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Indian
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____________________ &v_ eo',r (TrMO t."- 'Tluw 6u~nsknre-


Vol. VI. No. 35


U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba


Saturday, 3 September 1955


Turkey Shoot Slated

For Monday, 5 Sept,

Open to All Hands

Its time for all of you rifle and pistol enthusiasts to unlimber those shootin' irons of yours for the Labor Day Turkey Shoot which will be held Monday, 5 September.
'The shoot will began at 0900 with the dedication of the new Rifle and Pistol Range first on the list of events. Following this will be four shoots, each to consist of five events. Open to all hands on
the Base, this gives everyone a chance to see how they can fare against competition.
The first shoot, which is scheduled to began at 0930, will be a pistol shoot at 25 yards. This will be followed by a 25 yard rifle shoot, with the event being limited to .22 calibre rifles only.
At 1030 the third match of the day will began. This will consist of a 10 shot trap shoot, and as in the previous events, the top 3 scores in each event will take home a prize. The birds will be furnished for this shoot.
Tickets can be 'obtained from LCDR G.E. Hoppe, or by a. calling the Naval Station Personnel Office. Tickets also will be for sale at the range.
The new Rifle and Pistol Range, which will be available for practice anytime there is a qualified range master present, is located on Central Magazine Road, about 12 mile beyond the Naval Station Archery Range.
Sponsored by the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base Rifle and Pistol Club, it is the first event of its kind ever offered to the public here at Guantanamo Bay. If successful, the Club plans a competitive event open to the public approximately every other month.


CHANGE OF COMMAND I
On Monday, 12 September, j
1955, Rear Admiral Edmund B. Taylor, USN, will be relieved by Rear Admiral William G. Cooper, USN, as Commander, Naval Base. The change of command ceremony will take place on the parade grounds in front of the Marine Barracks Administration
Building.
Uniform will consist of full
dress white for Commissioned and Warrant Officers, service dress whites for Chief Petty Officers, and undress white "able" with neckerchief
for Enlisted Men.


The Medical Officer of the Naval Base entertained prominent Cuban Physicans at the Qfficers Club on Friday, 12 August, prior to a Medical Symposium on the subject "Retro - Pneumo - Peritonieum". Shown from left to right are: CAPT Tilden I Moe, MC, USN; Dr. Urbano Castell anos Yodu; Dr. Zayas Bazan; Dr. Jorge Dodon who presented the paper, and CAPT G. M. Holley, Chief of Staff, Naval Base.


Welfare Association Formed Navy Exchange Motel

For Emergency Loans To Soon to Be Completed;


Base Civilian Employees
A Federal Employee Welfare Association with $4;000 capital to be used for emergency loans to Navy Civil Service employees at Guantanamo Bay was established this week.
Establishment of the Welfare Association was made possible by an initial grant of $4,000 from the Naval Base Community Fund, which in turn derived the major share of its funds from the proceeds of the 1955 Guantanamo Bay Carnival.
Civil Service employees, both U. S. and non-U.S. citizens, who have two years or more of current continuous service on the Naval Base automatically qualify as members of the Welfare Association. Members will be eligible to apply for loans in amounts up to $200 maximum to meet emergencies, such as serious illness of themselves or their dependents.
In approving the establishment of the Federal Employees Welfare Association and of the grant of $4,000 to finance its operations, Rear Admiral E. B. Taylor, Naval Base Commander, pointed out that this non-profit organization is for the benefit of Naval Base employees whose continued faithful service has contributed to the excellent reputation which the Base enjoys.
Captain W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, was appointed as President of the
(Continaed on Page Three)

i


'Open House' This Monday
The new Navy Exchange Motel will soon be completed, and will hold "Open House" on Monday, 5 September, from 0900 to 1630. The Motel, which is located near the Red Cross building and across from the Service Station, will be open for business beginning next week.
The Motel consists of three quonset buildings around a central lobby. Two of the quonsets are divided into two apartments each with two bedrooms, living room, and a private bath. The third quonset is divided into 4 double bedrooms, each with an adjacent bath. Each of these rooms are fully equipped. In the future a lodge building will be added. This will consist of one big room with approximately six beds, and will be used mainly to house salesmen passing through the Base.
The primary purpose of the new motel is to provide sleeping quarters for visiting family members of Base personnel. To be rented on a first come, first served basis, reservations can be made in advance by contacting the Navy Exchange Officer or his representative. Occupancy will be limited to ten days.
At present, if a person stationed on the Base wishes to bring his family down for a visit, and he has no home on the Base, he was at a loss as where to house his family. This new addition to the Base will give a single man the opportunity to have his family visit him.


Local Emergency Campaign

Set Up By Amer, Red Cross

For Flood Disaster Area
The American Red Cross launched an emergency campaign this week to aid those stricken by floods in the northeastern United States. The emergency campaign is being held world wide in order to raise over $8,000,000 which will be required by the Red Cross to meet the needs of the homeless and stricken in the disaster area.
Incomplete surveys show how serious the six northeastern states were affected. Over 34,000 families were striken, 19,700 homes were damaged, 942 of these being comrletely destroyed. 5,500 people, at the last report, were evacuated from areas that were cut off from civilization by the flood waters.
The Red Cross is doing a tremendous part in giving aid to these people. Emergency teams are being flown in from all over the United States. Canteens and shelters have been set up by the American Red Cross, and, according *to the last report received, over 20,000 have been fed by the 27 canteens, and over 12,000 people have been housed in 107 shelters which they have set up.
The need for aid was summarized by President Dwight D. Eisenhower who urged everyone to contribute. Quote. "Red Cross money is not limited It goes to people who are in need, to human beings, not to just cleaning roads and rebuilding schools, but to people that are hungry, cold, or have no place to go. In my opinion, everybody within the sound of my voice will sleep better tonight if he turns in everything that he can spare to meet this great disaster that has happened to our fellow Americans. This is a chance where each of us can rise to an emergency and prove that the American people can meet an emergency and do it well." Unquote.
The emergency campaign began early this week and will run through the 17th. All hands are urged to contribute so that the Red Cross can give aid as needed.
Each Command on the Base will established their own fund, and after the 17th the combined funds will be turned over the Red Cross representative of the Naval Base, Mrs. Helen Bowler, who will in turn send it to the Disaster Relief Section of the National Headquarters.


HOLIDAY
In observance of Labor
Day, Monday, 5 September will be a National Holiday aboard the Naval Base. All but necessary work, drills, and exercises will be suspended on this day.


I\Y/






I Page Two


Saturday, 3 September 1955


THE INDIAN

The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as posible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
'RADM EDMUND B. TAYLOR, Commander Naval Base, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba
CAPT G.M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba
Editorial Staff
LTJG J. D. Byerley ------------------------------Officer-Advisor
G. L. Henderson, JOC -------------------------------------- Editor
D. C. Roberts, JOSN ----------------------------Managing Editor
E. J. Talen, SN -----------------------------------Staff Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
Materials marked AFPS may be used by any news medium provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part, with or without credit.
All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


Sunday, 4 September 1955
Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services
Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0930-Sunday School
0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1980-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Sabbath Services Christian Science
Sunday: 1000-Station Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J.J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)


Eastern Star Club

by Margaret Hohman
The Eastern Star Club met on the 22nd of August, and being Social night the evening was spent playing Canasta and Pinochle and enjoying the delicious refreshments served by the hostesses for the evening, Wilma Harper and Lucille Jordan. It takes a lot of rain in Gtmo Bay to keep our Eastern Stars from coming out to their meetings.
President Icie Schwartz has received permission for the institution of a Chapter in Guantanamo Bay, Naval Base. Those persons interested in the formation of an Order of the Eastern Star Chapter, may contact these members of the Hospitality Committee for further information concerning the forming of the Chapter:
Betty Boyer - Phone 9558 Doris Reynolds - Phone 9356
The regular meeting nights have been changed from the second and fourth Thursday's to the second and fourth Monday's of each month with meetings being held in the Club room, Building N-328, Marina Point, and just a reminder that


