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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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Gitmo Review
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Guantanamo Gazette
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Govers q1M0 Like The Suniskine"

Vol. VI, No. 34 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 27 August 1955



MCB-1 Leaves Today CAPT W, B Moore New O For R, L; Will Return Chief Of Staff At FTG


To Otmo In November

Early this morning Mobile Construction Battalion ONE departed for their home base in Davisville, Rhode Island for a three month period of leave and reorganization training. The small but hard working unit left Guantanamo Bay after completing four projects and getting a good start on two others.
The departure by MCB-1 is unusual in that there is no battalion relieving them. Due to the fact that MCB-8 was decommissiond and that the other See Bee battalions are tied upon on their own projects, MCB-1 will return to Gtmo in late November.
This week saw the See Bees still hard at work finishing up and loading their necessary equipment aboard the USS Latimer (APA 152) which will transport them back to the States.
Commanded by CDR J. A. Hiegel, MCB-1 first began work here as a battalion in late February of 1955. In the six months that they have been down here, they have complied an outStanding record of completing four projects-the power plant, ferry slip, and the rehabilitation of a pipeline on Leeward Point. In July they completed their fourth project, the 300 unit replacement housing located in Villamar, 92 of them being built by MCB-1.
The See Bees would have finished many more units, but as it is they had to quit upon completion of the shells due to a shortage of building materials. They now have 60 shells in N. W. Grahadillo and 26 more on Caravella Point ready for, finishing.
Scheduled. to return in the latter part of November, the See Bees left a security force of 34 men who will keep a watchful eye on all MCB-1 equipment left here, and will also receive, unicrate, and prepare for use any materials which should arrive in that time.
Upon returning, MCB-1 will undertake two more housing projects
-a 60 unit Department of Defense project for Enlisted Men and a 40 unit project for married officers.


CATHOLIC CATECHISM'
Registration for the new
term of Catholic Catechism
will be held Saturday 27,
August at the Naval School, at 10 A.M. At least one parent should accompany the child* for this enrollment.
Classes will be held each j | Saturday at 10 A.M., comimencing 3 September.


Captain William B. Moore, U.S. Navy, relieved Captain Dana B. Cushing U.S. Navy, as Chief Staff Officer to the Commander of the Fleet Training Group on Saturday 20 August. Captain Moore and family arrived in the Guantanamo Bay Area on 19 August by FLAW after considerable difficulty caused by hurricanes "Connie" and "Diane". Captain Moore was accomcompanied by his wife, the former Vivian Douglass, of Long Beach California and his three sons, Terry Moore age 7 (named after USS Terry DD-513), Robin Moore age 6, and William "Brig" Moore Jr. age 4.
The new Chief Staff Officer attended high school in Ogden, Utah and graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in the Class of 1930. He has since served upon the following naval vessels: USS West Virginia 1930-1934; USS Panay 19351936; USS Claxton 1937; USS Buhanan 1939-1940; USS Savannah 1940-1941; USS Terry 1944-1945 and the USS Magoffin 1950-1951. In addition, Captain Moore is a graduate of the U.S. Navy Post Graduate School in Ordnance Engineering- and has had two tours 'of duty in the Bureau of Ordnance plus several tours of duty as a Staff Officer. He has just left a 2Y year tour with the Atomic Energy Division of OpNav. Captain Moore's most exciting duty was as Commanding Officer of the USS Terry (DD-513) which saw considerable action and was severely damaged by a Japanese Shore Battery at Iwo Jima. For this action he was awarded the BronzeStar.

Mr. Albert Pratt

Ass't SecNav Now

Touring Naval Base
Mr. Albert Pratt, Assistant Secretary of the Navy of Personnel and Reserve Forces arrived here Thursday for a tour of the Naval Base. Mr. 'Pratt will be on the base until Monday morning when he will depart with Cruise "Baker" aboard the USS Wilkinson (DL 5) for Norfolk, Va.
A native of Massachusetts, Mr. Pratt was sworn in as Assistant Secretary of the Navy on 4 October, 1954.
During the war Mr. Pratt saw service on the staff of Admiral Nimitz in the Pacific. In addition he also served aboard the battleship Texas as gunnery officer. Mr. Pratt holds the Legion of Merit Medal, the Naval Reserve Medal, the American Defense Medal, the American Theatre and Asiatic-Pacific Theatre Medals, and the World War II Victoryr Medal.


LTJG W. N. Perry, Officer-in-Charge of FasRon SIX stationed at Leeward Point holds inspection of his group. This group of men hold maintenance check on all Fleet Aircraft during-their maneuvers here at Guantanamo Bay area.


New Hospital, Construction 'Mr, Chairman' Set Progressing At Fast Clip;

Completion Due In June For Sept, 30-Oct, 6


Construction on the new 100 bed Naval Base Hospital is continuing at a fast clip. The hospital, located on Caravella Point, will be one of the most modern of its kind, and when furnished will be a showplace on the base. To consist of a two story "H" shaped building, it will have the most 'modern of equipment and will be air-conditioned throughout.
The two wings will be used as wards while the center will consist of the X-ray room, operating room, surgical ards, nd offices.
Made of reinforced concrete, the new building will be completely hurricane proof.
Actual construction began early in February of this year, and the hospital is expected to be completed and ready for use by next June.
Also under construction is a new garage, which will house the hospital's emergency vehicles, and nurses and corpman quarters. The nurses quarters and garage are very near completion and wait only the final finishing. The nurses quarters will consist of a one story building and will have a lounge and a snack bar and many other modern features.
Construction of the new hospital is being done by Frederick H. Snare and Company. Most of the construction work done on the base by civilian corporations has been done by Snare. One of their more recent jobs, and also one of the biggest is the $3,500,000 hanger on Leeward Point which was commissioned last November.


Rehearsals are presently underway for the forthcoming production of the Guantanamo Bay Little Theatre's own original play titled "Mr. Chairman". The script for this new venture for the Little Theatre group was written by director Alan Wagner and technical director Joe Lewis with Bob Albright and Bob DeVour doing the music.
"Mr. Chairman" a slapstick musical comedy, is scheduled to open at Marina Point Community Auditorium on 30 September, and is guaranteed to be full of hilarious happenings throughout the entire three acts.
Rehearsals have been underway for approximately two weeks, and according to director Alan Wagner, the cast for "Mr. Chairman" which totals 40 people, is coming along very good and looks very promising.
Through the efforts of CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Offier, Naval Station, 100 new web chairs have been acquired for the comfort of the audiences' attending the seven night run of "Mr. Chairman.",
So for all of you who like a good stage production, make sure that you mark the date of 30 September on your calendar. Don't miss it. Let your sense of humtr and also your imagination run away with themselves and attend one of the big performances of "Mr. Chairman". You'll never regret it.


4


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PaeTo-TEIDA atra,2 uut15


THE INDIAN

The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as posible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
RADM EDMUND B. TAYLOR, Commander Naval Base, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba
CAPT G. 1M HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba
Editorial Staff
LTJG J.D. Byerley -------------------------------- Officer-Advisor
G. L. Henderson, JOC -------------------------------------- Editor
D.C. Roberts, JOSN ----------------------------- Managing Editor
E.J. Talen, SN -----------------------------..------ Staff Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
Materials marked AFPS may be used by any news medium provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part, with or without credit.
All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


Sunday, 28 August 1955

Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700w-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services
Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0930-Sunday School
0930-Adult Bible Class 190--Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Sabbath Services Christian Science
Sunday: 1000-Station Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J.J. Sullivan. CHC. USN
(Catholic)
LCDR X. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)


The Chaplain's Corner


It
When a baseball player. in a crucial game makes an error, he can't go back and try it again. When the right end of a football team drops a pass within the end zone, he can't say: "Let's take that again." Once the error or fumble is made-that's it.
In a much larger sense the same is true in living. We do not gct the chance to go back and do things over again in a different way, just because we made a mistake.
The game of life-that's it is called. But it should not be confused with pure sport. Fumbles and errors are part of life; however the important factor is that we are, or should be, "masters of our destiny"-because we are, or sl~ould be, in control of our actions.
The man who on the spur of the moment drives out to a Gretna Green and gets married without considering the obligations and responsibilities of marriage can't just say: "let's forget the whole


