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"Go,2ers qTMO Like The Sunshne"

Volume VII - Number 1 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 7 January 1956



Historic Schooner With International Crew.. First USO Show


A schooner owned by Columbia
university was tied up at Pier Able last week for two daysDec. 29, 30. The three-masted vessel is on a geographic expedition of the Caribbean and the midAtlantic between Brazil and Africa.
Named the VEMA, after one of
its former owners-VE from P.
Norweign named Vettelsen and MA from Vettelson's wife's name, the ship carries a crew of 24 including the scientists and their aides.
Built for Woolworth
The original owner of the
schooner was Mr. Woolworth uncle of socialite Barbara Hutton. He had it built in Copenhagen, Denmark in 1923. It weighs 500 ton and caries a multitude of complex
equipment used by scientists.
Head scientist for the expedition is Dr. M. Ewing,. director of Columbia U's Lamant geological lab. Also on board is a retired British CDR, A. L. Nelson. Home port of the ship is Palisades, New York where the Lamant lab is
located.
Columbia purchased the ship in
the early 1950's from a Capt. Kennedy of Nova Scotia.
The VEMA left New York in
the latter part of October. Her last stop before coming to Guantanamo was Nassau where a smaller ship, the Wissama, flying the British flag, was engaged to accompany the VEMA as far as San Juan. Two ships were needed for that part of the expedition in order to manipulate some of the complex equipment and take accurate soundings off the ocean floor
Flies Panamanian Flag
Although owned by an American enterprise, the VEMA flies the flag of Panama. Here is a ship owned by Americans, under con0 tract to the United States Navy,
manned by an international crew
and flying the flag of Panama.
Composing the international
crew is an Englishman, Americans, Norwegians, Danes and a Portuguese.
Some of the scientific equipment
carried on board: Magnetometer, to record the earth's magnetic field iluxuations; reflextion and refracaion mechanisms to measure sound waves, an actual shot is made at the ocean bottom and its echo is thereby recorded giving the scientists an indication of the depth of
the sediment on the bottom.
The biologist has a bottom running dredge and several plankten nets. Both of these pieces of equipment are lowered to collect specimens of ocean life which are preserved in bottles on board and taken to Lam ant for observation
and study.
Uses Homemade Camera
Another unusual apparatus found
on the VEMA is a homemade underwater camera. The scientist who made the camera claims it will


Of Year Coming


To Base Tuesday

A 16 member USO troup is coming to Gtmo on Jan. 10 and will present a performance at the Naval Station movie lyceum that night beginning at 1900.


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THE SCHOONER, VEMA, was tied up at Pier Able for several days last week. She is owned by Columbia university and is on a four month geographic expedition of the Atlantic. On board were noted scientists from Columbia. Barbara Hutton's uncle was the original owner of the vessel.


take an accurate picture as far down as four miles. However, the VEMA has taken shots only as deep as 2,000 fathoms. There is also a device on board which the scientists use to measure C 14-radio-active isotopes of carbon in the water. In common language, this determines the age of the water being tested. Anthropologists use much the same device to determine the age of fossils they dig up.
This is not the first such expedition the VEMA has been on. Columbia U keeps it on the go as much as possible. Of course, for each expedition there are different scientists on board and even on a single expedition the scientists may may change to take advantage of the specialties of individuals.
For this particular trip, Dr. Ewing expects to be aw,:y from the home port about four months.


Marine Board OK's

Permanent Warrants

Washington (AFPS)-The first permanent warrant officer selection board to meet since 1949 has recommended 45 applicants for promotion, the Marine Corps has announced.
Headquarters here said that competition was "extremely keen" with more than 10,000 marines filing applications for the permanent WO promotions.
Of those selected by the board, 99 are enlisted men, 99 temporary warrants and 447 temporary officers. All but 174 of the new warrants will serve in technical fields. The remainder will be designated marine gunners.


The show is intended for the single enlisted men from the Base commands. Therefore, they will be given seating preference with "brown-bagers" and officers given seats only after all the single men have been accomodated.
Known as the North AfricanCaribbean unit because of the areas they will cover while on the tour, the group is professional and hails from Hollywood, Calif. In the group are 9 women and 7 men; some are singers, some dancers, others comics and one pianist.
Although none of the members of the troup are big name movie stars, many are starlets.
The performance will replace the regular movie scheduled for the lyceum on that night. It is also tentatively planned to have the group appear over WGBY-TV and on the radio. And if time permits to have them give a show at the hospital.
If the performers are still on the Base the night of Jan. 11, another tentative plan is to have them repeat their performance of the night before. All of these tentative plans depend upon the consent of the troup.
Included in the trip: Renne Carin, singer; Louise On, dancer; Rita Conde, dancer; Nancy McDonald. singer; June Ross, singer; Dick Oshounessey, magic; Loretta Sweeney, comic; Bill Tracey, assistant manager; Eddie Leroy, comic; Ray and Bob Short, comics, and Armin Hoffman, pianist.


BuMed Visits Base

Real Admiral T. F. Cooper, Chief of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery of the Tenth Naval district, arrived on the Base Tuesday morning via Flaw and was given full honors.
He inspected the medical facilities throughout the Base. Tuesday he went through the Base hospital and Wednesday and Thursday he covered the Naval Station and the Naval Air Station.
Accompanying RADM Cooper on the inspection tour was CDR K. C. Schweingfurth. From here the party went to San Juan.


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Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday 7 January 1956


THE


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NDIAN


as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.


RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base,
Bay, Cuba.


Guantanamo


CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C. 0. Naval Station, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba
Editorial Staff
LTJG J. D. Byerley ---.---.------------------------- Officer-Advisor
G. L. Henderson, JOC --.----.------------------------------ Editor
C. S. Cornett, J02 ------------------------------ Managing Editor
Staff Reporters: D. D. Hinton, JOSA; and J. C. Curren, JOSA.
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve Materials marked AFPS may be used by news mediums provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit.


All photographs are official U.S. Nav


The Chaplain's Corner


A NEW YEAR - A NEW LIFE
One Sunday morning a father and his young son were making thcie way across the hills and over the meadow. The church bells began to ring. The little fellow said, "Daddy, why do the church bells ring?"
"Oh, I don't know, Son. I suppose to call people to go to church."
They walked on a little farther in silence. Then the little fellow said, "Daddy, the church bells don't ring for us, do they?"
"No Son," said the father, "they haven't been. But from now on they will ring for us."
In talking with a friend about it a few days later, he said, "I determined right there that I would no longer stand in the way of my son's having the influence of the church come into his life."
No, the church cannot save a person, but it can point the way and help us to know God better and His will for our lives. To lead a victorious life one must have a vital fellowship with the Christ of God.

Jerome J. Sullivan
Chaplain, USN


y photos unless otherwise credited.


18 Million Overpaid In '54 Tax

(This is the first in a series of eight articles on federal income tax for the
year 1955. The articles are based on information furnished to AFPS iy the American Institute of Accountants, the national organization of certified public accountants.)
The eve of April 16 will see a mad scramble in many households to put together the necessary facts and figures for the Federal income tax returns due on that date. This last minute rush can produce many careless mistakes. (April 15 falls on a Sunday this year, making April 1i; the deadline.) -_-Most of the errors are very simple. For example, about a million WHAT'S DIN' STATESIDE
returns are filed every year with
signatures missing. AMERICA'S private colleges
Little slips in arithmetic last and hospitals have been given a year resulted in OVERPAYMENTS "Christmas gift" of $500 million
by taxpayers of $18,000,000. Al- by the Ford Foundation, the largthough these overpayments are re- est single philanthropic grant in turned eventually, the taxpayer U.S. history . . . Virtually every shouldn't rely on the government privately endowed higher educato save him from all his mistakes. tional situation and most priMistakes of arithmetic favoring vately operated hospitals will the taxpayer were more numerous share in the grant... The money
-perhaps not entirely by coinci- is to be used to better salaries of dence. All returns are checked and teachers and hospital staff memwhen an overpayment is discovered bears. the government collects the difference-plus interest.
Apart from obvious mistakes, A couple of scientific advances
many taxpayers overlook oppor.' are in the news, one after a dectunities to claim exemptions and ade of experimentation and the deductions, and other ways to re- other still in its preliminary stages dducti .an er a . . . After a continuous 10-year
due t eir taxevoid such pitfalls, test in two cities, the New York
AFPS is publishing this series State Iepart enthch indicated
that may save you money. that drinking water containing
The first step, whether or not fluorine is substantially effective to file a return, is fairly well re- -in eduing ttaecy effecthe solved for service personnel. In i king tooth ab.rgl. ha
most cases, gross income for 1955 drinking water of Newburgh has
wa oethan the minimumn of been fiouridated while Kingston's was more th an ervimm en water hasn't . . . The experiment
e600 and ofew ,df wth ser ce en showed that Newburgh children $1,200 gross income. Thus a re between the ages of six and 14 turn is required. - have about 50 per cent less tooth
Don't forget that a tax excess decay than Kingston children of nay have been withheld on your the same ages . . . Predictions are
maeav e benwd th e on * y to that the New York test will result recover this money is to file a in many U.S. cities fluoridating return, their water supplies.
A common mistake is the filing -of a separate return by a wife ital losses, in which separate rewho had a small income. If she turns might result in a saving. If
files a separate income, she is not this is a possibility, it is best to permitted to file another return figure your tax bill both jointly jointly with her husband, nor is and separately before deciding her husband allowed to claim an which way to file. exemption for his wife on his sep- The instructions that come with arate return. your tax forms provide valuable
Most married couples will save guidance. Help also is available money by filing a joint return. fiom the Internal Revenue ServThis "splits" their income-as ice, which urges you to consult a though each had received half properly qualified advisor if you the total income. need outside help.
There are unusual cases, how- (Next article: Save money with
ever, such as those involving cap- the right form.) (AFS)


6A







COMMUNISTS find it easy to be militant about their tyrannical form of government. From childhood, the idea that communism is the best form of government and that other forms are "decadent" is impressed upon them.Y
We in America are not naturally militant about liberty Basically, we are individuals and we are apt to take things for granted.
However, in view of the present danger of communist expansion, a united drive for militant liberty is essential. Today, in every Free World country, some have dedicated themselves to causes that support liberty.
American servicemen overseas are ambassadors of liberty. They are serving in countries where the people daily are subjected to communist propaganda. It is vital that our servicemen overseas are able to explain clearly the principles of democracy.
A few individuals are not enough. All of us must join in this great effort. We must make it our business to know what democracy means and what it stands for. This is what we mean by "militant" liberty-to positively proclaim and explain the truths of our liberty and freedom. (AFPS)


Sunday, 8 January 1956
Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass.
Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0930-Sunday School
0930-Adult Bible Class
1930-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal
Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library
Latter Day Saints Sunday-1100-Naval St-tion Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)


HOLY NAME SOCIETY
The Guantanamo Bay Holy Name Society will receive communion in a body at the 1900 Mass, January 8.
Breakfast will be served immediately following the Mass at the Marine Family Restaurant.


