8:30 -eader's Digest 9:00-Philco Playhouse
ert Francis, Diane Foster and Brian Keith . . . U.S. Intelligence in a Korean prison camp . . . fair.
Bullet For Joey (U.A.) . . . Edward G. Robinson, George Raft and Audrey Totter ... gangland revenge and kidnapping . . average gangster pic.
The Detective (Col.), stars the incomparable Alec Guinness. It is a comedy that deals with a priest's attempts to track down a master thief. The Guinness comedy is of the type that you never stop chuckling to yourself. This movie and "Country Girl" are two top rated movies and the only must sees of the week.
Captain Lightfoot (U.I., in color) . . . Rock Hudson and Barbara Rush . . . a usual type swashbuckelr . . . fair.
Smoke Signal (U.I., in color)
Dana Andrews and Piper Laurie . . . cowboys and Indians again.. fair.


TV Tele Talk
Saturday night's Disneyland will please everyone from nine to ninety. It's the Donald Duck Story, .from the first stroke -of the pen, his rise to stardom and his present solid status in the hearts of the comic reading public. Colgate Variety Hour is also featured Saturday evening.

On Sunday night, a good evening of variety, with everything from Roy Rogers to What's My Line. A highlight of the evening is Philco Playhouse's "GhostWriter." It is the story of a person who does another's writing for him, and that person in turn steals all glory from the real writer.

Nina Foch stars in "Miss Turner's Decision" on ,Studio One Monday Night. It's the story of an unmarried woman and how her parents pawn her off. On the same bill Monday night, two lightweight sparers step into the St. Nick's Arena for a 10 round main event. Unbeaten Carlos Ortes, age 19 faces Ray Portilla, age 24. Ortes has fought 12 professional bouts while Portilla holds a 17-22 record.
Tuesday night the story of the "Vanishing Prairie" along with "Seal Island" make up a true life adventure on Disneyland. You'll see Warner Brothers Presents also on Tuesday. The story is "Cheyenne". It's one of the westerns seen on many of our movie screens. You will also see location shots of the movie "Rebel Without -A Cause". Another good play, "The Executioner", appears on Four Star Playhouse. Charles Boyer plays the part of a lonely man among his own people, and a murderer for love and honor.
The Kraft TV Theater presents a story entitled "Knight in a Business Suit" on Wednesday. The story revolves around wishes and chivalry of today verses chivalry of yesteryear.


A native of London is Miss Valerie French, a scene newcomer. She was seen for the first time in Columbia's "Jubal" with Glen Ford.




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COVERS GTMO LIKE THE SUNSHINE U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Volume VII, No. 16 Saturday, 21 April 1956 Grass Fire Burns 20 Acres In Cuzco Beach Magazine Area Monday A grass fire believed to have started from a carelessly handled cigarette charred an area of approximately 20 acres in the Cuzco Beach magazine area. The fire started in. the vicinity of the Marine guard house at the entrance to the magazine area and spread north and west. According to J. C. Pinckard, Base Fire Chief, the fire was reported to his department at 1143 and had been burning about two minutes before the call was received. The call was phoned in by A. L. Broughton who was working in the guard house area. Adm Cooper Presents Base Essay Checks To Winners, Chief Is First INDIAN Photo In RADM Cooper's office for the presentations of awards are the winners in the Base essay contest. Left to right: R. L. Heitzinger, CT1; R. D. Lakie, PNA 3; W. J. Koraska; W. A. Houston, SOC; RADM Cooper, and L. Koraska, FPC. All available men from the different commands on the Base were rushed to the area. The Provost Marshal says that all commands are to be congratulated for their spontaneous response in supplying men and aid. The closest the fire came to the magazines was 500 yards. The Fire Chief said that the magazines were luckily on the windward side of the fire. The fire department had a false alarm during the same time of the grass fire. A truck was dispatched to Victory Hill, but no fire. Approximately 350 fighters were at the scene of the fire along with three bulldozers and three fire trucks. By 1902 the fire was reported completely out. Throughout Monday night and Tuesday, the fire department had (Continued on Page Three) INDIAN Photo Uruguayan Seaplane Lands In Harbor A Uruguayan PBM-5 navy seaplane plowed into the waters of Guantanamo Bay harbor at 3:00 p.m., Saturday, April 14. Why the plane landed in Gtmo was not disclosed. The plane, whose former home base is NGP Corpus Christi, Texas, was reportedly given by the United States government to Uruguay under the Mutual Defense Pact entered into between the two countries. It left Gtmo Wednesday morning, April 18, for Montevideo, Uruguay. Piloting the seaplane was LCDR Sarmandi Araujo of the Uruguay Navy. Also aboard the plane were three Uruguayan naval officers and nine crewmen. Winners of the Base essay contest entitled "Why the United States Needs a Navy" were announced this week by RADM W. G. Cooper, Commander Naval Base and sponsor of the contest. The first place prize of a $50 check went to W. A. Houston, SOC, of Fleet Training Group. Other winners in the contest which ended April 7 were R. L. Hertzinger, CT1, of Radio Range, who took second place and won himself a $25 check; R. D. Lackie, PN3, of VU-10, took third place and a $10 check. W. J. Koraska, sophomore in the Base high school, walked off with the best dependent essay. Koraska is the son of L. Koraska, FPC. He was awarded a $25 check for his winning article. The contest was open to all Base enlisted personnel and their dependents. RADM Cooper told an INDIAN reporter that he planned on having another Base-wide contest in the future. Page five of this week's INDIAN has the winning essays-all four of them. Judges for the contest were CAPT G. L. Kohr, Commanding Officer Naval Air Station; CAPT W. B. Moore, Chief of Staff, Fleet Training Group; CDR G.E. Krouse, Base Legal Officer, and CDR W. G. Barton, Executive Officer, Naval Station. Santiago Archbishop Holds Confirmation On Sunday April 29 Archbishop Enrique Perez Serantes of Santiago de Cuba will make his annual official visit to the Base during the coming weekend. While here he will administer confirmation on approximately 15 children and a few adults. The sacrament will be administered immediately after the 9:00 a.m. Mass on Sunday, April 29. The Holy Name Society of the Base will sponsor a formal luncheon at the CPO Club in honor of the Archbishop. It will be held Saturday, April 28, at 12:30 p.m. The Archbishop, while on his annual tour of this section of Cuba has for some years made Guantanamo Bay an official stop. Fleet Reserve Assoc. To Sponsor Contest For Navy Wife Of '56 The navy-wide Fleet Reserve association is sponsoring a contest to select the wife of an enlisted man as an outstanding navy wife and to designate her as Mrs. U. S. Navy 1956. All commands have been authorized by the Secretary of the Navy to cooperate with the Fleet Reserve association to insure the success of the contest. Correspondence in regard to the contest should be addressed to Fleet Reserve association, Contest headquarters, Wilton Hotel, Long Beach, Calif.

