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Indian

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Title:
Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English

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"Go'vers gMO Like The Sunskine"

Vol. VI, No. 36 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 10 September 1955




Change Of Command This Monday RADM Taylor To Report Congressman Huddleston Avg, Sales Skyrocket Ceremony Being Held To Washington For Duty; rse e At Naval Exchanges; Marine Parade Grounds


RJADM Cooper Relieving HFd2 s Middies Biggest Buyers Starting At 9:0 AM.


Next Monday Rear Admiral Edmund B. Taylor will be relieved by Rear Admiral William G. Cooper as Commander, Guantanamo Naval Base. Admiral Taylor has been commanding officer of the Base since 9 February, 1954, and during that time has seen many improvements added to the Base.
Among the many projects which Admiral Taylor has seen conpleted during his tour here have been a 300 unit Replacement Housing Project, Pier Victor, the Hanger on Leeward Point, new Red Cross Building, Naval Base Golf Course Club House, and the new Motel. The biggest of these projects, both in size and in effect upon the Base was the completion of the Replacement Housing. Admiral Taylor was also instrumental in getting the furniture which is now being used in the new housing.
Among the projects that have been started during Admiral Taylors time here have been the new ultra-modern hospital, and the swimming pool in Trading Post Park.
The work done by Admiral Taylor during his tour of duty here is just another page in the outstanding record which he has compiled since entering the Naval Academy in 1921.
While in the Academy he was a member of the varsity football team, which he captained in 1924; played on the basketball squad in 1924; was a member of the boxing squad in 1923-24; and All-American on the Lacrosse team in 1924-25.
Upon graduating from the Academy in 1925, the Admiral served on various ships until 1933, when he returned to the Naval Academy as an Instructor, and as assistant coach in both football and La crosse.
During World War II Admiral Taylor compiled an outstanding record through his extraordinary heroism and distinguished service. In addition to the Navy Cross, the Silver Star Medal, the Legion of Merit with Combat 'V", the Bronze Star Medal, also with "V", and the commendation Ribbon, Rear Admiral Taylor is entitled to the Purple Heart Medal (for wounds received in action), and has the American Defense Service Medal, the American Campaign Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with one silver star and four bronze stars, the World War II Victory Medal, and the
(Continued on Page Three)


tember, to visit the two Naval Air Reserve Squadrons on training iere from Birmingham, Alabama. Congressman Huddleston, who represents the Ninth District of Alabama has more than just a persenal interest in the Reserve Squadrons.

A personal interest he does have, as during World War II the Congressman served four years in the Navy, 32 months of this time in the Pacific, and received 8 battle stars. At present he holds the rank of Lieutenant Commander, USNR.

Having just a personal interest was not enough to warrant a trip here from the States, since Mr. Huddleston has been elected to the House of Representatives h3 has been appointed to the House Armed Services Committee.
The two Reserve Squadrons that Congressman Huddleston came to look over are Fighter Squadron 681, under the command of LCDR Billy P. Burch, and F.A.S. Squadron 681 under the command of CDR Emil B. Stella.

The Reserves are on their annual two week training cruise. As they fly one full weekend of every month, the two squadrons keep themselves in fairly good fighting shape. The two squadrons, consisting of 29 officers and 124 men, have 17 Corsairs and 3 Beacheraft of their own here for training purposes. In the short time that they will be here, the flyers try to get 40% of their annual flight training in. As they are required to fly 100 hours annually, it keeps them pretty busy during the two weeks that they are here.

LETTER OF THANKS FROM MRS. TAYLOR
To the ladies of the Trading Post Committee and their workers, the Guantanamo I Transport Volunteers, and
the Hospital Volunteers:
In leaving the Base I wish
to thank you all _for your cooperation, willingness, work and your cheerfulness
in doing your job.
Admiral Taylor and.I are
proud, pleased, and duly grateful. This is a wonderful Base and you help to make
it so- Ii
Hasta la Vista
Elizabeth Valiant maylor

9.oo ----oooo..


The latter part of August saw the last of the Midshipmen and NROTC cruises departing from Guantanamo Bay ending the annual influx of middies here. However, they left a record of sales at Ships Service that was more than four times the amount of regular sales here.
This year, during the 12 days that the Navy Exchange and the Navy Air Exchange were open for the three cruises, the exchanges sold over $282,000 worth of goods. This included service departments and restaurants.
Of the three cruises. Cruise Able had the largest spenders, as they bought $107,841 worth of merchandise. Cruise Baker took second, spending a hearty sum of $88,931 in their four day here. The middies of Cruise Charlie were close behind, spending $85,366 during their time in Gtmo. The reason for big drop in sales from Cruise Able can be attributed to the drop in number of personnel in the last two cruises.
The number one sales item for the middies proved to be the sporting goods. A variety of items were in demand, with the gun department getting the primary nod. In the 12 days that the middies spent on the Base they purchased $37,786 worth of sporting goods.
Holding a close second for the three cruises were household appliances. This included toasters, electric coffee makers, frying pans, etc. Over $32,000 worth of appliances were purchased by the middies.
As always, leather goods and perfumes sold at four to six times the usual rate with sales skyrocketing to $25,807 for leather goods, and $24,357 for perfumes.
Also popular was the jeweley counter. This department reported a terrific increase, of sales during the three cruises, and sold $20,293 worth of goods during that time.
Close behind the jewerly counter in total sales was the camera department which took in $19,310 in the 12 day period.
About the only department that did not increase in sales were the clothing, shoes, and childrens counters.
In accordance with Navy policy, part of the funds taken in at the Navy Exchange will be turned over to the various recreation funds of the Base. This amount is computed on a per capita basis.


On Monday, 12 September, at 0900, Rear Admiral Edmund B. Taylor will be relieved as Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by Rear Admiral William G. Cooper, with the colorful change of command ceremonies to take place on the parade grounds in front of the Marine Administration Building on Marine Site #2.
At exactly 0830 all enlisted personnel who can be spared from their duties aboard the base will assemble in formation, with one chief petty officer in charge for each command to report to the Marine Officer in Charge of assembling formations. All but official traffic to Marine Site #2 will stop at 0845, with the buglar sounding attention on sighting the approach of the Base Commander's car.
RADM Taylor will read his orders, and order the Quartermaster to haul down his flag, at which point RADM Cooper will read his orders and have his flag run up. The ceremony is expected to be over within 15 minutes of starting.
Dependents of officers and enlisted personnel and civilian personnel of the Naval Base are cordially invited to witness the colorful ceremony, however everyone will be required to be there at least 15 minutes prior to the commencement of the ceremony. Parking areas have been designated as follows: Marine Lyceum, CPO's civilian visitors and enlisted personnel. The Marine Restaurant parking area has been reserved for officers cars, and the Exchange parking area for commanders and above.
The uniform for the ceremony will be as follows: Male Commissioned and Warrant Officers-full dress white. Nurse Corps Officers
-Service dress without purse. Chief Petty Officers-Service dress white. Other enlisted personnelundress white "Able" with neckerchief. Enlisted Marines-as prescribed by Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks.