BASE CALENDAR
Monday, January 9 O.E.S.-Bldg. 328 Marina Pt.-7:30 Tuesday, January 10 Little Theater-Community Auditorium
-7:30
Fleet Reserve AssociationCommunity Auditorium-8:00 Wednesday, January 11 Toastmaster's Club-Officer-6:30
Thursday, January 12 Felloweraft Club 1078-Business Meetine
-Community Hall-7:30)

NOTICE
ALL MARINE CORPS EXCHANGE ACTIVITIES WILL BE CLOSED FOR INVENTORY DURING THE PERIOD 7 THRU 9 JANUARY 1956.


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Page Two


THE INDIAN


Saturday 7 January 1956








Saturday, 7 January 1956


THE INDIAN


THE Grand Opening of the MCB-1 C.P.O. Club was celebrated by the cutting of a ribbon across the doorway, which opened the Club, by CDR J. A. Hiegel, Commanding Officer of MCB-1. There was a large cake bared for the event which was held January 1. The new club was built by the Seabees under the direction of their Chiefs. Construction of the Club started December 1, and was completed December 29. The plans for the club were formulated by the Chiefs in the spring of 1955. On hand for the Grand Opening were MCB-1 Chiefs, Officers and couples from the base. The club is an annex of the Base C.P.O. Club. The hours are 1500 to 2100 Sundays through Friday, and 1500 to 2230 Saturdays and holidays.


The Dental Explorer

Returning to the dental clinic after 30 days in the U. S. is Irvin Lister DT2. Needless to say Irvin had a wonderful time with the "southern belles" of Moundville, Ala.
Capt. and Mrs. W. D. F. Stagner with their son Bill returned from a holiday visit in Santiago de Cuba. While there they were guests of the President of the Oriente Province Dental Society, Dr. and Mrs. Jose A. Roca. Accompanying the Stagners were Capt. A. J. Loring and family.
The column wishes to congratulate Dr. L. W. Doss and Dr. R. P. Udall upon being selected for Lieutenant.
Congratulations are also in order for W. A. Jenkins, DTC who signed up for another six years. His pockets were bulging with a green article I believe they call money.
Its back to school for Bill Stagner and Doug Loring. They had a short, but most pleasant visit with their families.
R. C. George



Yippee Boat

On its way to Miami Tuesday morning the YIPPEE boat ran into some trouble; at 0130 she began taking water.
Her course was reversed and she proceeded to the nearest port-Baracoa, Cuba, on the northeast side of the island. Another reason for the YIPPEE's trouble was the rough weather.
She arrived in Baracoa Tuesday morning, repaired her pumps and departed for Miami that afternoon.


Teenage Round-up

by Jere and Pat
Well kiddies . . . back to ye ole salt mines. Seems as though evevryone had a real gone Christmas vacation . . . excluding the few who just couldn't wait get back to work again.
We're back after two week's absence with someone new at the other end of the pen. Delores and Sylvia send their fond farewells and best wishes for a happy new year. We'll try to make this column as interesting as they have done in the past. DID JA SEE . . . . Nancy brooding over the loss of her pineapples??? The crazy election at the TAC? ? ? ? Prissy's New Year's party that wasn't there? ? ? Where were you Priss? ? The beach filled to the brim with all the kats during the holidays ? ? ? Pat W's bad habit??? Eunice's engineering course? ? ? ? Que Pasa, Kid? ? ? Cavie home for Christmas ? ? ? "Red" Sierra rushing all of the "party goers" out of her house at 2:00 A.M. ? ? ? ? ? The New PA system at school? ? ? The word in Mum! ! ! ! Bobbie S. getting rid of some of her troubles? ? ? ? ? Betty S. happy over mail call? ? ? ? You weren't scared were you kid ? ? Pat's new hairdo?? ? Looks Good!
Well, until next week we'll see ya and our best wishes and good luck in the new year! Bye now!



LTJG Doss Leaves


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0411,4


LT(jg) L. W. Doss, NAS dental officer, left Tuesday night for the States. From here LT(jg) Doss will go to Memphis, Tennessee where he will open his private practice. $$$$$Chief Disbursing Clerk Jesse L. Piercy "ships over" for six
While in the Navy he was a more and receives more than $1,500 for his trouble. Doing the honors
reserve officer. is his Commanding cer, CAPT Robert A. Williams, SC, USN.


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Page Three


NSD Supply Line
Congratulations are in order for LCDR and Mrs. L. G. Maxwell upon the birth of a 7 pound 14 ounce baby boy. Little Richard Michael, practically a New Year Baby; he was born at 0100 on the 3rd of January. LCDR Maxwell, our Planning Officer, is beaming with pride and passing out Antonio Orsini pure Habana cigars.
Robert C. Peacock SN, the spendthrift of the Fuel Division, will be leaving on the 7th of January aboard the Johnson. Bob will report to the U. S. Naval Station, Brooklyn, New York for separation. He plans to resume his previous occupation as bricklayvi upon his return to civilian life. We will .11 miss Bob Peacock very much and we wish him the best of luck in his new civilian career.
LTJG J. R. Pope left Guantanamno Bay in the early part of this week to spend part of the holidays with his family in Richton, Mississippi.
LT Hynes and CWO Womble and their families are in the good ole U.S.A.
Benjamin Teters SN of the Fuel Division Boat Crew is presently on leave at Daytona Beach, Florida and is undoubtedly enjoying the sunny beaches there.
Robert H. Millar, one of our popular storekeepers, has just returned to his post duty at the salvage yard after a few days vacationing here at Gtmo.



Fleet Reserve News

The Fleet Reserve Association, Branch 100, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba will hold it's regular monthly meeting, Tuesday January 10th at the Community Auditorium.
A special program is planned with Chaplain J. J. Sullivan as the guest speaker.
A buffet dinner will be served after the program.
All members are urged to attend.


F T 6 Bulletin

Next Monday the ships will begin to pour back into Guantanamo Bay. Among the ships expected this winter are such new type vessels as the gigantic USS FORRESTAL and the guided missile cruiser, USS BOSTON which carries the TERRIER missile. As can be seen from the following preview of ships to arrive in January, tlh3 New Year promises to be a busy one for the Fleet Training Group.
USS W.C. LANE DD-763
USS POWER DD-839
USS GLENNON DD-840
USS WARRINTON DD-843
USS DARBY DE-218
USS J. D. BLACKWOOD DE-219
USS LOESER DE-680
USS DELONG DE-684
USS COATES DE-685
USS PARLE DE-708
USS SOLEY DD-707
USS BARTON DD-722
USS J. R. PIERCE DD-753
USS STRONG DD-758
USS BASILONE DDE-824
USS R. L. WILSON DDE-847
USS DAMATO DDE-871
USS FORRESTAL CVA159
USS C. T. O'BRIEN DE-421
Two Fleet Training Group yeomen, who have long helped keep the paper work in order, left Guantanamo on the third of January. Norman Perron and Donald Vescovi flew to Jacksonville by FLAW to report to the Commanding Officer, Jacksonville Naval Air Station for discharge. Goodbye and good luck.
Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Slaybaugh of Yonkers New York arrived in Guantanamo Bay last Wednesday to visit their daughter and sonin-law, LTJG and Mrs. Clarke. The Slaybaughs plan to remain for more comfortable here in the tropabout two weeks and then fly home, stopping at Havana for some sightseing. They report it's lost more ics than in the snow and slush of New York.


Football season is the time of year you can walk down the street with a blonde on one arm and a blanket on the other and no cop gives you a dirty look.


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THE INDIAN


Saturday 7 January 1956


Submarine In A Wind Tunnel


A one-fifth scale model of the Albacore, possibly the world's fastest submarine, is readied for testing for the Navy in the Langley Field, Va., wind tunnel. Experiments were conducted to verify operational characteristics obtained in the new hull streamlining of the submarine.


Sports Round Up

by Joe Celentano, JO1, USN
Quickie Quiz: Can you remember which two service teams played in the Rose Bowl in 1919? . . . Two of UCLA's linemen, John Hermann and Don Birren, played service football at Ft. Ord, Calif. . . Christmases come and Christmases go and each year one of the greatest men ever connected with baseball becomes a year older. The grand old man of baseball, Cornelius J. McGillicuddy (better known as Connie Mack), was 93 on Dec. 23.
Two University of Southern California basketball coaches expect to be in the Air Force by next spring. They are Dick Welsh, assh-Lant to head coach Forrest Twog.-,d, and freshman mentor Jack Findley . . . The pride and loy of Providence, R. I. Georgie Araujo-who at one time was a leading champion-is takin basic at Ft. Dix, N. J.
Pvt. Frank LaDue, a national gymnast champion and co-author of a textbook on trampolining, is a basic trainee at Camp Chaffee, Ark. La Due co-authored the book, "Two Seconds of Freedom-This Is Trampolining," with Jim Norman, a teammate at the University of Iowa . . . Answer to Quickie Quiz: Great Lakes beat Mare Island 17-0 . . . Steven Korcheck, Washington Seoators' rookie catcher, is now stationed at Ft. Jackson, S. C.
Ed Clune, Navy cager, is the younger brother of John Clune, who holds all of the Naval Academy scoring records. John is a second lieutenant in the Air Force at Rhine-Main AB, Germany Tallest mian on the Middies' quintct is Larry Higgins at 6'5".
Halfback Rick Casares of the Chicago Bears, a member of the 1954 AFPS All-Stars, will play for the West in the sixth annual Pro Bowl game in Memorial Stadium in Los Angeles, Jan. 15 . . . How 'bout that Bud Wilkinson? The Okluhoma grid coach has a remarkable record of 80 wins. 7 losses, and 3 ties . . . 2nd Lt Yr-non Dalgado, who went undefrai-d i 2,2 bouts as a lightweight ;ithe University of Utah, is the new boing coach of the 8GRh inf. RTgt. in Schweinfurt, Germany.