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m Page Two Saturday. 21 April 1956 THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Editorial Staff LTJG D. G. LaCasse --------------------------------Officer-Advisor G. L. Henderson, JOC __------------------------------Editor J. C. Curren, JOSN -------------------------------Managing Editor E. U. Orias, JO3 ------------------------------------Feature Editor D. D. Hinton, JOSN ---------------------------------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Materials marked AFPS may be used by news media provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. The Chaplain's Corner WHEN SANITY IS CALLED MADNESS In the records of Seville Cathedral in Spain, dated July 8, 1401, are these words of its founder, "Let us build a church so great that those who come after us may think we are mad to have attempted it." To this day the structure stands as "That stone fabric of man's imagination.' Long before the year 1401, the Roman ruler Festus had cried out, "Paul, you are mad; your great learning is turning you mad." Later the great apostle confessed, "We are looked upon as fools for Christ's sake." A crazy man may consider everyone else insane. A person whose light is darkness looks upon true light as utter opaqueness. To individuals who live selfish, washed lives, it seems madness for a good man so to live as to get himself crucified as a public enemy. When with tenacity we hold wrong ideas, those who contradict us are considered unsound. In the New Testament, the world, the flesh, and the devil are denounced as enemies of the good life. Self-centeredness in pursuit of its own gain is recognized as standing over against God-centeredness an eager desire to do His holy will in needs of loving kindness. Little wonder that the challenge still resounds: "Be not conformed to this world." Let us today that God will grant to each of us grace, mercy and peace. Let us beseech His forgiveness for our lukewarmness in responding to His love, and for the feebleness of our efforts. God is a kind and loving God, let us today prove ourselves to Him. Charles C. Gaston Chaplain, USNR Sunday, 22 April 1956 CATIfOLIC MASSES Sunday, 7000-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri.-1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval.Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 1900 -2000, and daily before Mass PROTESTANT SERVICES Sunday: 0930-Divine Worship (MCB-1 Chapel) 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship( Naval Base Chapel) 1100-Divine Worship LLwd. Pt.) 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal JEWISH SERVICES Friday-1900-Naval Base Chapel CHURCH OF CHRIST 1000-Bible Study 1045-Worship Service CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday-1000-Naval Base Library LATTER DAY SAINTS Sunday-1100-Naval Station Library Chaplains at this activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CRC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CH, USN (Protestant) LTJG C. C. Gaston, CHC, USNR (Protestant) Calendar of Events Monday, April 23 O.E.S. Charter Meeting-Community Auditorium-7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 24 Fleet Reserve Assn.-Special MeetingNomination for Branch Officers8:00 p.m. Wednesday, April 25 Toastmasters' Club-Officers' Club6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 26 Felloweraft Club 1078-Community Auditorium-7:30 p.m. Notice A farewell party will be held for the departing members of the Navy Wives Club, on April 27 at 7:00 p.m. The occasion will be held at the Staff NCO Club. Reservations may be had by calling 9219 Admiral's Appreciation Letter RADM William G. Cooper, Commander Naval Base, advised that the months of January, February, and March of this year have been of historic significance to the Navy and to the Guantanamo Naval Base. The constant stream of important visitors has given the Navy a prominent place in the public eye throughout the United States. The individual efforts of each and every Navy man and civilian concerned in extending the hand of hospitality have contributed in no small way to the success of this massive public relations enterprise. During the month of March alone the Base has welcomed thirty-four separate groups of dignitaries, including the Secretary of the Navy, seventy-six members of the House and Senate, approximately one hundred representatives of the press, and a group of high ranking Cuban officials. This influx of guests, the greatest in the history of the Na, Base, has placed unprecedented demands upon those personnel called upon to assist. The BOQs have been jammed to capacity throughout the entire period. The Naval Air Station has been beseiged with traffic comparable t La Guardia Field. The Officers Club has smashed all previous attendance records and has handled capacity crowds continuously. The official sedan drivers have been dispatched incessantly at all hours throughout the day and night. The Public Works Transportation Pool has ably augmented the repeatedly heavy transportation demands. An interesting sidelight is the fact that LCDR G. R. Ferrell, Naval Station Ordnance Officer, advised that funds for the supply of powder for the saluting batteries had been grossly overexpended during the early phases of the VIP migrations. It seemed as though the batteries had hardly time to cool before the next VIP arrival. Special mention goes to L. G. Cates, BM1, and to his indefatigable crew of VIP drivers from the Bay Hill Master-at-Arms shack. These men have cheerfully and diplomatically performed a great service to the Base and to the Navy with a minimum of men and equipment. The Naval Base Band, under the leadership of R. 0. Van Black, MrTC, is now recuperating from a heavy schedule of honors, ceremonies, a .1 official functions. The Marine Barracks Honor Guard, commanded b A PT J. J. Swords and at other times by LT J. W. Mann and LT J. A. Dot i. as earned a "Well Done" for its frequent and peerless performances. No fire department has ever been more instantly responsive as the Flag Boat Crew under the able guidance of N. E. Olson, BMC. Olson himself has earned an enviable reputation as Guide extraordinary and will always be remembered by our important guests for his expeditious and thorough diplomatic services. CWO J. A. Hould of the Naval Air Station and the men of the NAS Boat Shed provided some excellent and rapid transportation when it was necessary to use the Crash Boats to facilitate some of the tight VIP schedules. Their response was a distinct credit to the Navy. The NAS Line Crew, headed by L. B. Dixon, AEC, set an excellent example of service by handling the vast quantity of VIP aircraft in addition to their regular aircraft duties. J. M. Mansapit, SDC, G. Delacruz, SD1, L. C. DeLeon, SD3, and S. Nedera, SD3, have been the busiest men on the base while providing unexcelled hospitality to the guests on behalf of the Base Commander. There have been distinct rumblings at the Guest House, BOQ 90, the headquarters for the majority of our distinguished guests. 0. T. Butler, SDC, has presided over the many comings and goings with the able assist. ance of TN's H. W. Brown, J. S. Terry, and R. Williams. There are many ethers who have distinguished themselves during this very active period. These men have been fully aware of the fact that they themselves are the Navy, and that no quantity of FORRESTALS or BOSTONS can reflect the personality of the 1956 Navy better than they can in their dealings with the public. Admiral Arleigh Burke, Chief of Naval Operations, expressed his appreciation for the services rendered during the visit of the members of Congress in a letter to the Base Commander dated 5 April 1956. The letter is quoted herein. From: Chief of Naval Operations To: Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Subj: Services rendered during Congressional visit; appreciation of 1. During the period 21-24 March 1956, the Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, was placed in charge of the overall arrangements for the visit of approximately 75 members of Congress to the Guantanamo Bay area during demonstrations aboard USS BOSTON and USS FORRESTAL. 2. These arrangements-which included housing of male member: afloat and female members ashore; a reception for members of Congrre by the Secretary of the Navy; various details of the demonstrations which were completed by shifts of personnel from ship to ship, and from ship to shore and return; and the unscheduled return trip via Havana by one-third of the Congressmen-called for careful planning and ingenuity in meeting unforseen emergencies. THE INDIAN Saturday, 21 April 1956