Navy Wives' Club

by Pat Aldridge
One of the Guantanamo Bay Navy Wives' Club most pleasant social events of the season took place at the Marine Family Restaurant recently. A morning coffee klotch brought members and guests together in order to meet Mrs. Albert Pratt, wife of our visiting Under-Secretary of the Navy. Mrs. Pratt took advantage of the opportunity of meeting and talking with all those present by, as she termed it, "table hopping" and seemed particularly interested in conversation concerning the specific problems of service wives everywhere. Other than Navy Wives' club members, those attending to enjoy coffee with Mrs. Pratt were, Mrs. E. B. Taylor, Mrs.. W. R Caruthers, Mrs. G..M. Holley, Mrs. F. Habecker, Mrs. R.*E. Fojt and Mrs. K. G. Peterson.
Pearl Pearcy, Activities Chairman, is still sojourning in the Jacksonville Naval Hospital following a serious orthopedic operation while member Nan Jones is home again following the birth of a baby daughter at the local infirmary. Former recording Secretary, Bunny Cox and members Marian Becker and Sarah Barko have either departed or are slated to leave shortly. Present Recording Secretary, Isabelle Matao is anticipating departure for Guam sometime in October but Jean O'Brien, Corresponding Secretary will be a familiar figure around Guantanamo Bay until the advent of a new O'Brien anyway.
Just as a reminder, all service wives are eligible, and urged to join the local chapter of the Navy Wives' Club, an honored national organization dedicated to service and assistance where ever the need is felt. Business meetings are held the first Thursday night of every month at eight P.M. in the School Assembly Hall on Chapel Hill and social meetings, luncheons, bingo's, etc., every Thursday afternoon. New members are not only welcome but sought that the local chapter may function more adeptly in its many interests.

the meetings start promptly at 7:30. The first meeting of the month is a business meeting and the second is Social night Please do come out to the next meeting on the 12th of Septemoer.
0


Hospital' Notes

by P. R., Haberstroh HEIRPORT NEWS
At 0747 on 26 August Paula Elizabeth was born to GMC and Mrs. Clifton Booth. Paula was the first young lady to be enrolled in the Gtmo Birth Register for the month of August, and it is thought, that her birth has finally broken the jinx. Earlier in the week three new gents gathered in the hospital nursery, they were Arthur Joseph to AL2 and Mrs. Joseph Bushey Jr.; Richard David to TE3 and Mrs. Richard Shenberger; and Lawerance Alan to PH1 and Mrs. Oiville Lawson.
ARRIVALS
We wish to extend a hearty "Welcome Aboard" to William F. Mullins, HM2, who reported aboard on 29 August from the U. S. Naval Station, Trinidad Lritish West Indies.
DEPART UiRES
LCDR (MSC) Edward W. Walker our past Administrative Officer departed via FLAW for Patuxent River, Maryland where he will await his retirement orders. Another loss to the staff was Ralph Berggren, HM2. Berggren left on the USNS Pvt. W.H. Thomas for the N a v a I Receiving Station, Brooklyn, New York, where he will receive his separation from the naval service.
BIRTHDAYS FOR SEPTEMBER
Nine birthdays to be celebrated this month are: William Spears, 6 Sept.; Edwin Choate, 2 Sept.; John Nunn, 12 Sept.; Kenneth Williams, 12 Sept.; Alonzo Ball, 13 Sept.; Morris Gorden, 15 Sept.; William Dal, 19 Sept.; Ralph McKnight, 20 Sept.; and Carson Franklin, 30 Sept.
SIDELIGHTS
For those in doubt ask Kania what to do when you wake up at 0300, and find "Finger Prints".... The latset scoop is that Jackie Bennett is expecting to pay all debts during the month of September, and thus enable himself to come off of nights in the near future .... Harding is off night duty, and finds it hard to stay awake during the day .... Sea Sick Davis is on the YFR-1152.
MEET THE STAFF
Time is flying by for Joe Kelley, HM3, with only thirty some days to go in Cuba. Joe is spending his last month on night duty, and that way will be able to bear down in the game of golf. Kelley's home town is Bowling Green, Kentucky, but when it comes to, where he would like to be you would hear him say: "Ebensburg, Penna.". Received his Recruit Training at San Diego, Calif., and from there was transferred to Hospital Corps School in Bainbridge, Maryland After Corps School he stayed at the Naval Hospital in Bainbridge, from where he received orders to Gtmo. At present Joe is looking forward to receiving his separation papers, so he can return to Pennsylvania and start his civilian career.

9


Teenage RoOnd-up

by Sylvia Cavanaugh &
Delorice Kinchen
Well as school settles down into a full swing we still have people leaving for the states. Jack Staf. ford left for the "Promised Lard" Tuesday via FLAW. Jackie Lee will certainly be missed by all, especially the Student Council members of last year when we had our luncheon at the O'Club. Good old Jack was always the one who took the "extra" bun so the rest of us could do likewise. We all hope Jack has a good time stateside.
While we're on the subject of people leaving, an "old timer" down here is departing from our "island" Monday. Edgar has been attending school here since the first grade. He graduated last year and -worked this past summer to earn money to attend college in Tallahassee, Florida. Edgar was a big help to our school, especially during basketball season. He was always among the top ten scorers during the season. Ed also helped on the Yearbook and the "Arrow", our school newspaper. He will be missed by all who knew him.
And last, but not least, Irv Page, who was visiting for the summer, left by way of the Johnson Iast Monday to continue his schooling at the University of Florida. Although Irv was only here for a short time, we will all miss him.
DID 'JA SEE ....
All the new pupils flocking to our little old high school????.... Chuck Ryan, a new Sophomore kat, who hails from Morison, Mass., .... Judy Field, a Freshman girl from Jacksonville, Florida, and Sandra Davey from Lake Zurich, Illinois, also a Freshman, who have added their names to the list of kids attending our school? ? ? ? .... 'Marty and Rueben riding around? ? ? .... Becky being followed? ? ? ?.... All the kids at Windmill last Sunday engaging in pebble battles and burying their fellow friends under miles of pure old Gtmo sand????..... The new "exit" at the N.O.B. movies to the pop corn stand ? ? ? ?.... The little gal who removed herself from the N.O.B. movies? ??.... Eunice and Nancy's new specs ?? ? ?....


'Meet Your Child's Teacher'

Theme Of First PTA Meeting
The first meeting of the ParentTeacher Association of Guantanamo Bay (1955-56) will be held on Tuesday evening, September 6th, at the Chapel Hill Assembly Hall.
The highlight of the evening will be a reception for all the teachers of the Naval Base, to be held in the school patio after a short business meeting. The reception is sponsored by the P.T.A. and will afford an excellent opportunity for every parent to get acquainted with his child's teacher.
The meeting will commence at 7:30 P.M. after which Mr. T. G. Scarborough, school superintendent, will introduce the new school principal, Mr. J. E Brown and the entire faculty to the parents and friends of the Naval Base School. Everyone is cordially invited to attend.


THE INDIAN


U









Saturday, 3 September 1955 THE INDIAN Page Three


Track Star Returns To Naval Base

After Winning 10-Mile Road Race

Joe Tyler, SN, of Navil Statioh Special Services, returned to the Naval Base last Sunday from Salefh, Massachusetts, where he ran in the annual 10 mile Mack Phrk road race.
Wearing the No. 61, Tyler *ept the field of 55 competitors in a breeze, coveting the 10 miles ib 62 minutes and 55 seconds, just threc minutes over the course record.


Running against such Ataf as Robert M. Gillihiore of NeW Yorks Fishkill A. C. and Johnny Kelly of Edson A.A., Tyler showed terrific stamina and speed in spite of the 84 degree heat he was forced to run in. At the finish Tyler seemed hardly winded and looked fresh enough to run another 10 miles.
When asked about the race, Tyler said he was out to win, and had it been a little cooler, he would have made better time.
Never one to refuse a race, Tyler accepted the invitation to run in the 26 mile marathon held in Three Rivers, Province of Quebec, Canada, on Saturday, 20 August. Never having run in a marathon before, Tyler was eager to see what he could do. It was another hot day, but he decided to give it all he had.
Going strong the first 20 miles, Tyler held the lead, but his legs started tightening up, which forced him to slow his pace. With the slower pace forcing him to drop into second place behind Ted Corbitt of the New York A.C.,Tylers legs gradually got worse, and after completing 22 miles of the race, he was forced to drop out.
When asked about the race, Tyler said that it was rough, but the people that poured out to watch it were great. Unable to understand their comments, as they are a French speaking people, he was able to understand their gestures, as they handed him oranges and lemons, and poured cool water over him as he ran by.
The latter part of this month Tyler is scheduled to be transferred to San Diego Naval Training Center where he will began training for the Olympics which will be held in Melbourne, Australia in June of 1956.