On Jan. 1, 1776, the first American flag bearing seven red and six white stripes was raised at Cambridge, Mass.


Draft Needs Less Men
Hong Kong (AFPS)--Navy Secretary Charles S. Thomas has declared that between now and June the Navy would need to draft less than half the number of men previously thought necessary.
Originally the Navy had expected 56,000 men would be me ded between December and June, h- said. But increased enlistments have reduced the need for draftees.
The secretary, on a Far East tour, paid tribute to navy personnel as good ambassador. He said they showed high morale ;mnd good behaviour in foreign ports.
Mr. Thomas said that so ps are now being rotated from foreign duty nearly every six months in order to allow more time for 'u1ors to be with their families. Fe explained that 80 per cent of petty officers are married, compared to 1925 when 80 per cent of this group were single.


Gtmo Green Thumb

ED. NOTE: This will be the beginning of a series of articles on the various aspects of gardening and the seasons of the year for planting an( cultivating vegetabi-s and flowers. This week's article deals with the planting and care oi your lawns.
So you think that you have a green thumb! Perhaps you do, but here are a few tips in the plAining
of grass seed and the care of sowing.
your lawn. Water well with a fine spray
The soil can nevei oa si easily after the seed is sown. It needs conditioned as when you are just no further covering. If a roller is getting ready to plant your seed. available, use it to firm the ground The only way to build up soil on around the seed and help conserve an already established lawn is by the moisture. use of commercial plant foods. To rehabilitate an established
Eermuda grass, a narrow blade, lawn, mow and rake thoroughly. creeping grass is the type used Then, fertilize liberally. However, must for lawns here at Gtmo. It if there is a weed problem, use a will not grow under trees and in weed killer after applying fertilthe shade. izer. Allow two weeks for the
After you have prepared your weeds to die, then rake thoroughly
soil and are ready to plant the again and then seed and water it seed, select a time when no wind down. Bare spots should be turned is stirring. If not, the seed may and raked like new ground. Grass turn up in the neighbor's lawn that is properly planted, well-fed,
or by the roadside. adequately watered and mowed
Remember, make sure the ground often, but not close will soon is thoroughly prepared and that choke out weeds and wild grasses. it is pulverized and level. Remember, the two most imWhen sowing, divide the seed portant elements in grass culture
into two parts sowing one part in Cuban soil is water and plant
lengthwise and the other crosswise. food. When it is considered that
For a large lawn a hand seeder 90 per cent of grass composition is recommended. If a hand seeder is water, it can easily be seen how is used, mix the seed with two or important it is that your lawn rethree times its bulk of dry soil to ceives a regular supply of moisture. insure even distribution. This pro- Apply fertilizer when the lawn is cess may also be used with hand dry, and then water immediately.


Vehicle Inspection

The semi-annual motor vehicle inspection on the Base scheduled for early this month has been delayed temporarily.
Reason for the delay is the failure of a civilian contractor to meet the manufacturing deadline of new license plates. As a result the tags cannot be delivered to the Base on time.
At present, it is expected that the inspection will take place later this month.


Service Team To Compete In Olympics
New York (AFPS) - The Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps will complete in a basketball tournament in Louisville, Ky., March 22-24 to select an armed forces all-star team for the Olympic trials.
According to Harry D. Henshel, chairman of the U.S. Olympic basketball committee, the American quintet will be determined by a round the coach of the winning team robin tournament among an armed , robins tament aonege andarmd heading the Olympic quintet. Alterforces teamt, one college and two
Amateur Athletic Union teams in nates will also be chosen in the
Kansas City, April 2-4. event some of the players are
In explaining the method of se- unable to make the trip to Aulection, Henshel said the winning stralia. team in the round robin tourney The Air Force has a 12-man
will place at least five, but not squad working out, under former more than seven, on the Olympic Oklahoma coach Bruce Drake, at
team. Bunker Hill AFB, Ind. The AF
The remainder of the 12-man team will meet top service, colU.S. team will be chosen from the lege and amateur teams as a other squads in the tournament. warm-up to the inter-service tourT no coaches will be selected, with ney in Louisville.


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Marine Enlisted Promotions

Washington (AFPS) -Marine corps enlisted promotion tests for advancement to pay grades E-5, E-4 and E-3 will be held during January and February, headquarters here has announced.
General military subjects tests for sergeants eligible for promotion to staff will be given Jan. 25 and Feb. 21. Technical tests for that grade will be administered on Jan. 26 and Feb. 23. Those eligible for advancement to staff must have 19 months in grade by May 1, 1956.
Corporals and privates first class with at least 12 months in grade by next May will take their tests either Jan. 27 or Feb. 24.
The Marine Corps made no announcement about tests for promotion to master or tech sergeant.
Further test details are contained in Marine Corps Memo 93-55.


NavSta Inspections
Inspection dates for Naval Station personnel this month will be January 14 and 28.
Uniform for the January 14 inspection will be dress whites and on January 28 it will be working uniform.


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Saturday, 7 January 1956


THE INDIAN


Christmas Jamboree Golf Results

A series of tournaments highlighted the activity at the U.S. Naval Base Golf Club during the Christmas week. These tournaments were sponsored by the Men's and Women's Tournament Committee and were open to all base personnel. There were plenty of smiles on the faces of the lucky winners (and on the covers of many a golf ball) after the


results were posted.
Net Score
1st Place 55
D. E. Dustin BM3, CDR Skadowski, AKC Harville & Mary
Goolsby
2nd Place 56
LT Larson, CTC Rousseau,
RM1 Schmitt, and Annette Forester.
3rd Place (TIE) 57
John Kidwell, LCDR Kuhn, CDR Rothenberg and Doris
Dickson.
57
ADC Lee Rogers, LT(jg) Byerley, RMC Gibbons and
Fran Skadowski.
4th Place 58
CDR Lawlor, George Reynolds, RMC Gosnell and Emily
Griffin.
5th Place 59
RADM Cooper, Capt-tin Moe, LCDR Rooker and Psty Lou
Tipler.
At the ceremonies attcJiding this tournament, RADM Cooper, Commander U.S. Naval Base, also presented the 1955 Men's 1 idicap Championship trophies to tue following golfers:
1955 Champion
James W. Doulin PR2, VU-10
1955 Runner-up
John Kidwell AD3, NAS
Consolation Flight
James B. Gosnell BMC, NAS Runner-up
CDR Allan Rothenberg USN,
NAS
The second Christmas tournament was a "Blind Bogey" for the nen. The lucky number was 76. Winner 3 way tie BMC Jim Gosnell, NAS
GEO Reynolds, NavSta PW
Dept.
E. W. Watkins, NAS Runner-up 2 way tie CDR Allan Rothenberg, NAS
L. E. Corliss, NavSta
The third event of the week was a Scotch Foursome on 28 Dec. Alternate shots were hit by the ladies and gentlemen in this event.
Low Gross 80 whacks
Mary Goolsby and
LCDR Dempsey 2nd low
Red and Mrs. Adams
3rd low
Captain and Mrs. Ware 4th low
Miss Struble &
LT(jg) Byerley
Low Net 69 shots
Cynthia Holley &
RADM Cooper 2nd low (tie)
Annptte Forester & A. J.
Thorley, Mrs. Butler and G.
H. Babcock, DC1.
3rd low
Joy Graves and Bill-Gurka 4th low
CDR & Mrs. Skadowski.
Longest drive for Women
Mary Goolsby


Longest drive for Men
Red Adams
Longest putt on No. 9
Millie Kuba
Closest approach No. 18
Red Adams
Fewest number of putts
Joy Graves & Bill Gurka.
On Friday, 30 Dec., the Cominitte planned to have a "Try and beat the Admiral and Mrs. Cooper" (lay, but unfortunately our First Lady was on the binnacle list so we substituted another specialty tournament "Two guys and a gal."
Net score
Winner 55
LCDR Dempsey. A. J. Thorley and Gladys Hamilton. Runner up 56
D. E. Dustin BM3, CDR Skadowski, and Lavinia Butler. 3rd Place 57
(3 way tie)
RADM Cooper, Mr. A. J. McGowan, and Bee Kohr.
J. H. Beach YNC, E. E. Marsh
TE3, and Fran Skadowski.
Bill Gurka, LCDR Page, and
Cynthia Holley.
The final event was a Flag Tournament on 2 January for individual honors for both ladies and gentlemen. The results were: LADIES:
Winner Annette forester to the 19th Green.
2nd Mary Goolsby
to fairway 19th hole
3rd Audrey Page
to fairway 19th hole 4th Mary Alice Murphy
19th tee.
5th Edie Ware
in the 18th cup.
6th Mrs. Lavinia Butler
1 foot from 18th cup
7th Miss Struble
18th green.
Gentlemen:
Winner Bill Gurka &
(Tie) LT(jg) Byeriley
in cup on 18th.
2nd Dusty Dustin BM3
6 inches from cup 18.
3rd CDR Patterson
40 inches from cup 18.
4th CDR Skadowski
104 inches from cup 18.
5th LCDR Dempsey
10 feet from cup 18.
6th Hank Goolsby
15 feet from cup 18.
7th Mr. Shuler
20 feet fro meup 18.
For the information of all golfeis, the Committee expects to get the 1956 Inter-Command Tournament underway in January. All Commands are requested to nominate team captains and furnish the committee with a 10 player roster as soon as practicable. See the Golf Club Bulletin Board for further detail4