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Page Two


Saturday, 10 September 1955


NDIAN


What Freedom??? MAqUC osfNes

by LCDR G. E. Hoppe by Paul A. Hoffer, USMC


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
RADM EDMUND B. TAYLOR, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba
CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba
Editorial Staff
LTJG J. D. Byerley --------------------------------- Officer-Advisor
G. L. Henderson, JOC ------------------------------------- Editor
D. C. Roberts, JOSN ------------------------------ Managing Editor
E. J. Talen, SN -------------------------------------- Staff Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
Materials marked AFPS may be used by any news medium provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part, with or without credit.
All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


a
Sunday, 11 September 1955
Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0930-Sunday School
0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Sabbath Services Christian Science
Sunday: 1000-Station Library Latter Day Saints Sunday-1100-Naval Station Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)


The Chaplain's Corner



A MOTTO
The great St. Augustine, illustrious doctor of the Church, had a holy horror of all unkind conversation. To guard his guests against uncharitable talk he had a sign hung on the wall of the room where he usually entertained his friends. Painted in large letters were the words:
"Slanderer, beware,
This is no place for thee;
Here nought shall reign But truth and charity."
One day some of his guests, forgetful of the warning words, began to speak of the faults of an absent neighbor. At once the holy bishop kindly but gravely reproved them:
"My friends," he declared, "you must either cease to speak on such a subject or it will be necessary for me to have those verses blotted from the walls of my home."
You can be sure there was no more unkind talk by those individuals in the house at Hippo.
Would that those words would be inscribed on the walls of every


home and office and shop and club. Better still: would that those words would be carved into the fleshly walls of every human heart.
A LAW
The Augustinian motto was not merely an application, but the translation of the spirit of that Commandment which is observed respecting the good name of everyone, by always telling the truth, and by showing genuine love for our neighbor.
A 1 t h o u g h the Commandment says: "Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor," it is, like all God's laws, a very positive one.
A POEM
First and foremost, we must respect the good name and reputation of our neighbor, just as we want him to respect our good name. It is the most precious thing we have. Often we are willing to lose health, wealth, everything; but we do want to keep our good name. Shakespeare puts it like this:
"Good name in man or woman is the immediate jewel of their souls;
Who steals my purse steals
trash; 'tis something, nothing;
'Twas mine, 'tis his and has
been slave to thousands;
But he that filches from me
good name
Robs me of that which not
enriches him
And makes me poor indeed."
(Othello)
How patiently, how terribly true. You can replace almost anything else; but you cannot replace a reputation.
It is not enough to avoid harming other's good names; we must be positive. We must go out of our way to build up the good names of others. How much more pleasant, how much more uplifting, how much more ennobling of the individual and the community it is to talk about the good qualities of others.
Jerome J. Sullivan
Chaplain

HOLY COMMUNION
The Guantanamo Bay Holy
Name Society will receive Holy Communion in a body at the 0900 Mass on 11 September. All Catholic men are invited to attend. After Mass breakfast will be served at i
the CPO Club.

0-- ----ooooo


FREEDOM: A wonderful but
misinterpreted word is often the reason given for not reenlisting in the armed forces.
When asked what freedom do you mean, the separatee often replies, "the freedom to go home at night", "the freedom to work as I choose", the freedom to TELL OFF THE BOSS", "the freedom to dress and act as I choose, etc".
After listening to all these freedoms a person wonders what is freedom-just a word? Or is it something concrete which pertains to each individual as he sees fi . The latter seems to be the popular conception. If so, the only freedom not included when a man says he wants out, is freedom to think and make up his own mind.
Each individual has many freedoms, the majority of which he does not use. Mainly the freedoms are not used because each individual desires to conform to the crowd, be one of the boys. His cohorts state "I'm going out so I can go where I want to", so friend John thinks to himself, "man, that's for me." Another says, "I'm going out so I can work where I want and do as I please." Again friend John says to himself, "sounds pretty good". A third person states, "I'm tired of dressing like everyone in this outfit." Friend John remembers that he cut a sharp figure in a zoot suit.
In all cases above, friend John was going along with the crowd, he was following, not leading. John's friends were repeating ideas stated for years by men before them, thus being followers themselves. None of these people indicate good qualities of leadership or individuality. They were not exercising one of their most important freedoms, to think and decide for themselves.
These men are trying to justify why they are leaving the service, not why they desire civilian life. They are not thinking of-what would happen if I told the boss off. How will I be different if I wear a brown suit or a blue uniform, of where will I obtain the necessary funds to go where and when I please. A sweet dream but the idea of someone else, and it


DEPARTURES
Thursday, 1 September, Staff Sargeant William E. Kent departed for duty in the states. SSgt Kent was slated to report to Camp Lejeune, N.C. for duty but he has been selected for Officers' Candidate School and will be sent to Marine Corps Schools, Quantico Virginia when he reports to Camp Lejeune.
ARRIVALS
Arriving from the 2nd Marine Division in Camp Lejeune, N.C. was Staff Sergeant Alphonzo Birris Jr. Accompanying him were his wife and two children. SSgt Burrns is assigned to Security Section.
LABOR DAY PICNIC
A picnic was held at the Marine Barracks baseball field Monday afternoon. Events were held throughout the afternoon. Plenty of beer and chow were on hand and everyone had a good time.
SOFTBALL
1st section Guard Company moved into first place in the Marine Barracks softball league by defeating Headquarters in a close game Monday, 4 to 3. Tuesday, Headquarters defeated 2nd Section
5 to 4.
NEW EXECUTIVE OFFICER Lieutenant Colonel William C. Enterline has relieved Lieutenant Colonel John A. Burns as Executive Officer of Marine Barracks. LtCol Burns has departed for duty in California at Marine Corps Air Station, El Toro, California. LtCol Enterline joined us from The Pentagon in Washington, D.C. He was accompanied by his wife and two children.

has been proved that the idea did not become a reality.
A person who thinks and follows his own convictions-not those of someone else-is enjoying one of his greatest freedoms. A person who thinks for himself realizes why he has one thing today and another tomorrow. He is a MAN and an asset to any organization, military or civilian, because he thinks for himself and makes up his own mind .
He is the man the Navy wants
-a potential leader and a thinker. This type man knows what he, not the crowd, wants-and he goes after it. He uses his most important freedom. HE THINKS.


THE TOWN CRIER

by M. Gordon
An Open Forum is planned by the Community Council to be held on 20 September. All residents of the base are invited to attend. This will be an opportunity to voice your opinions and constructive criticism in helping to make the community a better one in which to live. The time and place of the Forum will be announced in next weeks INDIAN.
The Community Council takes pleasure in announcing that the award for the Yard of the Month of July goes to Mr. & Mrs. R. A. Mason, DH200. For the month of August, the award goes to Mr. & Mrs. Dickson, CB-7B. The council has agreed that the hours of hard work and perserverence by Mr. & Mrs. Mason, and Mr. & Mrs. Dickson have certainly helped to improve their part of the community. Congratulations. We hope you enjoy the prize you have certainly earned.
Another dance is in the making. Details as to time and date will be announced at a later date.
Just last week, a child ran into a car and had to be rushed to the hospital. Had it not been for the alertness of the operator of the vehicle, the child may have been injured seriously. As parents, it is up to you to keep your children from running in the streets. Please keep your children out of the streets and avoid such accidents, as this could be serious and regretful to all parties concerned. Have consideration for your children as well as the operators of the vehicles. And you operators of vehicles, give the children a "brake" and be certain that you observe the speed limit in the housing areas.


