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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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"Goners "frFMO like lie Mski ne" Vol. VI, No. 32 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 13 August 1955


Second Middie Cruise CDR J A, Hiegel


To Arrive Thursday;

Will Stay Four Days
More than 1300 Midshipmen of the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps from 52 colleges and universities will arrive here in 12 ships of the Atlantic Fleet on Thursday, 18 August when cruise "Charlie", the second of the middie cruises to hit Guantanamo Bay this
-year, arrives here.
Commanded by Rear Admiral E. R. McLean Jr., USN, Commander Cruiser Division TWO, Cruise Charlie is made up of a task force of two cruisers, four destroyers, three destroyer escorts, and three high speed transport vessels.
Headed by the flagship USS Roanoke, the task force has undergone four weeks intensive training so far, and while in the Guantanamo Bay area will receive intensive instruction and engage in simulated anti-aircraft drills, battle problems, and shore bombardment exercises.
Cruise Charlie so far has visited Colon, Panama, and Havana, Cuba, since they left Norfolk in late July.
Other ships in company with the cruiser Roanoke are the cruiser Newport News, Destrqyer Division 341 composed of the Heerman, Hazelwood, Badger, and Stockholm three destroyer escorts, the J. D. Blackwood, Greenwood, and the Manuel, and three high speed transport vessels, the Burdo, Carpellotti, and the Kliensmith.
Once again the base facilities will go all out in order to entertain the middies. The Base Exchanges and Sports Shop will begin :night hours in order to handle the onslaught of souvenier buyers.
The schedule of the Navy Exchange retail activities, including the Retail Exchange, Sport Shop, Uniform Shop, Tailor Shop, and Soda Fountain of the Naval Station, and the Retail Exchange, Tailor Shop, Cafeteria-FLAW Terminal, Photo Shop, and the Cobbler Shop of the Navy Air Station, during Cruise Charlie is as follows: Thursday-18 August-1300-2030 Friday-19 August-1300-2300 Saturday-20 August-0910,-2030 Sunday-21 August-1300-2300
The hours of the Fleet Restaurant, Family Restaurant, and the Photo Shop for 18-21 August are: 1130-1330, and 1530-2130.
The Petty Officers Club will be closed down to base and fleet petty officers to facilitate the handling of cool drinks for thirsty cadets. Even by using the entire PO Club as a Midshipmen's Club, an extra bar will be set up on the lawn to handle the large number that will be coming ashore.
The Special Services Department is getting all its recreational facilities squared away as every effort will be made to give the midshipmen every possible chance at recreation.


Assumes Command

Of MCB- One
CDR James A. Hiegel, CEC, USNR, relieved LCDR Russel J. Rawson, CEC, USN, as the commanding officer of MCB-1 at a short ceremony held last Saturday,
6 August.
CDR Hiegel arrived here on 3 August via FLAW from his last command, MCB-8, which had been decommissioned. He has been a CEC officer since the beginning of World War II, and in civilian life operated a construction business.
In October, 1945, CDR Hiegel was commended by Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal for outstanding performances during the war. Again in 1950 he was commended in Orlando, Florida by the Chief of Naval Personnel, J. Roper for outstanding performance as commanding officer of Construction Battalion Company 6-11.
LCDR Rawson left shortly after the change of command ceremonies were held for Earle, Red Bank, New Jersey, where he will assume duties as Public Works Officer of the Ammunition Depot there.


Abel Barja, Leading Electrician, Public Works, receives a Meritorious Civilian Service Award with a star above the shield from CAPT W. R. Caruthers, CO, Naval Station. This is the second award of this type received by Mr. Barja. Recommendation for this award was based on Mr. Baria's outstanding rating in the last performanceratings.


800 Students Start School Aug. 22

Registration To Be Held Thursday

Over 800 students will have their last fling at summer vacation next week, and almost as many parents will breathe a sign of relief on Monday, 22 August, as the Naval Base School opens its doors for another semester.
The enrollment is expected to total about 850 por all grades (nursery through 12th grade), or" about 100 more than were enrolled last year, according to Mr. T. G. Scarborough, School Superintendent.
Registration for all -students will
take place on Thursday, 18 August, in the following rooms at the school:
At C mmissaryStre PNursery School-Nursery School on MaKindergarten - Kindergarten Building,
Victory Hill
First Grade-Building #92, Victory Hill
Second Grade-Room #18, Chapel Hill
Does Big Business Third Grade-Room #1, Chapel Hill
Fourth Grade-Room #11, Chapel Hill
Fifth Grade-Room #22, Chapel Hill
The Commissary Store commis- Sixth Grade-Room #21, Chapel Hill sioned its new self Service meat Seventh Grade-Room #8, Chapel Hill department recently with a grand Eighth Grade-Room #3, Chapel Hill Ninth Grade-Room #9, Chapel Hill
total of 6,329 packages of assorted Tenth Grade-Room #5, Chapel Hill cuts being sold in the first week Eleventh Grade-Room #4, Chapel Hill of operation. Twelfth Grade--Room #7, Chapel Hill
On hand for the opening of the Kindergarten enrollment is limitnew self service counters were ed children who will reach the CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Command- age of five (5) on of before 1 Janing Officer, Naval Station, CDR uary 1956. Age limit for the first V. J. Soballe, Executive Officer and grade is six (6) on or before 1 LCDR W. W. Davis, Officer-in- January.
Children may be entered in the
nursery school any time during the school year after they have reached the age of 2 2. Mr. Scarborough stressed the importance of presenting written proof of age for children entering either the nursery, kindergarten, or first grade for the first time. The child's birth certificate is desirable, but if the certificate is not available, a sworn affidavit, obtainable at the Legal Office of the base administration building, is acceptable.
Charges for the nursery school
and the kindergarten, which are LCDR Davis, left, explains the entirely self-sufficient, are $15.00 function of the new weighing and e self-sufficient, a 1 pricing scale to CAPT Caruthers a month for the nursery school and CO, Naval Station, and CDR V.J. $10.00 a month for the kinderSoballe, Executive Officer, Naval Station. (Photo by CWO J. H. It will be necessary for all pupils England.) to bring their immunization papers
_in order that the school may verfy Charge, of the Commissary Store. immunization against small-pox, They inspected the remodeled tetanus, typhoid and diphtheria at butcher shop and new weighing the time of registration. and pricing equipment. Information about daily schedLCDR Davis is quite confident ules, bus schedules, etc. will be that the effort put forth in pur- given at the time of registration. chasing the required equipment on School busses will not run on regboard from various manufacturers istration day. will eliminate the many meat prob- The teaching staff has been inlems previously confronted by the creased to 38 this year, with 23 patrons of the Commissary Store. new teachers being added to the
Mr. Davis wishes to express his staff as replacements for former thanks to the Public Works De- teachers who have been transferred partment for a job "Well Done." and to supplement the regular
- teaching staff.


I CATHOLIC HOLYDAY
Monday, 15 August, Feast
of the Assumption" of the Blessed Virgin, is a Holyday of Obligation for Catholics.
Masses 12 o'clock (noon) and j 5 P.M. in the Base Chapel.