SPORTS REVIEW

by Joe Duffy

In the winter of 1891, Dr. James A. Naismith, a YMCA instructor, designee a new indoor game for the benefit of his physical education class when elements of winter postponed their outdoor soccer contests. In the eastern part of our country, soccer was the major sport that gapped the separation between the football and baseball seasons, but in Dr. Naismith's upper New York State area, the winter season usually consisted of a steady diet of snow and slush, hence the need for an indoor sport. The Doctor came up with an ingenius idea. He utilized two peach baskets and a soccer ball, divided his class into two sides and taught the students a new game which he aptly called basketball.
From this humble beginning was born a new form of mass hysteria that sometimes causes coeds to faint, and grown men to cry. Basketball had thrust its foot into the door of the sporting world. This indoor contest of competitive skill was the missing link in the sport calendar, and was eagerly accepted across the nation as a major winter sport.
Today the game is played before crowds of as many as forty thousand fren7ied fans in large college arenas and fieldhouses, a giant step from the small wire engaged gymnasiums where the game got its start. The wire enclosure has long since disappeared from the scene, but the deig nation of "Cager" as applied to the basketball player still remains in the sport jargon. The wire mesh was often responsible for player injuries when the play carried too far out of bounds at a fast pace, and bone fractures were common in basketball cycles.
The object of the game remains the same today as it did in the original inception, but the rules have been subject to numerous changes. The bulk of the rule changes have been inserted to offset the advantages gained by player height, the latest being the new twelve-foot foul line spread to replace the old six-foot distance.
Basketball makes its appearance on the local scene Monday night, January 16th, when the Inter-Command League opens with a two-game set on the Marine Site Basketball court. This year the league will operate with ten teams playing a 90-game schedule. The schedule will run until March 16, after which the top four teams will participate in a double elimination tournament. As it has in the past years, the action will alternate between the Marine's court and the Naval Station court located in the Fleet Recreation area. The games will be played at Marine Site on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, and at Naval Station on Tuesdays and Thursdays. There will be two games played each night, with the first contest starting at 1830.
The ten teams competing this year will come from the Naval Air
Station, VU-10, Marines, Naval Supply Depot, Fleet Training Group, Naval Station, MCB-1, Leeward Point, Hospital-Dental, and the High School.


TROPHY WINNERS OF THE MEN'S HANDICAP GOLF TOURNAMENT pose with Admiral Cooper after receiving their prizes. (L-R) CDR Allen Rothenberg, NAS, James Gosnell BMC, NAS, Admiral Cooper, James Doulin PR2, VU-10, and John Kidwell, AD3, NAS.


am


Page Five





M


Saturday, 7 January 1956 THE INDIAN 1OND-Gtmo.


Cinema - Scoop

by Don Hinton
Greetings! I missed last week on the best movie, it should have been, "The Looters."
Three new ones on the base circult this week, but one that's been here before takes the spotlight.
THE OTHER WOMAN (FOX). I'd rate it fair. It's a drama of a Hollywood producer and a very ambitious starlet. The old "eternal triangle" done up in a new (that is open to question) fashion. Hugo Hass, a very competent actor and Cleo Moore, who has been a target for some hot publicity are the stars of the picture.
THE SEVEN LITTLE FOYS (PARA). A very good movie. Bob Hope and Milly Vitale star in this technicolor film of the famed vaudeville performer. The seven little Foys, by the way, are all over the screen and do play a vital part in their Dad's story. Heart-warming would be an appropriate description. Take the whole family to see it.
NIGHT FREIGHT (A.A.). A rather recent movie with plenty of action and excitement. I'd rate it only fair, however. Forrest Tucker and Barbara Britton star. Tucker is an old western star and Miss Britton has recently been enjoying TV fame as Pam North, on the mystery show. The plot deals with a man's attempts to make a small railroad a financial success.
BRIGADOON (MGM). The best of the week and a 4 star MUSICAL in every respect. It's a technicolor fantasy based on the Broadway show. The music and dancing are excellent. Gene Kelley, Van Johnson, Cyd Charisse and Elaine Stewart are the stars. Remember, it's a musical in the strictest sense of the word. P.S., ten to one the majority will not agree with this choice for the movie of the week.
NEW YORK CONFIDENTIAL (W.B.). It deals with the underworld and the intricate dealings of a vast crime syndicate. As it points out, crime is big business, but not a very savory or easy one for a person if they conduct their dealings in a questionable manner! Broderick Crawford and Richard Conte star in this good movie.
CRASHOUT. Bill Bendix and Arthur Kennedy star in this prison picture. It mainly concerns a prison break, but some very revealing scenes of life in a big prison are superb. I'd rate it very good and possibly the sleeper of the week. It's not for the kids but would be a satisfying way to spend an evening for you older folks.
THE LAST COMMAND (REP). It is the closest thing to a western that could be dug up this week. The story of Jin Bowie and the defense of the Alamo. Sterling Hayden and Anna Marie Alberghetti are the stars. Hayden is always good and the new chick with the difficult monicker, is at least good to look at. It's one the whole family would enjoy.


Lulu said she was descended from a long line-her mother once foolishly listened to.


Saturday, Jan. 7 4:00-Law of the West 5:00-Game of the Week 5:30-Harry Owens 6:00-Jackie Gleason 7:00-Foreign Intrigue 7:30-$64,000 Question 8:00-Hit Parade 8:30-Danger
Sunday, Jan. 8 4:00-Appointment With Adve
4:30-Paul Winchell 5:00-Roy Rogers 6:00-Colgate Comedy Hour 7:00-Loretta Young 7:30-Reader's Digest 8:00-The Web 8:30-George Gobel
Monday, Jan. 9
5:30-Gary Moore 5:45-Perry Como 6:00-Robert Montgomery 7:00-Medic 7:30-Pabts Boxing




MOVIE


Tuesday, Jan. 10
5:30-Garry Moore 5:45-Perry 'Como
6:00-My Little Margie
6:30-Red Skelton
7:00-Bob Cummings
7:30-Philco Playhouse
Wednesday, Jan. 11
5:30-Garry Moore
5:45-Perry Como 6:00-Disneyland
7:00-Life of Riley
nture 7:30-U. S. Steel Hour
Thursday, Jan. 12
5:30-Garry Moore 5:45-Perry Como
6:00-Kraft Theater 7:00-,Johnny Carson
7:30-Big Town
8:00-Dragnet
Friday, Jan. 13
5:30-Garry Moore
5:45-Coke Time
6:00-Climax
7:00-The Whistler
7:30-Wednesday. Night Boxing


S


Saturday, January 7
NavSta-Other Woman-94 min. NAS-Cattle Queen of Montana100 mill.
Mar. Site-Betrayed-108 min. Villa.-The Looters-93 min. MCB-1-Passion-93 min. Lwd. Pt.-So This Is Paris-105
min.
Sunday, January 8 NAS-Other Woman 7dar. Site - The Americano -95
min..
Villa.-Betrayed MCB-1-The Looters Lwd. Pt.-Passion
Monday, January 9
NavSta-Night Freight-101 min. NAS-Seven Little Foys Mar. Site-Cattle Queen of Montana
Villa.-The Americano MCB-1-Betrayed Lwd. Pt.-The Looters
Tuesday, January 10
NavSta-(no movie)-Live Show NAS-Night Freight Mar. Site-Other Woman Villa.-Cattle Queen of Montana MCB-1-The Americano Lwd. Pt.-Betrayed
Wednesday, January 11
NavSta-New York Confidential93 min.
NAS-Brigadoon-109 min. Mar. Site-Seven Little Foys Villa.-Other Woman MCB-1-Cattle Queen of Montana Lwd. Pt.-The Americano
Thursday, January 12
NavSta-Crashout-101 min. NAS-New York Confidential Mar. Site-Night Freight Villa.-Seven Little Foys MCB-1-Other Woman Lwd. Pt.-Cattle Queen of Montana
Friday, January 13
NavSta-The Last Command-110
nun.
NAS-Crashout Mar. Site-Brigadoon Villa.-Seven Little Foys Lwd. Pt.-Other Womar


Miles and Miles


After making a picture in Utah's Monument Valley, pretty Vera Miles decides to spend some of her spare time at the seaside. The picture pretty Vea played in was War ner Bros. "The Sear chers," starring John Wayne and Ward Bond.


WGBY Television Program


FROM:


3 cent stamp


TO:


Home the Indian
Send


Book - Nook

THE ANGRY HILLS
by Leon M. Uris
A novel of adventure and intrigue by the author of BATTLE CRY.
Mike Morrison arrived in Greece in 1941-German invaders were already on the verge of driving the British into the sea. Mike settles his affairs in Greece quickly and plans to leave for the U. S., but before he departs he is handed a letter to deliver in London on the way.
A lethal German agent chases him all over Greece. A lightning
-fast spy thriller.
THE FISHERMEN'S
ENCYCLOPEDIA
edited by A. J. McClane
It has 1,376 pages, 750,000 words, over 700 drawings and 32 pages in full color. The most authoritative and comprehensive work on the sport of fishing ever published anywhere!
The editor of the book is also fishing editor of "Field and Stream." Here is a book that answeres all your questions whether a beginner or a professional, fresh water or deep sea fan.
HERITAGE
by Anthony West
The story of a son torn between two high-powered, world-famous and unmarried parents. It is the story of an unhappy and illigetimate child who grew up to be a very happy man.
GREAT OPERAS
by Milton Cross
A revised and enlarged edition including every aria, all the action and the complete stories of 76 operas by the man who brings the color and warmth of operas to millions of listeners.
Cross, whose name and voice is associated with the Saturday afternoon radio performance of the Met., has written in simple, lucid style. Included are play-by-play descriptions of the 76 operas, how to enjoy an opera (what to listen to, what to look for), a short history of the opera and a discussion of the ballet as a traditional part of the opera. New works in this edition include The Saint of Bleecker Street, Peter Grimes, etc.