Base Golf Championship
On Sunday, 28 August at 0700 Lee Rogers (NAS) and Peddycord (VU-10) will tee off for the first 18 holes of a 36 hole match to determine who will wear the crown of "King" of the Guantanamo golfers for 1955. The second 18 holes for the Guantanamo championship will commence at 1300. Spectators are cordially invited to accompany the matches.
In the First Flight, CHMACH Bush (AFDL-47) advanced to the final round along with Sherlacher (NAS).
The Second Flight finalists are Campbell (VU-10) and LT Noga (FTG).
In the Third Flight, CDR Skaddowski (FTG) takes Arnold. The Fourth Flight was won by B. E. Smith who defeated Choate to captur ehte prize for this event. In the Consolation Flight, Broughtor
(NS) meets Wilson.
The Scotch Foursome event has been cancelled for 28 August to permit the play-off of the Championship Flight.


thing."
The man who stays AOL can't replace himself on the station for the days he was gone.
The man who acts as if a liberty pass is a dispensation from all duty and obligation is living in a paradise-yes, of a fool.
Every day's living must be accepted as final. We live our lives but once and we do not have a chance to rehearse them or try out different patterns.
It is, therefore, sensible to do some thinking before we act, and be sure that whatever we do will be the best, not only for our moment's pleasure but in the long run as well, for ourselves for our families, and for our friends.
If, as Eddie Guest puts it, we "don't want to go out with the setting sun and hate ourselves for the things we've done," it's a good idea to look before we leap.
It is far better to omit some momentary pleasure than to be sorry permanently.
Jerome J. Sullivan
Chapiain


Teenage Round-up
by Sylvia Cavanaugh &
Delorice Kinchen
Friday night at the Villamar dance all the kats and chic's had a grand ball. The girls that went to the Midshipman dance also had a good time (so I heard.)
Our Cake Sale for the Middies didn't do as good as we thought, huh Judy? But all the Teenagers that were at the club that day had a goorl time.
Your budC e and mine Bob Pendleton left our little "rock" last Saturday night via FLAW (as usual). Bob has been on the base for several years and we will all miss his happy face.
A welcome back is extended to our "Sweet Little Miss Pris" who returned last Sunday from her wonderful trip to the States. She just couldn't buy out all of the stores .... and how does it feel to get "seasick"? Also returning on the Johnson Sunday was Maurice Morgan. Welcome back, y'all.
The Lasiter family, Peggy and Barbara will depart from the "rock" tonight for the States. Good luck to both of you.
DID 'JA SEE ....
Peggy P. and Red eating candy kisses in Study Hall? ? .... Phil K. doing the mambo, and Irv doing a jitterbug? ? .... Gary's "ladyfish"? .... Jere W's new theme song, "I've, Got A Lovely Bunch Of Coconuts"? ? ?.... Marty Abernathy, a new sophomore girl that hails from Jacksonville, Florida? ?
.... All the kids that stayed in after school on the first day???? ....-MaryAlice M. and Becky looking real cute these days?? ... Ronnie R. looking for a Biology book? ? ? ... All the girls in P.E. Class trying to open their lockers, because they forgot the combinations.


PTA MEETING
There will be a meeting
of the Executive Committees of the Parents-Teacher As-
sociation next Tuesday evening, August 30th at the home of Mr. Burt Knight,
- 47A-RH, Nob Hill, at 7:30
P.M. All member are urged
to attend.


Hospital Notes

by P. R. Haberstroh HEIRPORT NEWS
It could be the weather, or the change of the moon, then again it might not be, but to all the readers of this article here are the facts. Since the- first of August there has not been a single young lady in the hospital nursery, however five gents added there names to the Gtmo birth registar: Hal Craig to CWO and Mrs. Robert Pappano; Frederick Dale Jr. to AL2 and Mrs. Frederick Foster; Michael Lloyd to SN1 and Mrs. "R" McKinnon; Richard Davis to TE3 and Mrs. Richard Shenberger; Arthur Joseph to AL2 and Mrs. Joseph Bushey Jr.
ARRIVALS
Welcome to our most recent arrivals, namely LT Olga Segin, NC, reporting for duty from the Naval Hospital in Philadelphia. HMC W. F. Spears arriving from the USS Ross, off the USS Valley Forge came HMC August J. Bucki. Three other personnel came from the U.S. Naval Hospital, Bainbridge, Md., Peter Ouzonia, HN, David E. Shipley, HN, and Lester Medford Jr., HN.
DEPARTURES
Bon Voyage is extended to CAPT J.B. MacGregor, MC, who departed by FLAW to the Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Mass.-Dr. MacGregor was our Executive Officer. Also departing by FLAW was LT D. L. Lawson, NC, and HMC Jefferson Dekle. Miss Lawson was transferred to San Diego Naval Hospital, while Chief Dekle received orders to report to the Naval Station at Key West Florida.
SIDELIGHTS
Blank faces were seen both before and after the examination for HM2.... What McKnight needs is a wallet chain.... A word of thanks is extended to all who put their time and skill in repairing the pool table in Junior Quarters.
MEET THE STAFF
Being here in Gtmo since June of 54 we meet our newly appointed Executive Officer CDR Louis E. Tebow, MC, IUSN. Dr. Tebow received his B.C. and M.D. degree at the University of Illinois, College of Medicine. In 1941 he received his commission as LTJG, and since that time Dr. Tebow has earned the following ribbons and medals; American Defense; Am e r i ca n Theatre; Asiatic-Pacific (2-stars); Japanese Occupation; China Service (4-stars); United Nation; and Korean P.U.C. At present he is living here on the base with his wife and children Duncan and Mary Ellen. Beside being Executive Officer Dr. Tebow will continue as Chief of Surgery.


THE TOWN CRIER
by M. Gordon
It may be wise for everyone to get their television sets in tune! Just a hint.
In the near future an open forum is planned for the community. It will be held in the Villamar Lyceum and the Community Council is looking forward to seeing as many residents as can be there. Details will be announced at the Bingo Game" Monday night.
Have you been watching that your children aren't chasing behind the spray truc? And you operators of vehicles behind the spray truck, do you wait until the fog is clear before proceeding? Give the kids a "brake".
Anyone having any constructive criticism please contact your councilmen and give them the details and your ideas that may help the community.
Below are listed the councilmen for your convience: J.B. Ralston, precinct #6, Qtrs. RH266D; B. H. Carr, precinct #3, CB27B; W. A. Schnake, precinct #5, RH603A; R.W. Twining, precinct #7, RH87D; M. Gordon, precinct #2, RH87A; G. Liveakos, precinct #4, DH636; T. L. Trimble, precinct 1, CB36B and R. K. Marshall, precinct #8, RH36A.


to

Page Two


-THE INDIAN


Saturday, 27 August 1955








THE INDIAN'


Page Three


Local Baseball Nine

Win One, Lose One

In Tournament Play

The Guantanamo Navy All-Star team playing in the Southeastern Baseball Tournament held in Pensacola, Florida, took their opening game from the Corpus Christi nine by a score of 7-2 behind the fourhit pitching of "Mandy" Mandis, which eliminated the Texas team from the tournament.
The local nine began with three runs in the first inning, two on "Chuck" Hunter's triple, and were never headed. Mandis and Corpus Christi's McDonald each rapped out two singles apiece.
After defeating the Texas club, on the following evening the Gtmo team tangled with the defending champions Pensacola Navy Goshawks and were defeated by a score of 7 to 1. The Goshawks picked up 7 runs on 9 hits and left 11 men stranded on base. The All-Stars gathered their 1 lone run off 10 hits, committed 5 errors and also left 11 men on base. Winning pitcher for Pensacola was Marvel, losing pitcher, Edgar.
Yesterday the local team was again scheduled to tangle with Pensacola in the double elimination tournament, but no information was available before press time.
The teams will play each night until one club wins twice with the winners playing in the All-Eastern Meet which commences at Pensacola Monday.