This years teaching staff will consist of:
Elementary Pricipal - Jack E. Brown-Master Degree from Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida.
1st grade-June Beiland-B.A.,
from Central State College,
(Continued on Page Three)


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Page Two


T HF IN]IIAI


a....... In ,


Th fu 111e 6th, 7th, and 8t sailing\ by Sylvia Cavanaugh & .enttain all hand ,t e . e raceseof the stumier series were Delorice Kinchen Tha Judan s llsslonTQ ormndenr i [ haS 1o on I 6 August :ith the f ollow- , ell kiddhes ole column has as positive factor in promoting th~e-efficiency, welfare, and conte'ntmient "lhg-euls soel ndess fiers t ouhisk of personnel. som ew gossi nde this week, RADM EMUND ,B! .TAYLO, -:;. ,... CoO.de Thival R0o ACE NO. 7 :due to te e aure of the honoray ,EMCUba -A R Commander-N al Base,.Guantanamo It- CRCo =fin.-s _st-A. S. Archie ab'le Linda: Turston. Speaking of Bay, Cuba hie o-Stff2nd-H. , Henry nd-G. Leach Linda there's one gal everyone is CAPT G.M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff S u 3rd-B. Webber 3rd-Il. Struble gonna' miss. Last year in the CAPT WILLIAM R. T Ch.- NavalStation, Guantanamo 4th-H. 'Huf 4th-F. Meyer " brickyid", Linda coi'd beF-seen Bay, Cuba RACE NO. 8 bustling around trying to scrape pp Editorial Staff 1st-P. F. Wells enough news to put in our famous LTJG J. D. Byerley -------------------------------Officer-Advisor 2nd-G. A. Gardes paper, "The Arrow". Besides leG. L. Henderson, JOC --------------Edtor. 8rc-G. Leach ing editor of "The rOrow" she
D C. Roberts, JOSN ---------------------------- Managing Editor 4th- hipparoni Chairman of the Activities orE. J. Talen, SN-----------------------------------Staff Reporter Point Standings for races con- mittee o ,the Student 'Council,ducted trough. 6 gust ae: voted it". and, B.t'Al,
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station accordance N. OF 'TOTAL Round Girlo
with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropri- SKIPPER RACES POINTS could also beseen stumbling around( ated funds., A. S. Archie 3 .5 on the stage of thteLit.le Theati 'Mateiail marked AFPS may be used by any news medium provided C. R. Collins 3 13 as the school put on its 'annia credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may 'not be used. All G. Leach 3 11 Junior-Senior play, material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part, J. W. Furlong: " 2 9 'Wednesday night of last wee, with or without credit. F.P. Wells 2 9 everyone had a ball at Becky's 'All lihotographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless'Otherwise credited. B. Weber 2 8 paity, What was goin' on in the G. A, Gardes 2 8 kitchen, Edgar and Irv? ? .I
H.. B. Henry 2 .. 7 couldn't have been a private party
H. Huff 2 '6 of spin the 'bottle, could it ? ?....
Hospital N otes Annual Scout Circus F. Meyer 2 ,5 1 Did you hear Edwin and Dave
R. J. Matthews 1 3 playing the piano, Howard and
by P. R. Haberstroh M.R.Struble 1 '3 Pat W. spinning records, and HEIRPORT NEWS R. J. Harper 1 3 Ruben with the radio on"fill blast, ,Keeping at. a steady pace Sir At NA nl D. Lawson 1 2 all at the sane time. Very fa.sStork flew in with two young ladies At I|S Oeafpan namp A. Chipparoni 1 2 cinatin!.I! Pete and Judy haying, and one gent. The new members Races in the current series wil' a big secrt .., Jere W. and hisl of :the,: Gtmo Birth Parade are: The Annual Scout Circus will be held each Saturday aft~rioon snow capped shoes? ??,.. Anna. Marie to " EM3 and Mrs. commence at 1300 next Saturday, through 17 September, except that DID 'A SEE...... Herbert Bell; Mary Marie to FN 20 August 1955, at the Naval Air raceswill not be held on 20 and27. Tw g irls at Yateras River takand Mrs. Robert Boas; Robert Eric Station Seaplane ramp near the August. All holders of Guantan- ing a mud bath? ? ?. Don True
to LCDR and Mrs. Robert Minard. movie lyceum. This circus is held aro Bay Skippers Cards'are eligi- Akers a cute, little southen bell
ARRIVALS each year by the Brownie, Cubs, ble, andf-welcome to compete in, from; San Antonio,Texas? Sheis We 'wish to extend a hearty and Girl and Boy Scouts aboard the these sailing races. Call 8524 for visiting, her aunt, Mrs, Yarbro. "Welcomed Aboard" to LCDR Har- base to help raise funds for their information concerning these races. Welcome aboard.... Sylvia mah7 ry Edgar Rooker, MSC, USN, who respe ctive treasuries. lag a big hit with her father's reported for duty from the Naval Thereawill be three door prize Tr...,. Obh well, it won't cost iuch Hospital at Portsmouth, Va. Mr. offered of $50. $25. and $10 and State 0f Mn T fld der?.. Nancy H.and Anita S. Rooker will be our. new Admin- tickets can be obtained fron any being conceited, thinking they istrative Officer. HM3 Francis ;C. of the Scouts on.'the base for $.25 Spcial Election 12 Sept. would put Hollywood to shame.... Moore comes to us from the Naval each. woud.e. .same....u Supply Center,-N orfo1k iVa. In addition to rides and numer- The State of Maine will hold a i. being Pete's chauffer.... Que' Moore's home town is Philnnaelphia, ous booths, including a booth special election on 12 Septem-bei,'. Pasa Pete? ? ?.... Peggy P. having
B H F AUGU ST: where you can get home made cake, 1955, for the purpose of voting on big: troubles, but they are solved Six birthdays to be celebrated cookies and coffee, there will be a a proposed amendment to the con- now, huh Peg? ? ?.... Dolores R. Si ithisdonthare C. o.e B ero , 2 main show commencing at approx- stitution to claiify- voting by per- giving Phil K. and the kids in the this month are: C. R.Barorw, ws,. 2 imately 1600. All four scout units sons in the military" service. All movies .a: hard time??.... "It's August; M. A. Bilbow, 12 1AUgusf; will participate in the show And it servicemen who arequalified voters raining ice," says Phil! ! ! ..,'. All N. M. Nilsen, 14 August;. . . will last for approximately 1 hour. of Maine are urged toirequest an ofthe gang that was up to see Streetman, 18 August; Dr. L. E_ After which the drawing for the absentee ballot and to make their Linda off' last Saturday night? BQr, Tebow, 24 August; and R. A. Fred door prizes will be held. In order voice 'known in this election.' Any Voyage.... We welcome. R ph, ericks, 30 August. to win one of these door prizes written request for an absentee Eunice and Nancy Avila back Irom,
SIDELIGHTS you will have to be present at ballot for this election will be their journey to Los Estads Uni', Sober faces were seen as twenty-7 the drawing. honored; dos. . . two HN's took off Tuesday for. the
EM. 'Club to take the exailna- Come out and enjoy your self
tion for advancement to HM3. ... and help out the Scouts.
Three section liberty started for .. THE T1WN CRIER Special Departments....' McC61 B'as ' THE "' CRIER i in rnow geting t'week llntds " IL b G off in a row, so long to . sw-elI' Off,.: BaeLbry b .Gro


guy.... Edmunds where did you get 'the big red eyes you carried with you on Monday.... McKnight and the one o'clock punch. ... Pin-; cus ward coolie.
FLAW flight 223 on October 28, 1954 brought George J. Wosniak, HN, here to Gtmo. Prior to entering the service George- lived with,his parents in Buffalo, New York. On 25 May 1953 he entered the Naval- Recruiting Station at Buffalo and enlisted in the Navy to serve a minority cruise:. -After finishing his recruit training at Bainbridge, Maryland he was transferred to Hospital Corps School at Portsmouth, Va. Uponi completion of School, George moved on the Naval Hospital, Key West, Florida, where he stayed until coming here to Gtmo. At present he is working in the Dependents Clinic, and after hours may be. found in back of Junior Quarters lifting weights. ,With his date of discharge not until June of nexi year, George is not giving up his plans -for future.