Ladies Golf Shots

by Audrey Page
Going into the last match of team play Friday the Sharit Shimmeirs were leading by five points. The Ware Wigglers decided to hit the ball on that final day and came through the winner of the five week team matches by a total score of 22 to 24. Congratulations to Edie Ware and the members of her team! !
Interest has grown for more Team Matches so it has been decided to start another on September 15th.
On Wednesday Ladies Day a low gross-low net tournament was held. Wnnners were as follows:
1st Flight: Low Gross-tieEdie Ware, Kay Sharit. Low Net
-Mary Goolsby. 2nd Flight-Low Gross-Vivian Soballe. Low NetAudrey Page. - 3rd Flight-Low Gross - tie - Prue Aarts, Sarah Brotherton. Low Net-Mary Hall.


Large Crowd Turns Out

To Attend Scout Circus

Held At Seaplane Ramp
On Saturday, 20 August, at thn NAS Seaplane Ramp, the Girl and Boy Scouts, Brownies and Cub Scouts ,headed by Mrs. L. E. Hallman, Chief L. B. Dickson, Mrs. A. D. Nelson and W. A. Johnson, PN1, in that order, held their annual Scout Circus, which proved a great success.
The Cuban equivalent to the four scout represented on the base, were invited, and took part in the show that was put on. This was done without any prior knowledge of participating; proving that the Scout adage of "Be Prepared" is well taught here in Cuba.
All the profits from the Circus will be divided equally between the four units and will go to each treasury to take care of materials and other necessities needed during the coming year.
LCDR Fortenberry and CHSCLK Harper of the Circus Committee, along with all the Scouts, wish to extend a heartfelt "THANK YOU" to all persons Who donated their time, money and other help towards making the- Circus such a great success.


Welfare Association . ,
(Continued from Page One)
Board of Directors which will administer the funds of the Welfare Association. Other members of the Board of Directors include:
CAPT R. R. McCracken,,
Vice-President
CDR R. A. Williams, SC, USN
Mr. H. P. McNeal Mr. W. J. Sparks
Mr. H. L. DeLeon, Treasurer Mr. Carlos P. Bru, Secretary
Conditions under which employees may apply for loans are set forth in Base Instruction 12065.1 and the by-laws of the Welfare Association promulgated as an enclosure to the Instruction.
Applicants for loans must have as a co-maker or endorser on their notes another member of the Association. Either borrower or comaker, or the two together, must have to their credit sufficient annual leave at all times to cover the unpaid balance of the loan.
Loans will be made for periods up to 12 months, and must be repaid in regular payments on each pay day.
The Association will have no paid employees for the time being, but operating expenses will be paid from an interest charge on loans
-6% for each 6 months or fraction thereof.
Application blanks and other information may be obtained from the Secretary of the Association at the Industrial Relations Office, Base Adtistration Building.


The new 15i0bed air conditioned hospital which is being constructed on Caravella Point by the Frederick Snare Corp. is rapidly progressing and is scheduled to be completed and ready for use by June of 1956. The new hospital will be equipped with the most modern equipment and will be air-conditioned throughout.


FTG Bulletin

The Fleet Training Group is mighty proud of its "never belay a sheet and never expectorate to windward" sailors. CDR Archie is still holding first place in the summer series of sailing races. J. W. Furlong, ETi, C. R. Collins, ETC, and CDR Gardes hold 3rd, 4th and 5th places respectively. CHSCLK Harper, CDR Mathews and H. Tuff, ABC, are heaving around too. Each skipper has at least two more races to sail which should turn the blisters to callouses before the series ends.
A big ship and a little ship sailor reported aboard last week for duty. John Harrington, RDCA, reported to the CIC Department from the USS Abbot (DD-629). He enlisted in 1944 in his hometown of Hartford, Connecticut and has sailed on the USS PC 1262, the USS H.J. Thomas (DD-833Y and the USS Lloyd Thomas (DDE-764). The Chief is married and has two children, John Jr. age 4 and Gay age one. Brady Howard, DC1, the big ship sailor, reported to the Damage Control Department from the USS Tarawa (CVS-40). He is from Louisiana, is married and has one child, a son named Anthony age 3. Brady has served on the USS F.D. Roosevelt (CBV-42) in addition to being in a ship repair unit during Word War II.
Chief Watch of the Air Department is beginning to wonder what will come next. Last week he captured a scorpion on his back porch and two days later turned to bigger game and captured alive in his bathroom a tarantula (whew!), which measured about six inches across when walking. The Chief attacked the demon with a broom and with considerable nerve and persistence, he managed to get him in a bottle for all to see. CDR Gendreau says he used to hunt them in Haiti when he was a boy. Wouldn't you just love to find your young son out capturing tarantulas ?
Another Jones entered the world at 0434, 28 August, weighing in at 6 pounds 6 ounces. He is named Donald Stevens and is the son of Chief Jones of the Engineering. Donald is just a wee bit younger than Joanne DiMaggio who scaled
9


Supply Corps Midshipmen

Tour Naval Supply Depot

During Summer Cruises

The Naval Supply Depot, Guanatnamo Bay held open house for the Supply Option Midshipmen during the recent visits of Cruises Able, Baker and Charlie. Tours have been offered for the past several years and the midshipmen have grown to consider them as part of their regular summer training curriculum. The officers in charge of the various groups have stated that such tours are very helpful to these young men since they are potential Supply Corps Officers and requisitioning, procurement, issuing, storage, material handling and fiscal accounting will soon be their jobs. After being welcomed by the Commanding Officer, midshipmen were divided into groups and were conducted through the Fiscal Department, the Control Division, Material Division, and the Fuel Division where they actually observed their operations and had explained to them by officers in these fields the less obvious points. Issue Control and Procurement procedures held special interest for the midshipmen, since most of them upon graduation will be sent to sea and, undoubtedly, will be called upon to deal quite frequently with supply activities ashore in furnishing logistic support to their vessels. Added attractions offered to the Midshipmen during the tours were coffee and sweet rolls at the NSD sidewalk cafeteria (La Sombrita) and lunch at the Naval Station and Naval Air Station galleys.

7 pounds 5 ounces just a few minutes before. Joe DiMaggio, GM1, the proud father, was transferred last week to the Base Police on TAD.
With the arrival of the EPCE (R) 849, it was just like "old home week" for Jerry Fount Pitts, YN2, of the Reports Department and Ken Stumo, EM2, of the Engineering Department. Jerry and Ken visited their former ship and spent several enjoyable hours reminiscing with their old shipmates.


