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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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9(Ke


Noovere qTMO Like T6 Snhin"Volume VII, No. 2 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 14 January 1956


Base Aide For Three Years Leaves Atlantic Amphibious Exercises Slated Here

Washington (AFPS)-The first of four joint navy-marine amphibious training exercises in the Caribbean will take place in January, Adm. Jerauld Wright, Atlantic Fleet commander, has announced here.


Brrrr But It's


Cold Outside!!!

- Mother Nature, what have you
done? That was the question posed
this week, as the base found itself wrapping up in the nearest
available raincoat, peacoat, or what
-have you.
Well, it was quite simple according to the aerology department up
at NAS.
You see, all this cold weather
that we have been having originally forms in Canada. Then, it takes
off down through the States on
sort of an angle from the Dakotas
to Florida.
Usually, it stops there, but as
was said, Mother got her signals
LT G. H. Leach, (standing) relieved LT J. W. Richmond, as aide to crossed, and that fact combined RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase last week. LT. Richmond left Sat- with some abnormal winds from
urday, January 7, for California. the north and northwest caused
Gtmo and this part of Cuba to
by Don Tobias suffer from some unusually cold
The man that has been a combination Division Officer for personnel weather.
The an hat as eenThe temperatures that we have comprising the "Flag" division, arranger for most of the honors and been having lately are only 5-8 ceremonies taking place on the Base, along with being Public Informa- bees balog nal ar thiy time tion Officer and Assistant Game Warden left Gtmo on the USNS fegr es byela Normallyor this time
-- perature range is from a high of
LT John W. Richmond, Aide to self wearing LT's bars. 87 during the day to a low of 61
three Admirals on the Base dur- Upon leaving Gtmo LT Rich- in the evening. Lately, however,
ing his three year stay here, was mond, his wife and three children the temperatures have ranged from relieved by LT George H. Leach, -Susan Marie, John Walker and a high of 75 during the day to a
USNR. LT Leach had formerly David Arthur-will spend a 20 low of somewhere in the upper been attached to NAS. day vacation in Los Angeles, As far as existing records go
LT Richmond began his Naval Calif. After which he will report h-ereatGmhelwo prx
aboard the USS GEORGE, DE hereat Gtmo, the low of approxcareer after being graduated from 697, as Executive Officer. imately 57 degrees that was reach Looking back over his stay at ed during the evening of Monday, the University of California with Loigbcovrhsta at January 9 was the lowest temperaa B. A. degree .in Business Ad- Gtmo, LT Richmond said, "I will ture ever recorded for this section.
always remember the 50 anniverministration. He entered the serve sary ceremony of the signing of ice in March, 1943 and was com- the treaty between Cuba and the ,.
missioned in July of that year United States which turned this
with rank of Ensign in the Navy Base over to our Navy. That was C r v l ime
on December 10, 1953. It was one
Reserve. -of the most outstanding events
After serving his first hitch in that happened while I was here." Is Fun Tim e
the Navy, LT Richmond went into He continued, "It was also a
private business in California. great privilege to serve as personal New Orleans has its Mardi Gras, Aide to not one, but three Ad- Guantanamo City its Fiesta, but
Then in Jan., 1951 he was recalled mirals-Admiral Atkeson, Admiral Guantanamo Bay has its "FUN to active duty and went aboard Taylor and Admiral Cooper." TIME" at Carnival Time. It is the
the USS MISSOURI for 27 months time when the cares and worries
majority of tvhich was served in of daily chores are completely
Arrives frgotten, when the most staid and
the Far East. ADM Fahrion Arrives Osr"ed"can let their hair down
From the- "Big Mo" he came to for three glorious days of fun and
Gtiantapaio. for duty as Aide to " e lrosdy ffnad
the Commander of the Naval Base. Vice Admiral F. G. Fahrion, frolic. A person doesn't have to
A few im'nths after reporting Commander Amphibious Force At- be a millionaire, or even a thouaboard he received notification that lantic Fleet, arrived on the Base Fun Time. The Carnival is the
he had been promoted to LCDR yesterday. He came on his flag painless way to contribute to many
in the Naval Reserve, ship the USS POCONO, AGC-16. worthy charities which directly
It was shortly after his promo- Full honors were given the Vice benefit from the proce-ds.
tion that he decided to drop the Admiral who will be at Gtmo until WHAT IS YOUR STANDING
"R" in his designation and become Jan. 30. While here be will ob- ON THE CARNIVAL SCOREregular Navy. In. doing so, it was BOARD???? GET BEHIND THE
necessary to accept a lowering in serve the training exercises of TICKET S A L E S CAMPAIGN
rank. and once again he found him- the fleet. AND MAKE YOUR QUOTA! !!!


Thousands of marines, 32 navy ships from the Atlantic Fleet Amphibious Force, the battleship Wisconsin, the carrier Siboney, seven destroyers and one submarine will take part in the exercises.
All of the amphibious training will be held in the Roosevelt RoadsVieques area of Puerto Rico. The last exercise is expected to end May 5.
Vice Adm. Frank G. Fahrion, commander of the Atlantic Fleet over-all command of the exercises. Lt. Gen. Alfred H. Noble, CG of the Atlantic Fleet Marine Force, will direct marine training groups while Rear Adm. Wallace F. Peterson, commander of Amphibious Gp. 2, will supervise naval aspects.
Training in air and naval gunfire support of amphibious operations will be the main objectives of the final two exercises.
The first two exercises will include a period of training ashore for marine units, which will be followed-up with detailed amphibious operations. They will be concluded with an assault landing at Vieques.
A marine regimental combat team will operate in conjunction with supporting naval ships during this phase of the training.


Motor Vehicle Inspection

Scheduled For Base Soon
The semi-annual motor vehicle inspection will be held on the Base as soon as the new license plates arrive from the States. It is expected that this will be sometime this month. NOW is the time to get ready for it if your car is not up to par.
The motor vehicle inspection will cover the steering gear, mufflers, brakes, tailpipes, lights, horn, speedometer, windshield wiper, tires. Besides these your car must also be equipped with the following: Fenders, bumpers and windshields. The inspection will cover, but is not limited to these items.
The Provost Marshal wishes to impress upon the vehicle operators of the Base, the importance of Windshields and rear windows being in excellent condition. These windows may not have any cracks or holes in them of any kind.
Any vehicles that are not passed at -the inspection will be removed from operation until the necessary repairs are made and the vehicle reexamined.
Upon arrival of the license tags' a schedule will be published in this paper and the PAPOOSE.


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THE INDIAN


Saturday, 14 January 1956


THE INDIAN

The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba.
CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba
Editorial Staff
LTJG J. D. Byerley ---.----------------------------- Officer-Advisor
G. L. Henderson, JOC --....---------------------------------- Editor
C. S. Cornett, J02 ---------- -------------------- Managing Editor
Staff Reporters: D. D. Hinton, JOSA; and J. C. Curren, JOSA.
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
Materials marked AFPS may be used by news mediums provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit.
All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.




A SOB STORY ....

We fellows on the staff of the INDIAN have a purpose to fulfill . . . that of providing at least one story in each issue that will be of interest to anyone that reads the paper.
FIRST OF ALL, the INDIAN is YOUR NEWSPAPER! We simply try to carry out your wishes in publishing the various stories, jokes, cartoons and pinups. Naturally a story concerning a Cub Scout meeting is of no interest to a single man in the barracks. . . BUT it is to the Cub Scout and his parents. Likewise, a story about the Marines means nothing to NAS personnel or a story about new uniform regulations on liberty, of vital importance to the military, while it leaves the Base civilians and dependents cold.
Also, many times we get a real fine story in the office here that was written by one of our readers. We look the story over, passibly make minor changes in style and send the story down to the print shop to be set by the Linotype. They send back a proof and everything is hunky-dory. BUT! When we lay out the paper we find that we're short on space and will have to cut out part of JOE READER's story.
As soon as the INDIAN comes out on Saturday morning, Joe rushes out and grabs a copy. WHAM! ! ! ! "Cheese and Crackers' Them #$1/0# $%V0% down at the INDIAN cut my story! ! ! !Lemmee at that phone!
Joe calls us up AND DO WE CATCH IT! !!!
The point we're trying to make though is this. . . . WE NEED stories from you readers if we are going to be able to give you a paper you like. . . . Not only stories but cartoons, photos, jokes and YES-even sexy pinups. (But not TOO sexy!)
WE CAN'T PROMISE that we'll use them right away in the next INDIAN or even in the next six issues. . . . AND we may even change them around a little. . . . BUT WE WILL use them, if at all possible sooner or later.
SO IF YOU have anything of interest that you would like to see in the INDIAN. . . . Drop around and see us. We're located in the NavSta Special Services Building behind the door marked "WGBY". Better yet, GIVE US A CALL AT 9-6-1-5. . . .


I" "


IN



MEMORIAM





LTJG JEFF



JONES


The Chaplain's Corner


"CAN YOU FIND IT"
Some years ago I came upon a gathering of people on the outskirts of a small town. Curious, I stopped the car to see what was going on. It was a travelling show-shades of the old medicine shows which I had not seen since a youngster. I was attracted by the bally-ho of the hawker. His ability to mix Biblical quotation with quotes from Shakespeare and attribute the mixture to one or the other was something to hear.
I have been reminded of this experience recently by a saying going about that I suspect has a similar origin. Whether it has been used to salve the conscience of the promiscuous or to discredit the Bible is only a matter of who uses it. The misquote I am speaking of begins: "It is better to plant your seed-." I challenge anyone to find it in God's Word.
The Bible verse misquoted is Genesis 38:9. To understand this verse you must read Deuteronomy 25: 5-10, which reveals simply but specifically the ancient Hebrew law established to preserve the family. To insure the continuation of each family, the law made it the responsibility of a brother to take a deceased brother's wife as his own wife, if there were no children to carry on the family name. No one familiar with the moral teaching of God's Word would repeat it as a Biblical quotation. Certainly it could never be justification for immorality.
If you can find the misquote in God's Word, please let me know the book, chapter and verse.
Karl G. Peterson,
Chaplain, USN


Card Forms OK To File

(This is the second in a series of eight articles on federal income tax filing for the year 1955. The articles are based on information furnished to AFPS by the American Institute of Accountants, the national organization of certified public accountants.)
The government provides two forms for individual income tax returns. If you choose the wrong one, you may automatically cut yourself off from many possible tax savings.
The easiest way to file is to use the simple Form 1040A. It's a card the size of a check, which anyone can fill out if he is able to write 5. Made fairly large contribuhis name and address and a few tions.
other simple facts. You just send Form 1040 has been rearranged
it in with your withholding slips this year, so that although it still and the government takes care of contains four pages, a taxpayer the rest. If you owe more tax than whose income was entirely from was withheld you will get a bill wages needs to use only the first for the difference.. If more was one or two pages. Pages 3 and 4 withheld than you owe, you will are for other types of income and
get a refund check. for computing the special credits
The tax rules permit you to use for dividends and retirement inthe card form if your gross in- come. come consisted only of wages, dlvi- The instructions that come with ends or interest totalling less than your tax forms give further in$5,000, and if you did not have formation. Help is also available
iore than $100 of gross income from the Internal Revenue Servapart from that listed on your ice, which urges you to consult a W-2 withholding slips. properly qualified advisor if you
Before deciding to use the card need outside assistance. (AFPS) Form 1040A, you should consider these facts:
1. Your tax will be figured from
a table which allows you a deduction of about 10 per cent of your income instead of itemized deductions for contributions, taxes, interest paid, medical and dental ex- Sunday, 15 January 1956
penses, etc.
2. There is no provision in this Catholic Masses
form for filing as the "head of Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel
a household," as a "surviving Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel spouse," or for claiming special Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel credits for dividends and retire- Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel ment income. Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel
If you are sure that these two Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 1900points would not cost you any 2000. and daily before mass.
tax savings, and your income is Protestant Services
within the limits for filing a Forim sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 1040A, you might as well use this 090-Sunday School
simple card form. 0930-Adult Bible Class
If you decide to use the regular Form 1040, you still have the 1930-Fellowship Hour
choice of itmizing your deductions Wednesday: 1910-Mid-Week Bible Study or using a standard deduction Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal which generally amounts to about Christian Science
10 per cent of your income. Sunday: 1000-Station Library
You are likely to save by itemizing your deductions if you: Latter Day Saints
1. Own real estate. Sunday-1100-Noval Station Library
2. Had unusual medical expense. Chaplains at this Activity
3. Had deductible child-care ex- CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC. USN
pense. (Catholic)
4. Suffered losses from fire, LCDR K. G. Pete on, C1,. USN
storm, accident, or theft. (Prote ut)


f


Pag~e Two


PaL-e Two






0


Saturday, 14 January 1956


THE INDIAN


F T G Bulletin

The temperature on last Monday morning was some place in the high fifties Fahrenheit, which is about 20 degees below zero "Cubana". The coldest person on the base was the sailor riding down Sherman Ave. on a scooter with only a white hat, a skivie shirt, a pair of shorts, and some shoes. Some people just aren't properly calibrated and tuned in. People are even inquiring whether or not blues may be worn while shipriding. The answer is yes.
The FTG Officers and those of the Base Staff and Station had a golf match on Saturday. The results were disastrous for FTG. The Staff and Station won by a score of 16 to 11. LCDR Demipsey defeated LCDR Kuba 2% to 1/2, Chief Mach Bush defeated LT Noga 3 to 0, ADM Cooper and CDR Patterson played to a tie, LTJG Byerley was defeated by CDR Skadowski 1 to 2 and LTJG Clarke was defeated by LT Williams 0 to 3. The difference came in the team matches which FTG lost 7 to 2.
All of the Fleet Training Group are stunned by the death on 10 January of LTJG Jones of the Damages Control Department as a result of a sudden and swift attack of bulbar polio apparently contracted while he was on leave in the U.S. very recently. Our deepest sympathy will be extended to his family in Texas.
John Molloy RM1 of the Communications Department left Guantanamo by Flaw on the 10th with his wife and their two children. John is to report to U.S.S. GEARING DD-710 for duty.
LCDR Marvin Hamlin, LT Harold Yelton and ENS Henry Meloche Jr. reported aboard last week. Welcome!


PTA News

The Parent-Teacher Association will hold a special meeting on Tuesday evening, Januray 17, at the naval base school assembly. The meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m.
The meeting is a combined January-February PTA meeting and is planned especially to avoid interference with the Guantanamo Bay Carnival activities early in February.
The program will feature 16 mm movie of the Antarctic Expedition of QMC Monte of the Naval Base. The program should be of special interest to all Naval Base personnel and all parents and friends are urged to attend.
Attendance awards will be given as before and all parents are urged to be prompt in order to be counted in the contest.

BASE CALENDAR
Saturday, January 14 Square and Circle Club-Phillip's Park
-7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, January 17
American Legion and Auxiliary-Community Hall-7:30 p.m. Wednesday. January 18 Toastmaster's Club-Officer's Club-6:30 p.m.
Thursday, January 19 Navy wives Club-Luncheon at the Marine Family Restaurant-1:00 p.m. Thursday, January 19 Fellowcraft Club 1078-practice meeting
-Community Hall-7:30 p.m.
ED. NOTE: The Indian once again extends a bid for schedules of meetings of the various Base organizations. Please call 0635 and give us the schedule of your meetings.