Military base personnel have an' opportunity" to see Kingston; Port-: au-Prince, ,Santiago,. 'and 'other scenic spots by taking .advantage of the opportunity to travel:there on ships visiting these places over the Week-end. Check Wednesday's Papoose for" any last� minute changes. Ships going to liberty ports next week-end are: SHIP
USS Goodrich (DRR 831) PORT ' DATE Kingston 19-21 August USS K. D. Bailey (DDR 713) jl.ontigo Bay 19-21 August USS Turner (DRR 834)
Montigo Bay 19-21 August
Tipsy gentleman: "Hi babe, do you speak to strangers?"
Sweet young thing: "Certainly not "
'TTipy gentleman: "Then, shut, up.


The Bingo" Committee would like to take this opportunity to inform the community that Bingo will be played at the Villamair Lyceum on< Tuesday, 16 August instead of Monday, 15 August. On numerous occasions, many children have been noticed to be followin-the wake of the spray truck. Are your children off the street ,until the spray truck has gone from your street? For your children's protection, keep then from following in that fog. Have you-eonsidered the idea of sidewalks in Villamar on 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th: and 6th streets? This idea may become a reality in the immediate itcjprovided the residents are willing to contribute the labor invlyve" in building forms necessary for sidewalks and curbs. The council would like to havethe answers to a few questions: Would! you be -willing. to provide severl hours of your time in seeing' this project come true? If so, how may hours are you willing to contribute, towards this project-? What day could you be available? Type, of work you would most be suited for in this type of work? If you feel you would like to volunteer for this project and have no talent as to carpentry and cement pouring, .the council. feels certain, that you could be of some assistance in this project., Someone that has the "knowhow" 'is willing to show' those that aren' endowed with this sort of ability. Remember this project is for the benefit of the children and will certainly make your part of the community more eye: appealing. Don't forget the dance to be held at the Villamar Lyceum on the: 19th of August for all base residents and their dependents. Dancing from, 2000 to 2400'with music by Delgado and his orchestra wti the dance, team of .Tony and Mary to provide several specialty, danCes such as the Cha Cha Cha, Mambo, etc. Admission by invitation only and the Jhviia-1 tions will be delivered to all residents of the Naval Base.
9


THE INDIAN


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Page Three


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 13 August 1955


Mrs. James Yarber pins the gold bar of Ensign on her husband as CAPT R. R. McCracken CO, Naval Air Station, looks on.


NAS Chief Receives
HONOR MAN

Temporary Appointment To Ronk Of Ensign


On Friday, 5 August, Chief Aviation Machinist James Yarber culminated 18 years of service in the Navy as an enlisted man when his temporary appointment to ensign became effective. Ensign Yarber was appointed to a commissioned grade by the Selection Board which was convened by the Chief of Navy Personnel on 16 March, 1955. The date of rank was 2 July but did not become effective until 5 August,
Ensign Yarber enlisted in the Navy in Jupe, 1937, and went through boot camp in Norfolk, Virginia. On July of 1943 he made chief, and shortly afterward received his wings, which were pinned on him on Friday, the 13th of August. Since then he has attended helicopter school at Ellyson Field in Pensacola. Florida, and presently flies mainly helicopters and other search and rescue craft.
In appears that Ensign Yarber was born to be a flyer, as the farm that he was born on May 18, 1920, is now the main runway of the Naval Air Station in Jacksonville, Florida.
Ensign Yarber is scheduled to leave with his wife Charity and 3 year old son James for duty on 30 August with the Anti-Submarine Helicopter Squadron No. 1 in Key West, Florida.


NAS Enlisted Men's Club
To Hold White Hat Dance
Monday Night, 15 August
The Naval Air Station Enlisted Mens Club, under the direction of T.N. Douglas, ADC, is having a White Hat dance on Monday, 15 August. Music will be furnished by the Naval Base Band, and there will be ample hostesses for everyones dancing pleasure. The dance will begin at 2030, and for those who wish to dine or have some refreshments beforehand, the club will open at 1700.


George Babcock, DC1, 1st Division, was selected as honor man at last Saturday's Naval Station inspection, which was held by CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station.


Captain Justin A. Miller, Commander, Utility Wing, Atlantic Fleet, is welcomed by CDR S. R. Stanul, Commanding Officer of VU-10, his wife Gloria, and CDR C. C. Stamm, Executive Officer of VU-10, as he arrived here for a short mspection tour.


Registration Cent.
(Continued from Page One)
Edmond, Oklahoma.
Helen Watts-B.A., from Iowa
State Teachers College.
Peggy Fielding - B.S., from Central State Teachers College, Edmond Oklahoma.
Grace Johnson- B.A., from Oglethorpe University, Atlanta, Georgia.
Dale Ward-B.S., from Appalachin State, Teachers College, Boone, North Carolina.
2nd Grade--Helen Clarke-B.A.
from Millikin University, Decatur, Ill.
Eloise Grant-B.A. from University of California.
Alfreda Syvinski-B.S. from Salem Teachers College, Salem, Mass.
Mary O'Brien-B.S. from Lesley College, Cambridge, Mass.
Alice MacArthur-B.A. from Bates College, Lewiston, Maine.
3rd Grade-Fay Yarbro-B.S.
from Texas State Teachers
College.
Doris Giddings - B.S. from Sam Houston State Teachers
College, Huntsville, Texas.
Gertrude Gordyce-B.A. from State Teachers College, Valley
Stream, New York.
Elizabeth Hoyser-B.S. from Oregon College of Education,
Mammouth, Oregon.
4th Grade-Jessie Penner-B.A.
from Western State Teachers
College, Gunnison, Colo.
Anna Easler-B.A. from University of South Carolina.
Thomas Chambers-B.S. from
University of Tennessee.
5th Grade---Dorothy Bush-B.S.
from Alabama Polytechnic-Intitute, Auburn, Ala.
Nellie Walker - B. A. from Womens College, University of
North Carolina.
6th Grade-Wave Hummel-B.A.
from Indiana University.
Carrie Howell - B. S. from Florida Southern C o 11 e g e,
-Lakeland, Fla.
High School:
Math and Commerce - Iraida
Davis-B.S. from Ball State Teachers College, Muncie, Indiana.
Librarian-Lydia Stagnaro-B.
A. from College of William
and Mary.
Social Sciences-Ruth Liveakos
-Masters Degree from University of Alabama.
School Registration
English - Madelon Schwartz
Masters Degree from Mississippi Southern College.
Girls Physical Education-Ann
Tillman-B.S. from University of Florida.
Boys Physical Education-William C. Naylor-Masters Degree from Texas Arts and Industries College, Kingsville,
Texas.
Spanish - Carmen Ward - B.A.
from Syracuse University.
Home Economics - Lois Young
- B. S. f r o m Pennsylvania
State Colloge.
Kindergarten - Lucille Burke
University of Southern California.
Ruth Groeneveld-Colorado
University, Graduate Nurse.
Shirley Talen-Calvin College,
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Eleanor Moschella-B.S. from Regis College, Weston, Mass.
Nursery School-Jean Blakeman
and Louise McNeal will again be in charge of the Nursery
School.