CDR Robert W. Williams, commanding officer, Naval Supply Depot, cuts the ribbon which officially opened the new Fuel Division Office located on Oil Point. Looking on is Carlos Cabal, Foreman, Fuel Depot.

Brownie Scouts To Commence
Regular Weekly Troop Meetings
The regular troop meetings of the Base Brownie Scouts will commence the week of 5 September at the Scout Hut on Victory Hill. Questionaires have been circulated, but if anyone was missed and would like to attend the meeting, please call Mrs. Minard at 8621. Assistant scout leaders are still needed and anyone interested in helping out with the scout meetings, please call 8621.


F.TG Bulletin

If your golf opponent suddenly starts shooting in the low 80's, cheek and see if he hasn't been reading a little pamphlet titled "How to Win at Golf". This short booklet, which has been going the rounds among FTG sod busters, seems to have the secret of how to get out of the 90's and if used with discretion could result in some miraculous scores.
The departures from the Fleet Training Group this week have kept the Personnel Office people even busier than usual. Some of the Group's best liked people left for various places in various modes of transportation .
"Pappy" Lunsford, SO, and family were very reluctant to be departing. To prolong their stay for a little while longer in Cuba, they are leisurely travelling via their automobile to Havana. They intend ot enjoy the Cuban countryside on the way. The Lunsford family plans to take the ferry from Havana to Florida where "Pappy" will report to the Commanding Officer, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron ONE at Key West, Florida.
It's slippers, pipe and a comfortable chair while watching TV and waiting for the mailman to bring that monthly check for William Stipek, MMC, of the Engineering Department Bill departed for the Receiving Station Norfolk, Virginia to be transferred to the Fleet Reserve and for release to inactive duty. FLAW was the mode of transportation used by the man "who-did his share". Best of luck, Mr. Stipek.
Dale Huffman, DCC, of the Damage Control Department is on board the USS Amphion AR-13 in a different status than that to which he is accustomed. Chief Huffman's ride this timeis -as a passenger instead of an observer. The Amphion is taking Huffman to New London, Connecticut where he will report to the Commanding Officer, USS Fulton AS-11 for duty.
Gunnery Department's Pat Spelce, BMC, is in no hurry to report to his next duty station. Pat is taking the "Yippy Boat" to Miami where he will spend 30 days and then go to the West Coast where the USS Roanoke CL145 will be waiting for him.
The TAD's for this week involved LCDR Christie who is going to Norfolk for two weeks of Guided Missile and Weapons Orientation School. Also on TAD is Charlie Runge, ET3, of Crane Hill who is at the Naval School ET (Airborne Early Warning), Class "C", Great Lakes, Illinois. Charlie will be gone for six weeks.
Welcoming his wife back to Gtmo this week was George Partridge, YN2. Mrs. Partridge spent 30 days with her folks in Chicago. James F. Epting, EMC, and Victor R. Sorbal, BM1, arrived on board the USNS Pvt Thomas for what we hope will be a pleasant tour of duty.
Chief Epting reported from Norfolk, Virginia from the USS Moale DD-793. Jim hails from Charleston, South Carolina where at present his wife Virginia and daughter Virginia Louise are awaiting the "word" to join him in Gtmo. The Chief enlisted in his hometown in 1942 and has had duty in both the Atlantic and Pacific Fleet serving on the USS Bannock ATF-81 and USS Catawba ATA-210. For a short time he attended Clemson College in South Caroli'.a.


Albert R. Rade, PH1, Fleet Camera Party, poses with the 42 lb.. Tarpon -which he caught at the mouth of the Fresh Water River on rod and reel. The tarpon 57 " long and had a girth of 26". Rade took first prize in the tarpon class of the fishing tournament in the 1st division.


VU-1O Prop Blast

The KDC 77445, while on a small drones shoot last Monday, was slightly disabled and came limping home on one engine in the rough sea and thunder storms. LT Edward P. (Easy) Kellogg, the Small Drones Officer and Chief Petch, who is in charge of the KDC, were caught in the deluge which hit Gtmo. Nice sailing, fellows.
The VU-10 table at the "0" Club on Saturday evenings is beginning to snow ball. There was a good crowd at the gathering last week and a very enjoyable time was had by all. Lets see some faces around the table this Saturday.
"Movies are better than Ever" in Gtmo. They must be if people are willing to sit through an entire movie in a steady down pour for an hour. The Merzs, Blairs and Kaisers can give you the first hand rain-drop by rain-drop account of last Sunday night's movie. I should say cartoon.
The AOQ Annex has 2 new occunants. They have no names as yet, but maybe someone can think of some. If so, contact LTJG A. L. Miller so that his two misplaced turtles-the size of half-dollarsmay be rightly chistened.
The most recent description of the Drone Program's safety rides in the Red-Dogs, was made by LTJG Chuck King while directing a question to Fox Operator LTJG Dick Kaiser. Chuck asked Kaiser, "Who is going to play drop me on the runway tomorrow?"
The Chiefs have been seen whooping up swirls of dust at Hatuey Field practicing softball. They must be sharpening their batting eye for a return game between the Officers and the Chiefs.


The Marine Corps Exchange will be closed for inventory during the period 29 August thru 1 September 1955. The Exchange will open for business again on 2 $eptember.
I, . _. ,-


Naval Station Exchange

Constructing New Buildings

For Planned Expansion
The Navy Exchange is continuing their plan of expansion, and soon will start construction on two new buildings immediately behind the Naval Station Exchange. The buildings, which should be open for business by October 1st, will house both sales rooms and repair shops.
Present plans call for moving the Cobbler Shop into the new buildings, and to put a portrait studio where the Cobbler Shop is now located. There will also be a radio and phonograph repair shop, and in the near future this will be expanded to include television and minor appliance repair.
Also housed in the new buildings will be a cash register and juke box repair shop.
The ground work work is now being laid, and construciton should begin in the near future.


NSD Supply Line

Jim Marsden will be leaving Monday to spend his vacation between Cape Cod and Boston. His chief interest will be clam chowder, Bay scollops, and Porter House steak. Have a nice vacation, Jim,
Miss Josephine Hogg will be enjoying herself for the next two weeks in Jamaica visiting relatives. She left by plane from Santiago to Kingston and will return via Camaguey.
Mr. & Mrs. E. M. Nichols have just returned from a three weeks stay in Wilmington, Delaware, and are once again making their home in Guantanamo Bay.
SAN JOAQUIN HAD HIS DAY IN GUANTANAMO CITY LAST WEEK AND SO DID THE GANG FROM NSD. Many of our people were seen this past week paticipating in the gay frolicking fiesta at Guantanamo City. Among those celebrating the festivities were Chief and Mrs. Johnson-they were dancing the cha, cha, cha, in the street at Paseo. One of the popular carnival songs was "El hombre Marinero no se debe casar" (The sailor man should not marry) and there was Seaman Bob Peacock surrounded by lovely senoritas trying to convince them why a sailor man should marry. Mrs. Ruth Wilson was seen strolling ing down Carlos Manuel taking in the sights, and as we wandered over to the larger night spots, which were literally jumping with carnival excitement, who should we run into but CDR and Mrs. Williams; Lieutenant and Mrs. Larson; and Mr. and Mrs. Erickson. David Figueras was definitely one of the happier participants, and Edwin Heimer, after an hilarious evening of dancing in the streets, was forced to spend the night on the road stuck in the mud. All of the NSD personnel who went to the Guantanamo City Carnival reported that they had one of the finest and most enjoyable times of their lives.


U.