MEMORANDUM
From: Commanding Officer, Naval Station To: Mayor, Villamar-Bargo Council
Subj: Villamar-Bargo Decoration Christmas Contest; winner of


1. First Prize goes to the participants of the between RH-262, RH-264 and RH-266:
RH-262-A LAIROME, P. D. CIV.
RH-262-B INGRAM, J. E. ABI
RH-262-C SURROZ, E. D. MMC
RH-262-D MILLAR, R. H. SK3


RH-264-A RH-264-B RH-264-C RH-264-D RH-266-A RH-266-B RH-266-C RH-266-D
2. Second Prize
RH-84-B


COWARD, A. R. LADD, C. E.
CICIRETTI, V. NICHOLS, H. L. NEILL, J. L. BUNGER, H. P. FREY, J. L. RALSTON, J. B. winner: KRAFT, R. A.


3. Third Prize winner:
RH-609-A NELSON, J. R.
4. Fourth Prize winners:
CB-34-B BREITKERENTZ,
DH-105 O'BRIEN, F. H.
RH-609C GIBSON, P. E.
RH-278D HUDDY, N. W.


SH1 AT1 AM3 DC1 CIV. CIV. CIV. CIV.


Group Scene

PWD NAS FTG NSD

NAS
VU-10 VU-10
FTG
PWD PWD PWD
NAVSTA


DCC FTG


GM1 FTG

R. D. EN2 NAVSTA
TMC FTG ATC NAS CIV. PWD
W. R. CARUTHERS


USO Show Bangs

The first USO show of the year started off with a fizzle and ended up with a bang.
A large crowd of enlisted men, "brown bagers," and officers enjoyed a break in the usual routine of the nightly movie at the Naval Station lyceum.
The show hampered by the failure of the public address system opened with a Cuban dancer and kep the crowd's attention until the last act was over. A fast talking, laugh-a-minute Master of Ceremonies slighted no one in his laugh. producing jokes on the military system.
In mnid-performance the PA system was finally repaired and the audience received the full effect of the female folk singer, who was the hit of the evening.
Prior to the show at the lyceum the group presented a 30 minute program over WGBY-TV. This was the last stop for the troup on their tour of North Africa and the Caribbean.
Next month another USO troupe will put on another show according to the Special Services officer.


WHAT'S DOIN' STATESIDE LAFRA NEW S POW Code Of Conduct


The use of cigarettes in the U.S. rose to a reported 414 billion in 1955 as compared with 402 billion in 1954, according to the Agriculture Department. . . . The department predicted that the increase would go on if employment and income continued, but added a drop was possible because of state taxes on cigarettes. . . . The agency also reported that the biggest output of cigarettes was 435/2 billion in 1952, a record production. King-size, filtertip cigarettes, said the department, were in demand in '55 while tobacco for pipes and roll-your-own cigarettes dropped slightly.


The building industry is being geared for another banner year. Leading spokesmen in the business say construction expenditures will jump to more than $44 billion in 1956, $2 billion more than in 1955. . . . Another $21 billion will be added for alterations and maintenance of structures already standing, bringing the construction volume to a record-breaking high of $65.5 billion. . . . However, their sunny optimism is somewhat different from the outlook of some economists surveyed by F. W. Dodge Corp. . . . They believe that new construction will drop $1 billion from the 1955 high to $41 billion.
: * *
U.S. women not only live longer than their male counterparts but every year they are living a little longer . . . According to a Cornell University expert, men who are 65 in 1970 will have an even chance of reaching the age of 79, an increase of one-and-ahalf years over present life expectancy . . . But for women of 65 life expectancy will be 83 or three years longer than they now can expect to live.

Never ask a man raised on a chicken farm if he was once a happy, barefoot boy.



0


The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Fleet Reserve Association is having a Valentine Dance at the Flamingo Room on Thursday, 19 January from 2000 to 2400. This dance is being held for all Fleet Reserve members and their immediate families. Music will be provided by the Naval Base Combo. Prizes will be awarded during the evening and a buffet style lunch will be served. Special uniform has been authorized.


Texas Voters!

Attention, native Texans residing here on Gtmo!
Servicemen from Texas must pay a poll tax of $1.75 in the county of their residence on enlistment, to qualify to vote. A poll tax receipt may be secured prior to 31 January 1956.
An application form may be secured from tax assesor and collector in residence county or servicemen may pay poll tax by remittance through US mail to county tax collector. A remittance slip with a statement in writing must be signed under oath.
Servicemen who are married may sign for their wives and vice versa.
The following information must be included in statement to enable tax collector to fill out blank form poll tax receipt.
1. Name
2. Age and race.
3. Length of time applicant has resided in state
4. Whether native born or naturalized citizen
5. State of US or foreign country where taxpayer was born
6. Length of time applicant has resided in county.
7. Voting precinct in which applicant lives, if known, otherwise address.
8. Applicant's occupation and P. 0. address or if living in incorporated city, ward, street and number or residence in such city.


Lectures Begin Monday
Commencing Monday, Jan. 16, lectures on the Code of Conduct will be given to Naval Station personnel and associated activities.
The lectures are mandatory and failure to attend without sufficient reason will result in disciplinary action. The series will deal with the conduct of an American serviceman taken prisoner.
Each division will see to it that the men in the division go to the lecture on the designated day. The series should be completed by the end of this month. A page will be inserted in the individual's service record after he has attended the lecture.



I G Inspects


Gtmo Marines

Brigadier General Carson, A. Roberts, Inspector General of the Marine Corps, departed the Base at 1500 yesterday after an annual inspection of the Marine Corps Facilities here which commenced Wednesday.
The general, accompanied on the inspection by Colonel William A. Kurtis, Colonel John I. Williamson Jr., and Captain Carroll E. Kilduff, was piped aboard the base with full military honors when he arrived via government at 1145 Wednesday.
Next stop on the general's agenda is inspection of the Marine Security Guard at the American Embassy in Port Au Prince, Haiti.


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ft


Page Three






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Page Four


Saturday, 14 January 1956


by Joe Duffy
Referees

I think that I shall never see A satisfactory referee About whose head a halo shines Whose merits rate reporter's lines One who calls them as they are And not as I should wish, by far.

A gent who leans not either way But lets the boys decide the play A guy who'll sting the coach who
yaps
From Siwash Hi or old Milisaps Poems are made by fools like me But only God could referee.
-Larry Newman

I don't know who Mr. Newman is, but from the parody he wrote on referees he certainly showed an understanding towards the basketball official. Officiating is one of the most difficult jobs related to sports, and a thankless one. And I might add that the game of basketball rates as the most difficult sport to referee. The fast pace of the game, and the numerous faults that a player can commit either intentionally or unintentionally presents an enormous challenge to the referee.
Monday night on the Marine Site basketball court, the Naval Base Inter-Command league gets started on its 90-game schedule to inaugerate the 1956 sports program. The inaugural match will pit the youngsters from the High School against the Naval Air Station Flyers, followed by a second game between the VU-10 Mallards and the Marine quintet. The opening toss for the first game will be at 1830; the second game will start fifteen minutes after the first game is completed. The rest of the week's schedule shapes up as follows:
Tuesday-FTG vs MCB-1 and Naval Station vs Hospital
Wednesday-High School vs Leeward and NAS vs Supply
Thursday-VU-10 vs NavSta and MCB-1 -s Hospital
Friday-Marine vs Leeward and Supply vs FTG
In a practice game last week the Hospital-Dental team came from behind to edge out the Seabees by one point in an exciting battle. It was practically a repeat of the final game played in last year's tournament when the same two teams met for the tournament championship. . . . Dr. Doohen has a smooth running squad and will be hard to beat this year. Their superiority in controlling the rebounds was the deciding factor in their win over the Seabees. . . .


February Exams

The personnel office reminds all hands that the Feb. advancement exams are scheduled for Feb. 7, 14, 21 and 28. First testing date will be the CPO exam, the next for Third Class, then Second Class and finally First Class. Those who have not taken and passed their proficiency exams will not be allowed to take the advancement tests.


Seabee's coach, Chief Brooks, speaks in confident tones of his team's chances in this years race. His club is rated as a top contender on the basis of a strong first team and its reserve strength. . . . Of the other entries in the league, the Marines and VU-10 should rate among the leaders if pre-season form means anything. . . . Watching the Seabees and Corpmen in their practice game reminded us of the wrong basket toss made by Moebus of the Hospital team in last year's final match. In the closing minutes of the title game, the Corpmen held a three-point lead over their Seabee rivals when a held ball was called under the Seabee basket. On the subsequent toss-up at the foul circle, Moebus got the tap, pivoted and swished the cords of his opponent's basket for a two-point gift. The mental lapse had no bearing on the outcome of the game, however, for the Corpmen rallied and held their slim lead until the final whistle. . . . The win gave the tournament title to the Hospital-Dental team who had finished third in the season's race behind Naval Station and the Naval Air Station clubs. The MCB-1 squad, hampered with cancellations on their record still managed to finish fourth and qualify for the play-off berth. . . . The High School team may not finish high up in the race, but they do add plenty of color with their girl cheerleaders and routing section at all their games. This little scholastic touch to our athletic program is like frosting on a cake.... Last season the High School had the league's high scorer in Edgar Heimer, whose deadly accuracy from up close gave him high point average and total points title. Edgar has graduated and is now enrolled at Florida State U. in the freshmen class. Another school player who rated tops with the fans was Jinmy Cavanaugh, whose comical antics in the game kept the school spirit high when defeat appeared inevitable. Jimmy is a plebe al the Naval Academy this year.. . . This year the games will be played at Marine Site on Monday and Wednesday and at Fleet Recreation on Tuesday and Thurs(lay with Friday dates alternating between the two courts. . . . The first Friday date will be played at the Marine's court, the following Friday, Jan. 27th, play goes to the Fleet court. The remaining Friday dates will follow this rotation. . . . Check this column for the weekly schedule, and when your team is playing come out and give the boys your support. A cheering section sometimes is worth an extra five points.


Fleet Reserve News

Branch 100, of the Fleet Reserve Association held it's regular monthly meeting Tuesday night with the initiation of shipmates Harrison and Schoonover into the branch.
A buffet dinner was served and the guest speaker was Chaplain J. J. Sullivan who gave an impressive speech on the chaplains in the Navy and their duties in the time of war and peace.
A special meeting will be held on Tuesday the 24th of January at 8:00 p.m. at the Community Auditorium for the election of officers.
A buffet dinner will be served after the meeting. All members are urged to attend tois meeting.


SPORTS REVIEW


Gtmo Green Thumb

This week's article for the resident of Gtmo with the green thumb deals with further improving the looks of lawns and grounds with flowers.
The two categories of flowers that will be discussed are the seed and bulb flowers.
First, in starting flowers from seed, they may be grown in two ways; direct sowing in the open, or the planting of seeds in flats.
Direct sowing in the open, or the bed in which they will remain is self-explanatory, but the business of seeding the flowers in flats is a more complicated and serious business.
The flat culture has these advantages; (a) increased seed germination; (b) easier handling; (c) better seeding growth.
The following is an approved method in preparing a flat.
1. A flat is a shallow box of convenient size, with drainage holes in the bottom.
2. The soil used in flats should be a good grade of garden soil containing organic matter.
3. Firm the soil to within a half inch of the top of the flat with a brick or a block of wood. Flood the flat and drain it. Broadcast the seeds onto the wet surface. Then, cover lightly. Covering seeds too deeply is a common error. If the seeds are just barely hidden you can expect best results.
4. After the seeds have been covered with soil, place a wet newspaper over the flat and keep it in the coolest possible situation.
5. After germination, the flats must be placed where they can get an abundance of light.
6. When the seedlings show about four true leaves, they may be transplanted to beds where they are to bloom.
Here is a note on proper bulb planting. Take special care to plant your bulbs the right depth, as shallow planting causes much failure in successful bulb growth. In preparing the planting pocket for your bulbs, be sure the bottom is broad enough to permit the bulb base to rest on the soil. If an air pocket is left, the roots may quite likely dry out before the bulb has started to grow.
It is suggested that if complete information is desired on the planting of seeds and bulbs, acquire a a recommended gardening catalog or quide.


Ladies Golf Shots
by Bucky Pierce
The Ladies Golf Association wishes to extend a sincere welcome to all lady golfers to come out and join us on Wednesday morning. For details call me at 8607.
Welcome to three new members who gave the third fighters some keen competition this past week. They are Marge Kubicki, Ruth McGowan, and Margaret Wall.
Results of last Wednesday's Low Gross-Low Net Tournament follows:
1st Flight:
Low Gross-Edie Ware
Low Net-Bev Larson
2nd Flight:
Low Gross-Annette Forester
Low Net-Lavaria Butler
3rd Flight:
Low Gross-Dotty Deere Low Net-Bucky Pierce


THE INDIAN


The Fish Tale (s)

by Pat Aldridge
Ain't every week news is so plentiful no scratchin' 'n diggin' is necessary in order to fill up a fishin' type colyum. It do get kinda tedjus them times when the goldurned fish seem downright contrary and the 'Guster don't come out'n the rocks for no one. The river gets muddy and the bay gets choppy so the Snook ain't snookin' and the Snapper ain't snappin' and ye olde colyumnist ain't got nuthin' about which to tell ya all,
Down to the sailboat locker, there's a feller what goes by the handle, Firmin "Ben" Paliva. That ain't exactly news to no one what does a lot of sailin' or fishin' on account Ben has bin around for a right long time and his reputation as a darned near clarvoyant fishin' guide is wide spread around Guantanamo Bay. Well, sir, Ben has got hisself a party boat. Now, "party boat" don't mean no dancin' on the decks, that is unless'n someone nabbs a monsterous catch and there's pure reason fer a bit o' hornpipe'n. It do denote, howsomeover, there's gonna be a fair size vessel, under the skillful skippership of Firmin "Ben" Paliva, in a couple more weeks, all set to acconmodate six people on a guided fishin' expedition twice a day just about every day. As plans set now there'll be two periods, from six in the morning to two in the afternoon and from four in the afternoon to twelve midnite. This here boat, with a four cylinder Willys inboard, can sashay outside the harbor and search out the current thrivin' places of the biggest fish hereabouts. Won't be too much searchin' with Ben at the helm makin' the selections. He do got a right smart reputation for known' just where them criters is the most bountiful and the most likely to be real hungry. As fer the cost, well, Ben will be workin' hand 'n glove, so the sayin' goes, with Special Services and, fer approximately three and a half pesos fer that eight hour period, there's included not only the boat trip and guide service but bait and rod 'n reel if necessary. She'll be takin' off, and coming' in down to the sailboat locker, the party boat that is, and take a guess as to who has got one of the initial reservations! Somethin' new and nice has come to the fishin' folk of Guantanamo Bay along about two weeks from this here advance notice. This here's a chance to get outside where the really big 'uns dwell and we're fer that ... ain't you?
Gettin' back to today, and the recent past, young Bren Crockett ain't kilt hisself no bar he do be makin' like a smart feller out to Granadillo Point in a Croaker hole he's discovered and has bin delvin' into along with his Pa an Pa's new boat. Accordin' to reports, young Crockett is just about as apt as Pa be with that rod 'n reel. The 'teen agers is doin' right well in the spear fishin' department, too, what with sweet eatin' turtles being' captured by the young 'uns and some purty big piscatorial critters to boot. Makes ya feel the touch a' old Father Time when the kids come in after fourteen hours of divin' 'n swimmin' all in a hurry to get cleaned up fer four or five hours of dancin' or skatin', now don't it?