Jacksonville Reserve

Unit On Training Duty

Aboard Gtmo NavBase

If you have been seeing a group of officers making a tour of the base in the last -two weeks, more than likely it was part of the Reserve Unit here on training duty from Jacksonville, Florida. Consisting of 17 officers under the command of LCDR J.E. Kurtright, the Advanced Base Acorn Command Division 6-2 arrived here 31 July to gather data and experience that will be used in writing an A d v a n c e d Base Organizational Book. The Acorn Command Division has been working on this project for over six years, and as a group have made three trips to Davisville, Rhode Island, one to the Naval Air Station in Key West, Florida, and now to Guantanamo Naval Base.
The project itself is quite complicated, as the Division is given a location with no connective transportation ,and has to figure out the fastest and most economical way to set up an advanced base on that location.
The officers were assigned to various commands on the base to gain as much experience as is possible in their short stay here. As-


LCDR R. R. Rice, and LCDR J. S. McIntyre, attached to the reserve unit at Jacksonville, give the equipment of NSD the once over during their two week training
signed to the Operations Department of NAS were LCDR J. E. Kurtright, Commanding Officer of Division 6-2, LCDR H.L. King, Executive Officer, LCDR R. M. Schaughency, LT J.I. Hendesron, and LT W. N. Ross.
A unique feature of their trip here was when LCDR W. A. Stanul was assigned to VU-10. LCDR Stanul is a brother to the commanding officer of VU-10-CDR S. R. Stanul.
Assigned to the Public Works Department were four CEC officers: LCDR E. Eden, LT A. Frye, LT W. Daugherty, and LT M. Akel. CDR R. E. Byrd was assigned to the base hospital, while LT W. Lockwood was working at the Ordnance Department. The Provost Marshal had an assistant "sheriff" in LT R. E. Rourke. LCDR R. M, Proctor was assigned to Naval Station Communications while NSD claimed LCDRs J. S. McIntyre, and R. R. Rice. LCDR P. 0. McCoy spent his time with the Naval Station Special Services.
The Commanding Officer, LCDR Kurtright spoke for his division and said that they enjoyed their short stay here immensely. The division was very pleased with the cooperation shown them, and all were impressed with the fine facilities of the base.








THE INDIAN


Saturday, 13 August 1955


VU-10 Mallards Win Tournment Playoffs



All Guantanamo Team Leaves For Florida Today

by Joe Duffy.


The Mallards ot Utility Squadron Ten took the rubber game of the post-season tournament Monday night by defeating the Naval. Station Indians 5 to 3 in the season's most tensely fought'contest, to emerge the victors of the tournament play and become the 1955 CI.ampions. Manager Charles W. King of VU-10 was forced to call oin his ace pitcher, Gene Edgar, to pitch the final two contest with the runner-up Indian squad, and Ed came through with mound work seldom before equaled in this league. Finishing second in the regular season play behind Naval Station, VU-10 did not figure to present any threat in the post-season tournament due to the lost of their top hitter and pitching star, Bill Madden. In addition tQ - losing a .400 hitter, it meant that full seven games. The Mallards the pitching burden had fallen en- needed this one to win the title, tirely on Edgar. A situation such needed th e win to tay as this did not make the picture, th Indians needed the win to stay any too bright for the Mallard's in contentation. Naval Station chances. However, a combined team started their rally in eighth after effort to fill in the loss of batting two were out, when Haley gained power,. and Edgar's yeoman like first base on Postal's bad throw
powe, ad Edar' yeoan ike to retire him on what should have work on the mpQund not only over- toriehmonwasoudav came their loss but actually proved been the third out. Capitalizing on to be the winnlng spark they need- this break, the Indians scored the to e te nng srkw n e- tying and winning runs before the
Baseball takes an early depar- third out was eventually registered ture from the local scene as the as Shaffer walked, and McCowan abbreviated schedule comes to a and Morgan hit successive singles close. The schedule was shortened to counter two runs. VU-10 had

this year to enable this command broken into the scoring column to to field a team in the forthcoming take a 1-0 lead in the seventh insoutheastern conference tourna- ning as Ray Hall opened the inning ment being held in Pensacola, Flor- byp reaching first base on Petinaks ida, where the Guantanamo Bay misplay on third base. Hall adteam will represent the Tenth Na- vanced second on a sacrifice bunt, val District teams from the Sixth, stoled third, and reached home on Eighth and Fifteenth Districts. The a passed ball. Mandis pitched final teams will en- four inning to gain credit for the four representing winoverlEdgar. gage in a double elimination tour-' win over Edgar. nament, the winner to go on as H H E southeastern champion in the fol- VU-10 1 3 1 lowing tournament to determine NavSta 2 5 3 the East Coast Champions. The: Seventh game -VU-10, Naval East Coast Championship set will Station 8. get underway on August 29th, also * The VU-10 Mallards took the in Pensacola. final game of the post-season tourLTJG C.W. King of VU-10, will nament as they stopped a ninthtake the local nine to Pensacola, inning rally by Naval Station to as their officer-in-charge, and will' become the victors in another have LTJG Jerry Morgan of Na- thriller by these two teams. Gene val Station as player-manager, Edgar, Mallard's ace righthander, The squad will have Hunter and pitched brilliantly in notching his Kennedy for first base duty, Clark third win of the tournament. Edand Mandis at second base, Mor- gar's effectiveness was even more gan and Castellow at short, and apparent in the 'final inning when Postal and Keasey on third to the Indians loaded the bases after round out the infield. In the out- two were out on two infield errors field they will carry Wood, Ves- and an infield hit. The inning ended covi, Bland and McGowan. Tanzi, without a run scoring as Morris Ianiero and Skipper are listed as fielded Ianiero's ground ball to catchers .The pitching staff will force the runner at second. Trailconsist of Buss, Edgar, Stork and ing by a 3-2 score in the fourthMandis. The versatility of most of inning, the Mallards plated two the team members gives Manager runs on Merling's sharp single to Morgan depth at every spot. At right field scoring Hall and Edgar this stage it seems that his biggest from second and third base in base problem will be in picking the best in what proved to be the deciding combination. markers.
The team will depart this week- R H E end when they will board an R5D VU-10 5 7 6 transport at the Naval Air Station NavSta 3 8 2 for a direct flight to Pensaocla,
where they will have ample to get
in shape for the opening contest LadisGolf on August 22nd. We have no idea ies ol Shots what the strength of their opposition will be, but we can tell you by Audrey Page that Morgan's "Raiders" will bowl b A them over, because we think we We wish to welcome four new have a mighty fine ball team. Go members to the Ladies Golf Asget them "Big Team", bring home sociation. They are Betty Gardner, that blue ribbon. Etta Harville, Pru Aarts and BerPost - season tournament - fifth nice Doohen.
game-Naval Station 9, Marines A Low Gross-Low Net Tourna0 (forfeit). Sixth game-Naval ment was held last Wednesday. Station 2, VU-10 1. Winners were:
The Naval Station Indians threw 1st Flight -Low Gross- Mary the tournament into a tie when Goolsby-Low Net- Alma Mcthey came from behind in the Cracken. 2nd Flight-Low Grosseighth inning to score two runs Ann Forester-Low Net-Cynthia and edge out the Mallards 2 to 1 Holley. 3rd Flight-Low Grossin a closely fought contest, thus Doris Rothenberg - Low Net extending tournament play to the Sarah Brotherton.