Page Three


Saturday, 3 September 1955


THE INDIAN






g


Navv~DPPO-1OND-GtIno.-2163


THE INDIAN


SaturdaY. 8 Sentember 1955


STAR BRIDGE
by Jack Williamson and
James E. Gunn.
For those who enjoy Science Fiction, here is an unusual book of the future that depicts life in outnlr space. The story begins on Earth, and then takes you on exciting adventures through outer space to the planet called Eron. Fantastically written, it is a novel of adventures in exotic settings, giving glimpses of imaginative alien things and places and a cast of humans and unhumans �
THE SEA WOLVES by Wolfgang Frank
This is the complete story of the German U-Boat effort during World War II. Written by the Public Relations Officer of the German Admiral who supervised the secret rebuilding of the German U-Boat Flotilla, it supplies a much needed chapter in the military history of the last war. It includes the inside stories of the command decisions of Hitler and his Admirals and of their grim race to keep ahead, or even abreast of the technical developments of the allies. The author also shows how radar won the U-Boat war for the Allies. For anyone interested in the history of World War II, here is a chapter that shows why today the United States so respects the apalling destructive power of the submarine.
BEYOND COURAGE
by Clay Blair, Jr.
The fascinating and heroic stories of Air Force pilots who had crashed or been shot down behind enemy lines and then managing, by one means or another to make their way back to U.N. lines are vaugely known by everyone. The author presents in this book the most exciting of these stories. Written so that you can feel the agony of walking 40 miles over mountains in temperature of thirty degrees below with your feet ,frozen, or the torture of treatment
-or lack of it-in a Communist POW hospital, the stories show the terrific moral, mental, and physical fibre of our combat air crews.
THE MAN IN THE GRAY
FLANNEL SUIT by Sloan Wilson
This is a novel depicting the life of an average American who, with
-brief-case, leaves his home each morning to make his living as an executive in the nearby city. The story begans with this young executive, after just being married, entering the Army to defend his .country. Upon being discharged, the main theme of the novel appears . . . . the struggle of a man trying to adapt himeslf from the relative security of olive drab of the Army to the insecurity of gray flannel. Interestingly written, it shows which life is more secure, the gray flannel suit or the olive drab previously worn.
OUTLAW BREED
by Max Brand
For those of you who like Westerns, here is a fast and tense story written about the son of a notori.. ous gunfighter. Trying to establish a good name by avoiding fights, the young son is finally goaded into one to defend his life. Full of violence and local color, it shows that a man, no matter how good he is, can take only so much before fighting back.


The Fish Tale (s)

by P. J. Aldridge
With a right smart lot of cooperation we're gonna have a runnin' fishin' tournament goin' around these parts. Beginnin' the 1st of this month, last Thursday, a month to month contest got under way down to the sailboat locker, a real cooperative deal. All them as is interested in fishin' spear or rod n' reel are eligible and it works kna like this; ya gets down to the sailboat locker afore the 5th and you pays a dollar entry fee. No fair waitin' 'til ya tie inta a big 'un and then forkin' over with the entrance fee. There'll be about ten classes' of fish and ya can weigh in at the self same place as aforementioned. The sole judge will be an expert icthiologist (I had to look that 'un Up) around these parts who's been fishin' Cuban waters since he was knee high to a sea horse, Firmin Pavila, and what he gayp is what goes. The contest will run from the 1st to the 1st of any month and will run for just as long as you all seem to evidence some interest and ain't too reluctant to part with a buck. The entry fees will be divided and it's yet to be decided if'n ya win cash or some kinda prize thing but whatever it is will be fun gin' after. Ron Seagle, BM8, Rocco Aldridge, BMC, and F.L. Abney, CS2, form the committe responsible for gettin' this thing goin'-and it weren't no little bit of travaho. That there's spanish for work,
There's a mite bit o' change in the boatin' rules, Ron Seagle says as how we should inform ya. From here on ya Can rent a boat n' motor for two bucks for any eight hour period regardless from when to when. Anything over eight hours, just in case they just started bitin' and ya don't wanta come in, will cost ya a buck an hour. There's plenty of three types b4it to be had and some real fresh line on them rods n' reels for two bits a rental period. Havein' no gear ain't no excuse for not goin' fishin'. Got a tip for you langusterers, too, They got the gigs at the locker but there ain't no use goin' out for them caribbean lobsters if'n the cotton pickin' water ain't as calm as a sleepin' baby. Let the water be a 'wigglin' just a mite and then 'guster look like where they isn't all the time. All you'll get with that there gig is exercise.
Dr. Don Doohen nad Dr. Pete Wells tried their luck Snookin' here recently but I didn't hear tell of no luck. Seems as if them Snook snuk off somewhere's 'cause nobody much has been bringin' Yem in. Tarpon are hittin' all over the dad ratted bay but it's gonna take a real expert to keep one on the hook looks as if. Three or four leaps and that there rascal is long gone. Grenadillo point is producin' a lot of pan size snappers and they say the mackerel are runnin' outside so, with all them tips, if'n ya ain't catchin' don't give us the sad eye. Don't forget that there contest, neither. More entrants, better prizes.

Navy expressions and their meanings,:
We should confer: Send your yeoman over to see mine.
Take necessary action: It's your
head ache now.
Take immediate action: Do something before we both catch hell. Show him every courtezy: His uncle
is an adnirI


Public Works Chips

by Vic. Gault
Mr. James Solomon (Solly), an employee of long standing in the Public Works Department, resigned recently and left for the States via FLAW on Thursday. His permanent residence is in Brooklyn. Solly has had a long and commendable service with the Dapartment of the Navy, both as an enlisted man and in the Civil Service. He enlisted in the Navy at St. Croix, V.I. in the year 1917 with thle rating of Musician 2nd Class. He continued in active service for 1 . years or until 1935 in which year he transferred to the Fleet Reserve. After leaving the service he aca-nted employment in the Public Works Department of this Base where his first assigned duty was as laborer Common, however, he vws promoted several times through the ensuing years and in 1940 was promoted to the rating of Clerk, CAF-2, in which rating he remained until the year 1942 when he was recalled to' active Naval duty. His rating at that time was changed from Musician to that of Storekeeper. Upon his recall to active duty he served for a period of approximately 3 years and returned to inactive in 1945 with the rating of Storekeeper, 1st. 'lass. Again Solly became a member of the Public Works Department complement of civilian personnel in which activity he has remained until the present time. Mr. Solomon, at the time of his resignation, holds the rating of Supervisory General Supply Clerk, GS-6, in charge of the Materials Branch of the Department.
Solly's many friends gave him a party at the Trading Post Picnic area. That is to say the party started off at the Picnic area, but due to the heavy rain that fell that evening, Walt Schnake invited the gang to his quarters on the hill to continue the merrymaking. Two days later Mrs. Gault invited Polly to partake of a "going-away" Cuban style dinner. He and the other guests enjoyed themselves very much. Solly states that he definetely intends to take it easy for a while at his home in Brooklyn in the company of his family and then possibly go into the candy store business. We all wish him great success in his new venture and a sincere "'Feliz Viaje, Solly old boy".
LT J. P. Marron, Assistant Public Works Officer is on a week's leave at his quarters. He is availing himself of this week's leave to carry thru' a few "do it yourself" proiects around his quarters.
Mr. Anthony Richards, who was 'employed by the Naval Supply Depot, as supervisor over certain Shop Stores has been promoted and transferred to the Public Works Department to take charge of the Materials Branch. He is a former employee of this department and was transferred to the Naval Supply Depot about a year ago when that command took over operation of all Shop Stores that were under the cognizance of the Public Works Department.
"AND REMEMBER FOR THE GOOD t.., ALL, AND IN LINE WITH CONSERVATION POLICIES-LETS BE "ECONOMYMINDED" IN THE USE .OF UTILITIES SUCH AS WATER AND ELECTRICITY-UTILIZE THESE COMMODITIES IN LINE WITH EXISTING BASE INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING THEIR USE". 0


MOVIES


Saturday, 3 September
SLAVES OF BABYLON
Richard Conti Linda Chr""tian
This is the story in biblical setting, involving Daniel in the lions' den Nebuchadnezzar and the Igraelites and Cyrus' resumption of the throne of Persia. The kings of Persia and Babylon are rivals for the hand of the oriental beauty.
Sunday, 4 September
MAN WITH A MILLION
Gregory Peck Jane Griffith
Two old men give Peck, who is penniless, a one million note. By possessing this he finds that he can get credit anywhere and is accepted by the best of people. Eventually his creditors catch up with him and his difficult situation is resolved.
Monday, 5 September
ISLAND IN THE SKY
John Wayne L. Nolan
NO INFORMATION AVAILABLE,
Tuesday, 6 September
GAMBLER FROM NATCHEZ Dale Robertson Debra Paget
After service, a young soldier leaves for home and his faIher, a professional gambler. Ernroute he becomes involved with crooks and an adventuress who later turned out to be the people who killed his father.
Wednesday, 7 September MAKE HASTE TO LIVE
Stephen McNally Dorothy McGuire
A newspaper woman in a small New Mexico town, is confronted with her terrible past when her husband, a gangster with a prison record, turns upbrand tries to ruin her life and the life of their teenage daughter.
Thursday, 8 September
THE DESPERADO
Wayne Morris James Lydons
The friendship of Wayne Morris, a taciturn killer with a price on his head for James Lydons, reveals the former to be a hero when he voluntarily comes into town and testifies in Lydons defense on a murder charge by Lydons false friends.
Friday, 9 September
THE BLACK DAKOTAS
Gary Merrill Wanda Hendrix
Southern spies attack a stage coach and kill the emissary of Abraham Lincoln who was carrying an important treaty to be signed by the indian chief War Cloud. Many series of incidents happen b e f or e the situation straightened out.