Saturda- 27 Aurrust 1955






4"


Navy--DPPO-10ND-Gtmo.-2163


THE INDIAN


m


m


MOVIES

Saturday, 27 August
THUNDER BAY

James Stewart Joan Dru
Underwater oil drilling in the Louisiana Bay area causes hard feelings between the shrimp fisherman and the drillers due to the danger to fishing operations.
Sunday, 28 August
WHITE CHRISTMAS
Bing Crosby* Danny Kaye
Two World War II buddies team as entertainers after, the war, become involved with a singing sisters act, and find themselves in Vermont in search of a white Christmas .... but no snow, which means no show.
Monday, 29 August A STAR IS BORN


Judy Garland


James Mason


This is the story of a young singer, who through the help of a prominent star on the downgrade, becomes a picture star herself. In love she marries him and tries to keep him from his alcoholic weakness.
Tuesday, 30 August
THE ACTRESS


Spencer Tracy


Jean Simmons


This is the story of a young girl who wants to go on the stage. Her father is strictly against such a thing, and she has to try and overcome his objections.
Wednesday, 31 August
SANTE FE PASSAGE
John Payne Faith Domerge
A frontier scout who cherishes an unholy hatred for redskins, and a half-Indian beauty who is fiercely determined to escape the kind of poverty that warped her unhappy childhood carry on a feud during a troubled wagon train trip Westward in the early 19th Century.
Thursday, 1 September
THE LAVENDER HILL MOB
Alec Guinness Stanley Holloway
The story of a large bank robbery by one of the bank clerks and his attempt to peddle the gold.
Friday, 2 September
FRANCIS JOINS THE WACS


Donald O'Connor


Julia Adams


A young soldier must go through the same physical fitness as his female companions, when, through clerical error, he is assigned to the Wacs. His action and the information given him by his talking mule land him in the psycho ward before he is finally transferred to the right unit.


Public Works Chips
by Vic. Gault
The installation of a new and larger water clarifier at Water Plant No. 3 is nearing completion and lacks only a few minor parts, which are expected in the near future from the manufacturer, to go into operation. This new clarifier will greatly facilitate the processing of portable water in rainy seasons when the source of water becomes highly contaminated by marked turbidity. Now, without the clarifier, it becomes necessary to stop processing water at such times. This much needed improvement will be an asset to the Base and its dependents.
The "Welcome Back" mat was rolled out this week to the Schnakes, the Morgans, the Adairs and the Sanborns. They returned to the Base on the USS Thomas from a well earned vacation at their homes in the States. Leaving for the States this week will be the Robinsons, the Petelers, and the McIntoshs, they also will be on extended vacation. Welcome back to those that arrived and a Bon Voyage to those that are leaving.
Personnel of the Public Works Department, Heavy Construction Shop, Paving and Masonry Section, are preparing the site at the real of the Navy Exchange and the Commissary Store for additional structures which will be utilized by those activities for planned expansions.
During the period 16 August through 26 August several divisions and branches of the Public Works Department and personnel assigned to them were presented with Department of the Navy Commendations for Prevention of Accidents. These were presented to the several PWD divisions and branches, in addition several employees were presented with Safety Award pins for prevention of accidents and safe practices in performing their assigned duties. Some of the Safety Award pins were for as much as 7 and 8 years perfect records. Also presented were several Department of the Navy Certificate of Training. These certificates are issued by the Department of the Navy through the Industrial Relations Department to employees who have satisfactorily completed the course of "Supervisor Development Program" sponsored by the Department of the Navy, and are presented for each satisfactorily completed period of training. The program is conducted by Mr. Paul Adams, Senior Training Supervisor, who is on the staff of the Industrial Relations Officer. The Public Works Officer his assistants and the Master Mechanic of the department offer their congratulations and WELL DONE to the employees and the head of divisions and branches who received these awards.
Preliminary grading and preparation of the site for the new swimming pool at the Trading Post Park area has been started and upon completion of this large community swimming pool, residents of Villamar, Bargo Point, Granadillo Point and Nob Hill will have opportunity to utilize, this large family type pool any time they have the urge to take a dip.
Sailor: "Gosh ,you have a lovely figure."
Wave: "Oh, let's not go all over that again."


The Fish Tale (s)

by P.G. Aldridge
What with that gol dinged tournament a bein over, seems as though a lot of you so called fisher folk has givin' up atryin' to land a big un. Course theres a few, namely Chief (Doc) Martin, FTG man. He went out to the old dry dock area and he done tied into thet big tarpon out there. Had him for about six good jumps, a couple of them horrendous leaps, and one big roll, and thats all she wrote. Sayanaro bobo. (That theres Japon-ese fer 'So long cat I'ma cuttin' out'). Could even have been the same one what wrecked Doc's spinning rig awhile back. Well, better luck- next time Doc.
All this here now rain should drive a lot of them there snook type fish done outen the river. When it rains ya know, thet river gets all riled and muddied up some, like the creeks back home, and them fool fish cain't find nothin' to eat. That makes fer some mighty fine fishin' in the lower river. Lots of them tarpon fish in the lower river and out in the Bay too. Ever's day you see them there mullet a jumpin' and a acuttin' some real fancy -like didoes atryin' to git away from them big fish but it don't seem to do em much good.
T'other evenin' a few of my friends was over to help me wrestle with thet one eyed Indian feller (I won't mention his name cuz he's a real devil on the warpath) and we'uns was atalkin' about fishin' in the States. Now I thought for quite awhile they was ajoshin' me when they said that they used to go up a river and telephone the fish. Said them fish would wiggle and shake right up on top of the water to em, settin' there in a boat, and just reachin' over and liftin' right out of the water. Shore did sound like a big ole down right sure enough lie to me but then they got to explainin'. You really don't talk to the fish ya see; you do a lot of crankin' but no talkin'. Seems as though you gotta have one of them there country type telephones with a lot of wire. Then you throw one wire outten one side of the boat and the tother wire out over a stump down in the water. Then you crank like a fool, ahopin' the warden ain't alookin', and all, that there juice you is crankin' up is a zizzin' anda sizzin' through the fish or just plain ticklesem to the point to whar they gotta git outten the water or bust but howsomeever, they come up to the top and all ya gotta do is reach out an' pick em up. Course it don't seem sporty to me; 'pears to me like that theres cheatin' a little bit. The law must feel the same 'cause they gotta a big fine and about thirty days in the pokey iffen you get caught adoin' it... telephonin' thet is.
Me, I'll just stick to my rod and reel, a lazian' along, waitin' fer some fool fish to come along and grab the bait. Theys just like a feller I know; shake somepin' pretty and tanatlizin' in front of him and he he'l make a passat it ever time, the durn fool.
Ron Seagle ain't heard much from you folks about that monthly tournament thing. It only costs a dollar and you spend that for a ticket to a wrestli'f match (thet one eyed 'feller again). Give him a ring at 9545. We gotta get this thing cranked up. Y'all come, ya hear ?


by Ed Talen, SN
PSYCHOLOGICAL WARFARE
by P.L. Linebarger
Here is a logical and easily readable book written to inform the American people of the importance of psychological warfare. Although the majority of Americans fail to realize it the United States is fighting a psychological war right now. In this book the author tells what psychological warfare is, what it does, how it is fought, and who fights it. Written smoothly and interestingly, it is a book well worth reading.
THE TROUBLED MIDNIGHT
by Rodney Garland
This is a novel centering around the sudden mysterious disappearance of two key British Foreign Office diplomats. It clearly shows the trouble caused' by their disappearance and the never ending search to locate them and to bring them back. A well constructed novel dealing with treason in high places, it is full of excitement that makes fairly good reading.
THE MARTIAN WAY
by Isaas Asimou
Dealing with Science Fiction is sometimes classed as bordering on Fairyland, but as man's ideas and ways progress towards conquering outer space, his "dream" becomes less fiction and more science. Nobody knows when we will conquer space, and what will be found in the other world, but meanwhile we have to be content in visioning what we will find there. Such is done in this interestingly written novel as the author depicts life on Mars and the fight by the Martians for existence.
THE DAY OF THE DEAD
by Bart Spicer
This is a fast moving mystery centering around a. Communist conspiracy in modern Mexico. It is the story of an American citizen who has an opportunity to betray his country for financial gain. A well written mystery, it has a tightly coiled plot that builds its own suspense.
THE TWO, JACKS
by Will R. Bird
This is the thrilling account of the stirring adventures of two Canadians-Jack Fairweather and Jack Veness-who were taken prisoner early in World War II. The story of their experiences as prisoners, their escape to the French underground, and their fast moving scrapes with death make interesting reading.
A sailor wandered into a tennis court and sat down.
"Whose game?" he asked.
A shy young Wave looked up hopefully and said, "I am."
Cutie: "I'll have you know I intend to marry an officer and a gentleman."
Sailor: "That would be bigamy, honey."