RADM E. N. Parker, ComCruDiv SIX presents the golf trophy to CAPT F. S. Habecker ComFltTraGru; winners of the USS DesMoinesFleet Training Group Golf Team matches. FTG won the third match by a score of 29-7. Members of the team are, left ot right, standing, LCDR F. J. Pp,ton, F. S. Cohanski, ENC, CDR R. M. Ware, RADM E. N. Pal-ker, CAPT E. J. Burke, Capt. C. H. Smith, USMC, W. F. Malkowski, BTi, CAPT F. S. Habecker, CDR K. E. Skadowski LTJG W. M. Hyler, C* F. W. Singer, CAPT C. R. Adams, and E. C. Monte, QMC. Kneeling, CDR D.A. Scott, R. K. Wilson, QMC, CAPT 0. B. Murphy and LCDR M.F. Kuba


The Fish Tale (s)
Well, Monday sees the finish of the Guantanamo Fishing Tournam'!.nt for another year. so for you fishermen, or women, who haven't yet caught that winner, best get on the 'ball because time is really growing short.
The largest one to be caught so far this year in the Lournament is in the Shark Division sd hooked by G. J. Palm, FA, of the AFDL. The shark weighed in at 204 pounds and 100 inches in length and a waist of 42 inches. Chief V. A. Roberts, of NAS, still holds down the lead in the other division, with his 177 pound grouper, or jewfish, whichever it may be, which he caught at the mouth of the Guantanamo River. Lets have a look at the complete stalidings, as of 0800, Monday 8 August.
SNAPPER - GROUPER - JEWFISH Grouper 177 lbs. V. A. Roberts Snapper 57 lbs. D. Johnson Grouper 42 lbs. 14 oz. J. F. Robson
BARRACUDA
20 lbs. 8 oz. J. W. Wilson 17 lbs. 11'/_ oz. E.W. Watkins 15 lbs. 4 or. Sid Davenport
JACK - POMPANO Jack 20 lbs. E. D. Olson Jack 19 lbs. 14 oz. R. E. Seagle Jack 17 lbs. Mrs. D. Davenport
SNOOK
19 lbs. 6 oz. D. E. Thomas 18 lbs. 8 oz. R. E. Seagle 18 lbs. 1/ oz. Doris Seagle
LADYFISH - BONEFISH
Ladyfish 4 lbs. 6 oz. R. E. .Seagle Ladyfish 3 lbs. 15% oz. G. M. Ewing Bonefish 3 lbs. L. E. Hallman
CROAKER
1 lb. 3 oz. Mrs. HildiV Potts
1 lb. L. E. Hallman
MACKEREL
1 lb. 5 oz, A.D. Nelson
SHARK
204 lbs. G,. Palm"


Base Golf Championship
The first round winners in the race for the crown of Guantanamo's No. 1 golfer tightened their belts and backswings this week in the 2nd round play-offs of the Club Championships.


Winner Rogers Richards
Kidwell Adams LCDR Den Peddycord Doulin Gurka

Cohanski
Campbell Grabowski
CAPT Moe Dickson Roberts LTJG Byer LT Noga


Championship Flight
Loser
6-5 LCDR Kuba
6-5 Dr. Bryan 2 up Broughton
5-4 Clemons psey 3-2 Dustin
6-5 Harville 2-1 Wilson
1 up 20 holes Halentic
2nd Flight
2-1 Lackey 5-4 Payne 3-2 Corliss
6-5 CDR Soballe 8-7 LCDR Stowe
3-2 Savage rley 5-4 Hairston
1 up Kelley


3rd Flight
Arnold 5-4 Trotter Fuerst over CDR Rotehnberg LCDR Pierce
won by default Walker Dickson won by default White Kenyon 2-1 Jenkins Allen 6-5 Surges CDR Skadowski Bye
Consolation Flight Harville 3-1 Dustin Following now compose First Flight, matched as indicated: (LT Drace - Trytek) (Scherladher - LT Larson) (Latcbtara - CHPCLK Goolsby) (CDR Lawlor/CHMACH Bush - L T J G Morgan).

LARGEST BY LADIES
Snook 18 lbs. 11% oz. Doris Seagle
LARGEST BL CHILDREN Barracuda 7 lbs. 41/ oz. J. R. Page
SPEAR FISHING
Grouper 55 lbs. J. H. Dundore Grouper 43 lbs T. P. Ahlberg Spotted Jewfish 42 lbs. J. W. Kroger


Page Four


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Satrl-r IR1 Arivust 195 THE INDIAX1ag Fv


Ole Fire Inspector

Did you ever make a telephone call - nd think,; "G-osh it -take an awfully long time to get 'your party?
Well, are you sure you have the correct numbers? Did"you have to look-up the number in the phone book? .
If you know the telephone number, especially the:number ,of the Base Police, the 'Hospital or the: Fire Department it will cut the. time dawn to a bare minimum, and the call can be consumated without loss of time. It look to ime, like all emergency numbers should be memorized or these numbers be conspicuously displayed, where by, it would not be necessary to look for,'a phon'e directory for the numbers. Our view is, moments lost in reporting a .fire, are moments lost in combating same. The- first five minutes of a fire generally determines the loss caused by fire. Know how to report a fire. If by telephone, the number to call is 933. Take a look at your telephone, you will see in tie center of the dial, it says, "In Case of Fire Call 9333". Then it says "Your Fire Alarm Box is number so & so". Its nice to k ow what your fire alarm box iumber, is, but it is more important to know where the nearest'fire alarm box is located regardless of the number. If you should go to-a box and it does not have the, numbers listed on your telephone please use that box and don't try to find the "box so listed on your telephone. Regardless to the alarm box used, after yot "pull the box" remain there, and direct the fire ladders to the fire, inform them whats burning ad the, shortest route to the fire.
If the fire is reported by telephone, remain calm, be sure the fire di batcherd reeiv'es the location correctly, as per sample "There is a fire at Villamar, Building Number so & so".
All fires on the base are to be reported whether they are extinguished without the aid of the fire department or not. Be sure to call the fire' departinent in case of any and all fires.
There is a inan on duty 24 hours a day at the fire station dispatcher's office and: -will receive any calls properly made. Any delay in making. such calls could be caused by an improperly dialed phone. It could possibly be your fault in dialing.
Remember, in case of fire dial 9333, for business or any other reason dial 8222.
First aid fire fighting equipment, installed thru-out the base, is to be used after the fire department has been informed about the fire. Fire extinguishers are false security when used untimely and a fire could gain great head way by using them before the fire department is called.
To stop or control all fire lets all work as a unit.
Form a safe habit on Gtmo.

Absent-minded Prof: " Madam, what are you doing in my bed?"
She: "I like your bed, I like your house and-I like your neighborhood. Furthermore; I'm your wife."

Little Boy: "Ain't going to school, tomorrow." Mbther: Why not, dear?" Little Boy: "I can't read'n I cant' write'n 'they won't let me talk-so what's the use?H ....,


The runnerup team of the Ladies Bowling League proudly:display their trophies: Left to right. B :Nichols, M. Pugh, D, Aumann, S. Wenderlich, and T, Hollifield.


Four individual trophies were awarded in the Ladies Bowling League. Left to right: P. Way--High Score, F. Grounds--High Average, Nora Zaborski-Moskimproved, and' C. Godbout-2nd High Average.
t9


FTG Bulletin
Donald Vescovi, YN2, has been chosen to accompany the All Gtmo baseball team to. Pensacola for the Southeaster'n Championships. He is one man in the Group that ough to be "on the ball'I.
No news seems to be good news these days for the ASW Department. Undercomplemented as they are ini personnel, new orders are still coming in releasing "some of their top shipriders. On or about 1 September, LT Murphy will be leaviniW for his new assignment as instructor at the NROTC Unit, University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. Since the Murphys have their families residing in that part of the country, they are very pleased With this new billet. We wish you the best of luck on your new tour of duty!
"Pappy" Lunsford, S01, and Bill Mathis, S01, also in ASW, are both in receipt of orders to report to Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 1 at Key West. Twirlybirds here we come!
Due to return from leave in his home in Boston any day now is Chief Barter of ASW.
Softball practice has started for the Fleet Trading Group "Trainers". Some new blood has been added since the 'baseball season started and with a little more practice to eliminate errors they ought to do some damage this time.
Carl Meyer, FT1, left Tuesday for a normal tour of shore duty at the Fleet Gunnery and Torpedo SchOol, U.S. Naval Station, San Diego. He will be an instructor in Fire Control subjects.
LTJG Jeff B . Jones, joined the Damage Control Department: staff on Wednesday. LTJG Jones native of Forsan, Texas, entered the Navy in Houston, Texas in April 1953 and received- his initial training at the,: Officer's Candidate School, Newport, R.I. He has since attended Damage Control School in Philadelphia" and served on the USS Thomas E. Fraser (DM-24) from September 1953 until July this year. Mrs. Jones, also a native Texan, is making her home ,in Edenberg, Texas while awaiting housing facilities here. They are the proud parents of a two year old boy. Welcome to our happy home.
The Air Department is not so fortunate as Damage Control. CDR Scott, and family have departed via the air route for duty in Texas. The Scotts will be sorely missed by the whole Training Group and by many people on the Base.
The Fleet Training Group Officers'- Wives luncheon last Friday was one of the most exciting ever held. A quick downpour sent the participants scurrying for shelter, and we imagine that 40 ladies with wet hair was a sight to see. Despite the interruption an enjoyable time was had by all.
The TAD orders are still flying around. LT Darby returned from school in Norfolk in time to see LCDR Wild and LT Dent depart for the same area.
"Here's a photo of my wife. She's
the fattest woman I've ever seen."
"Who's that standing beside her?"
"Don't be silly, that's still my wife!"