Saturday, 14 January 1956


THE INDIAN


NSD Gtmo Is A Big Business; Does Multi-Million Dollar's Worth A Year


Imagine a remote island about 1,000 miles from the United States, then imagine the task of bringing the luxuries and necessities to which American people are accustomed, to the inhabitants of this island. It's an operation which requires extensive planning and clock-like coordination.
This is only part of the mission of the Naval Supply Depot here at Guantanamo. NSD has kept pace with the growth of the Naval Base and has supported the various Base activities in an effective manner.
For example: Materials issued by the Depot have totalled approximately $41,000,000; money disbursed by the Disbursing officer has totalled $27,000,000 which is a total business of $68,000,000 in the past two years. These figures in: dicate that NSD Gtmo is carrying on a big business!
The Depot is commanded by Capt. R. A. Williams assisted by Executive Officer, CDR C. E. Lee. LCDR John F. Bayer and LCDR L G. Maxwell head up the Fiscal and Planning departments respectively. LT(jg) R. F. Kezer is Asst. Planning Officer. The Planning department is of great interest because through this department the supply operation is coordinated and developed.
The Fiscal department in addition to doing all of the allotment accounting for the Base activities is responsible to the Disbursing division and Payroll division.
Planning department, in a staff capacity, advises and assists the commanding officer in the achievement and maintenance of effectiveness and economy in the operation of the Depot; prepares budgets estimates; administers budgetary controls; performs management


' i
PAYING a man his travel claim is R. C. Densmore, DKSN. Densmore works in the Public Voucher section of Disbursing. Elsa K. Simon and Gloria G. Castellanos also work in the same section. They average 175 claims per month and pay out a monthly average of $10,000 in claims or vouchers.


planning and review functions, etc. This department is divided into three divisions-War Plans division, Management Control division and the Statistical division.
How much money was spent for the maintenance and operation of the Naval Base, Guantanamo during the fiscal year 1955? Approximately $8,053,419. Where did this information come from? From the Fiscal department, NSD.
The Fiscal department performs the accounting functions for all Base commands and activities with the exception of the Naval hospital, Dental clinic and Marine corps. Because of this responsibility, they are advised of all authorizations needed for the maintenance, operation and expansion of facilities.
In connection with this responsibility, they are advised of all authorizations needed for the maintenance, operation and expansion of facilities.
In connection with this responsibility, the Fiscal department acts in the manner of a commercial bank in that funds are made available and expenditures against these funds are accounted forlike a checking account in a bank.
Disbursing division of the Fiscal department, under the direction of LT K. C. Deere, Disbursing Officer, and assisted by CWO Conrad Womble, Asst. Disbursing Officer, has the responsibility of collecting and and accounting for all cash deposits made by the various activities of the Base. The Disbursing division performs the functions of a bank in connection with cashing payroll checks for payment to employees who are paid from appropriated funds.
Large amounts of change are furnished to various activities. With the exception of the CB's, all personnel of the Base, military and civilian, whose salary is financed by appropriated funds are paid by the Disbursing division.
A grand total of 3,000 military pay records and 2,700 civilian pay records are handled in the Disbursing office. An astounding figure of $1,000,000 in cash payments is paid out each month. Sometimes $150.000 will go out on one military pay day.
When the fleet is in, the Disbursing division's work is increased. They have to handle the pay for the smaller ships having no disbursing officer.
Mrs. Betty Lou Tipler, Gtmo's own "pistol-packing Mama," is the agent cashier for the office. Reason for the "pistol-packing Mama" moniker is that she acompanies the pay truck on Fridays when it goes about the Base paying civilians; on these money hauling journeys Mrs. Tipler totes a gun.
F. J. "Pop" Conners, fiscal accountant supervisor, sees to it that all goes well in the house of greenbacks. There are 11 military personnel connected with Disbursing division.




0


LT K. C. Deere, Disbursing Officer, deals out $20 bills at the pay window in the office. At this window LT Deere handles special pay for both military and civilian.


CHANGING OVER last year's pay records to this year's are W. G. Geihm, SN, and B. C. Jones, SN. The two of them handle Marine and Ship's department accounts. In the background is F. J. Hanselman, DK3.


LCDR J. F. Bayer, Fiscal Officer, sits at his desk in the "big office" at NSD talking with A. Heimer, Fiscal accountant. The Fiscal department does all the accounting for Base activities and takes care of civilian pay rolls. In the department are 74 civilians and 13 military personnel.



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Page Five






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Page Six


Saturday, 14 January 1956


Sports Round Up

by Joe Celentano, J01, USN
Another year . . . New faces . . . New records . . . The Minneapolis Lakers of the National Basketball Assn. have released rookie Bob Williams, who last year starred at Sheppard AFB, Tex. He's now touring with a western unit of the Harlem Globetrotters . . . Columbia backfield coach Paul Governali was a teammate of Maj. Wally Williams, Paris Island, S. C., grid coach, on the 1945 El Toro, Calif., marine team. The major just finished his first year at the island, his 17th of football and his fifth as a coach.
A/2C Bruce Talford, formerly the editor of the Portal Journal at Sampson AFB, N. Y., has joined the sports staff at AFRS-NY . . . AFPS All-Star Buck McPhail was voted by opposing teams as the outstanding player in the Fourth Army football conference. The exOklahoma All-American was also the most valuable player on the All-Army team named by Army Times . . . Don Branby, Colorado's All-American end in '52, is still picking up football laurels. Branby, now stationed at Wiesbaden, Germany, was named to the All-Air Force team by Air Force T ies.
Secretary of Defense Charles E. Wilson was grand marshal of the 67th annual Tournament of Roses Parade . . . One of the featured units in the parade was the U.S. Air Force Band . . . A combined marine corps band, which included units from San Diego, Camp Pendleton and El Toro, also paraded.
All-American quarterback Earl iorraill, the Spartan who directed the Michigan State eleven to the 17-14 Rose Bowl win over UCLA, led the nation's punters in '55 with and average of 42.9 yards per boot.
Just for the records-Jimmy Swink TCU's great halfback, has been named to 18 All-America teams. He reported to the Horned Frogs' backetball team the day after the Cotton Bowl game . . . The Newark (N. J.) Athletic Club selected 800-meter champ Toin Courtney, now at Ft. Dix, N. J., as the outstanding amateur athlete of New Jersey for 1955 . . . Frank Sevigne, former Gelorgetown track coach, has moved to Nebraska U. In '54 he helped conduct the inter-service track chanpionships. Last winter he helped coach service thinclads prepping for the Pan-Am Games.


Navy Picks Location

Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has announced plans to establish a $40,000,000 jet air field in the vicinity of Meridian, Mass., as part of the Naval Air Training
Command.
The 4,500-acre field will be located 15 miles northeast of Meridian. No target date has yet been set for its completion.
The Navy said about 1,200 enlisted men and 115 officers will be stationed at the field to support advanced training operations for
aviation cadets.
The Navy plans to ask Congress at its next session for authorization to acquire the land.
Navy Secretary Charles S. Thomas said the Meridian area best fulfills the need for an additional naval air training field. It was selected after consideration of numerous other sites, he said.


IN THE Management Control division of the Planning department, NSD, R. F. Radcliffe, organization and methods examiner (efficiency expert), goes over forms with Mrs. Carol Martin, secretary for Planning dept. Not shown in the picture, but working in the same office is Edwin Heimer, Fiscal accounting clerk.



More $, Better Housing Cited As Service Needs

Washington (AFPS)-The armed forces would be more successful in attracting and retaining the high quality personnel they need by increasing financial benefits, improving housing conditions and encouraging a more normal family life.
This was indicated in a survey
of civilian attitudes toward mil- tam top quality personnel by rais, itary service as a career conducted ing financial benefits, encouraging by Public Opinion Surveys, Inc., a more normal family life whereof Princeton, N. J., for the Defense ever possible and improving housDepartment's Office of Armed ing conditions. Forces Information and Education. The survey among teen-agers
The analysis is now being studied showed young people saw little by the DOD and the military serv- prestige in life as an enlisted man. ices to find where improvements Greater opportunities to advance can be made in present policies and in civilian life, lack of adequate programs affecting military per- family life and inadequate financial sonnel. The findings also will be rewards were the main reasons used as a basis for action on cor- given why more officers and EM recting any public misconceptions did not stay in the service. "They revealed by the survey, get bored," was an oftstated reason.
The survey used two groups- Teen-agers held careers as offiadult civilians and 16 to 20-year- cers in higher regard than did the old males-to measure public at- adult group. titude toward a military career. Most of the male teen-agers were
The DOD said the study also inclined to look upon their military
sought to establish "a baseline service as an "onerous obligation" from which a program could be to get over with as quickly as launched to enhance the prestige possible. Despite their overall faof a military career in order to vorable attitude toward the new attract and retain high quality reserve program, less than one in personnel." 10 said he planned to take adFive major conclusions were vantage of it. However this can drawn from the sampling of adult be traced in part to a wide lack of civilians. They are: understanding of the reserve pro1. A military career, whether as gram.
an officer or an enlisted man, does The youths selected the Air not carry great prestige among Force as their favorite branch of
adults at the present time. In the service, with the Army and Navy public mind inadequate financial following. Most of them expect rewards, dislike of service disci- to see the U.S. in another war line and regimentation, lack of during their lifetimes. adequate family life and less on- Half the adults and 40 per cent rortunity to advance than in civil- of the teen-agers listed education ian life are the greatest drawbacks. and training as the major advan2. The best educated group held tage of a service career, while a lower opinion of both officers about 30 per cent of both groups and EM than did those with less said the outstanding disadvantage education. was the lack of an adequate fam3. The civilian public does not ily lifehave a clear idea of the role of Of the civilians questioned, 71
the various branches of the service per cent considered military perduring wartime. sonnel to be desirable members of
4. Civilian attitudes toward mili- the community, while 11 per cent tary service are based mostly on believed they were not. reports from people who have been The survey among civilian adults in uniform and from personal also indicated that: service experience. The influence 1. Only about 27 per cent defiof mass communications media ap- nitely would be displeased if their pears to be of secondary import- sons took up a military career. ance. 2. Seventy-four per cent believed
5. The military servi-es would the officer places duty above perbe more likely to attract and re- sonal welfare. Only 11 per cent


Ozma Of Oz
According to, Mrs. Thelma Minard, director, tickets are now available for the Little Theater Children's Workshop production of the "Ozma of Oz."
The sale of tickets will be conducted by the members of the cast with tickets available at the boxoffice the night of the first performance, January 20, and the following afternoon performances on the 21 and 22.
There will be a full cast rehearsal on Sunday January 15. All members of the cast are urged to be present, as the rehearsal is one of the most important.
Also, from Mrs. Minard, we learned that Dorothy, the little girl, who finds herself in the land of Oz, is more than ready to take on her task of rescuing the Queen of Ev and her ten children from the evil and cruel King Ruggido and his helper, Kaliko.



Now Ye Know

Q-I obtained a GI home loan when the maximum guarantee was $4,000. Since then, it was raised to $7,500 .Would I therefore be entitled to another GI home loan to be guaranteed for the difference, or $3,500?
A-Yes. You would be entitled to another home loan having a maximum guarantee of $3,500.
Q-I am a disabled veteran in school under Public Law 16. Would I be entitled to VA dental treatment if I need it to prevent interruption of training?
A-Yes. You would be entitled to dental treatment to avoid interrupting your training.
A-No. Under the law, a GI loan cannot be placed on property outside the United States or its territories or possessions.
Q-In computing my yearly income for VA pension purposes, do I include only my take-home salary or my gross salary including all deductions ?
A-You must include your gross salary, rather than your net takehome salary after deductions.
Q-As a Korea veteran, I have 120 days from the date of my discharge to obtain Korea GI term insurance. What would happen if I were to wait until the last day, and it happened to be on a Saturday or Sunday when the VA was not conducting business?
A-If the final day of the 120day period falls on a Saturday, Sunday or holiday, the time for obtaining Korea GI term insur' ance would be extended to include the first workday that followed.
Q-I am planning to take graduate courses at college under thie Korea GI Bill. What does VA consider to be full-time graduate college training ?
A-There are no set number of hours you are required to take. For graduate students, VA accepts the word of the school as to whether veterans are pursuing their training full-time or part-time.

said officers place personal considerations first.
3. On the matter of military pay, 42 per cent of the teen-agers. and 39 per cent of the adults thought the military shold be paid more than civilians in comparable jobs, 34 per cent of the teenagers and 43 per cent of the adults said they should be paid about the same, 16 per cent of the younger men and 11 per cent of the adults thought military men should be paid less.


THE INDIAN








THE INDIAN


Page Seven


Ahoy Skippers!!
by P. E. Gibson
The holiday racing events offered new challenges to all participants in the form of some really rough weather and some professional competition. Special permission was obtained to exceed the normal sailing area boundaries and this served to include additional pleasure to an already exciting sport.
Competition was keen and both races were over 15 miles long with each skipper tacking along his own cleverly conceived course. Remarkably all boats converged closed to the finish line for breath-taking finishes!
FIRST RACE
First Place: P. E. Gibson, ATC
Second Place: Dan Hunter,
ALC/AP
Third Place: CDR A. Archie
Fourth Place: C. R. Collins, ETC Fifth Place: CWO R. J. Harper In the second event, held later in the week, first place went to three crew members of the Schooner Vema. The Guantanamo Bay Sailing Yacht Club invited these people to participate and we must say we learned some things from them and sincerely enjoyed their participation.
SECOND RACE
First Place: Crew of the Vema
Second Place: Dan Hunter,
ALC/AP
Third Place: CDR Gardes
Fourth Place: P. E. Gibson, ATC Fifth Place: CWO R. J. Harper We are now looking forward to the commencement of the Spring Series and spirited competition with the new skippers that turned out recently.


Sqare & Circle Club

The Square and Circle Club is having its regular Saturday night meeting tonight, at Phillips Park beginning at 7:30.
Any base couple or single man with a date is urged to attend, especially if you like to square dance.
The Square and Circle is a comparatively new organization, formed just last May by "Pappy" Stone, Howard Bungar and Ernie Dean.
The main purpose of the club, which has a membership of approximately 20 couples, is just to get out and have some good old fashioned fun square dancing. The meetings are held on alternate Saturday nights.
The Club is trying to raise money to buy its own record player and new square dance records, therefore dues are paid yearly and a donation is accepted at every meeting.
Any couple interested in the organization is again invited to attend tonight's meeting. Also, the club wishes that any one here on the base with a square dance record collection, or if they are an experienced caller please contact Trev Hamilton at 8302, or Ernie or Betty Dean at 9638.