Saturday, 27 August 1955




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m m "&oers (JTMO Like The Sunskine" Vol. VI, No. 34 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 27 August 1955 MCB-1 Leaves Today CAPT W. B. Moore New For R. I.; Will Return Chief Of Staff At FTG To Gtmo In November Early this morning Mobile Construction Battalion ONE departed for their home base in Davisville, Rhode Island for a three month period of leave and reorganization training. The small but hard working unit left Guantanamo Bay after completing four projects and getting a good start on two others. The departure by MCB-1 is unusual in that there is no battalion relieving them. Due to the fact that MCB-8 was decommissiond and that the other See Bee battalions are tied upon on their own projects, MCB-1 will return to Gtmo in late November. This week saw the See Bees still hard at work finishing up and loading their necessary equipment aboard the USS Latimer (APA 152) which will transport them back to the States. Commanded by CDR J. A. Hiegel, MCB-1 first began work here as a battalion in late February of 1955. In the six months that they have been down here, they have complied an outstanding record of completing four projects-the power plant, ferry slip, and the rehabilitation of a pipeline on Leeward Point. In July they completed their fourth project, the 300 unit replacement housing located in Villamar, 92 of them being built by MCB-1. The See Bees would have finished many more units, but as it is they had to quit upon completion of the shells due to a shortage of building materials. They now have 60 shells in N. W. Granadillo and 26 more on Caravella Point ready for finishing. Scheduled to return in the latter part of November, the See Bees left a security force of 34 men who will keep a watchful eye on all MCB-1 equipment left here, and will also receive, uncrate, and prepare for use any materials which should arrive in that time. Upon returning, MCB-1 will undertake two more housing projects -a 60 unit Department of Defense project for Enlisted Men and a 40 unit project for married officers. CATHOLIC CATECHISM Registration for the new term of Catholic Catechism will be held Saturday 27, August at the Naval School, at 10 A.M. At least one parent should accompany the child for this enrollment. Classes will be held each Saturday at 10 A.M., commencing 3 September. Captain William B. Moore, U.S. Navy, relieved Captain Dana B. Cushing U.S. Navy, as Chief Staff Officer to the Commander of the Fleet Training Group on Saturday 20 August. Captain Moore and family arrived in the Guantanamo Bay Area on 19 August by FLAW after considerable difficulty caused by hurricanes "Connie" and "Diane". Captain Moore was accomcompanied by his wife, the former Vivian Douglass of Long Beach California and his three sons, Terry Moore age 7 (named after USS Terry DD-513), Robin Moore age 6, and William "Brig" Moore Jr. age 4. The new Chief Staff Officer attended high school in Ogden, Utah and graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in the Class of 1930. He has since served upon the following naval vessels: USS West Virginia 1930-1934; USS Panay 19351936; USS Claxton 1937; USS Buhanan 1939-1940; USS Savannah 1940-1941; USS Terry 1944-1945 and the USS Magoffin 1950-1951. In addition, Captain Moore is a graduate of the U.S. Navy Post Graduate School in Ordnance Engineering and has had two tours of duty in the Bureau of Ordnance plus several tours of duty as a Staff Officer. He has just left a 2 year tour with the Atomic Energy Division of OpNav. Captain Moore's most exciting duty was as Commanding Officer of the USS Terry (DD-513) which saw considerable action and was severely damaged by a Japanese Shore Battery at Iwo Jima. For this action he was awarded the Bronze Star. Mr. Albert Pratt Asst SecNav Now Touring Naval Base Mr. Albert Pratt, Assistant Secretary of the Navy of Personnel and Reserve Forces arrived here Thursday for a tour of the Naval Base. Mr. Pratt will be on the base until Monday morning when he will depart with Cruise "Baker" aboard the USS Wilkinson (DL 5) for Norfolk, Va. A native of Massachusetts, Mr. Pratt was sworn in as Assistant Secretary of the Navy on 4 October, 1954. During the war Mr. Pratt saw service on the staff of Admiral Nimitz in the Pacific. In addition he also served aboard the battleship Texas as gunnery officer. Mr. Pratt holds the Legion of Merit Medal, the Naval Reserve Medal, the American Defense Medal, the American Theatre and Asiatic-Pacific Theatre Medals, and the World War II Victor" Medal. LTJG W. N. Perry, Officer-in-Charge of FasRon SIX stationed at Leeward Point holds inspection of his group. This group of men hold maintenance check on all Fleet Aircraft during their maneuvers here at Guantanamo Bay area. New Hospital Construction 'Mr. Chairman' Set Progressing At Fast Clip; Completion Due In June For Sept. 30-Oct, 6 Construction on the new 100 bed Naval Base Hospital is continuing at a fast clip. The hospital, located on Caravella Point, will be one of the most modern of its kind, and when furnished will be a showplace on the base. To consist of a two story "H" shaped building, it will have the most modern of equipment and will be air-conditioned throughout. The two wings will be used as wards while the center will consist of the X-ray room, operating room, surgical wards, and offices. Made of reinforced concrete, the new building will be completely hurricane proof. Actual construction began early in February of this year, and the hospital is expected to be completed and ready for use by next June. Also under construction is a new garage, which will house the hospital's emergency vehicles, and nurses and corpman quarters. The nurses quarters and garage are very near completion and wait only the final finishing. The nurses quarters will consist of a one story building and will have a lounge and a snack bar and many other modern features. Construction of the new hospital is being done by Frederick H. Snare and Company. Most of the construction work done on the base by civilian corpo ations has been done by Snare. One of their more recent jobs, and also one of the biggest is the $3,500,000 hanger on Leeward Point which was commissioned last November. Rehearsals are presently underway for the forthcoming production of the Guantanamo Bay Little Theatre's own original play titled "Mr. Chairman". The script for this new venture for the Little Theatre group was written by director Alan Wagner and technical director Joe Lewis with Bob Albright and Bob DeVour doing the music. "Mr. Chairman" a slapstick musical comedy, is scheduled to open at Marina Point Community Auditorium on 30 September, and is guaranteed to be full of hilarious happenings throughout the entire three acts. Rehearsals have been underway for approximately two weeks, and according to director Alan Wagner, the cast for "Mr. Chairman" which totals 40 people, is coming along very good and looks very promising. Through the efforts of CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Offier, Naval Station, 100 new web chairs have been acquired for the comfort of the audiences attending the seven night run of "Mr. Chairman." So for all of you who like a good stage production, make sure that you mark the date of 30 September on your calendar. Don't miss it. Let your sense of humor and also your imagination run away with themselves and attend one of the big performances of "Mr. Chairman". You'll never regret it.