NavyDPP-10D-Gto.-163Satuday 8 epteber195


o




Full Text

PAGE 1

"&vers (TMO Like ie a& nshine" Vol. VI, No. 35 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 3 September 1955 Turkey Shoot Slated For Monday, 5 Sept. Open to All Hands Its time for all of you rifle and pistol enthusiasts to unlimber those shootin' irons of yours for the Labor Day Turkey Shoot which will be held Monday, 5 September. The shoot will began at 0900 with the dedication of the new Rifle and Pistol Range first on the list of events. Following this will be four shoots, each to consist of five events. Open to all hands on the Base, this gives everyone a chance to see how they can fare against competition. The first shoot, which is scheduled to began at 0930, will be a pistol shoot at 25 yards. This will be followed by a 25 yard rifle shoot, with the event being limited to .22 calibre rifles only. At 1030 the third match of the day will began. This will consist of a 10 shot trap shoot, and as in the previous events, the top 3 scores in each event will take home a prize. The birds will be furnished for this shoot. Tickets can be obtained from LCDR G. E. Hoppe, or by a calling the Naval Station Personnel Office. Tickets also will be for sale at the range. The new Rifle and Pistol Range, which will be available for practice anytime there is a qualified range master present, is located on Central Magazine Road, about 1/% mile beyond the Naval Station Archery Range. Sponsored by the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base Rifle and Pistol Club, it is the first event of its kind ever offered to the public here at Guantanamo Bay. If successful, the Club plans a competitive event open to the public approximately every other month. CHANGE OF COMMAND On Monday, 12 September, 1955, Rear Admiral Edmund B. Taylor, USN, will be relieved by Rear Admiral William G. Cooper, USN, as Commander, Naval Base. The change of command ceremony will take place on the parade grounds in front of the Marine Barracks Administration Building. Uniform will consist of full dress white for CommissionI ed and Warrant Officers, service dress whites for Chief Petty Officers, and undress white "able" with neckerchief for Enlisted Men. The Medical Officer of the Naval Base entertained prominent Cuban Physicans at the Officers Club on Friday, 12 August, prior to a Medical Symposium on the subject "Retro -Pneumo -Peritonieum". Shown from left to right are: CAPT Tilden I Moe, MC, USN; Dr. Urbano Castell anos Yodu; Dr. Zayas Bazan; Dr. Jorge Dodon who presented the paper, and CAPT G. M. Holley, Chief of Staff, Naval Base. Welfare Association Formed Navy Exchange Motel For Emergency Loans To Soon to Be Completed; Base Civilian Employees A Federal Employee Welfare Association with $4,000 capital to be used for emergency loans to Navy Civil Service employees at Guantanamo Bay was established this week. Establishment of the Welfare Association was made possible by an initial grant of $4,000 from the Naval Base Community Fund, which in turn derived the major share of its funds from the proceeds of the 1955 Guantanamo Bay Carnival. Civil Service employees, both U. S. and non-U.S. citizens, who have two years or more of current continuous service on the Naval Base automatically qualify as members of the Welfare Association. Members will be eligible to apply for loans in amounts up to $200 maximum to meet emergencies, such as serious illness of themselves or their dependents. In approving the establishment of the Federal Employees Welfare Association and of the grant of $4,000 to finance its operations, Rear Admiral E. B. Taylor, Naval Base Commander, pointed out that this non-profit organization is for the benefit of Naval Base employees whose continued faithful service has contributed to the excellent reputation which the Base enjoys. Captain W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, was appointed as President of the (Contiu ed on Page Three) 0 'Open House' This Monday The new Navy Exchange Motel will soon be completed, and will hold "Open House" on Monday, 5 September, from 0900 to 1630. The Motel, which is located near the Red Cross building and across from the Service Station, will be open for business beginning next week. The Motel consists of three quonset buildings around a central lobby. Two of the quonsets are divided into two apartments each with two bedrooms, living room, and a private bath. The third quonset is divided into 4 double bedrooms, each with an adjacent bath. Each of these rooms are fully equipped. In the future a lodge building will be added. This will consist of one big room with approximately six beds, and will be used mainly to house salesmen passing through the Base. The primary purpose of the new motel is to provide sleeping quarters for visiting family members of Base personnel. To be rented on a first come, first served basis, reservations can be made in advance by contacting the Navy Exchange Officer or his representative. Occupancy will be limited to ten days. At present, if a person stationed on the Base wishes to bring his family down for a visit, and he has no home on the Base, he was at a loss as where to house his family. This new addition to the Base will give a single man the opportunity to have his family visit him. Local Emergency Campaign Set Up By Amer, Red Cross For Flood Disaster Area The American Red Cross launched an emergency campaign this week to aid those stricken by floods in the northeastern United States. The emergency campaign is being held world wide in order to raise over $8,000,000 which will be required by the Red Cross to meet the needs of the homeless and stricken in the disaster area. Incomplete surveys show how serious the six northeastern states were affected. Over 34,000 families were striken, 19,700 homes were damaged, 942 of these being comnletely destroyed. 5,500 people, at the last report, were evacuated from areas that were cut off from civilization by the flood waters. The Red Cross is doing a tremendous part in giving aid to these people. Emergency teams are being flown in from all over the United States. Canteens and shelters have been set up by the American Red Cross, and, according to the last report received, over 20,000 have been fed by the 27 canteens, and over 12,000 people have been housed in 107 shelters which they have set up. The need for aid was summarized by President Dwight D. Eisenhower who urged everyone to contribute. Quote. "Red Cross money is not limited. It goes to people who are in need, to human beings, not to just cleaning roads and rebuilding schools, but to people that are hungry, cold, or have no place to go. In my opinion, everybody within the sound of my voice will sleep better tonight if he turns in everything that he can snare to meet this great disaster that has happened to our fellow Americans. This is a chance where each of us can rise to an emergency and prove that the American people can meet an emergency and do it well." Unquote. The emergency campaign began early this week and will run through the 17th. All hands are urged to contribute so that the Red Cross can give aid as needed. Each Command on the Base will established their own fund, and after the 17th the combined funds will be turned over the Red Cross representative of the Naval Base, Mrs. Helen Bowler, who will in turn send it to the Disaster Relief Section of the National Headquarters. HOLIDAY In observance of Labor Day, Monday, 5 September will be a National Holiday aboard the Naval Base. All but necessary work, drills, and exercises will be suspended on this day. r S' l