Father: Sonny, I'm going to tell you a story.
Four-year old: Okay, but keep it clean, the old lady might be listening.


10ND-Gtmo.


THE INDIAN




Full Text

PAGE 1

"Covers qTMO Like The Sunskine" Volume VII -Number 1 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 7 January 1956 Historic Schooner With International Crew. First USO Show A schooner owned by Columbia university was tied up at Pier Able last week for two daysDec. 29, 30. The three-masted vessel is on a geographic expedition of the Caribbean and the midAtlantic between Brazil and Africa. Named the VEMA, after one of its former owners-VE from a Norweign named Vettelsen and MA from Vettelson's wife's name, the ship carries a crew of 24 including the scientists and their aides. Built for Woolworth The original owner of the schooner was Mr. Woolworth uncle of socialite Barbara Hutton. He had it built in Copenhagen, Denmark in 1923. It weighs 500 ton and caries a multitude of complex equipment used by scientists. Head scientist for the expedition is Dr. M. Ewing, director of Columbia U's Lamant geological lab. Also on board is a retired British CDR, A. L. Nelson. Home port of the ship is Palisades, New York where the Lamant lab is located. Columbia purchased the ship in the early 1950's from a Capt. Kennedy of Nova Scotia. The VEMA left New York in the latter part of October. Her last stop before coming to Guantanamo was Nassau where a smaller ship, the Wissama, flying the British flag, was engaged to accompany the VEMA as far as San Juan. Two ships were needed for that part of the expedition in order to manipulate some of the complex equipment and take accurate soundings off the ocean floor Flies Panamanian Flag Although owned by an American enterprise, the VEMA flies the flag of Panama. Here is a ship owned by Americans, under contract to the United States Navy, manned by an international crew and flying the flag of Panama. Composing the international crew is an Englishman, Americans, Norwegians, Danes and a Portuguese. Some of the scientific equipment carried on board: Magnetometer, to record the earth's magnetic field fuxuations; reflextion and refrac%ion mechanisms to measure sound waves, an actual shot is made at the ocean bottom and its echo is thereby recorded giving the scientists an indication of the depth of the sediment on the bottom. The biologist has a bottom running dredge and several plankten nets. Both of these pieces of equipment are lowered to collect specimens of ocean life which are preserved in bottles on board and / taken to Lamant for observation and study. Uses Homemade Camera Another unusual apparatus found on the VEMA is a homemade underwater camera. The scientist who made the camera claims it will THE SCHOONER, VEMA, was tied up at Pier Able for several days last week. She is owned by Columbia university and is on a four month geographic expedition of the Atlantic. On board were noted scientists from Columbia. Barbara Hutton's uncle was the original owner of the vessel. take an accurate picture as far down as four miles. However, the VEMA has taken shots only as deep as 2,000 fathoms. There is also a device on board which the scientists use to measure C 14-radio-active isotopes of carbon in the water. In common language, this determines the age of the water being tested. Anthropologists use much the same device to determine the age of fossils they dig up. This is not the first such expedition the VEMA has been on. Columbia U keeps it on the go as much as possible. Of course, for each expedition there are different scientists on board and even on a single expedition the scientists may may change to take advantage of the specialties of individuals. For this particular trip, Dr. Ewing expects to be awey from the home port about four months. 4 Marine Board OK's Permanent Warrants Washington (AFPS)-The first permanent warrant officer selection board to meet since 1949 has recommended 45 applicants for promotion, the Marine Corps has announced. Headquarters here said that competition was "extremely keen" with more than 10,000 marines filing applications for the permanent WO promotions. Of those selected by the board, 99 are enlisted men, 99 temporary warrants and 447 temporary officers. All but 174 of the new warrants will serve in technical fields. The remainder will be designated marine gunners. Of Year Coming To Base Tuesday A 16 member USO troup is coming to Gtmo on Jan. 10 and will present a performance at the Naval Station movie lyceum that night beginning at 1900. The show is intended for the single enlisted men from the Base commands. Therefore, they will be given seating preference with "brown-bagers" and officers given seats only after all the single men have been accomodated. Known as the North AfricanCaribbean unit because of the areas they will cover while on the tour, the group is professional and hails from Hollywood, Calif. In the group are 9 women and 7 men; some are singers, some dancers, others comics and one pianist. Although none of the members of the troup are big name movie stars, many are starlets. The performance will replace the regular movie scheduled for the lyceum on that night. It is also tentatively planned to have the group appear over WGBY-TV and on the radio. And if time permits to have them give a show at the hospital. If the performers are still on the Base the night of Jan. 11, another tentative plan is to have them repeat their performance of the night before. All of these tentative plans depend upon the consent of the troup. Included in the trip: Renne Carin, singer; Louise On, dancer; Rita Conde, dancer; Nancy McDonald, singer; June Ross, singer; Dick Oshounessey, magic; Loretta Sweeney, comic; Bill Tracey, assistant manager; Eddie Leroy, comic; Ray and Bob Short, comics, and Armin Hoffman, pianist. BuMed Visits Base Real Admiral T. F. Cooper, Chief of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery of the Tenth Naval district, arrived on the Base Tuesday morning via Flaw and was given full honors. He inspected the medical facilities throughout the Base. Tuesday he went through the Base hospital and Wednesday and Thursday he covered the Naval Station and the Naval Air Station. Accompanying RADM Cooper on the inspection tour was CDR K. C. Schweingfurth. From here the party went to San Juan.

PAGE 2

THE INDIAN as a possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM WILLIAM G. COOPER, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C. 0. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Editorial Staff LTJG J. D. Byerley -------------------------------Officer-Advisor G. L. Henderson, JOC --------------------------------Editor C. S. Cornett, J02 ---------------------------------Managing Editor Staff Reporters: D. D. Hinton, JOSA; and J. C. Curren, JOSA. THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve Materials marked AFPS may be used by news mediums provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. 18 Million Overpaid In '54 Tax (This is the first in a series of eight articles on federal income tax for the year 1955. The articles are based on information furnished to AFPS by the American Institute of Accountants, the national organization of certified public accountants.) The eve of April 16 will see a mad scramble in many households to put together the necessary facts and figures for the Federal income tax returns due on that date. This last minute rush can produce many careless mistakes. (April 15 falls on a Sunday this year, making April 16 the deadline.) Most of the errors are very simple. For example, about a million returns are filed every year with signatures missing. AMERICA'S private colleges Little slips in arithmetic last and hospitals have been given a year resulted in OVERPAYMENTS "Christmas gift" of $500 million by taxpayers of $18,000,000. Alby the Ford Foundation, the largthough these overpayments are reeat single philanthropic grant in turned eventually, the taxpayer U.S. history .Virtually every shouldn't rely on the government privately endowed higher educato save him from all his mistakes. tonal institution and most priMistakes of arithmetic favoring lately operated hospitals will the taxpayer were more numerous share in the grant. The money -perhaps not entirely by coinciis to be used to better salaries of dence. All returns are checked and teachers and hospital staff memwhen an overpayment is discovered hers. the government collects the difference-plus interest. Apart from obvious mistakes, A couple of scientific advances many taxpayers overlook opporare in exnewson a dhe tunities to claim exemptions and dedutios, nd therway tore-other still in its preliminary stages deductions, and other ways to re.After a continuous 10-year duce their taxes. To help you avoid such pitfalls, test in two cities, the New York AFPS is publishing this series State Department of Health anthatmay ave ou mney. nouncad results which indicated that may save you money. ta rnigwtrcnann The first step, whether or not fluorini s atil ctive to file a return, is fairly well resolved for service personnel. In in reducing tooth decay .The most cases, gross income for 1955 drinking water of Newburgh has wasbeen flouridated while Kingston's 600 and few, if any, servicemen shoed hat N erg ecilen were 65 or older with less than between the aes osixdn $1,200 gross income. Thus a rehave t0e es tooth turn is required. Don't forget that a tax excess decay than Kingston children of may have been withheld on your Predictions are service pay and the on yo that the New York test will result serverpy thimoe onl t aylto in many U.S. cities fluoridating recover this money is to file supplies. return. A common mistake is the filing of a separate return by a wife vital losses, in which separate rewho had a small income. If she turns might result in a saving. If files a separate income, she is not this is a possibility, it is best to permitted to file another return figure your tax bill both jointly jointly with her husband, nor is and separately before deciding her husband allowed to claim aii which way to file. exemption for his wife on his sepThe instructions that come with arate return. your tax forms provide valuable Most married couples will save guidance. Help also is available money by filing a joint return. flom the Internal Revenue ServThis "splits" their income-as ice, which urges you to consult a though each had received half properly qualified advisor if you the total income. need outside help. There are unusual cases, how(Next article: Save money with ever, such as those involving capthe right form.) (AFtS) U.hsoy.9 ital vr The Chaplain's Comer A NEW YEAR -A NEW LIFE One Sunday morning a father and his young son were making thcir way across the hills and over the meadow. The church bells began to ring. The little fellow said, "Daddy, why do the church bells ring?" "Oh, I don't know, Son. I suppose to call people to go to church." They walked on a little farther in silence. Then the little fellow said, "Daddy, the church bells don't ring for us, do they?" "No Son," said the father, "they haven't been. But from now on they will ring for us." In talking with a friend about it a few days later, he said, "I determined right there that I would no longer stand in the way of my son's having the influence of the church come into his life." No, the church cannot save a person, but it can point the way and help us to know God better and His will for our lives. To lead a victorious life one must have a vital fellowship with the Christ of God. Jerome J. Sullivan Chaplain, USN COMMUNISTS find it easy to be militant about their tyrannical form of government. From childhood, the idea that communism is the best form of government and that other forms are "decadent" is impressed upon them. We in America are not naturally militant about liberty. Basically, we are individuals and we are apt to take things for granted. However, in view of the present danger of communist expansion, a united drive for militant liberty is essential. Today, in every Free World country, some have dedicated themselves to causes that support liberty. American servicemen overseas are ambassadors of liberty. They are serving in countries where the people daily are subjected to communist propaganda. It is vital that our servicemen overseas are able to explain clearly the principles of democracy. A few individuals are not enough. All of us must join in this great effort. We must make it our business to know what democracy means and what it stands for. This is what we mean by "militant" liberty-to positively proclaim and explain the truths of our liberty and freedom. (AFPS) Sunday, 8 January 1956 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1640-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Latter Day Saints Sunday-1100-Naval Stction Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) HOLY NAME SOCIETY The Guantanamo Bay Holy Name Society will receive communion in a body at the 1900 Mass, January 8. Breakfast will be served immediately following the Mass at the Marine Family Restaurant. BASE CALENDAR Monday, January 9 O.E.S.-Bldg. 328 Marina Pt.-7:30 Tuesday, January 10 Little Theater-Community Auditorium -7:30 Fleet Reserve AssociationCommunity Auditorium-8:00 Wednesday, January 11 Toastmaster's Club-Officer-f:30 Thursday, January 12 Felloweraft Club 1078-Business Meeting -Community Hall-7:30 NOTICE ALL MARINE CORPS EXCHANGE ACTIVITIES WILL BE CLOSED FOR INVENTORY DURING THE PERIOD 7 THRU 9 JANUARY 1956. S Saturday 7 January 1956 Page Two THE INDIAN