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Saturday, 27 August 1955 THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as posible factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM EDMUND B. TAYLOR, Commander Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Editorial Staff LTJG J. D. Byerley ----------------------------------Officer-Advisor G. L. Henderson, JOC ---------------------------------------Editor D. C. Roberts, JOSN ------------------------------Managing Editor E. J. Talen, SN -------------------------------------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Materials marked AFPS may be used by any news medium provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part, with or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. Base Golf Championship Sunday, 28 August 1955 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800: 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Sabbath Services Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner It When a baseball player in a crucial game makes an error, he can't go back and try it again. When the right end of a football team drops a pass within the end zone, he can't say: "Let's take that again." Once the error or fumble is made-that's it. In a much larger sense the same is true in living. We do not get the chance to go back and do things over again in a different way, just because we made a mistake. The game of life-that's it is called. But it should not be confused with pure sport. Fumbles and errors are part of life; however the important factor is that we are, or should be, "masters of our destiny"-because we are, or should be, in control of our actions. The man who on the spur of the moment drives out to a Gretna Green and gets married without considering the obligations and responsibilities of marriage can't just say: "let's forget the whole On Sunday, 28 August at 0700 Lee Rogers (NAS) and Peddycord (VU-10) will tee off for the first 18 holes of a 36 hole match to determine who will wear the crown of "King" of the Guantanamo golfers for 1955. The second 18 holes for the Guantanamo championship will commence at 1300. Spectators are cordially invited to accompany the matches. In the First Flight, CHMACH Bush (AFDL-47) advanced to the final round along with Sherlacher (NAS). The Second Flight finalists are Campbell (VU-10) and LT Noga (FTG). In the Third Flight, CDR Skaddowski (FTG) takes Arnold. The Fourth Flight was won by B. E. Smith who defeated Choate to captur ehte prize for this event. Ithe Consolation Flight, Broughtor (NS) meets Wilson. The Scotch Foursome event has been cancelled for 28 August to permit the play-off of the Championship Flight. thing." The man who stays AOL can't replace himself on the station for the days he was gone. The man who acts as if a liberty pass is a dispensation from all duty and obligation is living in a paradise-yes, of a fool. Every day's living must be accepted as final. We live our lives but once and we do not have a chance to rehearse them or try out different patterns. It is, therefore, sensible to do some thinking before we act, and be sure that whatever we do will be the best, not only for our moment's pleasure but in the long run as well, for ourselves for our families, and for our friends. If, as Eddie Guest puts it, we "don't want to go out with the setting sun and hate ourselves for the things we've done," it's a good idea to look before we leap. It is far better to omit some momentary pleasure than to be sorry permanently. Jerome J. Sullivan Chapsain Teenage Round-up by Sylvia Cavanaugh & Delorice Kinchen Friday night at the Villamar dance all the kats and chic's had a grand ball. The girls that went to the Midshipman dance also had a good time (so I heard.) Our Cake Sale for the Middies didn't do as good as we thought, huh Judy? But all the Teenagers that were at the club that day had a good1 time. Your bud(e and mine Bob Pendleton left our little "rock" last Saturday night via FLAW (as usual). Bob has been on the base for several years and we will all miss his happy face. A welcome back is extended to our "Sweet Little Miss Pris" who returned last Sunday from her wonderful trip to the States. She just couldn't buy out all of the stores. and how does it feel to get "seasick"? Also returning on the Johnson Sunday was Maurice Morgan. Welcome back, y'all. The Lasiter family, Peggy and Barbara will depart from the "rock" tonight for the States. Good luck to both of you. DID 'JA SEE Peggy P. and Red eating candy kisses in Study Hall? ? .Phil K. doing the mambo, and Irv doing a jitterbug? ? .Gary's "ladyfish"? ? .Jere W's new theme song, "I've, Got A Lovely Bunch Of Coconuts"? ? ?. Marty Abernathy, a new sophomore girl that hails from Jacksonville, Florida?? .All the kids that stayed in after school on the first day? ? ?? .MaryAlice M. and Becky looking real cute these days??. Ronnie R. looking for a Biology book? ? ? ...All the girls in P.E. Class trying to open their lockers, because they forgot the combinations. PTA MEETING There will be a meeting of the Executive Committee of the Parents-Teacher Association next Tuesday evening, August 30th at the home of Mr. Burt Knight, 47A-RH, Nob Hill, at 7:30 P.M. All member are urged to attend. Hospital Notes by P. R. Haberstroh HEIRPORT NEWS It could be the weather, or the change of the moon, then again it might not be, but to all the readers of this article here are the facts. Since the first of August there has not been a single young lady in the hospital nursery, however five gents added there names to the Gtmo birth registar: Hal Craig to CWO and Mrs. Robert Pappano; Frederick Dale Jr. to AL2 and Mrs. Frederick Foster; Michael Lloyd to SN1 and Mrs. "R" McKinnon; Richard Davis to TE3 and Mrs. Richard Shenberger; Arthur Joseph to AL2 and Mrs. Joseph Bushey Jr. ARRIVALS Welcome to our most recent arrivals, namely LT Olga Segin, NC, reporting for duty from the Naval Hospital in Philadelphia. HMC W. F. Spears arriving from the USS Ross, off the USS Valley Forge came HMC August J. Bucki. Three other personnel came from the U.S. Naval Hospital, Bainbridge, Md., Peter Ouzonia, HN, David E. Shipley, HN, and Lester Medford Jr., HN. DEPARTURES Bon Voyage is extended to CAPT J. B. MacGregor, MC, who departed by FLAW to the Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Mass. Dr. MacGregor was our Executive Officer. Also departing by FLAW was LT D. L. Lawson, NC, and HMC Jefferson Dekle. Miss Lawson was transferred to San Diego Naval Hospital, while Chief Dekle received orders to report to the Naval Station at Key West Florida. SIDELIGHTS Blank faces were seen both before and after the examination for HM2. What McKnight needs is a wallet chain. A word of thanks is extended to all who put their time and skill in repairing the pool table in Junior Quarters. MEET THE STAFF Being here in Gtmo since June of 54 we meet our newly appointed Executive Officer CDR Louis E. Tebow, MC, USN. Dr. Tebow received his B.C. and M.D. degree at the University of Illinois, College of Medicine. In 1941 he received his commission as LTJG, and since that time Dr. Tebow has earned the following ribbons and medals; American Defense; American Theatre; Asiatic-Pacific (2-stars); Japanese Occupation; China Service (4-stars); United Nation; and Korean P.U.C. At present he is living here on the base with his wife and children Duncan and Mary Ellen. Beside being Executive Officer Dr. Tebow will continue as Chief of Surgery. THE TOWN CRIER by M. Gordon It may be wise for everyone to get their television sets in tune! Just a hint. In the near future an open forum is planned for the community. It will be held in the Villamar Lyceum and the Community Council is looking forward to seeing as many residents as can be there. Details will be announced at the Bingo Game Monday night. Have you been watching that your children aren't chasing behind the spray true? And you operators of vehicles behind the spray truck. do you wait until the fog is clear before proceeding? Give the kids a "brake". Anyone having any constructive criticism please contact your councilmen and give them the details and your ideas that may help the community. Below are listed the councilmen for your convience: J. B. Ralston, precinct #6, Qtrs. RH266D; B. H. Carr, precinct #3, CB27B; W. A. Schnake, precinct #5, RH603A; R. W. Twining, precinct #7, RH87D; M. Gordon, precinct #2, RH87A; G. Liveakos, precinct #4, DH636; T. L. Trimble, precinct A1, CB36B and R. K. Marshall, precinct #8, RH36A. Page Two m M THE INDIAN