American Legion Post
by Armand V. Ward
The Guantanamo Bay Post No. 1, American Legion will hold it's regular meeting Tuesday, 17 January at 1930. This meeting will be the official end of the membership drive and should be very interesting in that both teams are confident of winning the drive. One source of information reveals that the team under Chief Adams is quite confident of bringing in a total of at least 100 new members and Chief Lieakos states that Chief Adams' team will need more than 100 to be sure of winning. Of course there could be a lot of smoke being blown but Tuesday night will tell the tale.
In view of the above, this promises to be one of the most interesting meetings ever held here and all members are urged to attend and help get all these new members initiated into the Post. It is also to the interest of each member to come on out and find out for sure if he will enjoy having a meal served to him or if he will be on the serving end. Don't forget-The Date, Tuesday 17 January, The Time-1930. The Place-Community Hall, Marina Point.


Teenage Round-up
by Jere & Pat
Everyone had a big ball at the Sunday School hayride last night! Seems as though "Friday the 13th" means good luck instead of bad. Sob . . . the poor seniors were left out! Too cold to dance anyway! .
Now for the . . . . DID YA SEE . . . .
Sylvia and her joke books ? ? ? ? ? Anita, Eunice and Nancy H. chasing guiness? ? ? ? ? Que Pasa, y'all? ? ?? Becky and Don playing tennis? ? ? ? Who won, Becky? ? ? ? Bobbie and Betty Stone: "The Naughty 'Ladies' of Shady Lane"? ??? Keenan doing nothing???? The "Seven Little Fojts . . . er ... Foys"???? Rosie and her jeep friend???? Dee Dee's two "little Dons'???? Peggy, Willy, Sandy and Eddie horseback riding Sunday afternoon??? Hey Sandy ... been riding long? ? ? ? Judy Inman? ? ? ? Well, that's all the news we could pick up for this time, but we'll be back next week with more. Don't forget the basketball game Monday night at Marine Site. Come on out and support your team. Bye now! ! ! ! !


Navy Wives Club
by Louise Smith
The regular business meeting of the Navy Wives Club was held in the Girl Scouts Hut on Marina Point at 8 p.m. January 5.
Twenty members were present including one new member, Mary Jeffris, and several guests. The club president, Elma Franklin was in charge of the program.
Many new activities and projects are underway for the new year inclusive of Volunteer Service at the Naval Hospital. Also on the agenda for the month of January is the luncheon to be held 1 p.m. Januray 19, at the Marine Family Restaurant For Reservations call 9219.
At the conclusion of the meeting a delightful coffee hour was enjoyed with Estelle Bailey as hostess.
The meeting for next month will be held at 8 p.m. on 'ebruary 2.


Teen- Agers Advisory Group Meets


The first 1956 meeting of the Teen-Agers Advisory Group was held at the Teen-Ager's Club on 2 January. In keeping with the spirit in which the Teen-Ager's club was established, our children's desires for club improvements and their participation in Base activities were carefully considered and resulted in a lively discussion. The very successful booth operated by the Teen-Agers in last year's carnival could only call for a repeat performance this year, and the youngsters are out to beat the old record.
Mrs. R. E. FOJT was appointed chairman of the Advisory Group, Carnival Committee and will coordinate adult supervision of the booth. All parents present were enthusiastic in their pledges of assistance and complete co-operation to insure the Teen-Agers a suc-


The Rifle-Pistol Club
At the regular Club meeting January 4, nominations were made for the offices of treasurer and excutive officer to replace Chief Walters and Mr. Ward who have tendered their resignations. LCDR Hoppe and Frauenfelder, PN1, were nominated for treasurer; Chief Tryon and' Chief Schoenderwoerd for executive officer.
Elections will be held at the next meeting, February 1. (1930 in the Community Hall, back of the Community Auditorium). The resignation of Chief Walters was accepted with regret and he was commended for the fine job he has done in the time-consuming job of Treasurer.
It was decided to make real effort to get things moving at the new Club range. LCDR Minard and Mr. Zaiser were appointed to investigate ways and means of speeding construction.
There will be an NRA approved Spring Match, probably in April. LCDR Hutchins was designated officer in charge.
We hope to send a pistol team to represent the Naval Base and/or ComTen to Tampa, Florida in March. For pistol shooters everywhere, mid-winter matches are second in importance only to the National Matches at Camp Perry. The matches this year will probably be instrumental in determining the shooters to be sent to the Olympic Games in Melbourne, Australia.
We have still received no reply to our query for approval of a Junior affiliate. There will be an organizational meeting called just as soon as we have the necessary information. In the meantime, interested children and their parents are urged to use the facilities available at the Naval Station small-bore range behind the main Navy Exchange. It is open all day Tuesday though Saturdays.
Semi-annual dues of $3.00 are now due and payable to the Club treasurer. New members are always welcome. Club meetings are open to all who are interested in rifle and pistol shooting.


cessful venture.
Club improvements were taken under study by the chairman of the Facilities Improvement Committee, CDR E. G. DOGGINS. Methods and means of improving the finances of the club were also discussed.
The next meeting of the Advisory Group, which consists of all parents of active Teen-Age Club members, will be held at 1900, Monday, 6 February at the TeenAger's Club. There will be several important committee reports which will be of vital interest to the teen-agers and their parents. The more ideas and suggestions presented, the happier will be the teenagers-our children. With the long and difficult summer months just ahead, it is not too early to take active steps and assist our children to plan a pleasant and worthwhile summer program.


The Town Crier

by Mayor Don Wilkinson
Representing the 643 families that makeup the Villamar-Bargo Community, your new mayor and councilmen met for the first time on January 3. Retiring Mayor Ralston recommended that the incoming members continue the policy of patient accomplishment and offered his continued support. We are grateful to all the previous workers on this community project and will need their experienced help. We hope that our efforts can be truly representative of the democratic tradition that is our valued heritage.
These are YOUR council members; their names and residences are listed. Please let them know what you think the needs of the community are and give them your support when volunteers are needed. It should be noted that precinct #1 no longer exists since the razing of West Bargo.
Precinct #2-Grounds EB 10B
Precinct #3-Hill EB 10A
(Treasurer)
Precinct #4-Groeneveld RH
278B (Assistant Mayor)
Precinct #5-Mrs. Peteler RH 605A
Precinct #6-Benedini DH-111
Precinct #7-Dunlap RH 84 B
Precinct #8-Hays RH 41A
Councilmen will serve on several committees but the chairmanships have been designated as follows:
Education - Dunlap; Lyceum Hill; Bingo-Benedini with Gus Liveoakos continuing as manager; Peace and Order - Wilkinson; Health and Sanitation - Groeneveld; Entertainment - Hays and Publicity including Radio and Television-Mrs. Peteler.
Your council represents you in small things and large.
Our first meeting this year dealt with such items as pet vaccination, bus scheduling, pest control, sponsorship of a juvenile program, television problems, maids quarters, exchange services and the long awaited swimming pool in the Community area. At present it is planned to continue the bi-weekly children's matinees. Any suggestions from parents regarding the problem of chaperonage will be welcomed.
Let us know what your ideas and recommendations are, please.


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Saturday 14 Januar 6








Sturdy, 14 January 1956


Satus day, 14 January 1956 THE INDIAN


Navy-DPPO-10ND-Gtmo.4042


Cinema - Scoop

by Don Hinton
It proved an interesting week, as far as the movies on the Base were concerned, last week. I missed on my rating of one of the movies last week, but I'll keep trying and I guess start getting ready to dodge brickbats.
SIX BRIDGES TO CROSS (Universal-International), is a really serious effort on the part of newcomers Tony Curtis, Julie Adams and George Nader at acting, but their inexperience shows through and the movie suffers. The story, one showing the fruitlessness of crime is sound. The experts rated it worth seeing and I'll go along with them. It's not for the kids, however.
MONEY FROM HOME keeps you laughing as only Martin and Lewis can. The standard formula, as always the Lewis comedy and the Martin voice, combined for 99 minutes of fun. You'll roar in one scene where Jerry is a jockey in a horse race. Take the whole family for an evening of laughs, you won't regret it.
CRY VENGEANCE (Allied Artists), is a feeble attempt on the part of this small Hollywood company. Mark Stevens and Martha Hyer figure in this gangster-mystery. Don't go expecting a topflight picture, you'll be disappointed. The stars are worthy of better material, but such is the breaks in the film capitol. You will be missing nothing, in my opinion, if you spend the evening elsewhere.
TONIGHT THE NIGHT (Allied Artists). Again we are plagued by this small company's contributions to the public entertainment. It is a British comedy released through A.A. It's stars David Niven and Yvonne de Carlo, also rate better material. I'd rate it a mediocre attempt at comedy.
Two of the main contributing factors that cause these small companies to come up with consistently Grade C motion pictures are the lack of big name stars and funds to acquire top story material that the big budget movies are made from.
MARTY (United Artists). There aren't enough praises for this movie, that I pick as the best of the week. It is one of those rare sleepers, that has been breaking box-office records. The movie, the stars Ernest Borgnine and Betsy Blair are rumored to be in line for the Academy Awards race for 1955. The simple love story of a butcher and the plain girl that he meets at a dance is warm, human and inspiring. It is the greatest in motion picture entertainment. See it, by all means.
TIGHT SPOT (Columbia), is another one of those shoot-em up, bang-bang ganster movies, that has a couple of unexptected twists. The movie will be enjoyed by the majority even though, it is a far cry from the top. Ginger Rogers and Edward G. Robinson turn in competent performances. It's definitely not for the kids.
THE VIOLENT MEN (Columbia), stars Barbara Stanwyck, Glen Ford and Edward G. Robinson. The story is a rip-roaring western and will be enjoyed by most people Again, as a few weeks ago, Miss Stanwyck is miscast along with both Ford and Robinson. They are definitely not at their best in a western movie. It concerns a range-war between cattlemen and farmers..


WGBY Television Program


Saturday, Jan. 14
4:00-Whirlwind Horsemen 5:00-Game of the Week 5:30-The Millionaire 6:00-Sid Ceasar 7:00-Man vs. Crime 7:30-Stop the Clock 8:00-Hit Parade 8:30-Danger
Sunday, Jan. 15
4:00-Appointment with Adventure
4:30-Wild Bill Hickok 5:00-Roy Rogers 5:30-Winky Dink & You 6:00-Colgate Comedy Hour 7:00-Loretta Young 7:30-People Are Funny 8:00-Justice 8:30-George Gobel
Monday, Jan. 16
5:30-News Parade 6:00-Martha Raye 7:00-I Love Lucy 7:30-Burns & Allen 8:00-Mr. & Mrs. North



MOVIES

Time will be listed only once.
Saturday, January 14
NavSta-Six Bridges to Cross108 min.
NAS-Last Command-110 mm. Mar. Site-New York Confidential
-93 min.
Villa.-Brigadoon-108 min. MCB-1-Night Freight-101 min. Lwd. Pt.-Seven Little Foys-l105 min.
Sunday, January 15
NavSta-Money From Home-99 mm.
NAS-Six Bridges to Cross Mar. Site-Crashout-101 mm. Villa-New York Confidential MCB-1-Brigadoon Lwd. Pt.-Night Freight
Monday, January 16
NavSta-Cry Vengeance-93 min. NAS-Money From Home Mar. Site-The Last Command Villa-Crashout MCB-1-New York Confidential Lwd. Pt.-Brigadoon
Tuesday, January 17
NavSta-Tonight's the Night-95 min.
NAS-Cry Vengeance Mar. Site-Six Bridges to Cross Villa-The Last Command MCB-1-Crashout Lwd. Pt.-New York Confidential
Wednesday, January 18
NavSta-Marty-100 mm. NAS-Tonight's the Night Mar. Site-Money From Home Villa-Six Bridges to Cross MCB-1-The Last Command Lwd. Pt.-Crashout
Thursday, January 19 NavSta-Tight Spot-96 min. NAS-Marty Mar. Site-Cry Vengeance Villa-Money From Home MCB-1-Six Bridges to Cross Lwd. Pt.-The Last Command
Friday, January 20
NavSta-The Violent Men-96 min. NAS-Tight Spot Mar. Site-Tonight's the Night Villa-Cry Vengeance MCB-1-Money From Home Lwd. Pt.-Six Bridges t( Cross


Tuesday, Jan. 17
5:30-News Parade 6:00-Milton Berle 7:00-Meet Millie 7:30-Penny to a Million 8:00-Man vs. Crime
Wednesday, Jan. 18 5:30-News Parade 6:00-Godfrey & Friends 7:00-Life with Father 7:30-You Are There 8:00-T-Men in Action
Thursday, Jan. 19 5:30-News Parade 6:00-Sceen Directer Playhouse 6:30-Dollar a Second 7:00-Joan Davis 7:30-Ray Milland Show 8:00-Cavalcade of Aierica
Friday, Jan. 20 5:30-News Parade 6:00-This Is Your Life 6:30-Cameo Theater 7:00-Professional Father 7:30-Line Up 8:00-Truth or Consequences



Notices

There will be a complete cast rehearsal of "OZMA of OZ", the Junior Workshop production, on Sunday, January 15 at 1:00 p.m. at the Little Theatre.

The are about 75 Girl Scout Calendars still for sale. If you missed getting your's see Mrs. Freeman or Mrs. Burgess (ladies ready to wear & children's clothing depts.) at the main Navy Exchange. Calendars are 50 cents. The money is used for supplies for the Brownie Scouts.


SCUTTLEBUTT




~~















"She's moried-bv het fsband gove me
a ope of "o'd


Book - Nook

A NIGHT TO REMEMBER
by Walter Lord
At 11:40 p.m. on April 14, 1912, the "unsinkable" TITANIC struck an iceberg and began to sink. By 8:50 a.m. on April 15 it was all over. Minute by minute, detail by detail, this book recreates these incredible hours.
You will meet passengers and crew and learn to know them intimately-the millionaires, the titied aristocrats, the immigrants, the officers and sailors. You will sit in the Smoking Room and hear that faint grinding jar.
This book will show you what made those nine breathless hours A NIGHT TO REMEMBER.
THE MOTH AND THE STAR
by Aileen Pippett
A fine biography of Virginia Woolf. With an. imagination genuinely creative, Mrs. Pippett .reveals the hypersensitive character of this remarkable woman from her Victorian childhood to her tragic end when she who knew, "It is life that matters," chose death.
SILVER LEOPARD
by F. van Wyck Mason
A novel of the first crusade by the author of CUTLASS EMPIRE and GOLDEN ADMIRAL.
In 1096 a fiery Papal exhortation sent myriad knights swarming from every part of Europe toward Constantinople; some were dedicated to a holy war, some to loot. Thus began the First Crusade.
When Sir Edmund and his band reached the Holy Land, the Infidels quickly discovered that these were iron men who, though thirsty and starving, could fight all day long in heavy armor under Aisa Minor's blistering sun.
DOME OF MANY COLOURED
GLASS
by Post Wheeler and Hallie Erminie Rives
An extraordinary dual autobiography filled with intelligent observation of the world's courts, parliaments and drawing rooms from 1910 to 1935.
Veteran career diplomat Post Wheeler tells the often disturbing story of American diplomacy. Mrs. Wheeler (Hallie Erminie Rives) instills shrewd, witty and penetrating comments on society.
The Library has anoher POTLUCK POGO on the shelves now.