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e Saturday, 21 April 1956 Cinemascope Lyceum For Leeward Point A new lyceum is under construction over at Leeward Point. The lyceum, the NAS Special Services office said, has been located within the immediate vicinity of the EM barracks. A cinemascope screen, according to the NAS Special Services Officer, will be one of the special features of the new Leeward Point lyceum. It was also reported that the lyceum is expected to be completed in late June. The Naval Air Station Special Services office also announced that ten new TV sets have been received. The same source said that the sets are to be installed in the enlisted men's barracks and EM clubs of both the Naval Air Station and Leeward Point. The NAS Special Services office also revealed that the foundation and pillars for the new EM beer garden at Leeward Point have already been erected. The building, it was reported, will be completed prior to June 30, 1956. Payday Routes Are Changed Charges on the military payday schedule involving what commands or units are to be covered at a certain time on paydays have been released by the Disbursing Office. The changes will commence next payday. Three separate disbursing teams, it was revealed, will cover all the various commands, two teams to go out on the field and one team to stay at the Supply Depot to take care of its own personnel and stragglers from the different commands. One team will cover VU-10 and NAS from 7:45-9:10; NAS galley from 9:15-9:30 and Leeward Point from 10:00 to 11:30. The other team will take charge of YW from 7:15-7:25; Marines from 7:30-7:45; Post Office and Registered Publications from 7:508:00; Naval Station from 8:108:55; Dental Clinic from 9:00-9:05; Print Shop from 9:10-915; NavSta Drydock from 9:20-9:40; NavSta Ad Bldg. from 9:45-10:15 and Hospital from 10:20-11:15. The third team, according to the Disbursing Office, will stay at the Naval Supply Depot. This team, it was reported, will take care of the depot's early pay line which commences at 7:00 and closes at 8:00. Ordnance, Ships' Repair and Electronics shops will be paid at the depot from 9:30 to 10:00. Stragglers from all commands, under the new schedule, will be paid at the Naval Supply Depot from 1300 to 1330 of the same day. Chilean Schooner Stops At Gtno On World Wide Training Cruise (9 The Chilean schooner "Esmeralda", reputed to be one o and most beautiful schooners in the world, docked at Gtmo' Wednesday morning, April 11. On a good will visit as part of her second instruction crr the Esmeralda complement enjoyed two days of Gtmo's un hospitality! The ship left Friday evening, April 13. The schooner is the sixth ship of the Chilean Navy tha the Esmeralda name. She was reportedly built with t training crews and midshipmen of the Chilean Navy. The period in which the glorious name of Esmeralda can dates back to the years of 1818 through 1820, when the N of Chile was first organized. The official birth of the C it was disclosed, was marked by the completion of its fir took the name of Esmeralda. This present Esmeralda was built and completed in t of Cadiz, Spain on June 15, 1954. It has a rigging of brig, with a displacement of 3,500 tons. The ship is of st struction, 108 meters in length, a beam of 13 meters and a diesel of 1,500. The schooner is commanded by CAPT Jorge Swett. Sec mand of the vessel is CAPT Horacio Bobillier. The ship complement of 18 officers and 56 men. Local Art Show Begins April 30 Guantanamo Bay's first local Art Show will begin Monday, April 30, at the Naval Station Library at 8:00 p.m. RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase and CAPT W. R. Caruthers, will open the show. It will consist of some 35 paintings executed here on the Base by Navy and civilian personnel and their dependents. All Base residents are invited to the show. The paintings will be on display throughout the week of April 30 to May 6, during regular Library hours. The show will have two major divisions, still life and landscapes. Some of the paintings will be availFire (Continued from mnen standing fire we area and Base Police spection of the area hour. Bay Hill galley sup fighters with sandwic drinks during the after Last year at about time there was another fire in the golf cou burned approximatel area-20 acres. able for purchase. A of each painting and be given on the inform which the Studio Co prepare for visitors. Artists submitting instructed to have and wired for hangin ings are due at the later than April 24. Base School Girls Take Up Bowling The bowling alleys at the Fleet Recreation Center have been mighty busy during the past four weeks! girls and nothing but girls he tutelage of Mrs. A. Tillhysical Education Director is of the local school, have benpundering and pillaging the shiny lanes. No destrucwever was reported. Their n is to learn the game! hsg," says Mrs. Tilman, eof the nine sports ated he physical education prof the school." "The object of sgram, explains Mrs. Tillis not only to bring about s61bt it also creates an interest oricntive among the girls to do such other things having to do with character development." One more week to go, the girls' bowling practice classes will come to an end. Then a bowling intramural among them on their own INDGAN Photo free time will follow. "This bowling the largest intramural," says Mrs. Tillman, a Piet Bakes "will be one among the sports yardsticks to be employed in determining who, among the girls, ise program, has shown brilliant performance tailing Naval on all the sports combined under the individual point system." thas earned An Athletic Letter award will be ho object of given by the Girls' Athletic Association to the winner during the school's field day festivities to be into being held on the second to the last day national Navy of the school's academic year. hilean Navy, *st ship that Ladies Golf Shots oe shipyards Last Wednesday the lady golffour-masted ers played for low net and low eel hull conputts. Results were as follows: horse power First and Second FlightFirst Low Net-a Kohr ond in comSeom d Low Net-Loearia otler fr t Third Low Net-Eelyn Leach iaLow Putt-Tie-Edie Wore Mary Goolahy Third PlightFirot Low Net-Kay Sos-toe Second Low Net-Bochy Pierce Page One) Low Potts-Lucy Upp .tches in the The Goat Tournatment continues made an infor 1st and 2nd flight. Officially, every half it was over Friday, April 13. Due to sote last minute challenges pied the fire there is a three way tie for second has and cold place which lust be played off to rnoon. determine the winner. Third flight .t this same finished on schedule with no ties. pr such grass Millie Kuba finished in 1st place rse area. It and Margaret Wall in 2nd place. y the same Full report of all winners will appear next week. description the price will nation sheets mmittee will paintings are hem framed g. All paintStudio not Notice The Fleet Reserve Association will hold a special meeting Tuesday night, April 24, at the Community Auditorium at 8:00 p.m. for the nominations of all branch officers. All members are urged to attend. I' e S THE INDIAN S Page Three