THE: INDIAN


I Page Five





a,


Saturday, 18 August 1955


THE INDIAN


Navy-DPPO-10ND-Gtmo.-2163


MOVIES

Saturday, 13 August
MARTY
Earnest Borguine Betsy Blair
A butcher, who has never married, even though his friends and mother keep urging him to do so, meets a wall flower at a dance. In trying to arrange a date the bashful butcher goes through one hilarious escapade after another.
Sunday, 14 August MADAME CURIE
Greer Garson Walter Pidgeon Greer Garson, an aspiring young scientist meets and marries Walter Pidegon,,a scientist. Through their combined efforts, after four years of exhausting experiments, they discover radium and give it to the world free of charge. Walter Pidgeon is killed anil Greer Garson as Madame Curie, attempts to carry on their work.
Monday, 15 August
NAUGHTY MARIETTA
Jeanette MacDonald Nelson Eddy
A princess is being forced into marriage against her will. Before the ceremony starts she stows away aboard a ship loaded with women who are headed for New Orleans. The ship is overtaken by pirates, but the women are saved by settlers headed by Captain Warrington. The captain sets the princess up in his house and attempts to make her love him.
Tuesday, 16 August
GENEVIEVE
John Gregson Dinah Sheridan
"Genevieve" is the name of a 1904 vintage automobile belonging to a young barrister. He is a normal, happily married man in all respects excepting those pertaining to old cars. He and his friend enter their cars in the London to Brighton commeration run, a trip which ordinarily would take several hours, but in a 1904 Darraco, takes two days.
Wednesday, 17 August
FLAT TOP
Sterling Hayden Richard Carlson
An Air Group Commander and the carrier captain stand on a flight deck in Korean waters and recall arrival on the same carrier deck in 1943. The story moves through many exciting actions to the time of the strike to regain the Philippines.
Thursday, 18 August
VERA CRUZ
Gary Cooper Burt Lancaster
Two American freebooters in Mexico join Emperor Maximilian and his sweetheart to help them through rebel lines with their belongings. They discover that there is a fortune in gold in which Maximilian is trying to smuggle out of the country. There is plenty of trouble as the freebooters try to return the money to the rightful owners.
Friday, 19 August
TEN WANTED MEN
Randolph Scott Jocelyn Brando
After building a cattle empire in Arizona, a rancher finds his property being attacked by a gang


A trim young actress, who's picture would look very well adorning the inside of any sailor's locker door, is the lovely and curvavicious Jarma Lewis, up and coming starlet of Metro-Goldywn-Mayers Studio.


NSD Supply Line What's Doing Stateside


D. F. Lowe, SA, reported aboard on 2 August from the USS Pandemus. Lowe has been assigned to duty in the Issue Control Branch of the Control Division.
Ralph A. MacNeal, SK3, and William J. Devaney, SK3, were presented with Good Conduct Medsls by CDR R.A. Williams, Commanding Officer, NSD, in a recent ceremony.
K.J. Kadlez, SKCA, was recently transferred to the Receiving Station, Philadelphia, for a tour of shore duty.
Mrs. Margaret Emory, Cash Accounting Clerk left NSD, Friday, 12 August. Marge and her husband, Doug, are returning to the States and civilian life. A party was given in Marge's honor by the Depot girls to wish her and Doug much good luck in their new life.
J. N. Devereaux, EN3, and J. E.' Harris, SK3, departed for the good old USA to spend a 30 day leave with their families in Savannah, Georgia, and Dexter, Kentucky, respectively.
Robert H. Griffith, SK3, has been busily passing out cigars in celebration of his recent promotion to SK2. Congratulations, Griff.
Mr. E. M. Nichols, Storage Branch Supervisor, and his family are presently vacationing in Wilmington, Delaware.

of professional gunmen who are imported by a jealous next door neighbor. There is murder and the usual difficulties in the attempt to restore law and order.


According to an Agriculture Dept. project just finished-two people really can live as cheaply as one. Department experts cooked up a three-week diet research project with a young college couple as guinea pigs. The couple ate heartily of chuck roast, potatoes, carrots, cottage cheese, peanut, pancakes, cabbage, fish, eggs and other nourishing low-priced foods. They finished the project in good health and with no loss of weght. ... It boiled down to $4.28 a person a week.
The Handwriting Foundation, Inc. of America, is making a fuss oer the romantic aspect of the lost art of penmanship. But it's more concerned that poor handwriting is responsible for a loss of more than $70 million a year to U.S. business.... A midwestern telephone company lost $50,000
in a single year because of mistakes made by employees such as scribbling illegible figures and notations on call slips.
Since 1940, California has gained many more people through migration than any other state in the union. According to Metropolitan Life Insurane statistics, the net emigration o civilians to California averaged 35,000 a year from April 1940 through June 1945, when defense production was booming. Even in recent years, the average has been 284,00 a year. (AFPS)


GREAT HOUSE
by Kate Thompson
A story about a colorful family told against the fascinating background of two family estates near Capetown, Africa, offers some interesting and pleasant reading. Told with a sense of continuity, the author depicts a South Africa that is the opposite of the natural conception of Africa of an average American.
THE BLACKBOARD JUNGLE
by Evan Hunter
For those of you who have seen the movie which is adapted from this novel, not much has to be said, other than that the book is clearer and much more gripping. The first novel written to dramatize one of the top social problems of our day, it is written so that the reader is not only gripped by the plot, but also is forced to think seriously of the implication involved.
UNDERSTANDING
TEEN-AGERS
by Paul H. Landis
Basing his writing and reasoning heavily on the autobiographies of over a thousand college students, the author presents a book that is intended to be of help to both parents and teen-agers alike. Discussing such timely subjects as Dating, Religion and Moral Maturfty, Physical Growth and Moral Problems, the author is helpful in bridging the gap between parents, teachers, and teen-agers.
HOW TO LIVE 365 DAYS
A YEAR
by John Schnider MD
Written for those who feelhat they are not getting all out of life that they could, the author brings out a tested method for living with. out fatigue, fear, or nervous stress. Ps)ed on his lifes experience as a Mid-Western doctor, the author explains the six basic needs for living and how they can be fulfilled.
THE DARKEST HOUR
by William P. McGivern
A thrilling mystery, it centers around a framed cop who lost everything that he valued in lifehis career, his wife, and his reputation as an honest cop. Following the hero as he struggles to find and destroy the killers that framed him for murder, the reader finds a down to earth realism and an upward spiral of suspense that makes it an impressive novel.
IN PASSING . ... for all the fans of Western Fiction ...
Showdown Creek by Lucas Todd; Big T. Ramrod by Leslie Ernenwein; and Good-by to Gunsmoke by Ralph Catlin.