90


THE INDIAN


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Saturday, 10 September 1955


THE INDIAN


FTG Bulletin

LT N. R. Schneible reported aboard last week and joined the Engineering Department. His present home is in Portsmouth, Virginia where his wife Helen and five children are staying while waiting for assignment to quarters. LT Schneible enlisted in the Navy in 1934 and has spent the majority of his career below decks having served aboard the USS Talbot, the USS Melville, the USS Dyess and the USS Conecuh in an engineering capacity. He also had a tour of duty in Brazil during the war at a repair facility. LT Schneible's children are his proudest possession, the two oldest are twin girls and the next thee are boys, the youngest is only 2 months old.
The Gunnery Department officers and wives set their sights last week at bingo and walked off with five of the 14 prizes. CHTORP Leimas and family automatically jumped to a higher income bracket.
LT Roby Flack, USN reported to the Air Department this week from VS-30 in Norfolk, Virginia. He and his wife are both natives of Marion, North Carolina. They have three children ranging from 8 years old to 3 weeks old. LT Flack enlisted in 1938 at Ashville, North Carolina and went to boot camp at Norfolk. He has served on the USS Enterprise, the USS Midway, and at the Jacksonville Naval Air Station. He received the Presidential Unit Citation while aboard the USS Enterprise.
The FTG Annual Handicap Golf Tournament was played during the Labor Day weekend holiday. A large turnout of players competed. A picnic lunch was held after the match which was an enjoyable climax. CDR Skadowski awarded the prizes and the winners were:
1st-low net 132
Roy Marino, SN
2nd-low net 141
Joe Dimaggio, GM1
3rd-low net 142
Pat Sparks, FP1
4th-low net 142
Ed Monte, QMC
low gross 159
Frank Cohanski, EMC
During the course of play, a total of 18 birdies were made.
Mr. and Mrs. Roland H. Jacques, the parents of Mrs. J. M. Ferrante, are currently enjoying a visit on the Naval Base with their daughter and son-in-law. LT Ferrante is the Executive Officer of the Fleet Training Center. They are on the homeward leg of a business and pleasure trip that in the past nine months has taken them from Australia to Singapore, Ceylon, India, Egypt, throughout Italy, France, Switzerland, Austria, Germay and other European countries and included a three months stay in England and Scotland. Mr. Jacque's visit here at the Naval Base is of particular interest to him because prior to leaving Australia he was installing boilers in Australian built destroyers. When Mr. and Mrs. Jacques leave here, they will cross the U.S. and then go by freighter from Los Angeles to Pago Pago and other South Pacific ports before returning to Australia.


Teonage Round-up

by Sylvia Cavanaugh &
Delorice Kinchen
Today, another of our old buddies, Norm Huddy departs for the place of work in the states. Norm is going to Villanova College to start his second year as an NROTC candidate.
DID 'JA SEE?? . . . .
All the "peasant" Freshmen this week of initiations? .. . Marise, Prisy and Red staggering down the hall with piles of books and all sorts of ornaments dangling from them ? ? ... Kenny S.'s new "egg on the head" shampoo?? ... Pat Dickson, Dave Wall, Carl H., Dan K., and Jon Ward with their pretzel earrings? ? . . . The chic with the technicolor hair?? . . . All the kids in Geometry class (after hearing a rooster crow) saying "geometrically prove it."? ? ... Pete, Judy, Jerry and Sharon's little "get together"?? ... Nita, Phil, Pat F., and Maryalice care fully and cautiously doing their experiments in Chemistry Cltps? ? ... Eunice in Typing Class? ? ... Nancy A. passing out cards reading "Vote for Me"? ? . . . Gary doing Algebra? ? . . . Ralph A. making sign language in Study Hall? ? . . .


Chiet Makes Ensign


Chief R. L. Magarity was recently swdrn in by CDR Stanul CO, VU-10 and accepted a commission as Ensign. Magarity's wife, Ira, pins the gold bars on his collar and Chief Brotherson collected the traditional first salute. Magarity received his wings in April, 1947 and since then has compiled a grand total of more than 4500 flying hours.


Local Talent Returns


From All-Navy Contest


Hel8d At Charleston

On Tuesday, 24 August, Harry Dias, announcer at Armed Forces Radio Station WGBY, left for Charleston, South Carolina, to enter the preliminary elimination contest to locate Navy talent to appear on Ed Sullivan's "Toast of the Town" All Navy Show.
The day following his arrival at Charleston, Dias was auditioned, nd the same evening participated in the contest which was held in th2 Naval Hospital there. The cont et had participants from Texas, Florida, North and South Carolina, and of course, from Cuba.
Singing "Body and Soul" in his deep baritone voice, which is famiiar to many on the Base, Dias was nosed out by a 2nd Class Corpsman from Texas who sang "Because Your Mine".
The judges, all of whom have had experience either in show business, or in radio and television, had quite a time choosing the winner, as they held the show up for a while before ruling Dias out.
The winners will continue on to New York, and on 18 September will be auditioned by Ed Sullivan's own staff before finally being allowed to appear on the Toast of the Town" All Navy Show.

Admiral Taylor Cant. . .1
Philippine Liberation Ribbon.
Immediately after the changeof-command ceremony Rear Admiral Taylor, accompanied by his wife, will depart for Ashburnham, Massachusetts where they will visit their daughter and family. On October 1 he will relieve Rear Admiral William G. Beecher Jr. as Chief of Information.
Rclieving Rear Admiral Taylor will be Rear Admiral William G. Cooper, who before his assignCent here, was Commander of Destroyer Flotilla 6. Admiral Cooper, who will arrive here tomorrow with his family, was Chief of Plans for the Bureau of Naval Personnel. Earlier he commanded the cruiser Newport News, attended the National War College, and commanded Destroyer Squadron 9 and Destroyer Division 91.


Revised Bus Schedule For Saturday Catholic Catechih

Bus I From West Bus 2 From East Bus 3


Cable Station Corinaso Point Oil Point Hospital Radio Point Victory Hill Arrive Chap- I


It


0915 Villamar 5th Av. 0920 Bargo


0920 NOB Hill 0925 Granadill
Arrive Ch 0930

0935


0930 Marina Point o Point 0935 Marine Site #1


apel


0945 Evans Point
Arrive Chapel


The Fish Tale (s)

by P. J. Aldridge
It has been brought to the attention of this here colyumnist that there are them as do not cotton to the venacular in which this weekly article is presented. Now, I'm inclined to go along with old Abe Lincoln who operated on the premise that ya can't please all of the people all of the time and, even though I can to that there adadge to the extent that, seeming.. ly, ya can't seem to please some of the people none of the time, I still figure there ain't nuthin' like tryin'. Maybe you all would like it better i the FISH TALE came out readin' somethin' like as follows:
Those homo sapien individuals possessing an avid desire to engage in pursuits piscatorial need not have been formally apprised in the many faceted science of icthyology. One has but to posses the manually dexterous ability to successfully wield either rod or spear gun and one requisite personal characteristic, patience. Although it has long been established fact that the most successful fishermen are fully cognizant of the important effects of tides and lunar aspect, nonenced by expert oceanographers. Too, particularly in adjacent waters, piscatorial inhabitants are so great in species variable and so plentiful that the neophyte is apt to be immediately fortunate. It is highly advisable, however, that the beginner consult and accept the testimony of the more experienced. Let it he known that no truly avid fishing hobbyist will give more than general information. The secrets of success are treasures locked securely within the labryinth of memory regarding trial and error. When the expert finds the rare prize of the grounds where the big ones dwell he lays claim in the fact of absolute silence.
If'n them there paragraphs, which are kinda slanted at the newcomers hereabouts, are more pleasin' to your readin' appetite all va gotta do is let us know and that's the way you'll get it. Meantime, we got a bit of info to pass on to ya. One of the rules of the fishin' tournament bein' conducted down to the sailboat locker has been changed a mite. Ya no longer gotta get your entry fee of a buck in by the fifth of the month. Just so long as ya fork over before ya go out to try your luck you're in like Finnegan. Monthly contests run from the first to the first and the more the entrys the better the prizes. Ya can see all the rules and regs at the locker or get 'em by callin' 9545. Spear fishin' divers are in on it, too, so get to gettin'.


No real monsters have been weighed in to date so we all got a chance.
Don't forget, neither, that ya only got to pay two bucks for any eight 0920 hour period for a boat and motor
and only a buck more for any hour 0930 overtime. Plenty of bait, lots of
rods, reels and strong, new line. 0935 No reason for not goin'. See ya 0940 up the river, bub.


0945


0940 0945


Plane passenger to stewardess: "How high is this plane?"
Stewardess: "About 19,000 feet." Small voice across the aisle: "How wide is it?"