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Page Four Dance Classes To Put NSD Supply Line F T G Bulletin The Medic On Revue Mon. Night The dancing classes, under the direction of Mrs. W.D.F. Stagner, will present a dance revue Monday, April 23 and Tuesday, April 24, at 7:30 p.m., in the Community Auditorium, Marina Point. Monday night's presentation will be for parents of the pupils plus as many guests as can be seated in the auditorium. Tuesday night will be open to the general public. The revue will consist of a ballet, "In An Old Fashion Garden," and a group of novelty and tap numbers. Children taking part are ages four through 14. No admission will be charged. MARINE MUSINGS Last Friday was record day for 57 Marines from Barracks. Private Roof was high shooter of the detail with an expert score. He was the only expert rifle shot. Nine other Marines fired a sharpshooter score. This wasn't the best detail we've ever put in the field but it was satisfactory. Sunday evening Sgt. Tyrone and Cpl. Griffin flew back to the Big Island. Both Marines will report to Camp Lejeune for the pistol and rifle matches and then assignments for their next duty station. The Barracks lost two good Marines but we wish them luck in their match firing. On March 20 we lost 16 more Marines. They boarded ship for the big ride Stateside. Most of the troops are reporting to 2nd MarDiv. Camp Lejeune. We are always sorry to see these Marines leave but we watch them go with some degree of envy. The baseball team needs more grandstand support so, Marines, lets get with it. Get out there and give the players some support. We're world-wide famous for our Esprit de Corps so let's show some. What is Esprit de Corps? There have been articles, essays and books written, trying to put the true meaning of Esprit de Corps down in black and white in an effort to teach it and instill it in units of men-usually with little or no success. But the Marines have it. It's pride in our outfit and in the Marine Corps. Esprit de Corps is the secret force that keeps Marines going in the impossible situation and always succeeding. It's the force that makes Marines start swinging at any slurring remark about our Corps. Marines have esprit de corps, have always had it and will always have it as long as we know we are the best and will always be the best. The E. M. Garretts were a happy family last Monday night when Mrs. Garrett, with their three children, arrived by Flaw from Greencove Springs, Florida. Seems it can be pretty lonely in Cuba or the States when the better half is away. Spring is rushing in and with it, the baseball season, which is now getting underway. Under the management of CPO Tony Maniscalco, the newly consolidated Naval Base Team, consisting of men from FTG, Naval Station, the Hospital, Dental Clinic and NSD, played their first game of the season Wednesday night, 18 April, against the Naval Air Station. Naval Supply gave two men to the team, Bary E. Wakeman, SN and Bob Eeels EK3. Gary will be catching for the team and Bob will be playing the outfield. We'll be cheering for you and a lucky season, boys! More happy news in the family department this past week, when Axel Heimer's wife Delia presented him with a seven and a half pound girl. The baby, who has been named Cora Lynn, was born April 13th at the Guantanamo City Clinic, and is the second child of the Heimers. Disbursing Clerk 2nd Class Melvin C. Duncan reported in this week from the destroyer USS RICH, where he served approximately sixteen months. Being a married man with a lovely 3 year old daughter, he's now awaiting their arrival from their home in Denver, Colorado. Welcome from all of us, Melvin. The personnel office has received word of the promotion of Lee P. Lusk of the Boat Crew from FN to EM3. The letter was received from the USS LEYTE, Lusk's former duty station. Teenage Roundup First off we want to welcome two new arrivals -Nancy and Doris Lewis -who came to Gtmo from Norfolk, Va. They came on the JOHNSON last Friday. Nancy is a junior and Doris is a sophomore. Everyone wishes them happiness during their stay on the Base. Pearls of Wisdom Sharon, have you found your tooth yet? ...Ronnie got left out Sat. afternoon! ...Ruben wearing dark glasses ...the crowds and crowds of people at the Teenage club ...The roof with the hole in the middle, real gone. Don McQuarrie and his "boattowing service" ...The chemistry class taking up scribbling; going to become geniuses ...Have you heard Dee R. says I'm too CWO and Mrs. Henry C. Leimas by J. F. Bertone & R. J. McNight are the proud parents of a baby girl, Lyndee Marie, born 14 April is their first child. Congratulation to both. The father was taking 5 to 1 odds on a boy. Imagine having to pay for a girl. Floyd R. Rittenhouse, SOC, and William L. Dennis, Jr., EN3, reported on board. Rittenhouse was assigned to the A/S department is married and has three children. He reported from Key West, Fla. and has served on the U.SS. MARTS (DE-174) and U.S.S. BACHE (DDE-470). The Chief is from Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. Dennis was assigned to the Engineering department. He is originally from Gaston, South Carolina, is married and has two children. Dennis repotred from U. S. S. LAKE CHAMPLAIN (CVA-39). FTG lost their three Chief Hospital corpsmen recently to the Base hospital as part of a personnel cut recently levied by BuPers. Chiefs Martin, Curry, and Trimble were transferred last Friday. FTG will miss Martin's trusty pitching arm when the softball season rolls around. Let's hope, at least, that he doesn't pitch against us. Congratulations are in order for the below listed FTG personnel who were advanced in rating last week. Name Pierce, R. A. Acevedo, J. A. Spicer, R. L. Lee, H. C., Jr. Holt, H. P. Marris, J. P. Murabito, A. C. Zukas, J. R. Johnson, P. D. From YN3 SN SN SN RMSN RMSN RMSN RMSN ET3 To YN2 MN3 PNA3 RD3 RM3 RM3 RM3 RM3 ET2 lazy to dream, how about that! .Speaking of dreams, Anita and Bobbie Q. are the original "horror dreamers". Newborn News Since the Stork is on leave, no deliveries of new babies were made this week. New Recruit John P. Filiberti, HM3, reported in from Physical Therapy School, NMS, Bethesda, Md. Welcome aboard! Promotions Smiling faces, and also cigars being passed out were seen around the Hospital this past week, due to notice of the new advancements. Advanced to HM1, were the following men: C. R. Barrow, J. W. Caddy, W. L. Helton, C. E. Ryan. Advanced to HM2, were the following: J. F. Bertone, W. E. Belling, R. W. Gingell, W. J. Marsh, J. M. Shaw, T. E. Schmidt, F. Sparks, W. F. Wilson. Advanced to HM3, were A. C. Ball, J. Doody, W. A. Dal, R. A. Frederick, B. C. Green, B. R McCormick, R. J. McKnight, L. J. Medford, J. C. McMillan, J. R. McCullough, J. H. Nunn, P. Ouzounan, G. F. Rogina, G. J. Wozniak. The Medic's Reviews It seems that "KING" was placed on the "Fleet Marine" draft. News has come up that "P.R.H." is going to be a "June Bride". P. R. Haberstroh, is it true you got skunked in ping pong, and by whom? I see Barrow that your sad story didn't work. It seems that the "Baldheaded" delegate from Arkansas is leaving shortly. Who's the fisherman, who always goes fishing, but never catches anything? Could it be P.R.H.? What's Doin' Stateside The farmer puts in the longest work week while the laborer toils the shortest, according to a recent report by the Census Bureau. The bureau said that farmers and farm managers were reported working an average of 57.2 hours a week. ...Average work weeks among other people ranged from 30 to 45 hours. ...The report also indicated that a long-term trend toward a shorter work week had influenced all major occupations. Surveys by the Agriculture Dept. showed 53 per cent of American women smoke cigarettes daily. The department