Master at Arms: "What's your job sailor?"
Sailor: "Locksmith, sir."
MAA: "What were you doing in the galley when we raided that dice game?"
Sailor: "Making a bolt for the door, sir."


Saturday, 13 August 1955


F




Full Text

PAGE 1

m VGoool .NaMv Bake at o Byubune" Vol. VI, No. 32 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 13 August 1955 Second Middle Cruise CDR J. A. Hiegel To Arrive Thursday; Will Stay Four Days More than 1300 Midshipmen of the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps from 52 colleges and universities will arrive here in 12 ships of the Atlantic Fleet on Thursday, 18 August when cruise "Charlie", the second of the middie cruises to hit Guantanamo Bay this year, arrives here. Commanded by Rear Admiral E. R. McLean Jr., USN, Commander Cruiser Division TWO, Cruise Charlie is made up of a task force of two cruisers, four destroyers, three destroyer escorts, and three high speed transport vessels. Headed by the flagship USS Roanoke, the task force has undergone four weeks intensive training so far, and while in the Guantanamo Bay area will receive intensive instruction and engage in simulated anti-aircraft drills, battle problems, and shore bombardment exercises. Cruise Charlie so far has visited Colon, Panama, and Havana, Cuba, since they left Norfolk in late July. Other ships in company with the cruiser Roanoke are the cruiser Newport News, Destroyer Division 341 composed of the Heerman, Hazelwood, Badger, and Stockholm three destroyer escorts, the J. D. Blackwood, Greenwood, and the Manuel, and three high speed transport vessels, the Burdo, Carpellotti, and the Kliensmith. Once again the base facilities will go all out in order to entertain the middies. The Base Exchanges and Sports Shop will begin night hours in order to handle the onslaught of souvenier buyers. The schedule of the Navy Exchange retail activities, including the Retail Exchange, Sport Shop, Uniform Shop, Tailor Shop, and Soda Fountain of the Naval Station, and the Retail Exchange, Tailor Shop, Cafeteria-FLAW Terminal, Photo Shop, and the Cobbler Shop of the Navy Air Station, during Cruise Charlie is as follows: Thursday-18 August-1300-2030 Friday-19 August-1300-2300 Saturday-20 August-0910-2030 Sunday-21 August-1300-2300 The hours of the Fleet Restaurant, Family Restaurant, and the Photo Shop for 18-21 August are: 1130-1330, and 1530-2130. The Petty Officers Club will be closed down to base and fleet petty officers to facilitate the handling of cool drinks for thirsty cadets. Even by using the entire PO Club as a Midshipmen's Club, an extra bar will be set up on the lawn to handle the large number that will be coming ashore. The Special Services Department is getting all its recreational facilities squared away as every effort will be made to give the midshipmen every possible chance at recreation. Assumes Command Of MCB -One CDR James A. Hiegel, CEC, USNR, relieved LCDR Russel J. Rawson, CEC, USN, as the commanding officer of MCB-1 at a short ceremony held last Saturday, 6 August. CDR Hiegel arrived here on 3 August via FLAW from his last command, MCB-8, which had been decommissioned. He has been a CEC officer since the beginning of World War II, and in civilian life operated a construction business. In October, 1945, CDR Hiegel was commended by Secretary of the Navy Jaimes Forrestal for outstanding performances during the war. Again in 1950 he was commended in Orlando, Florida by the Chief of Naval Personnel, J. Roper for outstanding performance as commanding officer of Construction Battalion Company 6-11. LCDR Rawson left shortly after the change of command ceremonies were held for Earle, Red Bank, New Jersey, where he will assume duties as Public Works Officer of the Ammunition Depot there. Abel Barja, Leading Electrician, Public Works, receives a Meritorious Civilian Service Award with a star above the shield from CAPT W. R. Caruthers, CO, Naval Station. This is the second award of this type received by Mr. Barja. Recommendation for this award was based on Mr. Barja's outstanding rating in the last performance ratings. 800 Students Start School Aug. 22 Registration To Be Held Thursday Over 800 students will have their last fling at summer vacation next week, and almost as many parents will breathe a sign of relief on Monday, 22 August, as the Naval Base School opens its doors for another semester. The enrollment is expected to total about 850 por all grades (nursery through 12th grade), of about 100 more than were enrolled last year, according to Mr. T. G. Scarborough, School Superintendent. Registration for all students will Newte place on Thursday, 18 AuNeW M at uonier gust, on the following rooms at Nursery School-Nursery School on MaAt Commissary Store nde Pint Does Big Business od rade-oo Chpel Hill Third Grade-Roomo #11, Chapel Hill Fourth Grade-Rtoom #11, Chapel Hill Fifth Grade-Rocom #122, Chapel Hill The Commissary Store commissith Grode-Room #21, Chopel Hill sioned its new self service meat Seventh Grade-oom #8, Chopel Hill department recently with a grand Eighth Grade-Room #3, Chapel Hill depatmen recntlyNioth Grode-Rocom #19, Chapel Hill total of 6,329 packages of assorted Teoth Grode-Room #5, Chapel Hill cuts being sold in the first week Eleventh Grade-Room #4, Chapel Hill of operation. Twelgth Grode--Room ;7, Chapel Hill On hand for the opening of the Kindergarten enrollment is limitnew self service counters were ed children who will reach the CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commandage of five (5) on of before 1 Janing Officer, Naval Station, CDR nary 1956. Age limit for the first V. J. Soballe, Executive Officer and grade is six (6) on or before 1 LCDR W. W. Davis, Officer-inJanuary. DChildren may be entered in the n nursery school any time during the schoolyard after they have reached the age of 2/. Mr. Scarborough stressed the impotence of presentlag written proof of age for children entering either the nursery, kindergarten, or first grade for the first time. The child's birth certificate is desirable, but if the certificate is not available, a sworn affidavit, obtainable at the Legal OfStfice of the base administration building, is acceptable. Charges for the nursery school illand the kindergarten, which are lCs previsleofrteplain the etrl efsfiinae$50 function of the new weighing and ae nth frfthenrsr scol0n pricing scale to CAPT Caruthers, a mo nth for the Deind CO, Naval Station, and CDR V.J. O y, Executive Officer, Naval garden. Station. (Photo by CWO J. H. It will be necessary for all pupils England.) to bring their immunization papers .in order that the school may very Charge, of the Commissary Store, immunization against small-pox, They inspected the remodeled tetanus, typhoid and diphtheria at butcher shop and new weighing the time of registration. and pricing equipment. information about daily schedLCDR Davis is quite confident rules, bus schedules, etc. will be that the effort put forth in purgiven at the time of registration. chasing the required equipment on School busses will not run on regboard from various manufacturers istration day. will eliminate the many meat probThe teaching staff has been inlems previously confronted by the creased to 38 this year, with 23 patrons of the Commissary Store. new teachers being added to the Mr. Davis wishes to express his staff as replacements for former thanks to the Public Works Deteachers who have been transferred partment for a job "Well Done." and to supplement the regular teaching staff. TThis years teaching staff will E CATHOLIC HOLIDAY I4consist of: Monday, 15 August, Feast Elementary Pricipal -Jack E. aof the Assumption of the Boown-Master Degree from FlorBlessed Virgin, is a Holyday ida State University, Tallahassee, of Obligation for Catholics. lFlorida. Masses 12 o'clock (noon) and g st grade-June Beiland-BA., 5 P.M. in the Base Chapel. from Central State College, strs(Continued on Page Three)