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Page Three


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Saturday, 10 September 1955


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THE INDIAN


Navy-DPPO-0ND-Gtmo.-2281


MY PHILADELPHIA FATHER
by Cordellia Drexel
Here is a story filled with rampart individualisim-the rollicking life-with-fatherish biography of Colonel Anthony J. Biddle. The dashing figurehead of one of Philadelphia's wealthiest and most influential families, Colonel Biddle was a living contradiction to the adage that money and happiness don't mix. Believing that nothing was worth doing unless done all the way, the Colonel's life is one of adventure after adventure and how he gets himself out of them.
BEST DETECTIVE STORIES
OF 1955
This is a book written for all who like mystery in short but powerful doses. Containing 12 of the years best mysteries, it is a well balanced collection that has stories to suit every taste. It is the tenth consecutive year that David C. Cooke has collected the best in detective fiction, and as before, each of the stories are well worth reading.
THE DINNER PARTY by Gretchen Finletter
A book written mainly for women, but also of enjoyment to men, it is a humorous and human picture of the lady of the house as she juggles a hundred different jobs with grace, good humour, and success. Full of humour, it is a well written book guaranteed to give all who read it a good laugh.
FROM MY EXPERIENCE
by Louis Bromfield
The practical experiences of a farmer are put down on paper for all to take advantage of. Containing practical wisdom-i and frank observation, this book is concerned with many things-soil and live stock, chemistry and nutrition religion and human relationships, and the richness that is born of country living. Written with wisdom and charm, it gives the reader an opportunity to glimpse the problems, and joys, of country living.
LEARNING TO SAIL
by H. A. Calahan
For those of you who have often wished to be able to take advantage of the sailing facilities on the Base, but through lack of knowhow were afraid to try, then here is a book that you need. Written with a background of 35 years of experience, the author puts on paper all the correct techniques needed to be able to sail on your own.




iRp-POV5 14!G CAR VMi A R5CKLEC' A -R
NoW NE' C~ -NG CC, R S
M AQ 0 DWHE5 _ $A

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. . .. . .


Radio's 'Tops' of the Week

SATURDAY, 10 Sept. . .. OUR MISS BROOKS ... 8:00 P.M.
Perpetually jumping out of the frying pan into the fire, Our Miss Brocks this time hits a matrimonial jackpot when she receives marriage proposals from handsome suitors across the nation. Connie Brook, schoolteacher, finds the situation out of her control and has to turn to the school principal for help.
SUNDAY, 11 Sept. . . . JACK BENNY . . . 8:00 P.M.
Jack Benny is your host in a fun program which includes his guest, Bob Hope. Bob and Jack join in a double date with two telephone operators and go on a picnic. Like many outings the picnic ends with a rain storm, but not before Jack is already drenched by falling in the creek.
MONDAY, 12 Sept. . . . STAR PLAYHOUSE . . . 9:00 P.M.
Star Playhouse presents June Allyson in the starring role of the comedy "The Major and the Minor". The story is one of confused identity, caused by a young woman who disguises herself as a young girl to take advantage of a half-price fare back to her hometown. Encountering a handsome Major enroute, she is protected as a "helpless little girl", which causes comic complications.
TUESDAY, 13 Sept. . . . WHAT'S MY LINE . . . 8:00 P.M.
John Daly is host for this week's show. The mystery guest this week are the popular husband and wife dance team, Marge and Gower Champion.
WEDNESDAY, 14 Sept. . . . ON STAGE . . . 9:00 P.M.
Cathy and Elliot Lewis star in the On Stage production of "Passage Strange" It's the story of a man trying to overcome the grief of losing his wife. Another woman teaches him to love again. THURSDAY, 15 Sept. . . . DRAGNET . . . 8:30 P.M.
The files of the Los Angeles Police Department come up with another
-tory with Jack Webb as Sgt. Joe Friday. Friday receives a phone call form a distracted wife. Upon her return from a shopping trip she discover her husband beaten to death. Friday's job, find killer.


Naval Base School Soon

To Build New Classrooms

The Naval Base School will soon have two new classrooms to help relieve the crowded situation caused by the increase of students in lower grades.
The two new classrooms are located on Victory Hill, and will be occupied by a section of first and third grades. The first grade section is already located on Victory Hill, but in with the Kindergarten Classes. Due to the crowded condition of their present classroom, it would be advantageous to the first grade to be apart from the Kindergarten. The third grade section still has to be made up. At present there is 133 pupils in this grade, divided into four classes. In order to keep the classes as small as possible, a fifth section has to be added.
The problem of overcrowding is not a unique problem here at Gtmo, but is a problem throughout all of the Public Schools in the United States. Schools all over the country are expanding as fast as possible, but still are unable to keep up with the increase in birth rate, the first wave of which is now hitting the lower grades.
Tentative plans for a new school building to be located in Villamar have been laid out to try and relieve the situation which faces the school here. This new building will house grades one through six which in turn will allow all classes housed in temporary classrooms to return to permanent classrooms. As yet, a definate site has not been chosen for the new building, but as details are released, they will le published at a later date in the INDIAN.


0


Base Golf Championship

The final results of the 1955 Men's Golf Championship play at the Guantanamo Golf Club are as follows: Championship flight won by Lee Rogers of NAS, with Harvey Peddycord, VU-10, runner-up. First flight, match not yet played, CHMACH H. H. Bush will play E. J. Scherlacher of NAS. The second flight was won by D. E. Campbell of VU-10 with LT Noga of FTG, runner-up. In the third flight E. E. Arnold won over CDR K. E. Skadowski of FTG. B. E. Smith, Naval Station, took the fourth flight from E. J. Choate of the Naval Hospital. In the Consolation (championship) flight, R. K. Wilson of FTG won over R. L. Broughton, Naval Station.
The 1955 Naval Station Invitational Tournament will be' held on 11-13 November, inclusive at the Guantanamo Golf Club. All base personnel, male military and civilian, are eligible to participate in the second tournament. See your tournament committee members for details. This is a handicap tournament.
The 1955 Men's Handicap Championships will also be coming up shortly, probably commencing the first week in October. If you do not have an established club handicap, better sharpen up the irons and get at least 10 scores posted. All golfers are requested to post their own scores. The Handicap Committee will give you a handicap after you have posted the required scores under the USGA system of handicaps. You do not have to be a member of the club to enter either of these tournaments.

New Steno: "Well, at last I've got a raise in salary."
Old Steno: "Honestly."
New Steno: "Oh, don't be so inquisitive."


90


MOVIES

Saturday, 10 September
THE BIG STEAL
Robert Mitchum Jane Greer
An army payroll officer pursues a band of outlaws into Mexico in an attempt to recover a stolen payroll for which he is responsible. The story gets more involved when he discovers that his senior officer is involved in on the robbery.
Sunday, 11 September BRINGING UP BABY
Katherine Hepburn Cary Grant
Katherine Hepburn, who is very wealthy and owns a baby tiger is in love with Cary Grant, who is a professor and is not in love with her. She pursues him in an attempt to get him to marry her.
Monday, 12 September THE WHITE ORCHID
William Lundigan Peggy Castle
An archeologist and his female photographer go into the wilds with a young native guide to learn of a mysterious people. Jealously develops between the two men and causes trouble, so that one has to give up his life to get the other two to safety.
Tuesday, 13 September CHICAGO SYNDICATE
Dennis O'Keefe Abbe Lane
Unable to get the proof to break up the activities of a huge crooked syndicate. Police and the leading citizens of Chicago get a brilliant young accountant in with the head of the gang. The young man's life is in constant danger as he attempts to get the necessary evidence.
Wednesday, 14 September
TOP OF THE WORLD
Dale Robertson Evelyn Keyes
A jet pilot in Hawaii is sent to Ladd Field as a regular pilot where he meets his wife who is loved by another pilot. The jet pilot, with six other men is sent to Ice Island near the North Pole which gradually disintegrates in a raging storm. Rescued by the "other" man, the jet pilot is informed that his wife wants him back, but it isn't that easy as the pilot is now in love with another girl.
Thursday, 15 September
THREE FOR THE SHOW
Betty Grable Jack Lemmon
The return of a Broadway musical comedy writer, after having been reported killed in action in Korea two years before, brings about a strange situation. Upon his return he finds that his wife has married again.
Friday, 16 September
SHOTGUN
Sterling Hayden Yvonne DeCarlo
A U.S. Marshall goes hunting for a killer and finds a man and women tied in a snake trap and left to die. He discovers that Apaches and the killers he is after have joined together, and he goes after both.