also found a connection between income and rate of smoking. Cigarette smoking among males was 39 per cent in the lowest income bracket-below $1,000 a year-and 55 to 60 per cent among groups earning more than $2,000 annually. The age group where cigarette smoking is highest, the reports said, was between 25 and 44. The department predicted cigarette output would exceed last year's 412.5 billion. I p e e e Saturday, 21 Apil 1956 THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 21 April 1956 Very few persons today question the United States policy of maintaining strong armed forces. Therefore any comment on why the United States needs a navy really brings forth a question: "have modern scientific advances, and tactics utilized by other branches of our armed forces, made the navy obsolescent?" Unfortunately, there are people, even in our own navy, who believe this is true. By conscientiously asking ourselves a few questions, stating a few facts, and attempting to analyze these facts, we can determine if this belief is justified. Question: Can we win a war by air power alone? Fact: Germany was completely devastated by bombing during the last war. Although this undoubtedly affected their caW. A. Houston, SOC pacity to wage war, it took a land army finally to conFirst Place Winner quer this determined enemy. It took the United States Navy to place the United States Army in a position where this could be accomplished. Question: Does our greatest potential enemy believe that sea power -is obsolescent? Fact: Soviet Russia, since World War II, has built a navy second in size only to our own. They have built a huge submarine force, far larger than Germany had at the beginning of World War II. Question: Can Atomic Bombs, or Ballistics Missiles alone win any future war? Fact: It is possible that Atomic Bombs might not be used in any future war for fear of retaliation. In any event, land armies would have to be moved in after any bombing to insure complete victory. Any ballistics missile we have available at the present time would probably have to be delivered by a naval vessel, because of the comparatively short range of present weapons. In addition, a movig launching site would be much more difficult to locate than a permanent land based installation. Final Analysis: Wars,. in the future, as in the past, will have to be won by land armies, utilizing modern weapons to soften up the enemy. Our potential enemy must realize that if she has any hope of a permanent victory in any future war she must prevent us from landing troops and equipment on her shores. In order to accomplish this, she must first gain control of the seas. This is why Russia has built the world's largest submarine fleet. The only thing that will insure that we will be able to place or troops on our enemy's shores, or prevent their forces from landing on ours, is a powerful Navy. All through history the United States Navy has protected our shores from invasion and defended our rights in foreign ports. Our Navy has stood as a symbol of our strength wherever its ships may be. With the coming of the airplane the Navy has lost its importance in the eyes of many. It has never ocurred to these people that in World War II had it not been for the Navy the planes never would have reached Japan, or Doolittle's raid would not have been possible if a Navy Carrier had not gotten his planes within range. It was Navy guns that softened the beach at Guadalcanal for Marine landings, and it was Navy guns that held it. In case of Atomic war or sneak W. J. Koraska attack upon the United States by Russia before heavy bombers could Winning Dependent get there, Navy missile carriers like BOSTON could sneak in from Japan fire their missiles and clear out, also Navy Carriers could launch fighters as escorts to the heavy bombers. Why The United States Needs A Navy, can be answered without all the preceeding, the answer is simple: To Protect and Defend our country and to take offense if need be. 6 'Why The US Needs A Navy'; Contest Winning Essays Printed Since World War II the T nited States has become leader, mainstay, and crutch of all the remaining free countries in the world. The United States has mutual assistance pacts with countries as remotely located from us as Formosa, Japan, Germany, England, France, Thailand, Burma, Korea, and many others. We are protectors to Japan, the Phillipines, to Cuba, and to Western Germany to mention just a few. An overt act of aggression against any of these countries would inevitably push us into war. For the United States successfully to prosecute a war in Europe or Asia our Navy would be needed to move troops into combat areas. The sea lanes would have to be kept open by force so that these troops could be safely moved. R. L. Heitzinger, CT1 Without a strong navy an enemy could keep us from moving the Second Place Winner necessary forces to prosecute their aggression. Our Navy is also necessary to prevent enemy forces from obtaining a foothold in the United States. Atomic bomb or no, before any country can seize another they must be able to neutralize and overcome the forces and government of the interior. In short: they must occupy. To prevent enemy forces from ever landing on U. S. soil, our Navy-a strong navy-would be sorely needed. Without our Navy, how could we have stemmed the tide of aggression in Korea? What power of persuasion could we continue to use in the Formosa Straits to convince the Communist thugs we mean business? What power, other than a strong, mobile, potent striking force-which indeed is what our Navy is? Defensively and offensively, to protect and to punish, to bargain and to deter; our Navy-a strong navy-is needed today perhaps more than at any other time in the history of our United States! Historically, the United States Navy has been our "First Line of Defense" against potential enemies. There is no reason this is not true today. An adequate national defense program demands a modern navy. Atomic-powered submarines, Forrestal-type aircraft carriers, and our vast guided missile program are evidence that the U.S. Navy is vigorously attaining a state of preparedness vital to averting or winning World War III. The Korean War proved that today's navy is not "out-dated." Carrier air strikes and incessant shore bombardment wrought devastation upon the enemy. Who would argue that the 7th Fleet's role in the Formosan Straits doesn't provide the biggest deterR. D. Lackie PNA3 rent against Red China in the Far East? Third Place Winner In a possible global war, a powerful, mobile navy could launch immediate retaliation upon the aggressor. Our power to strike back is probably the major cause for peace of the world today. A third reason for needing a navy is for protection of the gigantic movement of men and materials necessary for the execution of modern war. Russia's hundreds of submarines demand a strong U.S. Navy for the safety of these convoys. No, the U.S. Navy is not an antique of former wars, but a decisive weapon in America's arsenal. We've never needed a navy more than we need one today! m m THE INDIAN Page Five