PAGE 2

M Page Two THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as posible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM EDMUND B. TAYLOR, Commander Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Editorial Staff LTJG J. D. Byerley ----------------------------------Officer-Advisor G. L. Henderson, JOC ----------------------------------_ Editor D. C. Roberts, JOSN ------------------------------Managing Editor E. J. Talen, SN --------------------------------------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Materials marked AFPS may be used by any news medium provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part, with or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. Navy Wives' Club by Pat Aldridge Sunday, 4 September 1955 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1646-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Sabbath Services Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholie) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) Eastern Star Club by Margaret Hohman The Eastern Star Club met on the 22nd of August, and being Social night the evening was spent playing Canasta and Pinochle and enjoying the delicious refreshments served by the hostesses for the evening, Wilma Harper and Lucille Jordan. It takes a lot of rain in Gtmo Bay to keep our Eastern Stars from coming out to their meetings. President Icie Schwartz has received permission for the institution of a Chapter in Guantanamo Bay, Naval Base. Those persons interested in the formation of an Order of the Eastern Star Chapter, may contact these members of the Hospitality Committee for further information concerning the forming of the Chapter: Betty Boyer -Phone 9558 Doris Reynolds -Phone 9356 The regular meeting nights have been changed from the second and fourth Thursday's to the second and fourth Monday's of each month with meetings being held in the Club room, Building N-328, Marina Point, and just a reminder that One of the Guantanamo Bay Navy Wives' Club most pleasant social events of the season took place at the Marine Family Restaurant recently. A morning coffee klotch brought members and guests together in order to meet Mrs. Albert Pratt, wife of our visiting Under-Secretary of the Navy. Mrs. Pratt took advantage of the opportunity of meeting and talking with all those present by, as she termed it, "table hopping" and seemed particularly interested in conversation concerning the specific problems of service wives everywhere. Other than Navy Wives' club members, those attending to enjoy coffee with Mrs. Pratt were, Mrs. E. B. Taylor, Mrs. W. R Caruthers, Mrs. G. M. Holley, Mrs. F. Habecker, Mrs. R. E. Fojt and Mrs. K. G. Peterson. Pearl Pearcy, Activities Chairman, is still sojourning in the Jacksonville Naval Hospital following a serious orthopedic operation while member Nan Jones is hone again following the birth of a baby daughter at the local infirmary. Former recording Secretary, Bunny Cox and members Marian Becker and Sarah Barko have either departed or are slated to leave shortly. Present Recording Secretary, Isabelle Matao is anticipating departure for Guam sometime in October but Jean O'Brien, Corresponding Secretary will be a familiar figure around Guantanamo Bay until the advent of a new O'Brien anyway. Just as a reminder, all service wives are eligible, and urged to join the local chapter of the Navy Wives' Club, an honored national organization dedicated to service and assistance where ever the need is felt. Business meetings are held the first Thursday night of every month at eight P.M. in the School Assembly Hall on Chapel Hill and social meetings, luncheons, bingo's, etc., every Thursday afternoon. New members are not only welcome but sought that the local chapter may function more adeptly in its many interests. the meetings start promptly at 7:30. The first meeting of the month is a business meeting and the second is Social night Please do come out to the next meeting on the 12th of Septenoer. 0 Hospital Notes by P. R. Haberstroh HEIRPORT NEWS At 0747 on 26 August Paula Elizabeth was born to GMC and Mrs. Clifton Booth. Paula was the first young lady to be enrolled in the Gtmo Birth Register for the month of August, and it is thought, that her birth has finally broken the jinx. Earlier in the week three new gents gathered in the hospital nursery, they were Arthur Joseph to AL2 and Mrs. Joseph Bushey Jr.; Richard David to TE3 and Mrs. Richard Shenberger; and Lawerance Alan to PHI and Mrs. Oiville Lawson. ARRIVALS We wish to extend a hearty "Welcome Aboard" to William F. Mullins, HM2, who reported aboard on 29 August from the U. S. Naval Station, Trinidad. hritish West Indies. DEPARTURES LCDR (MSC) Edward W. Walker our past Administrative Officer departed via FLAW for Patuxent River, Maryland where he will await his retirement orders. Another loss to the staff was Ralph Berggren, HM2. Berggren left on the USNS Pvt. W. H. Thomas for the N a v a 1 Receiving Station, Brooklyn, New York, where he will receive his separation from the naval service. BIRTHDAYS FOR SEPTEMBER Nine birthdays to be celebrated this month are: William Spears, 6 Sept.; Edwin Choate, 2 Sept.; John Nunn, 12 Sept.; Kenneth Williams, 12 Sept.; Alonzo Ball, 13 Sept.; Morris Gorden, 15 Sept.; William Dal, 19 Sept.; Ralph McKnight, 20 Sept.; and Carson Franklin, 30 Sept. SIDELIGHTS For those in doubt ask Kania what to do when you wake up at 0300, and find "Finger Prints" .. The latset scoop is that Jackie Bennett is expecting to pay all debts during the month of September, and thus enable himself to come off of nights in the near future. .Harding is off night duty, and finds it hard to stay awake during the day .Sea Sick Davis is on the YFR-1152. MEET THE STAFF Time is flying by for Joe Kelley, HM3, with only thirty some days to go in Cuba. Joe is spending his last month on night duty, and that way will be able to bear down in the game of golf. Kelley's home town is Bowling Green, Kentucky, but when it comes to where he would like to be you would hear him say: "Ebensburg, Penna.". Received his Recruit Training at San Diego, Calif., and from there was transferred to Hospital Corps School in Bainbridge, Maryland After Corps School he stayed at the Naval Hospital in Bainbridge, from where he received orders to Gtmo. At present Joe is looking forward to receiving his separation papers, so he can return to Pennsylvania and start his civilan career. 0 Teenage Round-ui by Sylvia Cavanaugh & Delorice Kinchen Well as school settles down into a full swing we still have people leaving for the states. Jack Staf ford left for the "Promised Land" Tuesday via FLAW. Jackie Lee will certainly be missed by all, especially the Student Council members of last year when we had our luncheon at the O'Club. Good old Jack was always the one who took the "extra" bun so the rest of us could do likewise. We all hope Jack has a good time stateside. While we're on the subject of people leaving, an "old timer" clown here is departing from our "island" Monday. Edgar has been attending school here since the first grade. He graduated last year and worked this past summer to earn money to attend college in Tallahassee, Florida. Edgar was a big help to our school, especially during basketball season. He was always among the top ten scorers during the season. Ed also helped on the Yearbook and the "Arrow", our school newspaper. He will be missed by all who knew him. And last, but not least. Irv Page, who was visiting for the summer, left by way of the Johnson last Monday to continue his schooling at the University of Florida. Although Irv was only here for a short time, we will all miss him. DID 'JA SEE .. All the new pupils flocking to our little old high school? ? ? Chuck Ryan, a new Sophomore kat, who hails from Morison, Mass., .Judy Field, a Freshman girl from Jacksonville, Florida, and Sandra Davey from Lake Zurich, Illinois, also a Freshman, who have added their names to the list of kids attending our school? ? ? ? .Marty and Rueben riding around? ? ? .Becky being followed? ? ? ? .All the kids at Windmill last Sunday engaging in pebble battles and burying their fellow friends under miles of pure old Gtmo sand? ???. The new "exit" at the N.O.B. movies to the pop corn stand? ?? .The little gal who removed herself from the N.O.B. movies???. Eunice and Nancy's new specs ? ? ? ?. 'Meet Your Child's Teacher' Theme Of First PTA Meeting The first meeting of the ParentTeacher Association of Guantanamo Bay (1955-56) will be held on Tuesday evening, September 6th, at the Chapel Hill Assembly Hall. The highlight of the evening will be a reception for all the teachers of the Naval Base, to be held in the school patio after a short business meeting. The reception is sponsored by the P.T.A. and will afford an excellent opportunity for every parent to get acquainted with his child's teacher. The meeting will commence at 7:30 P.M. after which Mr. T. G. Scarborough, school superintendent, will introduce the new school principal, Mr. J. E. Brown and the entire faculty to the parents and friends of the Naval Base School. Everyone is cordially invited to attend. Saturday, 3 September 1955 m THE INDIAN