"I wish to marry your daughter, sir."
"Do you drink?"
"Thanks, but let's get this other matter settled first."


FROM:
3 cent stamp


TO:


Send
the Indian
Home


4


THE INDIAN




Full Text
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m m "Gover qTMO Like The Sunskine Volume VII, No. 2 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 14 January 1956 Base Aide For Three Years Leaves Atlantic Amphibious Exercises Slated Here Washington (AFPS)-The first of four joint navy-marine amphibious training exercises in the Caribbean will take place in January, Adm. Jerauld Wright, Atlantic Fleet commander, has announced here. LT G. H. Leach, (standing) relieved LT J. W. Richmond, as aide to RADM W. G. Cooper, ComNavBase last week. LT. Richmond left Saturday, January 7, for California. by Don Tobias The man that has been a combination Division Officer for personnel cmprising the "Flag" division, arranger for most of the honors and ceremonies taking place on the Base, along with being Public Information Officer and Assistant Game Warden left Gtmo on the USNS JIOHNSON last Satuirday. LT John W. Richmond, Aide to three Admirals on the Base during his three year stay here, was relieved by LT George H. Leach, USNR. LT Leach had formerly been attached to NAS. LT Richmond began his Naval career after being graduated from the University of California with a B. A. degree in Business Administration. He entered the service in March, 1943 and was commissioned in July of that year with rank of Ensign in the Navy Reserve. After serving his first hitch in the Navy, LT Richmond went into private business in California. Then in Jan., 1951 he was recalled to active duty and went aboard the USS MISSOURI for 27 months majority of which was served in the Far East. From the "Big .Mo" he came to Guantauaino. for duty as Aide to the Commander of the Naval Base. A few Tiio-iths after reporting aboard lie received notification that he had been promoted to LCDR in the Naval Reserve. It was shortly after his promotion that he decided to drop the "R" in his designation and become regular Navy. In. doing so, it was necessary to accept a lowering in rank and once again he found himself wearing LT's bars. Upon leaving Gtmo LT Richmond, his wife and three children -Susan Marie, John Walker and David Arthur-will spend a 20 day vacation in Los Angeles, Calif. After which he will report aboard the USS GEORGE, DE 697, as Executive Officer. Looking back over his stay at Gtmo, LT Richmond said, "I will always remember the 50 anniversary ceremony of the signing of the treaty between Cuba and the United States which turned this Base over to our Navy. That was on December 10, 1953. It was one of the most outstanding events that happened while I was here." He continued, "It was also a great privilege to serve as personal Aide to not one, but three Admirals-Admiral Atkeson, Admiral Taylor and Admiral Cooper." ADM Fahrion Arrives Vice Admiral F. G. Fahrion, Commander Amphibious Force Atlantic Fleet, arrived on the Base yesterday. He came on his flag ship the USS POCONO, AGC-16. Full honors were given the Vice Admiral who will be at Gtmo until Jan. 30. While here, he will observe the training exercises of the fleet. Brrrr But It's Cold Outside!!! Mother Nature, what have you done ? That was the question posed this week, as the base found itself wrapping up in the nearest available raincoat, peacoat, or what have you. Well, it was quite simple according to the aerology department up at NAS. You see, all this cold weather that we have been having originally forms in Canada. Then, it takes off down through the States on sort of an angle from the Dakotas to Florida. Usually, it stops there, but as was said, Mother got her signals crossed, and that fact combined with some abnormal winds from the north and northwest caused Gtmo and this part of Cuba to suffer from some unusually cold weather. The temperatures that we have been having lately are only 5-8 degrees below normal for this time of the year. Normally the temperature range is from a high of 87 during the day to a low of 61 in the evening. Lately, however, the temperatures have ranged from a high of 75 during the day to a low of somewhere in the upper fifties. As far as existing records go here at Gtmo, the low of approximately 57 degrees that was reached during the evening of Monday, January 9 was the lowest temperature ever recorded for this section. Carnival Time Is Fun Time New Orleans has its Mardi Gras, Guantanamo City its Fiesta, but Guantanamo Bay has its "FUN TIME" at Carnival Time. It is the time when the cares and worries of daily chores are completely forgotten, when the most staid and resrved can let their hair down for three glorious days of fun and frolic. A person doesn't have to be a millionaire, or even a thousandaire, to share in the Carnival Fun Time. The Carnival is the painless way to contribute to many worthy charities which directly benefit from the proce-ds. WHAT IS YOUR STANDING ON THE CARNIVAL SCOREBOARD???? GET BEHIND THE TICKET S A L E S CAMPAIGN AND MAKE YOUR QUOTA!!!! Thousands of marines, 32 navy ships from the Atlantic Fleet Amphibious Force, the battleship Wisconsin, the carrier Siboney, seven destroyers and one submarine will take part in the exercises. All of the amphibious training will be held in the Roosevelt RoadsVieques area of Puerto Rico. The last exercise is expected to end May 5. Vice Adm. Frank G. Fahrion, commander of the Atlantic Fleet over-all command of the exercises. Lt. Gen. Alfred H. Noble, CG of the Atlantic Fleet Marine Force, will direct marine training groups while Rear Adm. Wallace F. Peterson, commander of Amphibious Gp. 2, will supervise naval aspects. Training in air and naval gunfire support of amphibious operations will be the main objectives of the final two exercises. The first two exercises will include a period of training ashore for marine units, which will be followed-up with detailed amphibious operations. They will be concluded with an assault landing at Vieques. A marine regimental combat team will operate in conjunction with supporting naval ships during this phase of the training. Motor Vehicle Inspection Scheduled For Base Soon The semi-annual motor vehicle inspection will be held on the Base as soon as the new license plates arrive from the States. It is expected that this will be sometime this month. NOW is the time to get ready for it if your car is not up to par. The motor vehicle inspection will cover the steering gear, mufflers, brakes, tailpipes, lights, horn, speedometer, windshield wiper, tires. Besides these your car must also be equipped with the following: Fenders, bumpers and windshields. The inspection will cover, but is not limited to these items. The Provost Marshal wishes to impress upon the vehicle operators of the Base, the importance of Windshields and rear windows being in excellent condition. These windows may not have any cracks or holes in them of any kind. Any vehicles that are not passed at -the inspection will be removed from operation until the necessary repairs are made and the vehicle reexamined. Upon arrival of the license tags; a schedule will be published in this paper and the PAPOOSE. 0

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f THE INDIAN Page Two THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAP'T WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C. O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Editorial Staff LTJG J. D. Byerley --------------------------------Officer-Advisor G. L. Henderson, JOC ----------------------------------Editor C. S. Cornett, J02 -----------------------------Managing Editor Staff Reporters: D. D. Hinton, JOSA; and J. C. Curren, JOSA. THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Materials marked AFPS may be used by news mediums provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. A SOB STORY. e We fellows on the staff of the INDIAN have a purpose to fulfill .. that of providing at least one story in each issue that will be of interest to anyone that reads the paper. FIRST OF ALL, the INDIAN is YOUR NEWSPAPER! We simply try to carry out your wishes in publishing the various stories, jokes, cartoons and pinups. Naturally a story concerning a Cub Scout meeting is of no interest to a single man in the barracks. ..BUT it is to the Cub Scout and his parents. Likewise, a story about the Marines means nothing to NAS personnel or a story about new uniform regulations on liberty, of vital importance to the military, while it leaves the Base civilians and dependents cold. Also, many times we get a real fine story in the office here that was written by one of our readers. We look the story over, passibly make minor changes in style and send the story down to the print shop to be set by the Linotype. They send back a proof and everything is hunky-dory. BUT! When we lay out the paper we find that we're short on space and will have to cut out part of JOE READER's story. As soon as the INDIAN comes out on Saturday morning, Joe rushes out and grabs a copy. WHAM! ! "Cheese and Crackers' Them #$%90# $%*% down at the INDIAN cut my story! ! !Lemmee at that phone! Joe calls us up AND DO WE CATCH IT! ! The point we're trying to make though is this. ...WE NEED stories from you readers if we are going to be able to give you a paper you like. ...Not only stories but cartoons, photos, jokes and YES-even sexy pinups. (But not TOO sexy!) WE CAN'T PROMISE that we'll use them right away in the next INDIAN or even in the next six issues. ..AND we may even change them around a little. ...BUT WE WILL use them, if at all possible sooner or later. SO IF YOU have anything of interest that you would like to see in the INDIAN. ...Drop around and see us. We're located in the NavSta Special Services Building behind the door marked "WGBY". Better yet, GIVE US A CALL AT 9-6-1-5. IN MEMORIAM LTJG JEFF JONES The Chaplain's Corner "CAN YOU FIND IT" Some years ago I came upon a gathering of people on the outskirts of a small town. Curious, I stopped the car to see what was going on. It was a travelling show-shades of the old medicine shows which I had not seen since a youngster. I was attracted by the bally-ho of the hawker. His ability to mix Biblical quotation with quotes from Shakespeare and attribute the mixture to one or the other was something to hear. I have been reminded of this experience recently by a saying going about that I suspect has a similar origin. Whether it has been used to salve the conscience of the promiscuous or to discredit the Bible is only a matter of who uses it. The misquote I am speaking of begins: "It is better to plant your seed-." I challenge anyone to find it in God's Word. The Bible verse misquoted is Genesis 38:9. To understand this verse you must read Deuteronomy 25: 5-10, which reveals simply but specifically the ancient Hebrew law established to preserve the family. To insure the continuation of each family, the law made it the responsibility of a brother to take a deceased brother's wife as his own wife, if there were no children to carry on the family name. No one familiar with the moral teaching of God's Word would repeat it as a Biblical quotation. Certainly it could never be justification for immorality. If you can find the misquote in God's Word, please let me know the book, chapter and verse. Karl G. Peterson, Chaplain, USN Card Forms OK To File (This is the second in a series of eight articles on federal income tax filing for the year 1955. The articles are based on information furnished to AFPS by the American Institute of Accountants, the national organization of certified public accountants.) The government provides two forms for individual income tax returns. If you choose the wrong one, you from many possible tax savings. The easiest way to file is to use the size of a check, which anyone can fill out if he is able to write his name and address and a few other simple facts. You just send it in with your withholding slips and the government takes care of the rest. If you owe more tax than was withheld you will get a bill for the difference. If more was withheld than you owe, you will get a refund check. The tax rules permit you to use the card form if your gross income consisted only of wages, dividends or interest totalling less than $5,000, and if you did not have more than $100 of gross income apart from that listed on your W-2 withholding slips. Before deciding to use the card Form 1040A, you should consider these facts: 1. Your tax will be figured from a table which allows you a deduction of about 10 per cent of your income instead of itemized deductions for contributions, taxes, interest paid, medical and dental expenses, etc. 2. There is no provision in this form for filing as the "head of a household," as a "surviving spouse," or for claiming special credits for dividends and retirement income. If you are sure that these two points would not cost you any tax savings, and your income is within the limits for filing a Form 1040A, you might as well use this simple card form. If you decide to use the regular Form 1040, you still have the choice of itmizing your deductions or using a standard deduction which generally amounts to about 10 per cent of your income. You are likely to save by itemizing your deductions if you: 1. Own real estate. 2. Had unusual medical expense. 3. Had deductible child-care expense. 4. Suffered losses from fire, storm, accident, or theft. may automatically cut yourself off the simple Form 1040A. It's a card 5. Made fairly large contributions. Form 1040 has been rearranged this year, so that although it still contains four pages, a taxpayer whose income was entirely from wages needs to use only the first one or two pages. Pages 3 and 4 are for other types of income and for computing the special credits for dividends and retirement income. The instructions that come with your tax forms give further information. Help is also available from the Internal Revenue Service, which urges you to consult a properly qualified advisor if you need outside assistance. (AFPS) Sunday, 15 January 1956 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 000-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Latter Day Salata Sunday-1100-Naval Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K G. Peteron,, ClC, USN Page Two 4 Saturday, 14 January 1956