PAGE 3

Saturday, 7 January 1956 THE Grand Opening of the MCB-1 C.P.O. Club was celebrated by the cutting of a ribbon across the doorway, which opened the Club, by CDR J. A. Hiegel, Commanding Officer of MCB-1. There was a large cake bared for the event which was held January 1. The new club was built by the Seabees under the direction of their Chiefs. Construction of the Club started December 1, and was completed December 29. The plans for the club were formulated by the Chiefs in the spring of 1955. On hand for the Grand Opening were MCB-1 Chiefs, Officers and couples from the base. The club is an annex of the Base C.P.O. Club. The hours are 1500 to 2100 Sundays through Friday, and 1500 to 2230 Saturdays and holidays. The Dental Explorer Returning to the dental clinic after 30 days in the U. S. is Irvin Lister DT2. Needless to say Irvin had a wonderful time with the "southern belles" of Moundville, Ala. Capt. and Mrs. W. D. F. Stagner with their son Bill returned from a holiday visit in Santiago de Cuba. While there they were guests of the President of the Oriente Province Dental Society, Dr. and Mrs. Jose A. Roca. Accompanying the Stagners were Capt. A. J. Loring and family. The column wishes to congratulate Dr. L. W. Doss and Dr. R. P. Udall upon being selected for Lieutenant. Congratulations are also in order for W. A. Jenkins, DTC who signed up for another six years. His pockets were bulging with a green article I believe they call money. Its back to school for Bill Stagner and Doug Loring. They had a short, but most pleasant visit with their families. R. C. George Yippee Boat On its way to Miami Tuesday morning the YIPPEE boat ran into some trouble; at 0130 she began taking water. Her course was reversed and she proceeded to the nearest port-Baracoa, Cuba, on the northeast side of the island. Another reason for the YIPPEE's trouble was the rough weather. She arrived in Baracoa Tuesday morning, repaired her pumps and departed for Miami that afternoon. Teenage Round-up by Jere and Pat Well kiddies ..back to ye ole salt mines. Seems as though evevryone had a real gone Christmas vacation ...excluding the few who just couldn't wait get back to work again. We're back after two week's absence with someone new at the other end of the pen. Delores and Sylvia send their fond farewells and best wishes for a happy new year. We'll try to make this column as interesting as they have done in the past. DID JA SEE .. Nancy brooding over the loss of her pineapples??? The crazy election at the TAC? ? ? ? Prissy's New Year's party that wasn't there? ? ? Where were you Priss? ? The beach filled to the brim with all the kats during the holidays? ? ? Pat W's bad habit?? ? Eunice's engineering course? ? ? ? Que Pasa, Kid? ? ? Cavie home for Christmas ? ? ? "Red" Sierra rushing all of the "party goers" out of her house at 2:00 A.M.? ? ? ? ? The New PA system at school? ? ? The word in Mum! ! Bobbie S. getting rid of some of her troubles????? Betty S. happy over mail call? ? ? ? You weren't scared were you kid? ? Pat's new hairdo? ? ? Looks Good! Well, until next week we'll see ya and our best wishes and good luck in the new year! Bye now! LTJG Doss Leaves NSD Supply Line Congratulations are in order for LCDR and Mrs. L. G. Maxwell upon the birth of a 7 pound 14 ounce baby boy. Little Richard Michael, practically a New Year Baby; he was born at 0100 on the 3rd of January. LCDR Maxwell, our Planning Officer, is beaming with pride and passing out Antonio Orsini pure Habana cigars. Robert C. Peacock SN, the spendthrift of the Fuel Division, will be leaving on the 7th of January aboard the Johnson. Bob will report to the U. S. Naval Station, Brooklyn, New York for separation. He plans to resume his previous occupation as bricklay-r upon his return to civilian life. We will all miss Bob Peacock very much and we wish him the best of luck in his new civilian career. LTJG J. R. Pope left Guantanamo Bay in the early part of this week to spend part of the holidays with his family in Richton, Mississippi. LT Hynes and CWO Womble and their families are in the good ole U.S.A. Benjamin Teters SN of the Fuel Division Boat Crew is presently on leave at Daytona Beach, Florida and is undoubtedly enjoying the sunny beaches there. Robert H. Miller, one of our popular storekeepers, has just returned to his post duty at the salvage yard after a few days vacationing here at Gtmo. Fleet Reserve News The Fleet Reserve Association, Branch 100, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba will hold it's regular monthly meeting, Tuesday January 10th at the Community Auditorium. A special program is planned with Chaplain J. J. Sullivan as the guest speaker. A buffet dinner will be served after the program. All members are urged to attend. F T Bulletin Next Monday the ships will begin to pour back into Guantanamo Bay. Among the ships expected this winter are such new type vessels as the gigantic USS FORRESTAL and the guided missile cruiser, USS BOSTON which carries the TERRIER missile. As can be seen from the following preview of ships to arrive in January, tl;e New Year promises to be a busy one for the Fleet Training Group. USS W.C. LANE DD-763 USS POWER DD-839 USS GLENNON DD-840 USS WARRINTON DD-843 USS DARBY DE-218 USS J. D. BLACKWOOD DE-219 USS LOESER DE-680 USS DELONG DE-684 USS COATES DE-685 USS PARLE DE-708 USS SOLEY DD-707 USS BARTON DD-722 USS J. R. PIERCE DD-753 USS STRONG DD-758 USS BASILONE DDE-824 USS R. L. WILSON DDE-847 USS DAMATO DDE-871 USS FORRESTAL CVA159 USS C. T. O'BRIEN DE-421 Two Fleet Training Group yeomen, who have long helped keep the paper work in order, left Guantanamo on the third of January. Norman Perron and Donald Vescovi flew to Jacksonville by FLAW to report to the Commanding Officer, Jacksonville Naval Air Station for discharge. Goodbye and good luck. Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Slaybaugh of Yonkers New York arrived in Guantanamo Bay last Wednesday to visit their daughter and sonin-law, LTJG and Mrs. Clarke. The Slaybaughs plan to remain for more comfortable here in the tropabout two weeks and then fly home, stopping at Havana for some sightseing. They report it's lost more ics than in the snow and slush of New York. Football season is the time of year you can walk down the street with a blonde on one arm and a blanket on the other and no cop gives you a dirty look. LT (jg) L. W. Doss, NAS dental officer, left Tuesday night for the States. From here LT(jg) Doss will go to Memphis, Tennessee where he will open his private practice. $$$$$Chief Disbursing Clerk Jesse L. Piefey "ships over" for six While in the Navy he was a more and receives more than $1,500 for his trouble. Doing the honors reserve officer. is his Comnmanding cer, CAPT Robert A. Williams, SC, USN. THE INDIAN M Page Three