PAGE 3

Saturday, 3 September 1955 THE INDIAN Track Star Returns To Naval Base After Winning 10-Mile Road Race Joe Tyler, SN, of Naval Statioh Special Services, returned to the Naval Base last Sunday from Salem, Massachusetts, where he ran in the annual 10 mile Mack Park road race. Wearing the No. 61, Tyler stwept the field of 55 competitors in a breeze, covering the 10 miles ih 62 minutes and 55 seconds, just three minutes over the course record. Running against such stars as Robert M. Gillimore of New Yorks Fishkill A. C. and Johnny Kelly of Edson A. A., Tyler showed terrific stamina and speed in spite of the 84 degree heat he was forced to run in. At the finish Tyler seemed hardly winded and looked fresh enough to run another 10 miles. When asked about the race, Tyler said he was out to win, and had it been a little cooler, he would have made better time. Never one to refuse a race, Tyler accepted the invitation to run in the 26 mile marathon held in Three Rivers, Province of Quebec, Canada, on Saturday, 20 August. Never having run in a marathon before, Tyler was eager to see what he could do. It was another hot day, but he decided to give it all he had. Going strong the first 20 miles, Tyler held the lead, but his legs started tightening up, which forced him to slow his pace. With the slower pace forcing him to drop into second place behind Ted Corbitt of the New York A. C.,Tylers legs gradually got worse, and after completing 22 miles of the race, he was forced to drop out. When asked about the race, Tyler said that it was rough, but the people that poured out to watch it were great. Unable to understand their comments, as they are a French speaking people, he was able to understand their gestures, as they handed him oranges and lemons, and poured cool water over him as he ran by. The latter part of this month Tyler is scheduled to be transferred to San Diego Naval Training Center where he will began training for the Olympics which will be held in Melbourne, Australia in June of 1956. Ladies Golf Shots by Audrey Page Going into the last match of team play Friday the Sharit Shimmeirs were leading by five points. The Ware Wigglers decided to hit the ball on that final day and came through the winner of the five week team matches by a total score of 22 to 24. Congratulations to Edie Ware and the members of her team! Interest has grown for more Team Matches so it has been decided to start another on September 15th. On Wednesday Ladies Day a low gross-low net tournament was held. Wnnners were as follows: 1st Flight: Low Gross-tieEdie Ware, Kay Sharit. Low Net -Mary Goolsby. 2nd Flight-Low Gross-Vivian Soballe. Low NetAudrey Page. 3rd Flight-Low Gross -tie -Prue Aarts, Sarah Brotherton. Low Net-Mary Hall. Large Crowd Turns Out To Attend Scout Circus Held At Seaplane Ramp On Saturday, 20 August, at the NAS Seaplane Ramp, the Girl and Boy Scouts, Brownies and Cub Scouts ,headed by Mrs. L. E. Hallman, Chief L. B. Dickson, Mrs. A. D. Nelson and W. A. Johnson, PN1, in that order, held their annual Scout Circus, which proved a great success. The Cuban equivalent to the four scout represented on the base, were invited, and took part in the show that was put on. This was done without any prior knowledge of participating; proving that the Scout adage of "Be Prepared" is well taught here in Cuba. All the profits from the Circus will be divided equally between the four units and will go to each treasury to take care of materials and other necessities needed during the coming year. LCDR Fortenberry and CHSCLK Harper of the Circus Committee, along with all the Scouts, wish to extend a heartfelt "THANK YOU" to all persons who donated their time, money and other help towards making the Circus such a great success. Welfare Association .. (Continued from Page One) Board of Directors which will administer the funds of the Welfare Association. Other members of the Board of Directors include: CAPT R. R. McCracken,, Vice-President CDR R. A. Williams, SC, USN Mr. H. P. McNeal Mr. W. J. Sparks Mr. H. L. DeLeon, Treasurer Mr. Carlos P. Bru, Secretary Conditions under which employees may apply for loans are set forth in Base Instruction 12065.1 and the by-laws of the Welfare Association promulgated as an enclosure to the Instruction. Applicants for loans must have as a co-maker or endorser on their notes another member of the Association. Either borrower or comaker, or the two together, must have to their credit sufficient annual leave at all times to cover the unpaid balance of the loan. Loans will be made for periods up to 12 months, and must be repaid in regular payments on each pay day. The Association will have no paid employees for the time being, but operating expenses will be paid from an interest charge on loans -6% for each 6 months or fraction thereof. Application blanks and other information may be obtained from the Secretary of the Association at the Industrial Relations Office, Base Administration Building. The new 100-oed air conditioned hospital which is being constructed on Caravella Point by the Frederick Snare Corp. is rapidly progressing and is scheduled to be completed and ready for use by June of 1956. The new hospital will be equipped with the most modern equipment and will be air-conditioned throughout. FTG Bulletin The Fleet Training Group is mighty proud of its "never belay a sheet and never expectorate to windward" sailors. CDR Archie is still holding first place in the summer series of sailing races. J. W. Furlong, ET1, C. R. Collins, ETC, and CDR Gardes hold 3rd, 4th and 5th places respectively. CHSCLK Harper, CDR Mathews and H. Tuff, ABC, are heaving around too. Each skipper has at least two more races to sail which should turn the blisters to callouses before the series ends. A big ship and a little ship sailor reported aboard last week for duty. John Harrington, RDCA, reported to the CIC Department from the USS Abbot (DD-629). He enlisted in 1944 in his hometown of Hartford, Connecticut and has sailed on the USS PC 1262, the USS H. J. Thomas (DD-833) and the USS Lloyd Thomas (DDE-764). The Chief is married and has two children, John Jr. age 4 and Gay age one. Brady Howard, DC1, the big ship sailor, reported to the Damage Control Department from the USS Tarawa (CVS-40). He is from Louisiana, is married and has one child, a son named Anthony age 3. Brady has served on the USS F. D. Roosevelt (CBV-42) in addition to being in a ship repair unit during Word War II. Chief Watch of the Air Department is beginning to wonder what will come next. Last week he captured a scorpion on his back porch and two days later turned to bigger game and captured alive in his bathroom a tarantula (whew!), which measured about six inches across when walking. The Chief attacked the demon with a broom and with considerable nerve and persistence, he managed to get him in a bottle for all to see. CDR Gendreau says he used to hunt them in Haiti when he was a boy. Wouldn't you just love to find your young son out capturing tarantulas ? Another Jones entered the world at 0434, 28 August, weighing in at 6 pounds 6 ounces. He is named Donald Stevens and is the son of Chief Jones of the Engineering. Donald is just a wee bit younger than Joanne DiMaggio who scaled 0 Supply Corps Midshipmen Tour Naval Supply Depot During Summer Cruises The Naval Supply Depot, Guanatnamo Bay held open house for the Supply Option Midshipmen during the recent visits of Cruises Able, Baker and Charlie. Tours have been offered for the past several years and the midshipmen have grown to consider them as part of their regular summer training curriculum. The officers in charge of the various groups have stated that such tours are very helpful to these young men since they are potential Supply Corps Officers and requisitioning, procurement, issuing, storage, material handling and fiscal accounting will soon be their jobs. After being welcomed by the Commanding Officer, midshipmen were divided into groups and were conducted through the Fiscal Department, the Control Division, Material Division, and the Fuel Division where they actually observed their operations and had explained to them by officers in these fields the less obvious points. Issue Control and Procurement procedures held special interest for the midshipmen, since most of them upon graduation will be sent to sea and, undoubtedly, will be called upon to deal quite frequently with supply activities ashore in furnishing logistic support to their vessels. Added attractions offered to the Midshipmen during the tours were coffee and sweet rolls at the NSD sidewalk cafeteria (La Sombrita) and lunch at the Naval Station and Naval Air Station galleys. 7 pounds 5 ounces just a few minutes before. Joe DiMaggio, GM1, the proud father, was transferred last week to the Base Police on TAD. With the arrival of the EPCE(R) 849, it was just like "old home week" for Jerry Fount Pitts, YN2, of the Reports Department and Ken Stumo, EM2, of the Engineering Department. Jerry and Ken visited their former ship and spent several enjoyable hours reminiscing with their old shipmates. m Page Three