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Page Six Trading Post Sells U sed-Not-Abused Items, Profits Spent On Community INDIAN Photo Mrs. W. R. Caruthers, Trading Post chairman, on the left, and Mrs. 0. B. Murphy, Assistant Trading Post chairman, discuss some of the problems of the Trading Post. Among the matters brought about was the problem of filling the critical need for sewing machines. by Ely U. Orias An activity on the Base that is probably unheard of by the many residents of Guantanamo Bay but which is doing a public humanitarian service, is the Base Trading Post. Hardly seen from Sherman Avenue due to the colonnade of palm tress that surround it, the Trading Post is located between the Naval Station library and the Sports Shop. Chartered in February, 1953, as a Navy Relief Thrift Shop, it later became a local organization and consequently, was named as the Gtmo Trading Post. Headed by Mrs. W. R. Caruthers, wife of the Naval Station's commanding officer, the Trading Post has an executive committee composed of service wives from the various component commands of ComNavBase. Each command is represented by two wives in the Post's executive committee. Chairman of the committee is Mrs. W. G. Cooper, wife of the Base Commander. From the time the store was converted into a local entity, the Trading Post has functioned chiefly on the sale of "used-but-notabused" necessities in life and/or household materials such as clothing, small electrical appliances, toys and various notions which are either donated to the Post or brought by individuals for sale on commission. Has Rental Service Aside from the sale service that the Trading Post offers to the public, the organization also boasts of its rental service as a subsidiary function. Household equipment available for rent at the Trading Post are cribs, playpens, high kiddie chairs, sewing machines, ironing boards, irons and vacuum cleaners. The Trading Post's hours of operation are from 9:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Monday through Friday. Mrs. Caruthers assuredly said that the Post has always been open to everyone residing on the Base, including Cuban employees. "Profits from the Trading Post," declares Mrs. Caruthers, "are spent for the upliftment of the community." Reciting the many contributions made by the Trading Post, Mrs. Caruthers started with the $300 worth of slides that are now being "used and enjoyed" by the school children at the Villamar school playground. She also mentioned the $80 TP donation to the school band uniform fund; $900 for the purchase of two pianos to be given to the church and the school. Donated Community Clock "And, do you see the $600.00 community clock erected in front of the Drive Inn restaurant ?," interposed Mrs. Caruthers. "As you cruise along Sherman Avenue, especially during the night," says Mrs. Caruthers, "the illumined clock will not only tell you of the correct time but it will also give a message as being a Trading Post donation." This group of hardworking and civic-minded wives are never out of work. When an MSTS ship s GTMO SPORTING CHIPS by C. C. Drumright With pleasure we introduce, G. A. Babcock, DC1, who tooled that little 1.680 inch ball into a 4.250 inch hole from a distance of 130 yds, with one, repeat one stroke. This event came to pass on our local links at approximately 1020 April 14, 1956. The hole-No. 2, The club usedA number 6 iron. Witnesses were R. Newman, RM1, and W. A. Salisbury, AMI1. It is believed by the observers from the groans and clangs issued from the depths of Ole No. 2 and the position of the ball in the cup, that the ball entered the hole on the fly. A hearty well done to you, Mr. Babcock, but go easy on the flagsticks. Our Library Arts Department. ...A players ball strikes an opponents ball in match play-No Penalty. The displaced ball shall be placed as near as possible its original position before subsequent strokes are made. Note: in the event an opponent's ball knocks a player's ball into the cup, toe player is considered to have holed out on his last shot. In stroke play a player's ball is hit by an opponent's ball, when both balls lie Sthin 20 yds., of the hole, neither ball in a hazard, a 2 stroke penalty shall be incurred by the person striking the opponent's ball, his ball being played as it lies and the moved ball being immediately replaced at its original position. Note: When the ball being played comes to rest in the exact position of the displaced ball, the player of the displaced ball shall have his opponent play his shot first, then replace the displaced ball. Rimming the Cups around the 19th. ..Tis said Capt. Kohr's putting technique is the greatest thing since the wheel. Leaders in our red hot ringer tournament after the initial sight settings are: 1st-Sea Dog Bland, 2nd-CDR Rothenberg (persistence showing up) and a two way tie for third between El Ropo Goolsby and mighty mouse Delgado. There remains four weeks for anyone desiring to enter this tournament, full handicaps are being used and the tax is a pittance. The word is around that all present would appreciate it if people, who ride scooters or wear wings of navy gold would please settle all golf debts at time incurred. It's a fact that the sale of MT golf balls is way up-we wonder why? ? ? ? ? We have been informed a certain first T artist one day last week-end birdied #8, #9, #10 and #11-then reveille CAPT Murphy defeats laughing boy Wilson in the FTG ladder play-Wilson claims default, family assistance. Best wishes to a new player, CAPT Holley, in learning to hit them far and straight. An invoice has just been received in our S.S. dept. from NoAqua Mesa, Arabia for 26 Tons of sand that is to be used for trapping No. 8 green, but until all facts and figures are in and checked, you may continue to T up on any rock within two clubs-just don't hit it fat boy, don't hit it fat. Not Original. ...Definition of a Handicap-A Plea, very petiful in tone, most generally heard around the number one teeing ground. Gtmo Rifle and Pistol Club Cops Team Honors At Recent Base Match At the Caribbean Area Rifle and Pistol match on the Base last Saturday and Sunday, April 14-15, the Guantanamo Bay Rifle and Pistol club won three out of four team matches over representatives from the local Marine Barracks, and NavSta Coco Solo, Canal Zone. The local rifle and pistol team entry defeated the marines in the small bore team match, shattered the Coco Solo team in the .22 cal pistol match and again rolled back the marines in the .45 cal pistol match. The marines however garnered the .30 cal team match pennant over the club shooters. Individual honors went to MSgt comes along our shores, they swing into high gear to assume babysitting jobs so the mothers can either rest or go for a sight-seeing jaunt on the Base. At this time, they are known as the Trading Post Transport Volunteers. Zemaitis for winning the .30 cal match, LCDR Minard for winning the small bore match and Chief Schoonderwoerd who upset the experts by defeating LCDR Minard who was runner up in the Pistol Grand Aggregate match. The day was complete for the Schoonderwoerds when Mrs. Schonderwoerd copped both the ladies' events in the pistol and rifle matches. MSgt Zemaitis won the Grand Aggregate for rifle with LCDR Minard nipping at his heels for a close second. The day of the pistol matches was quite windy with the result that no record breaking scores were fired. 11 m m THE INDIAN M Saturday, 21 April 1956