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Saturday 27 Auust 1955THE Local Baseball Nine Win One, Lose One In Tournament Play The Guantanamo Navy All-Star team playing in the Southeastern Baseball Tournament held in Pensacola, Florida, took their opening game from the Corpus Christi nine by a score of 7-2 behind the fourhit pitching of "Mandy" Mandis, which eliminated the Texas team from the tournament. The local nine began with three runs in the first inning, two on "Chuck" Hunter's triple, and were never headed. Mandis and Corpus Christi's McDonald each rapped out two singles apiece. After defeating the Texas club, on the following evening the Gtmo team tangled with the defending champions Pensacola Navy Goshawks and were defeated by a score of 7 to 1. The Goshawks picked up 7 runs on 9 hits and left 11 men stranded on base. The All-Stars gathered their 1 lone run off 10 hits, committed 5 errors and also left 11 men on base. Winning pitcher for Pensacola was Marvel, losing pitcher, Edgar. Yesterday the local team was again scheduled to tangle with Pensacola in the double elimination tournament, but no information was available before press time. The teams will play each night until one club wins twice with the winners playing in the All-Eastern Meet which commences at Pensacola Monday. CDR Robert W. Williams, commanding officer, Naval Supply Depot, cuts the ribbon which officially opened the new Fuel Division Office located on Oil Point. Looking on is Carlos Cabal, Foreman, Fuel Depot. Brownie Scouts To Commence Regular Weekly Troop Meetings The regular troop meetings of the Base Brownie Scouts will commence the week of 5 September at the Scout Hut on Victory Hill. Questionaires have been circulated, but if anyone was missed and would like to attend the meeting, please call Mrs. Minard at 8621. Assistant scout leaders are still needed and anyone interested in helping out with the scout meetings, please call 8621. FTG Bulletin If your golf opponent suddenly starts shooting in the low 80's, check and see if he hasn't been reading a little pamphlet titled "How to Win at Golf". This short booklet, which has been going the rounds among FTG sod busters, seems to have the secret of how to get out of the 90's and if used with discretion could result in some miraculous scores. The departures from the Fleet Training Group this week have kept the Personnel Office people even busier than usual. Some of the Group's best liked people left for various places in various modes of transportation "Pappy" Lunsford, SO1, and family were very reluctant to be departing. To prolong their stay for a little while longer in Cuba, they are leisurely travelling vi-. their automobile to Havana. They intend ot enjoy the Cuban countryside on the way. The Lunsford family plans to take the ferry from Havana to Florida where "Pappy" will report to the Commanding Officer, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron ONE at Key West, Florida. It's slippers, pipe and a comfortable chair while watching TV and waiting for the mailman to bring that monthly check for William Stipek, MMC, of the Engineering Department Bill departed for the Receiving Station Norfolk, Virginia to be transferred to the Fleet Reserve and for release to inactive duty. FLAW was the mode of transportation used by the man "who did his share". Best of luck, Mr. Stipek. Dale Huffman, DCC, of the Damage Control Department is on board the USS Amphion AR-13 in a different status than that to which he is accustomed. Chief Huffman's ride this time is as a passenger instead of an observer. The Amphion is taking Huffman to New London, Connecticut where he will report to the Commanding Officer, USS Fulton AS-11 for duty. G un ner y Department's Pat Spelce, BMC, is in no hurry to report to his next duty station. Pat is taking the "Yippy Boat" to Miami where he will spend 30 days and then go to the West Coast where the USS Roanoke CL145 will be waiting for him. The TAD's for this week involved LCDR Christie who is going to Norfolk for two weeks of Guided Missile and Weapons Orientation School. Also on TAD is Charlie Runge, ET3, of Crane Hill who is at the Naval School ET (Airborne Early Warning), Class "C", Great Lakes, Illinois. Charlie will be gone for six weeks. Welcoming his wife back to Gtmo this week was George Partridge, YN2. Mrs. Partridge spent 30 days with her folks in Chicago. James F. Epting, EMC, and Victor R. Sorbal, BM1, arrived on board the USNS Pvt Thomas for what we hope will be a pleasant tour of duty. Chief Epting reported from Norfolk, Virginia from the USS Moale DD-793. Jim hails from Charleston, South Carolina where at present his wife Virginia and daughter Virginia Louise are awaiting the "word" to join him in Gtmo. The Chief enlisted in his hometown in 1942 and has had duty in both the Atlantic and Pacific Fleet serving on the USS Bannock ATF-81 and USS Catawba ATA-210. For a short time he attended Clemson College in South Caroli'.a. Albert R. Rade, PH1, Fleet Camera Party, poses with the 42 lt Tarpon which he caught at the mouth of the Fresh Water River on rod and reel. The tarpon 571/2" long and had a girth of 26". Rade took first prize in the tarpon class of the fishing tournament in the 1st division. VU-10 Prop Blast The KDC 77445, while on a small drones shoot last Monday, was slightly disabled and came limping home on one engine in the rough sea and thunder storms. LT Edward P. (Easy) Kellogg, the Small Drones Officer and Chief Petch, who is in charge of the KDC, were caught in the deluge which hit Gtmo. Nice sailing, fellows. The VU-10 table at the "0" Club on Saturday evenings is beginning to snow ball. There was a good crowd at the gathering last week and a very enjoyable time was had by all. Lets see some faces around the table this Saturday. "Movies are better than Ever" in Gtmo. They must be if people are willing to sit through an entire movie in a steady down pour for an hour. The Merzs, Blairs and Kaisers can give you the first hand rain-drop by rain-drop account of last Sunday night's movie. I should say cartoon. The AOQ Annex has 2 new occunants. They have no names as yet, but maybe someone can think of some. If so, contact LTJG A. L. Miller so that his two misplaced turtles-the size of half-dollarsmay be rightly chistened. The most recent description of the Drone Program's safety rides in the Red-Dogs, was made by LTJG Chuck King while directing a question to Fox Operator LTJG Dick Kaiser. Chuck asked Kaiser "Who is going to play drop me on the runway tomorrow?" The Chiefs have been seen whooping up swirls of dust at Hatuey Field practicing softball. They must be sharpening their batting eye for a return game between the Officers and the Chiefs. The Marine Corps Exchange will be closed for inventory during tl'e period 29 August thru 1 September 1955. The Exchange will open for business again on 2 September. Naval Station Exchange Constructing New Buildings For Planned Expansion The Navy Exchange is continuing their plan of expansion, and soon will start construction on two new buildings immediately behind the Naval Station Exchange. The buildings, which should be open for business by October 1st, will house both sales rooms and repair shops. Present plans call for moving the Cobbler Shop into the new buildings, and to put a portrait studio where the Cobbler Shop is now located. There will also be a radio and phonograph repair shop, and in the near future this will be expanded to include television and minor appliance repair. Also housed in the new buildings will be a cash register and juke box repair shop. The ground work work is now being laid, and construciton should begin in the near future. NSD Supply Line Jim Marsden will be leaving Monday to spend his vacation between Cape Cod and Boston. His chief interest will be clam chowder, Bay scollops, and Porter House steak. Have a nice vacation, Jim. Miss Josephine Hogg will be enjoying herself for the next two weeks in Jamaica visiting relatives. She left by plane from Santiago to Kingston and will return via Camaguey. Mr. & Mrs. E. M. Nichols have just returned from a three weeks stay in Wilmington, Delaware, and are once again making their home in Guantanamo Bay. SAN JOAQUIN HAD HIS DAY IN GUANTANAMO CITY LAST WEEK AND SO DID THE GANG FROM NSD. Many of our people were seen this past week participating in the gay frolicking fiesta at Guantanamo City. Among those celebrating the festivities were Chief and Mrs. Johnson-they were dancing the cha, cha, cha, in the street at Paseo. One of the popular carnival songs was "El hombre Marinero no se debe casar" (The sailor man should not marry) and there was Seaman Bob Peacock surrounded by lovely senoritas trying to convince them why a sailor man should marry. Mrs. Ruth Wilson was seen strolling ing down Carlos Manuel taking in the sights, and as we wandered over to the larger night spots, which were literally jumping with carnival excitement, who should we run into but CDR and Mrs. Williams; Lieutenant and Mrs. Larson; and Mr. and Mrs. Erickson. David Figueras was definitely one of the happier participants, and Edwin Heimer, after an hilarious evening of dancing in the streets, was forced to spend the night on the road stuck in the mud. All of the NSD personnel who went to the Guantanamo City Carnival reported that they had one of the finest and most enjoyable times of their lives. a THE INDIAN Page Three Saturday 27 Augus 5