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Saturday, 14 January 1956 F T G Bulletin The temperature on last Monday morning was some place in the high fifties Fahrenheit, which is about 20 degees below zero "Cubana". The coldest person on the base was the sailor riding down Sherman Ave. on a scooter with only a white hat, a skivie shirt, a pair of shorts, and some shoes. Some people just aren't properly calibrated and tuned in. People are even inquiring whether or not blues may be worn while shipriding. The answer is yes. The FTG Officers and those of the Base Staff and Station had a golf match on Saturday. The results were disastrous for FTG. The Staff and Station won by a score of 16 to 11. LCDR Dempsey defeated LCDR Kuba 2/z to 1, Chief Mach Bush defeated LT Noga 3 to 0, ADM Cooper and CDR Patterson played to a tie, LTJG Byerley was defeated by CDR Skadowski 1 to 2 and LTJG Clarke was defeated by LT Williams 0 to 3. The difference came in the team matches which FTG lost 7 to 2. All of the Fleet Training Group are stunned by the death on 10 January of LTJG Jones of the Damages Control Department as a result of a sudden and swift attack of bulbar polio apparently contracted while he was on leave in the U.S. very recently. Our deepest sympathy will be extended to his family in Texas. John Molloy RM1 of the Communications Department left Guantanamo by Flaw on the 10th with his wife and their two children. John is to report to U.S.S. GEARING DD-710 for duty. LCDR Marvin Hamlin, LT Harold Yelton and ENS Henry Meloche Jr. reported aboard last week. Welcome! PTA News The Parent-Teacher Association will hold a special meeting on Tuesday evening, Januray 17, at the naval base school assembly. The meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m. The meeting is a combined January-February PTA meeting and is planned especially to avoid interference with the Guantanamo Bay Carnival activities early in February. The program will feature 16 mm movie of the Antarctic Expedition of QMC Monte of the Naval Base. The program should be of special interest to all Naval Base personnel and all parents and friends are urged to attend. Attendance awards will be given as before and all parents are urged to be prompt in order to be counted in the contest. BASE CALENDAR Saturday, January 14 Square and Circle Club-Phillip's Park -7:30 p.m. Tuesday, January 17 American Legion and Auxiliary-Community Hall-7:30 p.m. Wednesday. January 18 Toastmaster's Club-Officer's Club-6:30 p.m. Thursday. January 19 Navy Wives Club--Luncheon at the Marine Family Restaurant-1:00 p.m. Thursday, January 19 Felloweraft Club 1078-practice meeting -Community Hall-7:30 p.m. ED. NOTE: The Indian once again extends a bid for schedules of meetings of the various Base organizations. Please call 9615 and give us the schedule of your meetings. MEMORANDUM From: Commanding Officer, Naval Station To: Mayor, Villamar-Bargo Council Subj: Villamar-Bargo Decoration Christmas Contest; winner of 1. First Prize goes to the participants of the Group Scene between RH-262, RH-264 and RH-266: RH-262-A LAIROME, P. D. CIV. PWD RH-262-B INGRAM, J. E. AB1 NAS RH-262-C SURROZ, E. D. MMC FTG RH-262-D MILLAR, R. H. SK3 NSD RH-264-A COWARD, A. R. RH-264-B LADD, C. E. RH-264-C CICIRETTI, V. RH-264-D NICHOLS, H. L. RH-266-A NEILL, J. L. RH-266-B BUNGER, H. P. RH-266-C FREY, J. L. RH-266-D RALSTON, J. B. 2. Second Prize winner: RH-84-B KRAFT, R. A. 3. Third Prize winner: RH-609-A NELSON, J. R. 4. Fourth Prize winners: CB-34-B BREITKERENTZ, DH-105 O'BRIEN, F. H. RH-609C GIBSON, P. E. RH-278D HUDDY, N. W. SH1 AT1 AM3 DC1 CIV. CIV. CIV. CIV. NAS VU-10 VU-10 FTG PWD PWD PWD NAVSTA DCC FTG GM1 FTG R. D. EN2 TMC ATC CIV. NAVSTA FTG NAS PWD W. R. CARUTHERS USO Show Bangs The first USO show of the year started off with a fizzle and ended up with a bang. A large crowd of enlisted men, "brown bagers," and officers enjoyed a break in the usual routine of the nightly movie at the Naval Station lyceum. The show hampered by the failure of the public address system opened with a Cuban dancer and kep the crowd's attention until the last act was over. A fast talking, laugh-a-minute Master of Ceremonies slighted no one in his laughproducing jokes on the military system. In mid-performance the PA system was finally repaired and the audience received the full effect of the female folk singer, who was the hit of the evening. Prior to the show at the lyceum the group presented a 30 minute program over WGBY-TV. This was the last stop for the troup on their tour of North Africa and the Caribbean. Next month another USO troup will put on another show according to the Special Services officer. WHAT'S 0OIN' STATESIDE LAFRA NEW S POW Code Of Conduct The use of cigarettes in the U.S. rose to a reported 414 billion in 1955 as compared with 402 billion in 1954, according to the Agriculture Department. ...The department predicted that the increase would go on if employment and income continued, but added a drop was possible because of state taxes on cigarettes. ...The agency also reported that the biggest output of cigarettes was 4351/ billion in 1952, a record production. King-size, filtertip cigarettes, said the department, were in demand in '55 while tobacco for pipes and roll-your-own cigarettes dropped slightly. The building industry is being geared for another banner year. Leading spokesmen in the business say construction expenditures will jump to more than $44 billion in 1956, $2 billion more than in 1955. ..Another $21 billion will be added for alterations and maintenance of structures already standing, bringing the construction volume to a record-breaking high of $65.5 billion. ...However, their sunny optimism is somewhat different from the outlook of some economists surveyed by F. W. Dodge Corp. ...They believe that new construction will drop $1 billion from the 1955 high to $41 billion. U.S. women not only live longer than their male counterparts but every year they are living a little longer ...According to a Cornell University expert, men who are 65 in 1970 will have an even chance of reaching the age of 79, an increase of one-and-ahalf years over present life expectancy ...But for women of 65 life expectancy will be 83 or three years longer than they now can expect to live. Never ask a man raised on a chicken farm if he was once a happy, barefoot boy. The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Fleet Reserve Association is having a Valentine Dance at the Flamingo Room on Thursday, 19 January from 2000 to 2400. This dance is being held for all Fleet Reserve members and their immediate families. Music will be provided by the Naval Base Combo. Prizes will be awarded during the evening and a buffet style lunch will be served. Special uniform has been authorized. Texas Voters! Attention, native Texans residing here on Gtmo! Servicemen from Texas must pay a poll tax of $1.75 in the county of their residence on enlistment, to qualify to vote. A poll tax receipt may be secured prior to 31 January 1956. An application form may be secured from tax assesor and collector in residence county or servicemen may pay poll tax by remittance through US mail to county tax collector. A remittance slip with a statement in writing must be signed under oath. Servicemen who are married may sign for their wives and vice versa. The following information must be included in statement to enable tax collector to fill out blank form poll tax receipt. 1. Name 2. Age and race. 3. Length of time applicant has resided in state 4. Whether native born or naturalized citizen 5. State of US or foreign country where taxpayer was born 6. Length of time applicant has resided in county. 7. Voting precinct in which applicant lives, if known, otherwise address. 8. Applicant's occupation and P. 0. address or if living in incorporated city, ward, street and number or residence in such city. Lectures Begin Monday Commencing Monday, Jan. 16, lectures on the Code of Conduct will be given to Naval Station personnel and associated activities. The lectures are mandatory and failure to attend without sufficient reason will result in disciplinary action. The series will deal with the conduct of an American serviceman taken prisoner. Each division will see to it that the men in the division go to the lecture on the designated day. The series should be completed by the end of this month. A page will be inserted in the individual's service record after he has attended the lecture. I G Inspects Gtmo Marines Brigadier General Carson, A. Roberts, Inspector General of the Marine Corps, departed the Base at 1500 yesterday after an annual inspection of the Marine Corps Facilities here which commenced Wednesday. The general, accompanied on the inspection by Colonel William A. Kurtis, Colonel John I. Williamson Jr., and Captain Carroll E. Kilduff, was piped aboard the base with full military honors when he arrived via government at 1145 Wednesday. Next stop on the general's agenda is inspection of the Marine Security Guard at the American Embassy in Port Au Prince, Haiti. 0 0 THE INDIAN Page Three

PAGE 4

am Page Four by Joe Duffy Referees I think that I shall never see A satisfactory referee About whose head a halo shines Whose merits rate reporter's lines One who calls them as they are And not as I should wish, by far. A gent who leans not either way But lets the boys decide the play A guy who'll sting the coach who yaps From Siwash Hi or old Millsaps Poems are made by fools like me But only God could referee. -Larry Newman I don't know who Mr. Newman is, but from the parody he wrote on referees he certainly showed an understanding towards the basketball official. Officiating is one of the most difficult jobs related to sports, and a thankless one. And I might add that the game of basketball rates as the most difficult sport to referee. The fast pace of the game, and the numerous faults that a player can commit either intentionally or unintentionally presents an enormous challenge to the referee. Monday night on the Marine Site basketball court, the Naval Base Inter-Command league gets started on its 90-game schedule to inaugerate the 1956 sports program. The inaugural match will pit the youngsters from the High School against the Naval Air Station Flyers, followed by a second game between the VU-10 Mallards and the Marine quintet. The opening toss for the first game will be at 1830; the second game will start fifteen minutes after the first game is completed. The rest of the week's schedule shapes up as follows: Tuesday--FTG vs MCB-1 and Naval Station vs Hospital Wednesday-High School vs Leeward and NAS vs Supply Thursday-VU-10 vs NavSta and MCB-1 s Hospital Friday-Marine vs Leeward and Supply vs FTG In a practice game last week the Hospital-Dental team came from behind to edge out the Seabees by one point in an exciting battle. It was practically a repeat of the final game played in last year's tournament when the same two teams met for the tournament championship. ...Dr. Doohen has a smooth running squad and will be hard to beat this year. Their superiority in controlling the rebounds was the deciding factor in their win over the Seabees. February Exam: The personnel office reminds all hands that the Feb. advancement exams are scheduled for Feb. 7, 14, 21 and 28. First testing date will be the CPO exam, the next for Third Class, then Second Class and finally First Class. Those who have not taken and passed their proficiency exams will not be allowed to take the advancement tests. Seabee's coach, Chief Brooks, speaks in confident tones of his team's chances in this years race. His club is rated as a top contender on the basis of a strong first team and its reserve strength. ...Of the other entries in the league, the Marines and VU-10 should rate among the leaders if pre-season form means anything. ...Watching the Seabees and Corpmen in their practice game reminded us of the wrong basket toss made by Moebus of the Hospital team in last year's final match. In the closing minutes of the title game, the Corpmen held a three-point lead over their Seabee rivals when a held ball was called under the Seabee basket. On the subsequent toss-up at the foul circle, Moebus got the tap, pivoted and swished the cords of his opponent's basket for a two-point gift. The mental lapse had no bearing on the outcome of the game, however, for the Corpmen rallied and held their slim lead until the final whistle. The win gave the tournament title to the Hospital-Dental team who had finished third in the season's race behind Naval Station and the Naval Air Station clubs. The MCB-1 squad, hampered with cancellations on their record still managed to finish fourth and qualify for the play-off berth. ...The High School team may not finish high up in the race, but they do add plenty of color with their girl cheerleaders and routing section at all their games. This little scholastic touch to our athletic program is like frosting on a cake. Last season the High School had the league's high scorer in Edgar Heimer, whose deadly accuracy from up close gave him high point average and total points title. Edgar has graduated and is now enrolled at Florida State U. in the freshmen class. Another school player who rated tops with the fans was Jimmy Cavanaugh, whose comical antics in the game kept the school spirit high when defeat appeared inevitable. Jimmy is a plebe ai the Naval Academy this year. ..This year the games will be played at Marine Site on Monday and Wednesday and at Fleet Recreation on Tuesday and Thursday with Friday dates alternating between the two courts. ...The first Friday date will be played at the Marine's court, the following Friday, Jan. 27th, play goes to the Fleet court. The remaining Friday dates will follow this rotation. Check this column for the weekly schedule, and when your team is playing come out and give the boys your support. A cheering section sometimes is worth an extra five points. Fleet Reserve News Branch 100, of the Fleet Reserve Association held it's regular monthly meeting Tuesday night with the initiation of shipmates Harrison and Schoonover into the branch. A buffet dinner was served and the guest speaker was Chaplain J. J. Sullivan who gave an impressive speech on the chaplains in the Navy and their duties in the time of war and peace. A special meeting will be held on Tuesday the 24th of January at 8:00 p.m. at the Community Auditorium for the election of officers. A buffet dinner will be served after the meeting. All members are urged to attend tais meeting. SPORTS REVIEW Gtmo Green Thumb This week's article for the resident of Gtmo with the green thumb deals with further improving the looks of lawns and grounds with flowers. The two categories of flowers that will be discussed are the seed and bulb flowers. First, in starting flowers from seed, they may be grown in two ways; direct sowing in the open, or the planting of seeds in flats. Direct sowing in the open, or the bed in which they will remain is self-explanatory, but the business of seeding the flowers in flats is a more complicated and serious business. The flat culture has these advantages; (a) increased seed germination; (b) easier handling; (c) better seeding growth. The following is an approved method in preparing a flat. 1. A flat is a shallow box of convenient size, with drainage holes in the bottom. 2. The soil used in fiats should be a good grade of garden soil containing organic matter. 3. Firm the soil to within a half inch of the top of the flat with a brick or a block of wood. Flood the flat and drain it. Broadcast the seeds onto the wet surface. Then, cover lightly. Covering seeds too deeply is a common error. If the seeds are just barely hidden you can expect best results. 4. After the seeds have been covered with soil, place a wet newspaper over the flat and keep it in the coolest possible situation. 5. After germination, the flats must be placed where they can get an abundance of light. 6. When the seedlings show about four true leaves, they may be transplanted to beds where they are to bloom. Here is a note on proper bulb planting. Take special care to plant your bulbs the right depth, as shallow planting causes much failure in successful bulb growth. In preparing the planting pocket for your bulbs, be sure the bottom is broad enough to permit the bulb base to rest on the soil. If an air pocket is left, the roots may quite likely dry out before the bulb has started to grow. It is suggested that if complete information is desired on the planting of seeds and bulbs, acquire a a recommended gardening catalog or quide. Ladies Golf Shots by Bucky Pierce The Ladies Golf Association wishes to extend a sincere welcome to all lady golfers to come out and join us on Wednesday morning. For details call me at 8607. Welcome to three new members who gave the third fighters some keen competition this past week. They are Marge Kubicki, Ruth McGowan, and Margaret Wall. Results of last Wednesday's Low Gross-Low Net Tournament follows: 1st .Flight: Low Gross-Edie Ware Low Net-Bev Larson 2nd Flight: Low Gross-Annette Forester Low Net-Lavaria Butler 3rd Flight: Low Gross-Dotty Deere Low Net-Bucky Pierce 9 Saturday. 14 JTanav 691 4m The Fish Tale (s) by Pat Aldridge Ain't every week news is so plentiful no scratchin' 'n diggin' is necessary in order to fill up a fishin' type colyum. It do get kinda tedjus them times when the goldurned fish seem downright contrary and the 'Guster don't come out'n the rocks for no one. The river gets muddy and the bay gets choppy so the Snook ain't snookin' and the Snapper ain't snappin' and ye olde colyumnist ain't got nuthin' about which to tell ya all. Down to the sailboat locker, there's a feller what goes by the handle, Firmin "Ben" Paliva. That ain't exactly news to no one what does a lot of sailing' or fishin' on account Ben has bin around for a right long time and his reputation as a durned near clarvoyant fishin' guide is wide spread around Guantanamo Bay. Well, sir, Ben has got hisself a party boat. Now, "party boat" don't mean no dancin' on the decks, that is unless'n someone nabbs a monsterous catch and there's pure reason fer a bit o' hornpipe'n. It do denote, howsomeover, there's gonna be a fair size vessel, under the skillful skippership of Firmin "Ben" Paliva, in a couple more weeks, all set to accomodate six people on a guided fishin' expedition twice a day just about every day. As plans set now there'll be two periods, from six in the morning to two in the afternoon and from four in the afternoon to twelve midnite. This here boat, with a four cylinder Willys inboard, can sashay outside the harbor and search out the current thrivin' places of the biggest fish hereabouts. Won't be too much searchin' with Ben at the helm makin' the selections. He do got a right smart reputation for knowin' just where them criters is the most bountiful and the most likely to be real hungry. As fer the cost, well, Ben will be workin' hand 'n glove, so the sayin' goes, with Special Services and, fer approximately three and a half pesos fer that eight hour period, there's included not only the boat trip and guide service but bait and rod 'n reel if necessary. She'll be takin' off, and coming' in down to the sailboat locker, the party boat that is, and take a guess as to who has got one of the initial reservations! Somethin' new and nice has come to the fishin' folk of Guantanamo Bay along about two weeks from this here advance notice. This here's a chance to get outside where the really big 'uns dwell and we're fer that. ain't you? Gettin' back to today, and the recent past, young Bren Crockett ain't kilt hisself no bar he do be main' like a smart feller out to Granadillo Point in a Croaker hole he's discovered and has bin delvin' into along with his Pa an Pa's new boat. Accordin' to reports, young Crockett is just about as apt as Pa be with that rod 'n reel. The 'teen agers is doin' right well in the spear fishin' department, too, what with sweet eatin' turtles being' captured by the young 'uns and some purty big piscatorial critters to boot. Makes ya feel the touch a' old Father Time when the kids come in after fourteen hours of divin' 'n swimming' all in a hurry to get cleaned up fer four or five hours of dancin' or skatin', now don't it? THE INDIAN 0 ,aura 14Jna 15