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mf Navy-DPPO-10ND-Gtmo.-2163 THE INDIAN Saturday. 3 September 1955 5 0 0I NOQK STAR BRIDGE by Jack Williamson and James E. Gunn. For those who enjoy Science Fiction, here is an unusual book of the future that depicts life in outer space. The story begins on Earth, and then takes you on exciting adventures through outer space to the planet called Eron. Fantastically written, it is a novel of adventures in exotic settings, giving glimpses of imaginative alien things and places and a cast of humans and unhumans THE SEA WOLVES by Wolfgang Frank This is the complete story of the German U-Boat effort during World War II. Written by the Public Relations Officer of the German Admiral who supervised the secret rebuilding of the German U-Boat Flotilla, it supplies a much needed chapter in the military history of the last war. It includes the inside stories of the command decisions of Hitler and his Admirals and of their grim race to keep ahead, or even abreast of the technical developments of the allies. The author also shows how radar won the U-Boat war for the Allies. For anyone interested in the history of World War II, here is a chapter that shows why today the United States so respects the apalling destructive power of the submarine. BEYOND COURAGE by Clay Blair, Jr. The fascinating and heroic stories of Air Force pilots who had crashed or been shot down behind enemy lines and then managing, by one means or another to make their way back to U.N lines are vaugely known by everyone. The author presents in this book the most exciting of these stories. Written so that you can feel the agony of walking 40 miles over mountains in temperature of thirty degrees below with your feet frozen, or the torture of treatment -or lack of it-in a Communist POW hospital, the stories show the terrific moral, mental, and physical fibre of our combat air crews. THE MAN IN THE GRAY FLANNEL SUIT by Sloan Wilson This is a novel depicting the life of an average American who, with brief-case, leaves his home each morning to make his living as an executive in the nearby city. The story begans with this young executive, after just being married, entering the Army to defend his country. Upon being discharged, the main theme of the novel appears ....the struggle of a man trying to adapt himeslf from the relative security of olive drab of the Army to the insecurity of gray flannel. Interestingly written, it shows which life is more secure, the gray flannel suit or the olive drab previously worn. OUTLAW BREED by Max Brand For those of you who like Westerns, here is a fast and tense story written about the son of a notori. ous gunfighter. Trying to establish a good name by avoiding fights, the young son is finally goaded into one to defend his life. Full of violence and local color, it shows that a man, no matter how good he is, can take only so much before fighting back. The Fish Tale (s) by P. J. Aldridge With a right smart lot of cooperation we're gonna have a runnin' fishin' tournament going' around these parts. Beginnin' the 1st of this month, last Thursday, a month to month contest got under way down to the sailboat locker, a real cooperative deal. All them as is interested in fishin' spear or rod n' reel are eligible and it works kna like this; ya gets down to the sailboat locker afore the 5th and you pays a dollar entry fee. No fair waitin' 'til ya tie inta a big 'un and then forkin' over with the entrance fee. There'll be about ten classes of fish and ya can weigh in at the self same place as aforementioned. The sole judge will be an expert icthiologist (I had to look that 'un Up) around these parts who's been fishin' Cuban waters since he was knee high to a sea horse, Firmin Pavila, and what he says is what goes. The contest will run from the 1st to the 1st of any month and will run for just as long as you all seem to evidence some interest and ain't too reluctant to part with a buck. The entry fees will be divided and it's yet to be decided if'n ya win cash or some kinda prize thing but whatever it is will be fun going' after. Ron Seagle, BMS, Rocco Aldridge, BMC, and F. L. Abney, CS2, form the committe responsible for gettin' this thing going' and it weren't no little bit of travaho. That there's spanish for work, There's a mite bit o' change in the boatin' rules, Ron Seagle says as how we should inform ya. From here on ya can rent a boat n' motor for two bucks for any eight hour period regardless from when to when. Anything over eight hours, just in case they just started bitin' and ya don't wanta come in, will cost ya a buck an hour. There's plenty of three types beit to be had and some real fresh line on them rods n' reels for two bits a rental period. Havein' no gear ain't no excuse for not going' fishin'. Got a tip for you langusterers, too. They got the gigs at the locker but there ain't no use going' out for them caribbean lobsters if'n the cotton picking' water ain't as calm as a sleepin' baby. Let the water be a 'wigglin' just a mite and then 'guster look like where they isn't all the time. All you'll get with that there gig is exercise, Dr. Don Doohen nad Dr. Pete Wells tried their luck Snookin' here recently but I didn't hear tell of no luck. Seems as if them Snook snuk off somewhere's 'cause nobody much has been bringin' 'em in. Tarpon are hittin' all over the dad ratted bay but it's gonna take a real expert to keep one on the hook looks as if. Three or four leaps and that there rascal is long gone. Grenadillo point is producin' a lot of pan size snappers and they say the mackerel are runnin' outside so, with all them tips, if'n ya ain't catchin' don't give us the sad eye. Don't forget that there contest, neither. More entrants, better prizes. Navy expressions and their meanings: We should confer: Send your yeoman over to see mine. Take necessary action: It's your head ache now. Take immediate action: Do something before we both catch hell. Show him every courtczy: His uncle is an adir i1. Public Works Chips by Vic. Gault Mr. James Solomon (Solly), an eCployee of long standing in the Public Works Department, resigned recently and left for the States via FLAW on Thursday. His permanent residence is in Brooklyn. Solly has had a long and commendable service with the Dapartment of the Navy, both as an enlisted man and in the Civil Service. He enlisted in the Navy at St. Croix, V. I. in the year 1917 with th>e rating of Musician 2nd Class. He continued in active service for 1? years or until 1935 in which year he transferred to the Fleet Reserve. After leaving the service he acernted employment in the Public Works Department of this Base where his first assigned duty was as laborer Common, however, he was promoted se vera 1 times through the ensuing years and in 1940 was promoted to the rating of Clerk, CAF-2, in which rating he remained until the year 1942 when he was recalled to active Naval duty. His rating at that time was changed from Musician to that of Storekeeper. Upon his recall to active duty he served for a period of approximately 3 years and returned to inactive in 1945 with the rating of Storekeeper, 1st. less. Again Solly became a member of the Public Works Department complement of civilian personnel in which activity he has remained until the present time. Mr. Solomon, at the time of his resignation, holds the rating of Supervisory General Supply Clerk, GS-6, in charge of the Materials Branch of the Department. Solly's many friends gave him a party at the Trading Post Picnic area. That is to say the party started off at the Picnic area, but due to the heavy rain that fell that evening, Walt Schnake invited the gang to his quarters on the hill to continue the merrymaking. Two days later Mrs. Gault invited Polly to partake of a "going-away" Cuban style dinner. He and the other guests enjoyed themselves very much. Solly states that he definetely intends to take it easy for a while at his home in Brooklyn in the company of his family and then possibly go into the candy store business. We all wish him great success in his new venture and a sincere "'Feliz Viaje, Solly old boy". LT J. P. Marron, Assistant Public Works Officer is on a week's leave at his quarters. He is availing himself of this week's leave to carry thru' a few "do it yourself" projects around his quarters. Mr. Anthony Richards, who was employed by the Naval Supply Depot, as supervisor over certain Shop Stores has been promoted and transferred to the Public Works Department to take charge of the Materials Branch. He is a former employee of this department and was transferred to the Noval Supply Depot about a year ago when that command took over operation of all Shop Stores that were under the cognizance of the Public Works Department. "AND REMEMBER FOR THE GOOD iF ALL, AND IN LINE WITH CONSERVATION POLICIES -LETS BE "ECONOMYMINDED" IN TKE USE OF UTILITIES SUCH AS WATER AND ELECTRICITY -UTILIZE THESE COMMODITIES IN LINE WITH EXISTING BASE INSTRUCTIONS GO VERNING THEIR USE". 0 MOVIES Saturday, 3 September SLAVES OF BABYLON Richard Conti Linda Christian This is the story in biblical setting, involving Daniel in the lions' den Nebuchadnezzar and the Israelites and Cyrus' resumption of the throne of Persia. The kings of Persia and Babylon are rivals for the hand of the oriental beauty. Sunday, 4 September MAN WITH A MILLION Gregory Peck Jane Griffith Two old men give Peck, who is penniless, a one million note. By possessing this he finds that he can get credit anywhere and is accepted by the best of people. Eventually his creditors catch up with him and his difficult situation is resolved. Monday, 5 September ISLAND IN THE SKY John Wayne L. Nolan NO INFORMATION AVAILABLE. Tuesday, 6 September GAMBLER FROM NATCHEZ Dale Robertson Debra Paget After service, a young soldier leaves for home and his father, a professional gambler. Erroute he becomes involved with crooks and an adventuress who later turned out to be the people who killed his father. Wednesday, 7 September MAKE HASTE TO LIVE Stephen McNally Dorothy McGuire A newspaper woman in a small New Mexico town, is confronted with her terrible past when her husband, a gangster with a prison record, turns up and tries to ruin her life and the life of their teenage daughter. Thursday, 8 September THE DESPERADO Wayne Morris James Lydons The friendship of Wayne Morris, a taciturn killer with a price on his head for James Lydons, reveals the former to be a hero when he voluntarily comes into town and testifies in Lydons defense on a murder charge by Lydons false friends. Friday, 9 September THE BLACK DAKOTAS Gary Merrill Wanda Hendrix Southern spies attack a stage coach and kill the emissary of Abraham Lincoln who was carrying an important treaty to be signed by the indian chief War Cloud. Many series of incidents happen b e f o r e the situation straightened out. Stra, 3Spebr15


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