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Navy-'DPPO-0ND-Gtmo.-2163 4m THE INDIAN M Saturday, 27 August 1955 MOVIES Saturday, 27 August THUNDER BAY James Stewart Joan Dru Underwater oil drilling in the Louisiana Bay area causes hard feelings between the shrimp fisherman and the drillers due to the danger to fishing operations. Sunday, 28 August WHITE CHRISTMAS Bing Crosby -Danny Kaye Two World War II buddies team as entertainers after 'the war, become involved with a singing sisters act, and find themselves in Vermont in search of a white Christmas .but no snow, which means no show. Monday, 29 August Public Works Chips by Vic. Gault The installation of a new and larger water clarifier at Water Plant No. 3 is nearing completion and lacks only a few minor parts, which are expected in the near future from the manufacturer, to go into operation. This new clarifier will greatly facilitate the processing of portable water in rainy seasons when the source of water becomes highly contaminated by marked turbidity. Now, without the clarifier, it becomes necessary to stop processing water at such times. This much needed improvement will be an asset to the Base and its dependents. The "Welcome Back" mat was rolled out this week to the Schnakes, the Morgans, the Adairs and the Sanborns. They returned to the Base on the USS Thomas from a well earned vacation at their homes in the States. Leaving for the States this week will be the Robinsons, the Petelers, and the McIntoshs, they also will be on extended vacation. Welcome back to those that arrived and a Bon Voyage to those that are leaving. Personnel of the Public Works Department, Heavy Construction Shop, Paving and Masonry Section, are preparing the site at the rea: of the Navy Exchange and the Commissary Store for additional structures which will be utilized by those activities for planned expansions. A STAR IS BORN A STR ISBORNDuring the period 16 August Judy Garland James Mason through 26 August several diviThis is the story of a young sons and branches of the Public singer, who through the help of Works Department and personnel a prominent star on the downgrade, assigned to them were presented becomes a picture star herself. In with Department of the Navy love she marries him and tries to Commendations for Prevention of keep him from his alcoholic weakAccidents. These were presented ness.to the several PWD divisions and ness.branches, in addition several emTuesday, 30 August ployees were presented with Safety THEAward pins for prevention of acTHE ATRESScidents and safe practices in perSpencer Tracy Jean Simmons forming their assigned duties. Some of the Safety Award pins This is the story of a young were for as much as 7 and 8 years girl who wants to go on the stage. perfect records. Also presented Her father is strictly against such were several Department of the a thing, and she has to try and Navy Certificate of Training. These overcome his objections. certificates are issued by the DeWednesday, 31 August apartment of the Navy through the Industrial Relations Department to SANTE FE PASSAGE employees who have satisfactorily completed the course of "SuperJohn Payne Faith Domerge visor Development Program" sponA frontier scout who cherishes scored by the Department of the an unholy hatred for redskins, and Navy, and are presented for each a half-Indian beauty who is fiercely satisfactorily completed period of determined to escape the kind of training. The program is conductpoverty that warped her unhappy ed by Mr. Paul Adams, Senior childhood carry on a feud during Training Supervisor, who is on a troubled wagon train trip Westthe staff of the Industrial Relations ward in the early 19th Century. Officer. The Public Works Officer Thursday,his assistants and the Master Thurday 1 Spteber Mechanic of the department offer THE LAVENDER HILL MOB their congratulations and WELL DONE to the employees and the Alec Guinness Stanley Holloway head of divisions and branches who The story of a large bank robreceived these awards. bery by one of the bank clerks and Preliminary grading and prehis attempt to peddle the gold. paration of the site for the new swimming pool at the Trading Friday, 2 September Post Park area has been started FRANIS JINSTHE ACS and upon completion of this large FRANCIScommunity swimming pool, resiDonald O'Connor Julia Adams dents of Villamar, Bargo Point, Granadillo Point and Nob Hill will A young soldier must go through have opportunity to utilize this the same physical fitness as his large family type pool any time female companions, when, through they have the urge to take a dip. clerical error, he is assigned to the Wacs. His action and the inSailor: "Gosh you have a lovely formation given him by his talking mule land him in the psycho ward fiue" before he is finally transferred to go a the right unit. that again." thog0 6Ags eea ii The Fish Tale(s) by P. G. Aldridge What with that gol dinged tournament a being over, seems as though a lot of you so called fisher folk has givin' up atryin' to land a big un. Course theres a few, namely Chief (Doc) Martin, FTG man. He went out to the old dry dock area and he done tied into thet big tarpon out there. Had him for about six good jumps, a couple of them horrendous leaps, and one big roll, and thats all she wrote. Sayanaro bobo. (That theres Japon-ese for 'So long cat I'ma cuttin' out'). Could even have been the same one what wrecked Doc's spinning rig awhile back. Well, better luck next time Doc. All this here now rain should drive a lot of them there snook type fish done outen the river. When it rains ya know, thet river gets all riled and muddied up some, like the creeks back home, and them fool fish cain't find nothin' to eat. That makes far some mighty fine fishin' in the lower river. Lots of them tarpon fish in the lower river and out in the Bay too. Ever's day you see them there mullet a jumpin' and a acuttin' some real fancy like didoes atryin' to git away from them big fish but it don't seem to do em much good. T'other evenin' a few of my friends was over to help me wrestle with thet one eyed Indian seller (I won't mention his name cuz he's a real devil on the warpath) and we'uns was atalkin' about fishin' in the States. Now I thought for quite awhile they was ajoshin' me when they said that they used to go up a river and telephone the fish. Said them fish would wiggle and shake right up on top of the water to em, settin' there in a boat, and just reachin' over and liftin' right out of the water. Shore did sound like a big ole down right sure .enough lie to me but then they got to explainin'. You really don't talk to the fish ya see; you do a lot of crankin' but no talkin'. Seems as though you gotta have one of them there country type telephones with a lot of wire. Then you throw one wire outten one side of the boat and the tether wire out over a stump down in the water. Then you crank like a fool, ahopin' the warden ain't alookin', and all, that there juice you is crankin' up is a zizzin' anda sizzin' through the fish or just plain ticklesem to the point to whar they gotta git outten the water or bust but howsomeever, they come up to the top and all ya gotta do is reach out an' pick em up. Course it don't seem sporty to me; 'pears to me like that theres cheatin' a little bit. The law must feel the same 'cause they gotta a big fine and about thirty days in the pokey iffen you get caught adoin' it. telephonin' thet is. Me, I'll just stick to my rod and reel, a lazian' along, waitin' fer some fool fish to come along and grab the bait. Theys just like a feller I know; shake somepin' pretty and tanatlizin' in front of him and he he'll make a passat it ever time, the durn fool. Ron Seagle ain't heard much from you folks about that monthly tournament thing. It only costs a dollar and you spend that for a ticket to a wrestlin' match (thet one eyed feller again). Give him a ring at 9545. We gotta get this thing cranked up. Y'all come, ya hear? by Ed Talen, SN PSYCHOLOGICAL WARFARE by P. L. Linebarger Here is a logical and easily readable book written to inform the American people of the importance of psychological warfare. Although the majority of Americans fail to realize it the United States is fighting a psychological war right now. In this book the author tells what psychological warfare is, what it does, how it is fought, and who fights it. Written smoothly and interestingly, it is a book well worth reading. THE TROUBLED MIDNIGHT by Rodney Garland This is a novel centering around the sudden mysterious disappearance of two key British Foreign Office diplomats. It clearly shows the trouble caused by their disappearance and the never ending search to locate them and to bring them back. A well constructed novel dealing with treason in high places, it is full of excitement that makes fairly good reading. THE MARTIAN WAY by Isaas Asimou Dealing with Science Fiction is sometimes classed as bordering on Fairyland, but as man's ideas and ways progress towards conquering outer space, his "dream" becomes less fiction and more science. Nobody knows when we will conquer space, and what will be found in the other world, but meanwhile we have to be content in visioning what we will find there. Such is done in this interestingly written novel as the author depicts life on Mars and the fight by the Martians for existence. THE DAY OF THE DEAD by Bart Spicer This is a fast moving mystery centering around a Communist conspiracy in modern Mexico. It is the story of an American citizen who has an opportunity to betray his country for financial gain. A well written mystery, it has a tightly coiled plot that builds its own suspense. THE TWO JACKS by Will R. Bird This is the thrilling account of the stirring adventures of two Canadians-Jack Fairweather and Jack Veness-who were taken prisoner early in World War II. The story of their experiences as prisoners, their escape to the French underground, and their fast moving scrapes with death make interesting reading. A sailor wandered into a tennis court and sat down. "Whose game?" he asked. A shy young Wave looked up hopefully and said, "I am." Cutie: "I'll have you know I intend to marry an officer and a gentleman." Sailor: "That would be bigamy, honey."