Full Text

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#82e a a at "Gooers QTrMO Like CJe Su.nsl-tine" Vol. VI, No. 36 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 10 September 1955 Change Of Command This Monday HADM Taylor To Report Congressman Huddleston Aug, Sales Skyrocket Ceremony Being Held To Washington For Duty; Visits Two Reserve Units On Training Exercises Here RADM Cooper Relieving Congressma n 2 Middies Biggest Buyers Starting At 9:00 AM Next Monday Rear Admiral Edmund B. Taylor will be relieved by Rear Admiral William G. Cooper as Commander, Guantanamo Naval Base. Admiral Taylor has been commanding officer of the Base since 9 February, 1954, and during that time has seen many improvements added to the Base. Among the many projects which Admiral Taylor has seen completed during his tour here have been a 300 unit Replacement Housing Project, Pier Victor, the Hanger on Leeward Point, new Red Cross Building, Naval Base Golf Course Club House, and the new Motel. The biggest of these projects, both in size and in effect upon the Base was the completion of the Replacement Housing. Admiral Taylor was also instrumental in getting the furniture which is now being used in the new housing. Among the projects that have been started during Admiral Taylors time here have been the new ultra-modern hospital, and the swimming pool in Trading Post Park. The work done by Admiral Taylor during his tour of duty here is just another page in the outstanding record which he has compiled since entering the Naval Academy in 1921. While in the Academy he was a member of the varsity football team, which he captained in 1924; played on the basketball squad in 1924; was a member of the boxing squad in 1923-24; and All-American on the Lacrosse team in 1924-25. Upon graduating from the Academy in 1925, the Admiral served on various ships until 1933, when he returned to the Naval Academy as an Instructor, and as assistant coach in both football and La crosse. During World War II Admiral Taylor compiled an outstanding record through his extraordinary heroism and distinguished service. In addition to the Navy Cross, the Silver Star Modal, the Legion of Merit with Combat "V", the Bronze Star Medal, also with "V", and the commendation Ribbon, Rear Admiral Taylor is entitled to the Purple Heart Medal (for wounds received in action), and has the American Defense Service Medal, the American Campaign Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with one silver star and four bronze stars, the World War II Victory Medal, and the (Continued on Page Three) tember, to visit the two Naval Air Reserve Squadrons on training here from Birmingham, Alabama. Congressman Huddleston, who represents the Ninth District of Alabama has more than just a personal interest in the Reserve Squadrons. A personal interest he does have, as during World War II the Congressman served four years in the Navy, 32 months of this time in the Pacific, and received 8 battle stars. At present he holds the rank of Lieutenant Commander, USNR. Having just a personal interest was not enough to warrant a trip here from the States, since Mr. Huddleston has been elected to the House of Representatives ha has been appointed to the House Armed Services Committee. The two Reserve Squadrons that Congressman Huddleston came to look over are Fighter Squadron 681, under the command of LCDR Billy P. Burch, and F.A.S. Squadron 681 under the command of CDR Emil B. Stella. The Reserves are on their annual two week training cruise. As they fly one full weekend of every month, the two squadrons keep themselves in fairly good fighting shape. The two squadrons, consisting of 29 officers and 124 men, have 17 Corsairs and 3 Beachcraft of their own here for training purposes. In the short time that they will be here, the flyers try to get 40% of their annual flight training in. As they are required to fly 100 hours annually, it keeps them pretty busy during the two weeks that they are here. LETTER OF THANKS FROM MRS. TAYLOR To the ladies of the Trading Post Committee and their workers, the Guantanamo Transport Volunteers, and the Hospital Volunteers: In leaving the Base I wish to thank you all for your cooperation, willingness, work, and your cheerfulness in doing your job. Admiral Taylor and I are proud, pleased, and duly grateful. This is a wonderful Base and you help to make it soHasta la Vista Elizabeth Valiant 'aylor 9i The latter part of August saw the last of the Midshipmen and NROTC cruises departing from Guantanamo Bay ending the annual influx of middies here. However, they left a record of sales at Ships Service that was more than four times the amount of regular sales here. This year, during the 12 days that the Navy Exchange and the Navy Air Exchange were open for the three cruises, the exchanges sold over $282,000 worth of goods. This included service departments and restaurants. Of the three cruises. Cruise Able had the largest spenders, as they bought $107,841 worth of merchandise. Cruise Baker took second, spending a hearty sum of $88,931 in their four day here. The middies of Cruise Charlie were close behind, spending $85,366 during their time in Gtmo. The reason for big drop in sales from Cruise Able can be attributed to the drop in number of personnel in the last two cruises. The number one sales item for the middies proved to be the sporting goods. A variety of items were in demand, with the gun department getting the primary nod. In the 12 days that the middies spent on the Base they purchased $37,786 worth of sporting goods. Holding a close second for the three cruises were household appliances. This included toasters, electric coffee makers, frying pans, etc. Over $32,000 vorth of appliances were purchased by the middies. As always, leather goods and perfumes sold at four to six times the usual rate with sales skyrocketing to $25,807 for leather goods, and $24,357 for perfumes. Also popular was the jeweley counter. This department reported a terrific increase, of sales during the three cruises, and sold $20,293 worth of goods during that time. Close behind the jewerly counter in total sales was the camera department which took in $19,310 in the 12 day period. About the only department that did not increase in sales were the clothing, shoes, and children counters. In accordance with Navy policy, part of the funds taken in at the Navy Exchange will be turned over to the various recreation funds of the Base. This amount is computed on a per capita basis. On Monday, 12 September, at 0900, Rear Admiral Edmund B. Taylor will be relieved as Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by Rear Admiral William G. Cooper, with the colorful change of command ceremonies to take place on the parade grounds in front of the Marine Administration Building on Marine Site #2. At exactly 0830 all enlisted personnel who can be spared from their duties aboard the base will assemble in formation, with one chief petty officer in charge for each command to report to the Marine Officer in Charge of assembling formations. All but official traffic to Marine Site #2 will stop at 0845, with the buglar sounding attention on sighting the approach of the Base Commander's car. RADM Taylor will read his orders, and order the Quartermaster to haul down his flag, at which point RADM Cooper will read his orders and have his flag run up. The ceremony is expected to be over within 15 minutes of starting. Dependents of officers and enlisted personnel and civilian personnel of the Naval Base are cordially invited to witness the colorful ceremony, however everyone will be required to be there at least 15 minutes prior to the commencement of the ceremony. Parking areas have been designated as follows: Marine Lyceum, CPO's civilian visitors and enlisted personnel. The Marine Restaurant parking area has been reserved for officers cars, and the Exchange parking area for commanders and above. The uniform for the ceremony will be as follows: Male Commissioned and Warrant Officers-full dress white. Nurse Corps Officers -Service dress without purse. Chief Petty Officers-Service dress white. Other enlisted personnelundress white "Able" with neckerchief. Enlisted Marines-as prescribed by Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks. 0 ;