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Saturday 7 January 1956 Submarine In A Wind Tunnel A one-fifth scale model of the Albacore, possibly the world's fastest submarine, is readied for testing for the Navy in the Langley Field, Va., wind tunnel. Experiments were conducted to verify operational characteristics obtained in the new hull streamlining of the submarine. Sports Round Up by Joe Celentano, JO1, USN Quickie Quiz: Can you remember which two service teams played in the Rose Bowl in 1919? Two of UCLA's linemen, John Hermann and Don Birren, played service football at Ft. Ord, Calif. ...Christmases come and Christmases go and each year one of the greatest men ever connected with baseball becomes a year older. The grand old man of baseball, Cornelius J. McGillicuddy (better known as Connie Mack), was 93 on Dec. 23. Two University of Southern California basketball coaches expect to be in the Air Force by next spring. They are Dick Welsh, assistant to head coach Forrest Twogu-d, and freshman mentor Jack Findley ...The pride and 3oy of Providence, R. I. Georgie Araujo-who at one time was a leading champion-is takin basic at Ft. Dix, N. J. Pvt. Frank LaDue, a national gymnast champion and co-author of a textbook on trampolining, is a basic trainee at Camp Chaffee, Ark. La Due co-authored the book, "Two Seconds of Freedom-This Is Trampolining," with Jim Norman, a teammate at the University of Iowa ...Answer to Quickie Quiz: Great Lakes beat Mare Island 17-0 ...Steven Korcheck, Washington Senators' rookie catcher, is now stationed at Ft. Jackson, S. C. Ed Clune, Navy cager, is the younger brother of John Clone, who holds all of the Naval Academy scoring records. John is a second lieutenant in the Air Force at Rhine-Main AB, Germany Tallest man on the Middies' quintet is Larry Higgins at 6'5". Halfback Rick Casares of the Chicago Bears, a member of the 1954 AFPS All-Stars, will play for the West in the sixth annual Pro Bowl game in Memorial Stadium in Los Angeles, Jan. 15 ...How 'bout that Bud Wilkinson? The Oklahoma grid coach has a remarkable record of 80 wins. 7 losses, and 3 ties ...2nd Lt. Vrnon Dalgado, who went undefeated in 32 bouts as a lightweight at the University of Utah, is the new boxing coach of the 86th Inf. Rlegt. in Schweinfurt, Germany. On Jan. 1, 1776, the first American flag bearing seven red and six white stripes was raised at Cambridge, Mass. Draft Needs Less MBn Hong Kong (AFPS)-Navy Secretary Charles S. Thomas has declared that between now and June the Navy would need to draft less than half the number of men previously thought necessary. Originally the Navy had expected 56,000 men would be needed between December and June, h said. But increased enlistments have reduced the need for draftees. The secretary, on a Far East tour, paid tribute to navy personnel as good ambassador. He said they showed high morale and good behaviour in foreign ports. Mr. Thomas said that st.ps are now being rotated from foreign duty nearly every six months in order to allow more time for cdlors to be with their families. le explained that 80 per cent of petty officers are married, compared to 1925 when 80 per cent of this group were single. Gtmo Green Thumb ED. NOTE: This will be the beginning of a series of articles on the various aspects of gardening and the seasons of the year for planting and cultivating vegetables and flowers. This week's article deals with the planting and care of your lawns. So you think that you have a green thumb! Perhaps you do, but here are a few tips in the pining of grass seed and the care of sowing. your lawn. Water well with a fine spray The soil can never oz sc easily after the seed is sown. It needs conditioned as when you are just no further covering. If a roller is getting ready to plant your seed. available, use it to firm the ground The only way to build up soil on around the seed and help conserve an already established lawn is by the moisture. use of commercial plant foods. To rehabilitate an established Eermuda grass, a narrow blade, lawn, mow and rake thoroughly. cr,:eping grass is the type used Then, fertilize liberally. However, must for lawns here at Gtmo. It if there is a weed problem, use a will not grow under trees and in weed killer after applying fertilthe shade. izer. Allow two weeks for the After you have prepared your weeds to die, then rake thoroughly soil and are ready to plant the again and then seed and water it seed, select a time when no wind down. Bare spots should be turned is stirring. If not, the seed may and raked like new ground. Grass turn up in the neighbor's lawn that is properly planted, well-fed, or by the roadside. adequately watered and mowed Remember, make sure the ground often, but not close will soon is thoroughly prepared and that choke out weeds and wild grasses. it is pulverized and level. Remember, the two most imWhen sowing, divide the seed portant elements in grass culture into two parts sowing one part in Cuban soil is water and plant lengthwise and the other crosswise. food. When it is considered that For a large lawn a hand seeder 90 per cent of grass composition is recommended. If a hand seeded is water, it can easily be seen how is used, mix the seed with two or important it is that your lawn rethree times its bulk of dry soil to ceives a regular supply of moisture. insure even distribution. This proApply fertilizer when the lawn is cess may also be used with hand dry, and then water immediately. Vehicle Inspection The semi-annual motor vehicle inspection on the Base scheduled for early this month has been delayed temporarily. Reason for the delay is the failure of a civilian contractor to meet the manufacturing deadline of new license plates. As a result, the tags cannot be delivered to the Base on time. At present, it is expected that the inspection will take place later this month. Service Team To Compete In Olympics New York (AFPS) -The Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps will complete in a basketball tournament in Louisville, Ky., March 22-24 to select an armed forces all-star team for the Olympic trials. According to Harry D. Henshel, chairman of the U.S. Olympic basketball committee, the American quintet will be determined by a round the coach of the winning team robin tournament among an armed heading the Olympic quintet. Alterforces team, one college and two Amateur Athletic Union teams in nates will also be chosen in the Kansas City, April 2-4. event some of the players are In explaining the method of seunable to make the trip to Aulection, Henshel said the winning stralia. team in the round robin tourney The Air Force has a 12-man will place at least five, but not squad working out, under former more than seven, on the Olympic Oklahoma coach Bruce Drake, at team. Bunker Hill AFB, Ind. The AF The remainder of the 12-man team will meet top service, eolU.S. team will be chosen from the lege and amateur teams as a other squads in the tournament. warm-up to the inter-service tourTw;,o coaches will be selected, with ey in Louisville. OPERATION BLONDE Wi tZ TOP WoRRyi c! I'fL HANDLE Marine Enlisted Promotions Washington (AFPS) -Marine corps enlisted promotion tests for advancement to pay grades E-5, E-4 and E-3 will be held during January and February, headquarters here has announced. General military subjects tests for sergeants eligible for promotion to staff will be given Jan. 25 and Feb. 21. Technical tests for that grade will be administered on Jan. 26 and Feb. 23. Those eligible for advancement to staff must have 19 months in grade by May 1, 1956. Corporals and privates first class with at least 12 months in grade by next May will take their tests either Jan. 27 or Feb. 24. The Marine Corps made no announcement about tests for promotion to master or tech sergeant. Further test details are contained in Marine Corps Memo 93-55. NavSta Inspections Inspection dates for Naval Station personnel this month will be January 14 and 28. Uniform for the January 14 inspection will be dress whites and on January 28 it will be working uniform. YOUR EYES ARE 1.E LIMi POOLG~-YOU L4iP$ST ME~ : APO-E / 0 9 m Page Four THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 7 January 1956 Christmas Jamboree Golf Results A series of tournaments highlighted the activity at the U.S. Naval Base Golf Club during the Christmas week. These tournaments were sponsored by the Men's and Women's Tournament Committee and were open to all base personnel. There were plenty of smiles on the faces of the lucky winners (and on the covers of many a golf ball) after the results were posted. Net Score 1st Place 55 D. E. Dustin BM3, CDR Skadowski, AKC Harville & Mary Goolsby 2nd Place 56 LT Larson, CTC Rousseau, RM1 Schmitt, and Annette Forester. 3rd Place (TIE) 57 John Kidwell, LCDR Kuba, CDR Rothenberg and Doris Dickson. 57 ADC Lee Rogers, LT(jg) Byerley, RMC Gibbons and Fran Skadowski. 4th Place 58 CDR Lawlor, George Reynolds, RMC Gosnell and Emily Griffin. 5th Place 59 RADM Cooper, Captuin Moe, LCDR Rooker and Petty Lou Tipler. At the ceremonies attending this tournament, RADM Cooper, Commander U.S. Naval Base. also presented the 1955 Men's Hidicap Championship trophies to toe following golfers: 1955 Champion James W. Doulin PR2, VU-10 1955 Runner-up John Kidwell AD3, NAS Consolation Flight James B. Gosnell BMC, NAS Runner-up CDR Allan Rothenberg USN, NAS The second Christmas tournament was a "Blind Bogey" for the nen. The lucky number was 76. Winner 3 way tie BMC Jim Gosnell, NAS GEO Reynolds, NavSta PW Dept. E. W. Watkins, NAS Runner-up 2 way tie CDR Allan Rothenberg, NAS L. E. Corliss, NavSta The third event of the week was a Scotch Foursome on 28 Dec. Alternate shots were hit by the ladies and gentlemen in this event. Low Gross 80 whacks Mary Goolsby and LCDR Dempsey 2nd low Red and Mrs. Adams 3rd low Captain and Mrs. Ware 4th low Miss Struble & LT(jg) Byerley Low Net 69 shots Cynthia Holley & RADM Cooper 2nd low (tie) Annette Forester & A. J. Thorley, Mrs. Butler and G. H. Babcock, DC1. 3rd low Joy Graves and Bill -Gurka 4th low CDR & Mrs. Skadowski. Longest drive for Women Mary Goolsby Longest drive for Men Red Adams Longest putt on No. 9 Millie Kuba Closest approach No. 18 Red Adams Fewest number of putts Joy Graves & Bill Gurka. On Friday, 30 Dec., the Commnitte planned to have a "Try and beat the Admiral and Mrs. Cooper" day, but unfortunately our First Lady was on the binnacle list so we substituted another specialty tournament "Two guys and a gal." Net score Winner 55 LCDR Dempsey. A. J. Thorley and Gladys Hamilton. Runner up 56 D. E. Dustin BM3, CDR Skadowski, and Lavinia Butler. 3rd Place 57 (3 way tie) RADM Cooper, Mr. A. J. McGowan, and Bee Kohr. J. H. Beach YNC, E. E. Marsh TE3, and Fran Skadowski. Bill Gurka, LCDR Page, and Cynthia Holley. The final event was a Flag Tournament on 2 January for individual honors for both ladies and gentlemen. The results were: LADIES: Winner Annette forester to the 19th Green. 2nd Mary Goolsby to fairway 19th hole 3rd 4th Audrey Page to fairway 19th hole Mary Alice Murphy 19th tee. SPORTS REVIEW by Joe Duffy In the winter of 1891, Dr. James A. Naismith, a YMCA instructor, designed a new indoor game for the benefit of his physical education class when elements of winter postponed their outdoor soccer contests. In the eastern part of our country, soccer was the major sport that gapped the separation between the football and baseball seasons, but in Dr. Naismith's upper New York State area, the winter season usually consisted of a steady diet of snow and slush, hence the need for an indoor sport. The Doctor came up with an ingenius idea. He utilized two peach baskets and a soccer ball, divided his class into two sides and taught the students a new game which he aptly called basketball. From this humble beginning was born a new form of mass hysteria that sometimes causes coeds to faint, and grown men to cry. Basketball had thrust its foot into the door of the sporting world. This indoor contest of competitive skill was the missing link in the sport calendar, and was eagerly accepted across the nation as a major winter sport. Today the game is played before crowds of as many as forty thousand frenzied fans in large college arenas and fieldhouses, a giant step from the small wire encaged gymnasiums where the game got its start. The wire enclosure has long since disappeared from the scene, but the designation of "Cager" as applied to the basketball player still remains in the sport jargon. The wire mesh was often responsible for player injuries when the play carried too far out of bounds at a fast pace, and bone fractures were common in basketball cycles. The object of the game remains the same today as it did in the original inception, but the rules have been subject to numerous changes. The bulk of the rule changes have been inserted to offset the advantages gained by player height, the latest being the new twelve-foot foul line spread to replace the old six-foot distance. Basketball makes its appearance on the local scene Monday night, January 16th, when the Inter-Command League opens with a two-game set on the Marine Site Basketball court. This year the league will operate with ten teams playing a 90-game schedule. The schedule will run until March 16, after which the top four teams will participate in a double elimination tournament. As it has in the past years, the action will alternate between the Marine's court and the Naval Station court located in the Fleet Recreation area. The games will be played at Marine Site on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, and at Naval Station on Tuesdays and Thursdays. There will be two games played each night, with the first contest starting at 1830. The ten teams competing this year will come from the Naval Air Station, VU-10, Marines, Naval Supply Depot, Fleet Training Group, Naval Station, MCB-1, Leeward Point, Hospital-Dental, and the High School. 5th Edie Ware in the 18th cup. 6th Mrs. Lavinia Butler 1 foot from 18th cup 7th Miss Struble 18th green. Gentlemen: Winner Bill Gurka & (Tie) LT(jg) Byerley in cup on 18th. 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th Dusty Dustin BM3 6 inches from cup 18. CDR Patterson 40 inches from cup 18. CDR Skadowski 104 inches from cup 18. LCDR Dempsey 10 feet from cup 18. Hank Goolsby 15 feet from cup 18. 7th Mr. Shuler 20 feet fro mcup 18. For the information of all golfers, the Committee expects to get the 1956 Inter-Command Tournament underway in January. All Commands are requested to nominate team captains and furnish the committee with a 10 player roster as soon as practicable. See the Golf Club Bulletin Board for further detail TROPHY WINNERS OF THE MEN'S HANDICAP GOLF TOURNAMENT pose with Admiral Cooper after receiving their prizes. (L-R) CDR Allen Rothenberg, NAS, James Gosnell, BMC, NAS, Admiral Cooper, James Doulin PR2, VU-10, and John Kidwell, AD3, NAS. I THE INDIAN Page Five