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m Saturday, 21 April 1956 THE INDIAN Page Seven RADM Cooper Tosses First Ball To Open The Fish Tale(s) by P. J. Aldridge '56 Gtmo Baseball Season; Marines Win by Joe Duffy RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase, threw out the first ball on Monday night and the 1956 Naval Base intercommand baseball league was underway. Following the short ceremonies, the Marines under the managership of Sergeant Mike Magas, took the field to oppose the Naval Air Station Flyers, skippered by LTJG Arnie McCalmont. The Marines who finished third last season in a six-team league, figure to be strong contenders for the title this year, but will meet with stiff opposition from the other contenders from VU-10, Naval Base Comp, and NAS. MCB-1 is working into the schedule for the first two weeks of the season, but since they are due to leave this area, their games will not figure into the standings. Chief A. J. Jackson of the Compound, has a good Seabee club that should improve with competition, especially on the strength of the pitching they have shown so far. VU-10 is managed by LTJG Charlie King, who guided the Mallards to last year's tournament championship, and took the All-Gtmo team to the Southeastern AllNavy finals in Pensacola last year. The newly formed Naval Base club is managed by Chief Maniscalco, who last year led the Naval Station softball club to a successful campaign. The Scorebook Marines 7, NAS 6 The Marines started the scoring in the third inning when Duncan, and Patton singled then scored on Dowd's double. Hunter then singled across Dowd, and advanced on a safe bunt by Castellow. A wild peg by the catcher scored Hunter and advanced Castellow to second from where he scored on Bland's base knock to complete the merry -go -round with the Leathernecks ahead 5-0. The Marines added another in the fourth inning when Patton opened with a single, his second of three, and scored when Dowd and Kavolic followed suit. That was all for the Flyer pitcher Gustafson, as McCalmont relieved to strike out Young and end the inning. The Flyers notched their first marker in the sixth when Pearson singled, advanced on an infield out and scored on a fielding error. Kavolic scored the Marine's final run from second. Hunter punched out a double to send the Leathernecks into a 7-1 lead. Waldrop opened the Flyer's ninth inning with a walk to start the five-run uprising featured by McCalmont's double, singles by Williams and Pearson and a second walk to Rhodes woven around three Leatherneck errors, but the rally fell one short and the Marines took the inaugural win by the 7-6 score. NAS 000 001 005-6 7 1 MARINES 005 100 01x-7 11 5 Batteries: Gustafson, McCalmont and Tanzi; Patton and Duncan. VU-10 8, MCB-1 0 VU-10 broke the game wide open in the fourth when the Bee's hurler, Civitelli, who had been hit with a pitch in the previous inning while at bat, lost his effectiveness and had to withdraw after Morris singled and Postal walked. Cigainero relieved on the mound only to bear the blunt of the attack as the Seabee's infield defense collapsed. Six runs crossed the plate before Cigainero threw a third strike pass Colombani to end the inning. In the eight inning Leroy Smith drove a pitch over the left field fence to score Postal ahead of him for the Mallard's final runs and the season' first home run. The Mallard's Montgomery duplicated the feat by retiring the side on strikes in the ninth after Guinn opened with a pinch-hit single. The triple whiff act gave Cigainero a total of 12 and Montgomely 15, while Civitelli set down five as the batters were stirring up a breeze with their bats. The Mallard pitcher hurled hitless balls for 6-1/3 innings before Banjoff punched a single off the bat handle between first and second for the Bee's first hit, but any semblence of a threat died as McCormack hit into a double play. to end the inning. VU-10 000 600 020-8 5 2 MCB-1 000 000 000-0 2 3 Batteries: Montgomery and M. Smith; Civitelli, Cigainero and Stutzman. NavBase 9, NAS 8 Successive singles by McCaffrey, Bailey and Eells in the ninth inning gave the newly formed Naval Base club a 9-8 win over the winless Flyers. The Indians collected 13 hits and were helped by 7 Flyers, miscues, as NAS manager McCalmont shuffled his defense in vain effort to provide a stopgap. Bob Eeels opened the Indians attack with a lead-off triple in the first frame to score the first of three runs, but the Flyers came back in their half of the inning to push across four runs and drive Weingartner, the Indians, starter, from the mound. The NAS defense sieve was responsible for two Indian runs in both the third and fourth and a singleton in the sixth for a 8-4 lead. The Flyers tied it up in the eighth inning with a tying marker after having pushed across three in the seventh, but Naval Base took the win with their final rally good for one and the decision. Naval Base 302 201 001-9 13 3 NAS 400 000 310-8 5 7 Batteries: Weingarten, Coleman, Bailey and laniero, Wakeman. McCalmont and Tanzi, Ransom. Marines 9, VU-10 5 Joe Bland's big bat propelled the Marines to their second win of the campaign Thursday night as they came from behind in the last inning to push across seven runs and sew up the victory. Bland opened the inning with a slashing double to start the winning rally. Before the inning was over he made a second appearance at the plate with the bases full, and rapped a country-mile triple to drive in the final three runs of the inning. Charlie King started on the mound for the Mallards, but gave way to Streigle in the ninth, a victim of costly errors rather than the base hit. Dowd's two-hit hurling in the final three innings earned him the pitching win in relief of starter Fortney. Marines 020 000 007-9 4 3 VU-10 100 030 100-5 10 2 Batteries: Fortney, Dowd and Duncan; King, Streigle and M. Smith. The Schedule Sunday VU-10 vs NAS Monday MCB-1 vs Marines Tuesday VU-10 vs NavBase Wednesday NAS vs MCB-1 Thursday NavBase vs Marines The Spotlight Although the Naval Base team is wearing last year's Naval Station uniforms, recognition is due to the other commands that are represented in the league by contributing players to make up the composite club. In addition to Naval Station, the roster is made up of personnel from Supply Depot, Fleet Training Group, Naval Hospital and Dental Corps. Anyone for Tennis??? John Nici, SKC, of Leeward Point would like to know how many men are interested in organizing a tennis tournament. John says the facilities are excellent on the Base and more personnel should take advantage of the opportunity to get organized in a real tennis goaround. 4. All right, so I told a big fat fib! At least that's what the fish are trying to make it look like. At any rate, there are now literally schools of fish in the Bay. Snapper up to eight pounds are being taken at the Coast Guard Pier, using mullet or fresh herring as bait. If you have the initiative, you can get a pass from the Base Police and go back into the Granadillo area after dark. There, snapper up to and including twenty pounds are being taken, same bait as mentioned before. While they are never the tremendous fish that all fisherman like to land, and brag about, the croaker are alot of fun on a light rig and when biting, keep you as busy as the proverbial cat. Strings of croaker, thirty or more, are being brought in nightly by those who don't care for too much sun or haven't the time during the day. All of your fresh herring, by the way, come from the efforts of Ben Pavila, who nightly plays the ancient art of the throw net. You try to "fan out" a 16' diameter net so that it settles evenly over a school of very elusive herring. And speaking of this Pavila fella, he and Special Services got together and now he has his boat all rigged for deep sea fishing. Yep, at last you have a way to get out there. And the amberjack are running like Speedy Gonzales! All you need is to call 9545 for reservations. They will tell you when to bring your cold fried chicken, potato salad, beer, and portable radio (for those ballgame men). Oh yes, last but not least, bring $3.50 for each person going. They can take six, day or nite. The subject being boats; the Sea Gull type sailboats have been converted to almost luxury fishing boats, 16' long, wide comfortable beam, and plenty of room, even for six people. Now you can take the wife and kiddies anywhere in the bay with one of these boats and a little common sense. $4.00 for eight hours of comfortable fishing from a large boat, powered with brand new 15 horse Johnsons. Have the charter boat all booked up for one night this week, in company with some of the more avid fisherman here on the base and I hope to have a lot of good news for all of you Issac Waltons next week. They tell me that the large yellowtail snappers and wahoo, not to mention amberjack and dolphin, are running around like so many flies outside. Last year a fellow brought in a black marlin, a supposed rarity in these waters, 80 libs. he was.