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Saturday, 10 September 1955 THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as possible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM EDMUND B. TAYLOR, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Editorial Staff LTJG J. D. Byerley ----------------------------------Officer-Advisor G. L. Henderson, JOC ---------------------------------------Editor D. C. Roberts, JOSN ------------------------------Managing Editor E.J. Talen, SN -------------------------------------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Materials marked AFPS may be used by any news medium provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part, with or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. home and office and shop and club. Better still: would that those Sunday, 11 September 1955 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Sabbath Services Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Latter Day Saints Sunday-1100-Naval Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner A MOTTO The great St. Augustine, illustrious doctor of the Church, had a holy horror of all unkind conversation. To guard his guests against uncharitable talk he had a sign hung on the wall of the room where he usually entertained his friends. Painted in large letters were the words: "Slanderer, beware, This is no place for thee; Here nought shall reign But truth and charity." One day some of his guests, forgetful of the warning words, began to speak of the faults of an absent neighbor. At once the holy bishop kindly but gravely reproved them: "My friends," he declared, "you must either cease to speak on such a subject or it will be necessary for me to have those verses blotted from the walls of my home." You can be sure there was no more unkind talk by those individuals in the house at Hippo. Would that those words would be inscribed on the walls of every words would be carved into the fleshly walls of every human heart. A LAW The Augustinian motto was not merely an application, but the translation of the spirit of that Commandment which is observed respecting the good name of everyone, by always telling the truth, and by showing genuine love for our neighbor. A I thou g h the Commandment says: "Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor," it is, like all God's laws, a very positive one. A POEM First and foremost, we must respect the good name and reputation of our neighbor, just as we want him to respect our good name. It is the most precious thing we have. Often we are willing to lose health, wealth, everything; but we do want to keep our good name. Shakespeare puts it like this: "Good name in man or woman is the immediate jewel of their souls; Who steals my purse steals trash; 'tis something, nothing; 'Twas mine, 'tis his and has been slave to thousands; But he that filches from me good name Robs me of that which not enriches him And makes me poor indeed." (Othello) How patiently, how terribly true. You can replace almost anything else; but you cannot replace a reputation. It is not enough to avoid harming other's good names; we must be positive. We must go out of our way to build up the good names of others. How much more pleasant, how much more uplifting, how much more ennobling of the individual and the community it is to talk about the good qualities of others. Jerome J. Sullivan Chaplain HOLY COMMUNION The Guantanamo Bay Holy Name Society will receive Holy Communion in a body at the 0900 Mass on 11 September. All Catholic men are invited to attend. After Mass, breakfast will be served at the CPO Club. 6 What Freedom??? M~qn Mosses by LCDR G. E. Hoppe by Paul A. Hoffer, USMC FREEDOM: A wonderful but misinterpreted word is often the reason given for not reenlisting in the armed forces. When asked what freedom do you mean, the separatee often replies, "the freedom to go home at night", "the freedom to work as I choose", the freedom to TELL OFF THE BOSS", "the freedom to dress and act as I choose, etc". After listening to all these freedoms a person wonders what is freedom-just a word? Or is it something concrete which pertains to each individual as he sees fit. The latter seems to be the popular conception. If so, the only freedom not included when a man says he wants out, is freedom to think and make up his own mind. Each individual has many freedoms, the majority of which he does not use. Mainly the freedoms are not used because each individual desires to conform to the crowd, be one of the boys. His cohorts state "I'm going out so I can go where I want to", so friend John thinks to himself, "man, that's for me." Another says, "I'm going out so I can work where I want and do as I please." Again friend John says to himself, "sounds pretty good". A third person states, "I'm tired of dressing like everyone in this outfit." Friend John remembers that he cut a sharp figure in a zoot suit. In all cases above, friend John was going along with the crowd, he was following, not leading. John's friends were repeating ideas stated for years by men before them, thus being followers themselves. None of these people indicate good qualities of leadership or individuality. They were not exercising one of their most important freedoms, to think and decide for themselves. These men are trying to justify why they are leaving the service, not why they desire civilian life. They are not thinking of-what would happen if I told the boss off. How will I be different if I wear a brown suit or a blue uniform, of where will I obtain the necessary funds to go where and when I please. A sweet dream but the idea of someone else, and it DEPARTURES Thursday, 1 September, Staff Sargeant William E. Kent departed for duty in the states. SSgt Kent was slated to report to Camp Lejeune, N.C. for duty but he has been selected for Officers' Candidate School and will be sent to Marine Corps Schools, Quantico Virginia when he reports to Camp Lejeune. ARRIVALS Arriving from the 2nd Marine Division in Camp Lejeune, N.C. was Staff Sergeant Alphonzo Birris Jr. Accompanying him were his wife and two children. SSgt Burris is assigned to Security Section. LABOR DAY PICNIC A picnic was held at the Marine Barracks baseball field Monday afternoon. Events were held throughout the afternoon. Plenty of beer and chow were on hand and everyone had a good time. SOFTBALL 1st section Guard Company moved into first place in the Marine Barracks softball league by defeating Headquarters in a close game Monday, 4 to 3. Tuesday, Headquarters defeated 2nd Section 5 to 4. NEW EXECUTIVE OFFICER Lieutenant Colonel William C. Enterline has relieved Lieutenant Colonel John A. Burns as Executive Officer of Marine Barracks. LtCol Burns has departed for duty in California at Marine Corps Air Station, El Toro, California. LtCol Enterline joined us from The Pentagon in Washington, D.C. He was accompanied by his wife and two children. has been proved that the idea did not become a reality. A person who thinks and follows his own convictions-not those of someone else-is enjoying one of his greatest freedoms. A person who thinks for himself realizes why he has one thing today and another tomorrow. He is a MAN and an asset to any organization, military or civilian, because he thinks for himself and makes up his own mind He is the man the Navy wants -a potential leader and a thinker. This type man knows what he, not the crowd, wants-and he goes after it. He uses his most important freedom. HE THINKS. THE TOWN CRIER by M. Gordon An Open Forum is planned by the Community Council to be held on 20 September. All residents of the base are invited to attend. This will be an opportunity to voice your opinions and constructive criticism in helping to make the community a better one in which to live. The time and place of the Forum will be announced in next weeks INDIAN. The Community Council takes pleasure in announcing that the award for the Yard of the Month of July goes to Mr. & Mrs. R. A. Mason, DH200. For the month of August, the award goes to Mr. & Mrs. Dickson, CB-7B. The council has agreed that the hours of hard work and perserverence by Mr. & Mrs. Mason, and Mr. & Mrs. Dickson have certainly helped to improve their part of the community. Congratulations. We hope you enjoy the prize you have certainly earned. Another dance is in the making. Details as to time and date will be announced at a later date. Just last week, a child ran into a car and had to be rushed to the hospital. Had it not been for the alertness of the operator of the vehicle, the child may have been injured seriously. As parents, it is up to you to keep your children from running in the streets. Please keep your children out of the streets and avoid such accidents, as this could be serious and regretful to all parties concerned. Have consideration for your children as well as the operators of the vehicles. And you operators of vehicles, give the children a "brake" and be certain that you observe the speed limit in the housing areas. I9 Page Two ft THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 10 September 1955 FTG Bulletin LT N. R. Schneible