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M Saturday, 7 January 1956 THE INDIAN 1OND-Gtmo. Cinema -Scoop by Don Hinton Greetings! I missed last week on the best movie, it should have been, "The Looters." Three new ones on the base circuit this week, but one that's been here before takes the spotlight. THE OTHER WOMAN (FOX). I'd rate it fair. It's a drama of a Hollywood producer and a very ambitious starlet. The old "eternal triangle" done up in a new (that is open to question) fashion. Hugo Hass, a very competent actor and Cleo Moore, who has been a target for some hot publicity are the stars of the picture. THE SEVEN LITTLE FOYS (PARA). A very good movie. Bob Hope and Milly Vitale star in this technicolor film of the famed vaudeville performer. The seven little Foys, by the way, are all over the screen and do play a vital part in their Dad's story. Heart-warming would be an appropriate description. Take the whole family to see it. NIGHT FREIGHT (A.A.). A rather recent movie with plenty of action and excitement. I'd rate it only fair, however. Forrest Tucker and Barbara Britton star. Tucker is an old western star and Miss Britton has recently been enjoying TV fame as Pam North, on the mystery show. The plot deals with a man's attempts to make a small railroad a financial success. BRIGADOON (MGM). The best of the week and a 4 star MUSICAL in every respect. It's a technicolor fantasy based on the Broadway show. The music and dancing are excellent. Gene Kelley, Van Johnson, Cyd Charisse and Elaine Stewart are the stars. Remember, it's a musical in the strictest sense of the word. P.S., ten to one the majority will not agree with this choice for the movie of the week. NEW YORK CONFIDENTIAL (W.B.). It deals with the underworld and the intricate dealings of a vast crime syndicate. As it points out, crime is big business, but not a very savory or easy one for a person if they conduct their dealings in a questionable manner! Broderick Crawford and Richard Conte star in this good movie. CRASHOUT. Bill Bendix and Arthur Kennedy star in this prison picture. It mainly concerns a prison break, but some very revealing scenes of life in a big prison are superb. I'd rate it very good and possibly the sleeper of the week. It's not for the kids but would be a satisfying way to spend an evening for you older folks. THE LAST COMMAND (REP). It is the closest thing to a western that could be dug up this week. The story of Jim Bowie and the defense of the Alamo. Sterling Hayden and Anna Marie Alberghetti are the stars. Hayden is always good and the new chick with the difficult monicker, is at least good to look at. It's one the whole family would enjoy. Lulu said she was descended from a long line-her mother once foolishly listened to. Saturday, Jan. 7 4:00-Law of the West 5:00-Game of the Week 5:30-Harry Owens 6:00-Jackie Gleason 7:00-Foreign Intrigue 7:30-$64,000 Question 8:00-Hit Parade 8:30-Danger Sunday, Jan. 8 4:00-Appointment With Adventure 4:30-Paul Winchell 5:00-Roy Rogers 6:00-Colgate Comedy Hour 7:00-Loretta Young 7:30-Reader's Digest 8:00-The Web 8:30-George Gobel Monday, Jan. 9 5:30-Gary Moore 5:45-Perry Como 6:00-Robert Montgomery 7:00-Medic 7:30-Pabts Boxing MOVIES Saturday, January 7 NavSta-Other Woman-94 min. NAS-Cattle Queen of Montana100 min. Mar. Site-Betrayed-108 min. Villa.-The Looters-93 min. MCB-1-Passion-93 min. Lwd. Pt.-So This Is Paris-105 mi. Sunday, January 8 NAS-Other Woman Mar. Site -The Americano -95 mm. Villa.-Betrayed MCB-1-The Looters Lwd. Pt.-Passion Monday, January 9 NavSta-Night Freight-101 NAS-Seven Little Foys Mar. Site-Cattle Queen of tana Villa.-The Americano MCB-1-Betrayed Lwd. Pt.-The Looters Tuesday, Jan. 10 5:30-Garry Moore 5:45-Perry 'omo 6:00-My Little Margie 6:30-Red Skelton 7:00-Bob Cummings 7:30-Philco Playhouse Wednesday, Jan. 11 5:30-Garry Moore 5:45-Perry Como 6:00-Disneyland 7:00-Life of Riley 7:30-U. S. Steel Hour Thursday, Jan. 12 5:30-Garry Moore 5:45-Perry Como 6:00-Kraft Theater 7:00--Johnny Carson 7:30-Big Town 8:00-Dragnet Friday, Jan. 13 5:30-Garry Moore 5:45-Coke Time 6:00-Climax 7:00-The Whistler 7:30-WednesdayNight Boxing Miles and Miles min. MonTuesday, January 10 NavSta-(no movie)-Live Show NAS-Night Freight Mar. Site-Other Woman Villa.-Cattle Queen of Montana MCB-1-The Americano Lwd. Pt.-Betrayed Wednesday, January 11 NavSta-New York Confidential93 min. NAS-Brigadoon-109 min. Mar. Site-Seven Little Foys Villa.-Other Woman MCB-1-Cattle Queen of Montana Lwd. Pt.-The Americano Thursday, January 12 NavSta-Crashout-101 min. NAS-New York Confidential Mar. Site-Night Freight Villa.-Seven Little Foys MCB-1-Other Woman Lwd. Pt.-Cattle Queen of Montana Friday, January 13 NavSta-The Last Command-110 m1l. NAS-Crashout Mar. Site-Brigadoon Villa.-Seven Little Foys Lwd. Pt.-Other Womar After making a picture in Utah's Monument Valley, pretty Vera Miles decides to spend some of her spare time at the seaside. The picture pretty Vera played in was Warner Bros.' "The Searchers," starring John Wayne and Ward Bond. WGBY Television Program FROM: 3 cent stamp TO: Home the Indian Send Book -Nook THE ANGRY HILLS by Leon M. Uris A novel of adventure and intrigue by the author of BATTLE CRY. Mike Morrison arrived in Greece in 1941-German invaders were already on the verge of driving the British into the sea. Mike setties his affairs in Greece quickly and plans to leave for the U. S., but before he departs he is handed a letter to deliver in London on the way. A lethal German agent chases him all over Greece. A lightning -fast spy thriller. THE FISHERMEN'S ENCYCLOPEDIA edited by A. J. McClane It has 1,376 pages, 750,000 words, over 700 drawings and 32 pages in full color. The most authoritative and comprehensive work on the sport of fishing ever published anywhere! The editor of the book is also fishing editor of "Field and Stream." Here is a book that answeres all your questions whether a beginner or a professional, fresh water or deep sea fan. HERITAGE by Anthony West The story of a son torn between two high-powered, world-famous and unmarried parents. It is the story of an unhappy and illigetimate child who grew up to be a very happy man. GREAT OPERAS by Milton Cross A revised and enlarged edition including every aria, all the action and the complete stories of 76 operas by the man who brings the color and warmth of operas to millions of listeners. Cross, whose name and voice is associated with the Saturday afternoon radio performance of the Met., has written in simple, lucid style. Included are play-by-play descriptions of the 76 operas, how to enjoy an opera (what to listen to, what to look for), a short history of the opera and a discussion of the ballet as a traditional part of the opera. New works in this edition include The Saint of Bleecker Street, Peter Grimes, etc. Father: Sonny, I'm going to tell you a story. Four-year old: Okay, but keep it clean, the old lady might be listening. 10ND-Gtmo. THE INDIAN


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