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Saturday, 21 April 1956 THE INDIAN a Navy-DPPO-1ND-Gtmo-3441 WGBY Television Program Saturday, April 21 NavSta-Last Frontier-101 min. NAS-Lawless Street-97 min. Mar. Site-World In My Corner-101 min. Villa.-Houston Story-90 min. Lwd. Pt.-King Dinosaur-89 min. MCB-1-I Died A Thousand Times121 min. Sunday, April 22 NavSta-Country Girl-104 min. NAS-Last Frontier Mar. Site-At Gunpoint-115 min. Villa.-World In My Corner Lwd. Pt.-Houston Story MCB-1-King Dinosaur Monday, April 23 NavSta-Bamboo Prison-96 min. NAS-Country Girl Mar. Site-Lawless Street Villa.-At Gunpoint Lwd. Pt.-World In My Corner MCB-1-Houston Story Tuesday, April 24 NavSta-Bullet For Joey-93 min. NAS-Bamboo Prison Mar. Site-Last Frontier Villa.-Lawless Street Lwd. Pt.-At Gunpoint MCB-1-World In My Corner Wednesday, April 25 NavSta-Detective-96 min. NAS-Bullet For Joey Mar. Site-Country Girl Villa.-Last Frontier Lwd. Pt.-Lawless Street MCB-1-At Gunpoint NavSta-Captain Lightfoot-104 min. Thursday, April 26 NAS-Detective Mar. Site-Bamboo Brison Villa.-Country Girl Lwd. Pt.-Last Frontier MCB-1-Lawless Street Friday, April 27 NavSta-Smoke Signal-100 min. NAS-Captain Lightfoot Mar. Site-Bullet For Joey Villa.-Bamboo Prison Lwd. Pt.-Country Girl MCB-1-Last Frontier Book -Nook An excellent "picture book" is "A PICTORIAL HISTORY OF AMERICAN PRESIDENTS," compiled by John and Alice Durant. The book is composed of 300 pages of easy-to-read text, hundreds of prints and pictures, and several famous political cartoons. This is another good way to study history as it was made by our presidents from Washington to Eisenhower. The library has a new mystery by Agatha Christie-"HICKORY DICKORY DEATH," and also a new installment in the "Rivers of America" series-this time, "THE COLUMBIA." Marguerite Higgins, the petite blonde reporter who won fame in Korea as a war correspondent, has been to Russia. "RED PLUSH AND BLACK BREAD" is the result of her fact-finding trip. Miss Higgins is still an experienced newspaperwoman and her journalistic talents have enabled her to pierce the glowing front which the Soviets are parading these days in order to get the true picture of the conditions in Russia. 4 :004:305:005:306:007:007:308:009:009:30Saturday, April 21 -Contest Carnival -Paul Winchell -Beat the Clock -Victory At Sea -Disneyland -Eddie Cantor -This Is Your Life -Colgate Variety -George Gobel -Appointment With Adventure Sunday, April 22 4:00-Roy Rogers 4 :30-Jamie 5:00-Mama 5:30-Frontier of Faith 6:00--You Are There 6 :30-Readers Digest 7:00-What's My Line 7:30-Hallmark Hall of Fame 8:00-Shower of Stars 9:00-Philco Playhouse Monday, April 23 5:30-Newrs Parade 5:45-Jane Froman 6:00-I & E Time 6:30-December Bride 7:00-I Love Lucy 7:30-Liberace 8:00-Studio One 9:00-Boxing Tuesday, April 24 5:30-News Parade 5:45-Jo Stafford 6:00-Disneyland 7:00-Phil Silvers 7:30-Big Town 8:00-Red Skelton 8:30-Warner Presents 9:30-Four Star Playhouse Wednesday, April 25 5:30-News Parade 5:45-Robert Q. Lewis 6:00-I & E Time 6:30-Pantomine Quiz 7:00-I Married Joan 7:30-Mr. & Mrs. North 8:00-Milton Berle 9:00-Kraft Theater Thursday, April 26 5:30-News Parade 5:45-Coke Time 6:00-Prof. Father 6:30-Truth or Consequence 7:00-Daymon Runyon 7:30-Bob Cummings 8:00-You Bet Your Life 9:00-Climax Friday, April 27 5:30-News Parade 5:45-Dinah Shore 8:00-I & E Time 6:30-Life of Riley 7 :30-Playhouse of Stars 0:00-Meet Millie 8:30-header's Digest 9:00-Philco Playhouse ert Francis, Diane Footer and Cinema -Scoop Brian Keith .TUS.Intelience by D.D.H. Well, the Navy's "Pony Express" Bullet For Joey (U.A.) ...Eddidn't come through in time this ward G. Robinson, George Raft week and we find ourselves faced and Audrey Totter .gangland with nothing but pictures that have revenge and kidnapping .averbeen shown here before, with one age gangster pic. exception. The Detective (Col.), stars the Last Frontier (Col.; in color) incomparable Alec Guinness. It is Victor Mature Anne Banroft G a comedy that deals with priest's Madison and Robert Preston .. cowboys and Indians ...dull ... this one is the above mentioned exception. Country Girl (Para.), is a movie all should welcome back to the Base with the greatest enthusiasm. Bing Crosby, Bill Holden and Grace Kelly (who gives her oscar winning performance in this one), star. The story of a has-been actor, turned drunk and his long suffering wife. One of '54's best and winner of at least two Oscars. Bamboo Prison (Col.) ...Robattempts to track down a master thief. The Guinness comedy is of the type that you never stop chuckling to yourself. This movie and "Country Girl" are two top rated movies and the only must sees of the week. Captain Lightfoot (U.I., in color) ...Rock Hudson and Barbara Rush ...a usual type swashbuckelr ...fair. Smoke Signal (U.I., in color) ...Dana Andrews and Piper Laurie ...cowboys and Indians again ...fair. TV Tele Talk Saturday night's Disneyland will please everyone from nine to ninety. It's the Donald Duck Story, from the first stroke of the pen, his rise to stardom and his present solid status in the hearts of the comic reading public. Colgate Variety Hour is also featured Saturday evening. On Sunday night, a good evening of variety, with everything from Roy Rogers to What's My Line. A highlight of the evening is Philco Playhouse's "GhostWriter." It is the story of a person who does another's writing for him, and that person in turn steals all glory from the real writer. Nina Foch stars in "Miss Turner's Decision" on .Studio One Monday Night. It's the story of an unmarried woman and how her parents pawn her off. On the same bill Monday night, two lightweight sparers step into the St. Nick's Arena for a 10 round main event. Unbeaten Carlos Ortes, age 19 faces Ray Portilla, age 24. Ortes has fought 12 professional bouts while Portilla holds a 17-22 record. Tuesday night the story of the "Vanishing Prairie" along with "Seal Island" make up a true life adventure on Disneyland. You'll see Warner Brothers Presents also on Tuesday. The story is "Cheyenne". It's one of the westerns seen on many of our movie screens. You will also see location shots of the movie "Rebel Without A Cause". Another good play, "The Executioner", appears on Four Star Playhouse. Charles Boyer plays the part of a lonely man among his own people, and a murderer for love and honor. The Kraft TV Theater presents a story entitled "Knight in a Business Suit" on Wednesday. The story revolves around wishes and chivalry of today verses chivalry of yesteryear. A native of London is Miss Valerie French, a scene newcomer. She was seen for the first time in Columbia's "Jubal" with Glen Ford. P


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