reported aboard last week and joined the Engineering Department. His present home is in Portsmouth, Virginia where his wife Helen and five children are staying while waiting for assignment to quarters. LT Schneible enlisted in the Navy in 1934 and has spent the majority of his career below decks having served aboard the USS Talbot, the USS Melville, the USS Dyess and the USS Conecuh in an engineering capacity. He also had a tour of duty in Brazil during the war at a repair facility. LT Schneible's children are his proudest possession, the two oldest are twin girls and the next three are boys, the youngest is only 2 months old. The Gunnery Department officers and wives set their sights last week at bingo and walked off with five of the 14 prizes. CHTORP Leimas and family automatically jumped to a higher income bracket. LT Roby Flack, USN reported to the Air Department this week from VS-30 in Norfolk, Virginia. He and his wife are both natives of Marion, North Carolina. They have three children ranging from 8 years old to 3 weeks old. LT Flack enlisted in 1938 at Ashville, North Carolina and went to boot camp at Norfolk. He has served on the USS Enterprise, the USS Midway, and at the Jacksonville Naval Air Station. He received the Presidential Unit Citation while aboard the USS Enterprise. The FTG Annual Handicap Golf Tournament was played during the Labor Day weekend holiday. A large turnout of players competed. A picnic lunch was held after the match which was an enjoyable climax. CDR Skadowski awarded the prizes and the winners were: 1st-low net 132 Roy Marino, SN 2nd-low net 141 Joe Dimaggio, GM1 3rd-low net 142 Pat Sparks, FP1 4th-low net 142 Ed Monte, QMC low gross 159 Frank Cohanski, EMC During the course of play, a total of 18 birdies were made. Mr. and Mrs. Roland H. Jacques, the parents of Mrs. J. M. Ferrante, are currently enjoying a visit on the Naval Base with their daughter and son-in-law. LT Ferrante is the Executive Officer of the Fleet Training Center. They are on the homeward leg of a business and pleasure trip that in the past nine months has taken them from Australia to Singapore, Ceylon, India, Egypt, throughout Italy, France, Switzerland, Austria, Germay and other European countries and included a three months stay in England and Scotland. Mr. Jacque's visit here at the Naval Base is of particular interest to him because prior to leaving Australia he was installing boilers in Australian built destroyers. When Mr. and Mrs. Jacques leave here, they will cross the U.S. and then go by freighter from Los Angeles to Pago Pago and other South Pacific ports before returning to Australia. Teenage Round-up by Sylvia Cavanaugh & Delorice Kinchen Today, another of our old buddies, Norm Huddy departs for the place of work in the states. Norm is going to Villanova College to start his second year as an NROTC candidate. DID 'JA SEE?? .... All the "peasant" Freshmen this week of initiations? ? ..Marise, Prisy and Red staggering down the hall with piles of books and all sorts of ornaments dangling from them? ? .Kenny S.'s new "egg on the head" shampoo??. Pat Dickson, Dave Wall, Carl H., Dan K., and Jon Ward with their pretzel earrings? ? ...The chic with the technicolor hair? ?. .. All the kids in Geometry class (after hearing a rooster crow) saying "geometrically prove it."? ? .Pete, Judy, Jerry and Sharon's little "get together"? ? ...Nita, Phil, Pat F., and Maryalice care fully and cautiously doing their experiments in Chemistry Chps ? ? .Eunice in Typing Class? ? .. Nancy A. passing out cards reading "Vote for Me"?? .Gary doing Algebra? ? ...Ralph A. making sign language in Study Hall?? .. Chief Makes Ensign Chief R. L. Magarity was recently swdrn in by CDR Stanul CO, VU-10 and accepted a commission as Ensign. Magarity's wife, Ira, pins the gold bars on his collar and Chief Brotherson collected the traditional first salute. Magarity received his wings in April, 1947 and since then has compiled a grand total of more than 4500 flying hours. Local Talent Returns From All-Navy Contest Held At Charleston On Tuesday, 24 August, Harry Dias, announcer at Armed Forces Radio Station WGBY, left for Charleston, South Carolina, to enter the preliminary elimination contest to locate Navy talent to appear on Ed Sullivan's "Toast of the Town" All Navy Show. The day following his arrival at Charleston, Dias was auditioned, zmd the same evening participated in the contest which was held in th Naval Hospital there. The cont-,t had participants from Texas, Florida, North and South Carolina, and of course, from Cuba. Singing "Body and Soul" in his deep baritone voice, which is familiar to many on the Base, Dias was nosed out by a 2nd Class Corpsman from Texas who sang "Because Your Mine". The judges, all of whom have had experience either in show business, or in radio and television, had quite a time choosing the winner, as they held the show up for a while before ruling Dias out. The winners will continue on to New York, and on 18 September will be auditioned by Ed Sullivan's own staff before finally being allowed to appear on the Toast of the Town" All Navy Show. Admiral Taylor Cont, .. Philippine Liberation Ribbon. Immediately after the changeof-command ceremony Rear Admiral Taylor, accompanied by his wife, will depart for Ashburnham, Massachusetts where they will visit their daughter and family. On October 1 he will relieve Rear Admiral William G. Beecher Jr. as Chief of Information. Relieving Rear Admiral Taylor will be Rear Admiral William G. Cooper, who before his assignment here, was Commander of Destroyer Flotilla 6. Admiral Cooper, who will arrive here tomorrow with his family, was Chief of Plans for the Bureau of Naval Personnel. Earlier he commanded the cruiser Newport News, attended the National War College, and commanded Destroyer Squadron 9 and Destroyer Division 91. Revised Bus Schedule For Saturday Catholic Catechism Bus 1 From West Bus 2 From East Bus 3 Cable Station 0915 Villamar 5th Av. 0920 Bargo 0920 Corinaso Point Oil Point Hospital Radio Point Victory Hill 0920 NOB Hill 0925 0930 0935 0940 0930 Marina Point Granadillo Point 0935 Marine Site #1 Arrive Chapel 0945 Evans Point Arrive Chapel Arrive Ch pl 0945 The Fish Tale (s) by P. J. Aldridge It has been brought to the attention of this here colyumnist that there are them as do not cotton to the venacular in which this weekly article is presented. Now, I'm inclined to go along with old Abe Lincoln who operated on the premise that ya can't please all of the people all of the time and, even though I can to that there adadge to the extent that, seeming. ly, ya can't seem to please some of the people none of the time, I still figure there ain't nuthin' like tryin'. Maybe you all would like it better if'n the FISH TALE came out readin' somethin' like as follows: Those homo sapien individuals possessing an avid desire to engage in pursuits piscatorial need not have been formally apprised in the many faceted science of icthyology. One has but to posses the manually dexterous ability to successfully wield either rod or spear gun and one requisite personal characteristic, patience. Although it has long been established fact that the most successful fishermen are fully cognizant of the important effects of tides and lunar aspect, nonenced by expert oceanographers. Too, particularly in adjacent waters, piscatorial inhabitants are so great in species variable and so plentiful that the neophyte is apt to be immediately fortunate. It is highly advisable, however, that the beginner consult and accept the testimony of the more experienced. Let it be known that no truly avid fishing hobbyist will give more than general information. The secrets of success are treasures locked securely within the labryinth of memory regarding trial and error. When the expert finds the rare prize of the grounds where the big ones dwell he lays claim in the fact of absolute silence. If'n them there paragraphs, which are kinda slanted at the newcomers hereabouts, are more pleasin' to your readin' appetite all va gotta do is let us know and that's the way you'll get it. Meantime, we got a bit of info to pass on to ya. One of the rules of the fishin' tournament being' conducted down to the sailboat locker has been changed a mite. Ya no longer gotta get your entry fee of a buck in by the fifth of the month. Just so long as ya fork over before ya go out to try your luck you're in like Finnegan. Monthly contests run from the first to the first and the nfore the entrys the better the prizes. Ya can see all the rules and regs at the locker or get 'em by callin' 9545. Spear fishin' divers are in on it, too, so get to gettin'. No real monsters have been weighed in to date so we all got a chance. Don't forget, neither, that ya only got to pay two bucks for any eight hour period for a boat and motor and only a buck more for any hour overtime. Plenty of bait, lots of rods, reels and strong, new line. No reason for not goin'. See ya up the river, bub. Plane passenger to stewardess: "How high is this plane?" Stewardess: "About 19,000 feet." Small voice across the aisle: "How wide is it?" m M THE INDIAN f Page Three