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Saturday, 14 January 1956 NSD Gtmo Is A Big Business; Does Multi-Million Dollar's Worth A Year Imagine a remote island about 1,000 miles from the United States, then imagine the task of bringing the luxuries and necessities to which American people are accustomed, to the inhabitants of this island. It's an operation which requires extensive planning and clock-like coordination. This is only part of the mission of the Naval Supply Depot here at Guantanamo. NSD has kept pace with the growth of the Naval Base and has supported the various Base activities in an effective manner. For example: Materials issued by the Depot have totalled approximately $41,000,000; money disbursed by the Disbursing officer has totalled $27,000,000 which is a total business of $68,000,000 in the past two years. These figures indicate that NSD Gtmo is carrying on a big business! The Depot is commanded by Capt. R. A. Williams assisted by Executive Officer, CDR C. E. Lee. LCDR John F. Bayer and LCDR L. G. Maxwell head up the Fiscal and Planning departments respectively. LT(jg) R. F. Kezer is Asst. Planning Officer. The Planning department is of great interest because through this department the supply operation is coordinated and developed. The Fiscal department in addition to doing all of the allotment accounting for the Base activities is responsible to the Disbursing division and Payroll division. Planning department, in a staff capacity, advises and assists the commanding officer in the achievement and maintenance of effectiveness and economy in the operation of the Depot; prepares budgets estimates; administers budgetary controls; performs management PAYING a man his travel claim is R. C. Densmore, DKSN. Densmore works in the Public Voucher section of Disbursing. Elsa K. Simon and Gloria G. Castellanos also work in the same section. They average 175 claims per month and pay out a monthly average of $10,000 in claims or vouchers. planning and review functions, etc. This department is divided into three divisions-War Plans division, Management Control division and the Statistical division. How much money was spent for the maintenance and operation of the Naval Base, Guantanamo during the fiscal year 1955? Approximately $8,053,419. Where did this information come from? From the Fiscal department, NSD. The Fiscal department performs the accounting functions for all Base commands and activities with the exception of the Naval hospital, Dental clinic and Marine corps. Because of this responsibility, they are advised of all authorizations needed for the maintenance, operation and expansion of facilities. In connection with this responsibility, they are advised of all authorizations needed for the maintenance, operation and expansion of facilities. In connection with this responsibility, the Fiscal department acts in the manner of a commercial bank in that funds are made available and expenditures against these funds are accounted forlike a checking account in a bank. Disbursing division of the Fiscal department, under the direction of LT K. C. Deere, Disbursing Officer, and assisted by CWO Conrad Womble, Asst. Disbursing Officer, has the responsibility of collecting and and accounting for all cash deposits made by the various activities of the Base. The Disbursing division performs the functions of a bank in connection with cashing payroll checks for payment to employees who are paid from appropriated funds. Large amounts of change are furnished to various activities. With the exception of the CB's, all personnel of the Base, military and civilian, whose salary is financed by appropriated funds are paid by the Disbursing division. A grand total of 3,000 military pay records and 2,700 civilian pay records are handled in the Disbursing office. An astounding figure of $1,000,000 in cash payments is paid out each month. Sometimes $150,000 will go out on one military pay day. When the fleet is in, the Disbursing division's work is increased. They have to handle the pay for the smaller ships having no disbursing officer. Mrs. Betty Lou Tipler, Gtmo's own "pistol-packing Mama," is the agent cashier for the office. Reason for the "pistol-packing Mama" moniker is that she acompanies the pay truck on Fridays when it goes about the Base paying civilians; on these money hauling journeys Mrs. Tipler totes a gun. F. J. "Pop" Conners, fiscal accountant supervisor, sees to it that all goes well in the house of greenbacks. There are 11 military personnel connected with Disbursing division. LT K. C. Deere, Disbursing Officer, deals out $20 bills at the pay window in the office. At this window LT Deere handles special pay for both military and civilian. CHANGING OVER last year's pay records to this year's are W. G. Geihm, SN, and B. C. Jones, SN. The two of them handle Marine and Ship's department accounts. In the background is F. J. Hanselman, DK3. LCDR J. F. Bayer, Fiscal Officer, sits at his desk in the "big office" at NSD talking with A. Heimer, Fiscal accountant. The Fiscal department does all the accounting for Base activities and takes care of civilian pay rolls. In the department are 74 civilians and 13 military personnel. 4 THE INDIAN M Page Five

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M Page Six THE INDIAN Saturday, 14 January 1956 Sports Round Up by Joe Celentano, JO1, USN Another year ...New faces New records ...The Minneapolis Lakers of the National Basketball Assn. have released rookie Bob Williams, who last year starred at Sheppard AFB, Tex. He's now touring with a western unit of the Harlem Globetrotters Columbia backfield coach Paul Governali was a teammate of Maj. Wally Williams, Paris Island, S. C., grid coach, on the 1945 El Toro, Calif., marine team. The major just finished his first year at the island, his 17th of football and his fifth as a coach. A/2C Bruce Talford, formerly the editor of the Portal Journal aT Sampson AFB, N. Y., has joined the sports staff at AFRS-NY .. AFPS All-Star Buck McPhail was voted by opposing teams as the outstanding player in the Fourth Arimy football conference. The exOklahoma All-American was also the most valuable player on the All-Army team named by Army Times ...Don Branby, Colorado's All-American end in '52, is still picking up football laurels. Branby, now stationed at Wiesbaden, Germany, was named to the All-Air Force team by Air Force Times. Secretary of Defense Charles E. Wilson was grand marshal of the 67th annual Tournament of Roses Parade ...One of the featured units in the parade was the U.S. Air Force Band ...A combined marine corps band, which included units from San Diego, Camp Pendleton and El Toro, also paraded. .All-American quarterback Earl Morraill, the Spartan who directed the Michigan State eleven to the 17-14 Rose Bowl win over UCLA, led the nation's punters in '55 with and average of 42.9 yards per boot. Just for the records-Jimmy Swink TCU's great halfback, has been named to 18 All-America teams. He reported to the Horned Frogs' backetball team the day after the Cotton Bowl game .. The Newark (N. J.) Athletic Club selected 800-meter champ Tom Courtney, now at Ft. Dix, N. J., as the outstanding amateur athlete of New Jersey for 1955 .. Frank Sevigne, former Georgetown track coach, has moved to Nebraska U. In '54 he helped conduct the inter-service track championships. Last winter he helped coach service thinclads prepping for the Pan-Am Games. Navy Picks Location Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has announced plans to establish a $40,000,000 jet air field in the vicinity of Meridian, Mass., as part of the Naval Air Training Command. The 4,500-acre field will be located 15 miles northeast of Meridian. No target date has yet been set for its completion. The Navy said about 1,200 enlisted men and 115 officers will be stationed at the field to support advanced training operations for aviation cadets. The Navy plans to ask Congress at its next session for authorization to acquire the land. Navy Secretary Charles S. Thomas said the Meridian area best fulfills the need for an additional naval air training field. It was selected after consideration of numerous other sites, he said. IN THE Management Control division of the Planning department, NSD, R. F. Radcliffe, organization and methods examiner (efficiency expert), goes over forms with Mrs. Carol Martin, secretary for Planning dept. Not shown in the picture, but working in the same office is Edwin Heimer, Fiscal accounting clerk. More $, Better Housing Cited As Service Needs Washington (AFPS)-The armed forces would be more successful in attracting and retaining the high quality personnel they need by increasing financial benefits, improving housing conditions and encouraging a more normal family life. This was indicated in a survey of civilian attitudes toward milta top quality personnel by rais, itary service as a career conducted ing financial benefits, encouraging by Public Opinion Surveys, Inc., a more normal family life whereof Princeton, N. J., for the Defense ever possible and improving housDepartment's Office of Armed ing conditions. Forces Information and Education. The survey among teen-agers The analysis is now being studied showed young people saw little by the DOD and the military servprestige in life as an enlisted man. ices to find where improvements Greater opportunities to advance can be made in present policies and in civilian life, lack of adequate programs affecting military perfamily life and inadequate financial sonnel. The findings also will be rewards were the main reasons used as a basis for action on corgiven why more officers and EM recting any public misconceptions did not stay in the service. "They revealed by the survey. get bored, was an oftstated reason. The survey used two groupsTeen-agers held careers as offiadult civilians and 16 to 20-yearcers in higher regard than did the old males-to measure public atadult group. titude toward a military career. Most of the male teen-agers were The DOD said the study also inclined to look upon their military sought to establish "a baseline service as an onerous obligation" from which a program could be to get over with as quickly as launched to enhance the prestige possible. Despite their overall faof a military career in order to vorable attitude toward the new attract and retain high quality reserve program, less than one in personnel." 10 said he planned to take adFive major conclusions were vantage of it. However this can drawn from the sampling of adult be traced in part to a wide lack of civilians. They are: understanding of the reserve pro1. A military career, whether as gram. an officer or an enlisted man, does The youths selected the Air not carry great prestige among Force as their favorite branch of adults at the present time. In the service, with the Army and Navy public mind inadequate financial following. Most of them expect rewards, dislike of service discito see the U.S. in another war pine and regimentation, lack of during their lifetimes. adequate family life and less onHalf the adults and 40 per cent nortunity to advance than in civilof the teen-agers listed education ian life are the greatest drawbacks. and training as the major advan2. The best educated group held tags of a service career, while a lower opinion of both officers about 30 per cent of both groups and EM than did those with less said the outstanding disadvantage education. was the lack of an adequate fai3. The civilian public does not ily life. have a clear idea of the role of Of the civilians questioned, 71 the various branches of the service per cent considered military perduring wartime. sonnel to be desirable members of 4. Civilian attitudes toward milithe community, while 11 per cent tary service are based mostly on believed they were not. reports from people who have been The survey among civilian adults in uniform and from personal also indicated that: service experience. The influence 1. Only about 27 per cent defiof mass communications media annicely would be displeased if their pears to be of secondary importsons took up a military career. ane.2. Seventy-four per cent believed 5. The military servi-es would the officer places duty above perbe more likely to attract and resonal welfare. Only 11 per cent Ozma Of Oz According to, Mrs. Thelma Minard, director, tickets are now available for the Little Theater Children's Workshop production of the "Ozma of Oz." The sale of tickets will be conducted by the members of the cast with tickets available at the boxoffice the night of the first performance, January 20, and the following afternoon performances on the 21 and 22. There will be a full cast rehearsal on Sunday January 15. All members of the cast are urged to be present, as the rehearsal is one of the most important. Also, from Mrs. Minard, we learned that Dorothy, the little girl, who finds herself in the land of Oz, is more than ready to take on her task of rescuing the Queen of Ev and her ten children from the evil and cruel King Ruggido and his helper, Kaliko. Now Ya Know Q-I obtained a GI home loan when the maximum guarantee was $4,000. Since then, it was raised to $7,500 .Would I therefore be entitled to another GI home loan to be guaranteed for the difference, or $3,500? A-Yes. You would be entitled to another home loan having a maximum guarantee of $3,500. Q-I am a disabled veteran in school under Public Law 16. Would I be entitled to VA dental treatment if I need it to prevent interruption of training? A-Yes. You would be entitled to dental treatment to avoid interrupting your training. A-No. Under the law, a GI loan cannot be placed on property outside the United States or its territories or possessions. Q-In computing my yearly income for VA pension purposes, do I include only my take-home salary or my gross salary including all deductions? A-You must include your gross salary, rather than your net takehome salary after deductions. Q-As a Korea veteran, I have 120 days from the date of my discharge to obtain Korea GI term insurance. What would happen if I were to wait until the last day, and it happened to be on a Saturday or Sunday when the VA was not conducting business? A-If the final day of the 120day period falls on a Saturday, Sunday or holiday, the time for obtaining Korea GI term insurance would be extended to include the first workday that followed. Q-I am planning to take graduate courses at college under the Korea GI Bill. What does VA consider to be full-time graduate college training ? A-There are no set number of hours you are required to take. For graduate students, VA accepts the word of the school as to whether veterans are pursuing their training full-time or part-time. said officers place personal considerations first. 3. On the matter of military pay, 42 per cent of the teen-agers. and 39 per cent of the adults thought the military shold be paid more than civilians in comparable jobs, 34 per cent of the teenagers and 43 per cent of the adults said they should be paid about the same, 16 per cent of the younger men and 11 per cent of the adults thought military men should be paid less. THE INDIAN Saturday, 14 January 1956