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e Saturday, 10 September 1955 e e THE INDIAN Navy-DPPO-10ND-Gtmo.-2281 MY PHILADELPHIA FATHER by Cordellia Drexel Here is a story filled with rampart individualisim-the rollicking life-with-fatherish biography of Colonel Anthony J. Biddle. The dashing figurehead of one of Philadelphia's wealthiest and most influential families, Colonel Biddle was a living contradiction to the adage that money and happiness don't mix. Believing that nothing was worth doing unless done all the way, the Colonel's life is one of adventure after adventure and how he gets himself out of them. BEST DETECTIVE STORIES OF 1955 This is a book written for all who like mystery in short but powerful doses. Containing 12 of the years best mysteries, it is a well balanced collection that has stories to suit every taste. It is the tenth consecutive year that David C. Cooke has collected the best in detective fiction, and as before, each of the stories are well worth reading. THE DINNER PARTY by Gretchen Finletter A book written mainly for women, butalso of enjoyment to men, it is a humorous and human picture of the lady of the house as she juggles a hundred different jobs with grace, good humour, and success. Full of humour, it is a well written book guaranteed to give all who read it a good laugh. FROM MY EXPERIENCE by Louis Bromfield The practical experiences of a farmer are put down on paper for all to take advantage of. Containing practical wisdom and frank observation, this book is concerned with many things-soil and live stock, chemistry and nutrition religion and human relationships, and the richness that is born of country living. Written with wisdom and charm, it gives the reader an opportunity to glimpse the problems, and joys, of country living. LEARNING TO SAIL by H. A. Calahan For those of you who have often wished to be able to take advantage of the sailing facilities on the Base, but through lack of knowhow were afraid to try, then here is a book that you need. Written with a background of 35 years of experience, the author puts on paper all the correct techniques needed to be able to sail on your own. WT 4ARKCKLECS AIR I As C tp f f 'eRadio's 'Tops' of the Week SATURDAY, 10 Sept. OUR MISS BROOKS .8:00 P.M. Perpetually jumping out of the frying pan into the fire, Our Miss Brocks this time hits a matrimonial jackpot when she receives marriage proposals from handsome suitors across the nation. Connie Brook, schoolteacher, finds the situation out of her control and has to turn to the school principal for help. SUNDAY, 11 Sept. .JACK BENNY ...8:00 P.M. Jack Benny is your host in a fun program which includes his guest, Bob Hope. Bob and Jack join in a double date with two telephone operators and go on a picnic. Like many outings the picnic ends with a rain storm, but not before Jack is already drenched by falling in the creek. MONDAY, 12 Sept. STAR PLAYHOUSE .9:00 P.M. Star Playhouse presents June Allyson in the starring role of the comedy "The Major and the Minor". The story is one of confused identity, caused by a young woman who disguises herself as a young girl to take advantage of a half-price fare back to her hometown. Encountering a handsome Major enroute, she is protected as a "helpless little girl", which causes comic complications. TUESDAY, 13 Sept. ..WHAT'S MY LINE .8:00 P.M. John Daly is host for this week's show. The mystery guest this week are the popular husband and wife dance team, Marge and Gower Champion. WEDNESDAY, 14 Sept. .ON STAGE ...9:00 P.M. Cathy and Elliot Lewis star in the On Stage production of "Passage Strange" It's the story of a man trying to overcome the grief of losing his wife. Another woman teaches him to love again. THURSDAY, 15 Sept. .DRAGNET .8:30 P.M. The files of the Los Angeles Police Department come up with another story with Jack Webb as Sgt. Joe Friday. Friday receives a phone call form a distracted wife. Upon her return from a shopping trip she discover her husband beaten to death. Friday's job, find killer. Naval Base School Soon To Build New Classrooms The Naval Base School will soon have two new classrooms to help relieve the crowded situation caused by the increase of students in lower grades. The two new classrooms are located on Victory Hill, and will be occupied by a section of first and third grades. The first grade section is already located on Victory Hill, but in with the Kindergarten Classes. Due to the crowded condition of their present classroom, it would be advantageous to the first grade to be apart from the Kindergarten. The third grade section still has to be made up. At present there is 133 pupils in this grade, divided into four classes. In order to keep the classes as small as possible, a fifth section has to be added. The problem of overcrowding is not a unique problem here at Gtmo, but is a problem throughout all of the Public Schools in the United States. Schools all over the country are expanding as fast as possible, but still are unable to keep up with the increase in birth rate, the first wave of which is now hitting the lower grades. Tentative plans for a new school building to be located in Villamar have been laid out to try and relieve the situation which faces the school here. This new building will house grades one through six which in turn will allow all classes housed in temporary classrooms to return to permanent classrooms. As yet, a definate site has not been chosen for the new building, but as details are released, they will be published at a later date in the INDIAN. Base Golf Championship The final results of the 1955 Men's Golf Championship play at the Guantanamo Golf Club are as follows: Championship flight won by Lee Rogers of NAS, with Harvey Peddycord, VU-10, runner-up. First flight, match not yet played, CHMACH H. H. Bush will play E. J. Scherlacher of NAS. The second flight was won by D. E. Campbell of VU-10 with LT Noga of FTG, runner-up. In the third flight E. E. Arnold won over CDR K. E. Skadowski of FTG. B. E. Smith, Naval Station, took the fourth flight from E. J. Choate of the Naval Hospital. In the Consolation (championship) flight, R. K. Wilson of FTG won over R. L. Broughton, Naval Station. The 1955 Naval Station Invitational Tournament will be held on 11-13 November, inclusive at the Guantanamo Golf Club. All base personnel, male military and civilian, are eligible to participate in the second tournament. See your tournament committee members for details. This is a handicap tournament. The 1955 Men's Handicap Championships will also be coming up shortly, probably commencing the first week in October. If you do not have an established club handicap, better sharpen up the irons and get at least 10 scores posted. All golfers are requested to post their own scores. The Handicap Committee will give you a handicap after you have posted the required scores under the USGA system of handicaps. You do not have to be a member of the club to enter either of these tournaments. New Steno: "Well, at last I've got a raise in salary." Old Steno: "Honestly." New Steno: "Oh, don't be so inquisitive." MOVIES Saturday, 10 September THE BIG STEAL Robert Mitchum Jane Greer An army payroll officer pursues a band of outlaws into Mexico in an attempt to recover a stolen payroll for which he is responsible. The story gets more involved when he discovers that his senior officer is involved in on the robbery. Sunday, 11 September BRINGING UP BABY Katherine Hepburn Cary Grant Katherine Hepburn, who is very wealthy and owns a baby tiger is in love with Cary Grant, who is a professor and is not in love with her. She pursues him in an attempt to get him to marry her. Monday, 12 September THE WHITE ORCHID William Lundigan Peggy Castle An archeologist and his female photographer go into the wilds with a young native guide to learn of a mysterious people. Jealously develops between the two men and causes trouble, so that one has to give up his life to get the other two to safety. Tuesday, 13 September CHICAGO SYNDICATE Dennis O'Keefe Abbe Lane Unable to get the proof to break up the activities of a huge crooked syndicate. Police and the leading citizens of Chicago get a brilliant young accountant in with the head of the gang. The young man's life is in constant danger as he attempts to get the necessary evidence. Wednesday, 14 September TOP OF THE WORLD Dale Robertson Evelyn Keyes A jet pilot in Hawaii is sent to Ladd Field as a regular pilot where he meets his wife who is loved by another pilot. The jet pilot, with six other men is sent to Ice Island near the North Pole which gradually disintegrates in a raging storm. Rescued by the "other" man, the jet pilot is informed that his wife wants him back, but it isn't that easy as the pilot is now in love with another girl. Thursday, 15 September THREE FOR THE SHOW Betty Grable Jack Lemmon The return of a Broadway musical comedy writer, after having been reported killed in action in Korea two years before, brings about a strange situation. Upon his return he finds that his wife has married again. Friday, 16 September SHOTGUN Sterling Hayden Yvonne DeCarlo A U.S. Marshall goes hunting for a killer and finds a man and women tied in a snake trap and left to die. He discovers that Apaches and the killers he is after have joined together, and he goes after both.


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