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Em THE INDIAN Ahoy Skippers! by P. E. Gibson The holiday racing events offered new challenges to all participants in the form of some really rough weather and some professional competition. Special permission was obtained to exceed the normal sailing area boundaries and this served to include additional pleasure to an already exciting sport. Competition was keen and both races were over 15 miles long with each skipper tacking along his own cleverly conceived course. Remarkably all boats converged closed to the finish line for breath-taking finishes! FIRST RACE First Place: P. E. Gibson, ATC Second Place: Dan Hunter, ALC/AP Third Place: CDR A. Archie Fourth Place: C. R. Collins, ETC Fifth Place: CWO R. J. Harper In the second event, held later in the week, first place went to three crew members of the Schooner Vema. The Guantanamo Bay Sailing Yacht Club invited these people to participate and we must say we learned some things from them and sincerely enjoyed their participation. SECOND RACE First Place: Crew of the Vema Second Place: Dan Hunter, ALC/AP Third Place: CDR Gardes Fourth Place: P. E. Gibson, ATC Fifth Place: CWO R. J. Harper We are now looking forward to the commencement of the Spring Series and spirited competition with the new skippers that turned out recently. Square & Circle Club The Square and Circle Club is having its regular Saturday night meeting tonight, at Phillips Park beginning at 7:30. Any base couple or single man with a date is urged to attend, especially if you like to square dance. The Square and Circle is a comparatively new organization, formed just last May by "Pappy" Stone, Howard Bungar and Ernie Dean. The main purpose of the club, which has a membership of approximately 20 couples, is just to get out and have some good old fashioned fun square dancing. The meetings are held on alternate Saturday nights. The Club is trying to raise money to buy its own record player and new square dance records, therefore dues are paid yearly and a donation is accepted at every meeting. Any couple interested in the organization is again invited to attend tonight's meeting. Also, the club wishes that any one here on the base with a square dance record collection, or if they are an experienced caller please contact Trev Hamilton at 8302, or Ernie or Betty Dean at 9638. American Legion Post by Armand V. Ward The Guantanamo Bay Post No. 1, American Legion will hold it's regular meeting Tuesday, 17 January at 1930. This meeting will be the official end of the membership drive and should be very interesting in that both teams are confident of winning the drive. One source of information reveals that the team under Chief Adams is quite confident of bringing in a total of at least 100 new members and Chief Lieakos states that Chief Adams' team will need more than 100 to be sure of winning. Of course there could be a lot of smoke being blown but Tuesday night will tell the tale. In view of the above, this promises to be one of the most interesting meetings ever held here and all members are urged to attend and help get all these new members initiated into the Post. It is also to the interest of each member to come on out and find out for sure if he will enjoy having a meal served to him or if he will be on the serving end. Don't forget-The Date, Tuesday 17 January, The Time-1930. The Place-Community Hall, Marina Point. Teenage Round-up by Jere & Pat Everyone had a big ball at the Sunday School hayride last night! Seems as though "Friday the 13th" means good luck instead of bad. Sob ...the poor seniors were left out! Too cold to dance anyway! ! Now for the DID YA SEE .. Sylvia and her joke books? ? ? ? ? Anita, Eunice and Nancy H. chasing guiness? ? ? ? ? Que Pasa, y'all? ? ? ? Becky and Don playing tennis? ? ? ? Who won, Becky? ? ? ? Bobbie and Betty Stone: "The Naughty 'Ladies' of Shady Lane"? ? ? ? Keenan doing nothing???? The "Seven Little Fojts. er. Foys"? ? ? ? Rosie and her jeep friend???? Dee Dee's two "little Dons"'? ? ? ? Peggy, Willy, Sandy and Eddie horseback riding Sunday afternoon??? Hey Sandy .been riding long? ? ? ? Judy Inman? ? ? ? Well, that's all the news we could pick up for this time, but we'll be back next week with more. Don't forget the basketball game Monday night at Marine Site. Come on out and support your team. Bye now! !!!! Navy Wives Club by Louise Smith The regular business meeting of the Navy Wives Club was held in the Girl Scouts Hut on Marina Point at 8 p.m. January 5. Twenty members were present including one new member, Mary Jeffris, and several guests. The club president, Elma Franklin was in charge of the program. Many new activities and projects are underway for the new year inclusive of Volunteer Service at the Naval Hospital. Also on the agenda for the month of January is the luncheon to be held 1 p.m. Januray 19, at the Marine Family Restaurant For Reservations call 9219. At the conclusion of the meeting a delightful coffee hour was enjoyed with Estelle Bailey as hostess. The meeting for next month will be held at 8 p.m. on 'D'ebruary 2. W Page Seven TeenAgers Advisory Group Meets The first 1956 meeting of the Teen-Agers Advisory Group was held at the Teen-Ager's Club on 2 January. In keeping with the spirit in which the Teen-Ager's club was established, our children's desires for club improvements and their participation in Base activities were carefully considered and resulted in a lively discussion. The very successful booth operated by the Teen-Agers in last year's carnival could only call for a repeat performance this year, and the youngsters are out to beat the old record. Mrs. R. E. FOJT was appointed chairman of the Advisory Group, Carnival Committee and will coordinate adult supervision of the booth. All parents present were enthusiastic in their pledges of assistance and complete co-operation to insure the Teen-Agers a sucThe Rifle-Pistol Club At the regular Club meeting January 4, nominations were made for the offices of treasurer and excutive officer to replace Chief Walters and Mr. Ward who have tendered their resignations. LCDR Hoppe and Frauenfelder, PN1, were nominated for treasurer; Chief Tryon and Chief Schoenderwoerd for executive officer. Elections will be held at the next meeting, February 1. (1930 in the Community Hall, back of the Community Auditorium). The resignation of Chief Walters was accepted with regret and he was commended for the fine job he has done in the time-consuming job of Treasurer. It was decided to make real effort to get things moving at the new Club range. LCDR Minard and Mr. Zaiser were appointed to investigate ways and means of speeding construction. There will be an NRA approved Spring Match, probably in April. LCDR Hutchins was designated officer in charge. We hope to send a pistol team to represent the Naval Base and/or ComTen to Tampa, Florida in March. For pistol shooters everywhere, mid-winter matches are second in importance only to the National Matches at Camp Perry. The matches this year will probably be instrumental in determining the shooters to be sent to the Olympic Games in Melbourne, Australia. We have still received no reply to our query for approval of a Junior affiliate. There will be an organizational meeting called just as soon as we have the necessary information. In the meantime, interested children and their parents are urged to use the facilities available at the Naval Station small-bore range behind the main Navy Exchange. It is open all day Tuesday though Saturdays. Semi-annual dues of $3.00 are now due and payable to the Club treasurer. New members are always welcome. Club meetings are open to all who are interested in rifle and pistol shooting. cessful venture. Club improvements were taken under study by the chairman of the Facilities Improvement Committee, CDR E. G. DOGGINS. Methods and means of improving the finances of the club were also discussed. The next meeting of the Advisory Group, which consists of all parents of active Teen-Age Club members, will be held at 1900, Monday, 6 February at the TeenAger's Club. There will be several important committee reports which will be of vital interest to the teen-agers and their parents. The more ideas and suggestions presented, the happier will be the teenagers-our children. With the long and difficult summer months just ahead, it is not too early to take active steps and assist our children to plan a pleasant and worthwhile summer program. The Town Crier by Mayor Don Wilkinson Representing the 643 families that makeup the Villamar-Bargo Community, your new mayor and councilmen met for the first time on January 3. Retiring Mayor Ralston recommended that the incoming members continue the policy of patient accomplishment and offered his continued support. We are grateful to all the previous workers on this community project and will need their experienced help. We hope that our efforts can be truly representative of the democratic tradition that is our valued heritage. These are YOUR council members; their names and residences are listed. Please let them know what you think the needs of the community are and give them your support when volunteers are needed. It should be noted that precinct #1 no longer exists since the razing of West Bargo. Precinct #2-Grounds EB 10B Precinct #3-Hill EB 10A (Treasurer) Precinct #4-Groeneveld RH 278B (Assistant Mayor) Precinct #5-Mrs. Peteler RH 605A Precinct #6-Benedini DH-111 Precinct #7-Dunlap RH 84 B Precinct #8-Hays RH 41A Councilmen will serve on several committees but the chairmanships have been designated as follows: Education -Dunlap; Lyceum Hill; Bingo-Benedini with Gus Liveoakos continuing as manager; Peace and Order -Wilkinson; Health and Sanitation -Groeneveld; Entertainment -Hays and Publicity including Radio and Television-Mrs. Peteler. Your council represents you in small things and large. Our first meeting this year dealt with such items as pet vaccination, bus scheduling, pest control, sponsorship of a juvenile program, television problems, maids quarters, exchange services and the long awaited swimming pool in the Community area. At present it is planned to continue the bi-weekly children's matinees. Any suggestions from parents regarding the problem of chaperonage will be welcomed. Let us know what your ideas and recommendations are, please. ytd 14Jnay15 Saturday 14 Janu 6

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Saturday, 14 January 1956 Saturday, 14 January 1956 THE INDIAN Navy-DPPO-10ND-Gtmo.4042 Cinema -Scoop by Don Hinton It proved an interesting week, as far as the movies on the Base were concerned, last week. I missed on my rating of one of the movies last week, but I'll keep trying and I guess start getting ready to dodge brickbats. SIX BRIDGES TO CROSS (Universal-International), is a really serious effort on the part of newcomers Tony Curtis, Julie Adams and George Nader at acting, but their inexperience shows through and the movie suffers. The story, one showing the fruitlessness of crime is sound. The experts rated it worth seeing and I'll go along with them. It's not for the kids, however. MONEY FROM HOME keeps you laughing as only Martin and Lewis can. The standard formula, as always the Lewis comedy and the Martin voice, combined for 99 minutes of fun. You'll roar in one scene where Jerry is a jockey in a horse race. Take the whole family for an evening of laughs, you won't regret it. CRY VENGEANCE (Allied Artists), is a feeble attempt on the part of this small Hollywood company. Mark Stevens and Martha Hyer figure in this gangster-mystery. Don't go expecting a topflight picture, you'll be disappointed. The stars are worthy of better material, but such is the breaks in the film capitol. You will be missing nothing, in my opinion, if you spend the evening elsewhere. TONIGHT THE NIGHT (Allied Artists). Again we are plagued by this small company's contributions to the public entertainment. It is a British comedy released through A.A. It's stars David Niven and Yvonne de Carlo, also rate better material. I'd rate it a mediocre attempt at comedy. Two of the main contributing factors that cause these small companies to come up with consistently Grade C motion pictures are the lack of big name stars and funds to acquire top story material that the big budget movies are made from. MARTY (United Artists). There aren't enough praises for this movie, that I pick as the best of the week. It is one of those rare sleepers, that has been breaking box-office records. The movie, the stars Ernest Borgnine and Betsy Blair are rumored to be in line for the Academy Awards race for 1955. The simple love story of a butcher and the plain girl that he meets at a dance is warm, human and inspiring. It is the greatest in motion picture entertainment. See it, by all means. TIGHT SPOT (Columbia), is another one of those shoot-em up, bang-bang ganster movies, that has a couple of unexptected twists. The movie will be enjoyed by the majority even though, it is a far cry from the top. Ginger Rogers and Edward G. Robinson turn in competent performances. It's definitely not for the kids. THE VIOLENT MEN (Columbia), stars Barbara Stanwyck, Glen Ford and Edward G. Robinson. The story is a rip-roaring western and will be enjoyed by most people Again, as a few weeks ago, Miss Stanwyck is miscast along with both Ford and Robinson. They are definitely not at their best in a western movie. It concerns a range-war between cattlemen and farmers. Saturday, Jan. 14 4:00-Whirlwind Horsemen 5:00-Game of the Week 5:30-The Millionaire 6:00-Sid Ceasar 7:00-Man vs. Crime 7:30-Stop the Clock 8:00-Hit Parade 8:30-Danger Sunday, Jan. 15 4:00-Appointment with ture 4:30-Wild Bill Hickok 5:00-Roy Rogers 5:30-Winky Dink & You 6:00-Colgate Comedy Hou 7:00-Loretta Young 7:30-People Are Funny 8:00-Justice 8:30-George Gobel Monday, Jan. 16 5:30-News Parade 6:00-Martha Raye 7:00-I Love Lucy 7:30-Burns & Allen 8:00-Mr. & Mrs. North MOVIES Time will be listed only once. Saturday, January 14 NavSta-Six Bridges to Cross108 min. NAS-Last Command-110 min. Mar. Site-New York Confidential -93 min. Villa.-Brigadoon-108 min. MCB-1-Night Freight-101 min. Lwd. Pt.-Seven Little Foys-105 mm. Sunday, January 15 NavSta-Money From Home-99 mm. NAS-Six Bridges to Cross Mar. Site-Crashout-101 min. Villa-New York Confidential MCB-1-Brigadoon Lwd. Pt.-Night Freight Monday, January 16 NavSta-Cry Vengeance-93 min. NAS-Money From Home Mar. Site-The Last Command Villa-Crashout MCB-1-New York Confidential Lwd. Pt.-Brigadoon Tuesday, January 17 NavSta-Tonight's the Night-95 mm. NAS-Cry Vengeance Mar. Site-Six Bridges to Cross Villa-The Last Command MCB-1-Crashout Lwd. Pt.-New York Confidential Wednesday, January 18 NavSta-Marty-100 min. NAS-Tonight's the Night Mar. Site-Money From Home Villa-Six Bridges to Cross MCB-1-The Last Command Lwd. Pt.-Crashout Thursday, January 19 NavSta-Tight Spot-96 min. NAS-Marty Mar. Site-Cry Vengeance Villa-Money From Home MCB-1-Six Bridges to Cross Lwd. Pt.-The Last Command Friday, January 20 NavSta-The Violent Men-96 min. NAS-Tight Spot Mar. Site-Tonight's the Night Villa-Cry Vengeance MCB-1-Money From Home Lwd. Pt.-Six Bridges tr Cross I Tuesday, Jan. 17 5:30-News Parade 6:00-Milton Berle 7:00-Meet Millie 7:30-Penny to a Million 8:00-Man vs. Crime Wednesday, Jan. 18 5:30-News Parade 6:00-Godfrey & Friends 7:00-Life with Father 7:30-You Are There 8:00-T-Men in Action Thursday, Jan. 19 5:30-News Parade 6:00-Sceen Directer Playhouse 6:30-Dollar a Second 7:00-Joan Davis 7:30-Ray Milland Show 8:00-Cavalcade of America Friday, Jan. 20 5:30-News Parade 6:00-This Is Your Life 6:30-Cameo Theater 7:00-Professional Father 7:30-Line Up 8:00-Truth or Consequences Notices There will be a complete cast rehearsal of "OZMA of OZ", the Junior Workshop production, on Sunday, January 15 at 1:00 p.m. at the Little Theatre. The are about 75 Girl Scout Calendars still for sale. If you missed getting your's see Mrs. Freeman or Mrs. Burgess (ladies ready to wear & children's clothing depts.) at the main Navy Exchange. Calendars are 50 cents. The money is used for supplies for the Brownie Scouts. SCUTTLEBUTT She s moroned-but her Fusbond gave me a couple of good numbr' WGBY Television Program FROM: 3 cent stamp TO: Send the Indian Home THE INDIAN Book -Nook A NIGHT TO REMEMBER by Walter Lord At 11:40 p.m. on April 14, 1912, the "unsinkable" TITANIC struck an iceberg and began to sink. By 8:50 a.m. on April 15 it was all over. Minute by minute, detail by detail, this book recreates these incredible hours. You will meet passengers and crew and learn to know them intimately-the millionaires, the titled aristocrats, the immigrants, the officers and sailors. You will sit in the Smoking Room and hear that faint grinding jar. This book will show you what made those nine breathless hours A NIGHT TO REMEMBER. THE MOTH AND THE STAR by Aileen Pippett A fine biography of Virginia Woolf. With an imagination genuinely creative, Mrs. Pippett .reveals the hypersensitive character of this remarkable woman from her Victorian childhood to her tragic end when she who knew, "It is life that matters," chose death. SILVER LEOPARD by F. van Wyck Mason A novel of the first crusade by the author of CUTLASS EMPIRE and GOLDEN ADMIRAL. In 1096 a fiery Papal exhortation sent myriad knights swarming from every part of Europe toward Constantinople; some were dedicated to a holy war, some to loot. Thus began the First Crusade. When Sir Edmund and his band reached the Holy Land, the Infidels quickly discovered that these were iron men who, though thirsty and starving, could fight all day long in heavy armor under Aisa Minor's blistering sun. DOME OF MANY COLOURED GLASS by Post Wheeler and Hallie Erminie Rives An extraordinary dual autobiography filled with intelligent observation of the world's courts, parliaments and drawing rooms from 1910 to 1935. Veteran career diplomat Post Wheeler tells the often disturbing story of American diplomacy. Mrs. Wheeler (Hallie Erminie Rives) instills shrewd, witty and penetrating comments on society. The Library has anoher POTLUCK POGO on the shelves now. "I wish to marry your daughter, sir." "Do you drink?" "Thanks, but let's get this other matter settled first."