PAGE 2

Saturday, 13 August 1955 THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM EDMUND B. TAYLOR, Commander Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Editorial Staff LTJG J. D. Byerley ----------------------------------Officer-Advisor G. L. Henderson, JOC ------------------------------------Editor D. C. Roberts, JOSN ------------------------------Managing Editor E. J. Talen, SN ------------------------------------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Material marked AFPS may be used by any news medium provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part, with or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. Hospital Notes by P. R. Haberstroh HEIRPORT NEWS Keeping at a steady pace Sir Stork flew in with two young ladies and one gent. The new members of the Gtmo Birth Parade are: Anna Marie to EM3 and Mrs. Herbert Bell; Mary Marie to FN and Mrs. Robert Boas; Robert Eric to LCDR and Mrs. Robert Minard. ARRIVALS We wish to extend a hearty "Welcomed Aboard" to LCDR Harry Edgar Rooker, MSC, USN, who reported for duty from the Naval Hospital at Portsmouth, Va. Mr. Rooker will be our new Administrative Officer. HM3 Francis C. Moore comes to us from the Naval Supply Center, Norfo 1k, Va. Moore's home town is Phihjtlelphia, Penna. BIRTHDAYS FOR AUGUST Six birthdays to be celebrated this month are: C. R. Barrows, 2 August; M. A. Bilbow, 12 August; N. M. Nilsen, 14 August; J. G. Streetman, 18 August; Dr. L. E. Tebow, 24 August; and R. A. Fredericks, 30 August. SIDELIGHTS Sober faces were seen as twentytwo HN's took off Tuesday for the E. M. Club to take the examination for advancement to HM3. Three section liberty started for Special Departments. McCormick is now getting two weekends off in a row, so long to a swell guy. Edmunds where did you get the big red eyes you carried with you on Monday. McKnight and the one o'clock punch. Pincus ward coolie. FLAW flight 223 on October 28, 1954 brought George J. Wosniak, HN, here to Gtmo. Prior to entering the service George lived with his parents in Buffalo, New York. On 25 May 1953 he entered the Naval Recruiting Station at Buffalo and enlisted in the Navy to serve a minority cruise. After finishing his recruit training at Bainbridge, Maryland he was transferred to Hospital Corps School at Portsmouth, Va. Upon completion of School, George moved on the Naval Hospital, Key West, Florida, where he stayed until coming here to Gtmo. At present he is working in the Dependents Clinic, and after hours may be found in back of Junior Quarters lifting weights. With his date of discharge not until June of next year, George is not giving up his plans for future. Annual Scout Circus To Be Next Saturday At NAS Seaplane Ramp The Annual Scout Circus will commence at 1300 next Saturday, 20 August 1955, at the Naval Air Station Seaplane ramp near the movie lyceum. This circus is held each year by the Brownie, Cubs, and Girl and Boy Scouts aboard the base to help raise funds for their respective treasuries. There will be three door prize offered of $50. $25. and $10 and tickets can be obtained from any of the Scouts on the base for $.25 each. In addition to rides and numerous booths, including a booth where you can get home made cake, cookies and coffee, there will be a main show commencing at approximately 1600. All four scout units will participate in the show and it will last for approximately 1 hour. After which the drawing for the door prizes will be held. In order to win one of these door prizes you will have to be present at the drawing. Come out and enjoy your self and help out the Scouts. Off Base Liberty Military base personnel have an opportunity to see Kingston, Portau-Prince, Santiago, and other scenic spots by taking advantage of the opportunity to travel there on ships visiting these places over the week-end. Check Wednesday's Papoose for any last minute changes. Ships going to liberty ports next week-end are: SHIP USS Goodrich (DRR 831) PORT DATE Kingston 19-21 August USS K. D. Bailey (DDR 713) Montigo Bay 19-21 August USS Turner (DRR 834) Montigo Bay 19-21 August Tipsy gentleman: "Hi babe, do you speak to strangers?" Sweet young thing: "Certainly not!" Tipsy gentleman: "Then, shut up. Sailing Club Info The 6th, 7th, and 8th sailing races of the summer series were held on 6 August with the following results: RACE NO. 6 RACE NO. 7 1st-C. R. Collins 1st-A. S. Archie 2nd-H. B. Henry 2nd-G. Leach 3rd-B. Webber 3rd-R. Struble 4th-H. Huff 4th-F. Meyer RACE NO. 8 1st-P. F. Wells 2nd-G. A. Gardes 3rd-G. Leach 4th-A. Chipparoni Point Standings for races conducted through 6 August are: NO. OF TOTAL SKIPPER RACES POINTS A. S. Archie 3 15 C. R. Collins 3 13 G. Leach 3 11 J. W. Furlong 2 9 F. P. Wells 2 9 B. Weber 2 8 G. A. Gardes 2 8 H. B. Henry 2 7 H. Huff 2 6 F. Meyer 2 5 R. J. Matthews 1 3 M. R. Struble 1 3 R. J. Harper 1 3 D. Lawson 1 2 A. Chipparoni 1 2 Races in the current series will be held each Saturday afternoon through 17 September, except that races will not be held on 20 and 27. August. All holders of Guantanamo Bay Skippers Cards are eligible and welcome to compete in these sailing races. Call 8524 for information concerning these races. State Of Maine To Hold Special Election 12 Sept. The State of Maine will hold a special election on 12 September, 1955, for the purpose of voting on a proposed amendment to the constitution to clarify voting by persons in the military service. All servicemen who are qualified voters of Maine are urged to request an absentee ballot and to make their voice known in this election. Any written request for an absentee ballot for this election will be honored. Teenage Round-up by Sylvia Cavanaugh & Delorice Kinchen Well kiddies ye' ole column has some new gossip finders this week, due to the departure of the honorable Linda Thurston. Speaking of Linda there's one gal everyone is gonna' miss. Last year in the "brickyard", Linda could be seen bustling around trying to scrape up enough news to put in our famous paper, "The Arrow". Besides being editor of "The Arrow",. she was the treasurer of the GAA, Chairman of the Activities Conmittee of the Student Council, voted "Wittiest" and Best All Round Girl of the Year. .Linda could also be seen stumbling around on the stage of the Little Theatre. as the school put on its annual Junior-Senior play. Wednesday night of last week everyone had a ball at Becky's party. What was goin' on in the kitchen, Edgar and Irv? ? It couldn't have been a private party of spin the bottle, could it? ?. Did you hear Edwin and Dave playing the piano, Howard and Pat W. spinning records, and Ruben with the radio on full blast, all at the same time. Very fascinatin! ! Pete and Judy having a big secret. Jere W. and his snow capped shoes? ? ?. DID 'JA SEE. Two girls at Yateras River taking a mud bath? ? ?. Don True Akers, a cute little southern belle from San Antonio, Texas? She is visiting her aunt, Mrs. Yarbro. Welcome aboard. Sylvia making a big hit with her father's car. Oh well, it won't cost much to straighten the dents in the fender? ?. Nancy H. and Anita S. being conceited, thinking they would put Hollywood to shame. Yes, it would be a shame'. Judy I. being Pete's chauffer. Que' Pasa Pete? ? ?. Peggy P. having big troubles, but they are solved now, huh Peg? ? ?. Dolores R. giving Phil K. and the kids in the movies a hard time? ?. "It's raining ice," says Phil! ! .All of the gang that was up to see Linda off last Saturday night? Bon Voyage. .We welcome Ralph, Eunice and Nancy Avila back from their journey to Los Estados Unidos. .. THE TOWN CRIER by M. Gordon The Bingo Committee would like to take this opportunity to inform the community that Bingo will be played at the Villamar Lyceum on Tuesday, 16 August, instead of Monday, 15 August. On numerous occasions, many children have been noticed to be followin the wake of the spray truck. Are your children off the street until the spray truck has gone from your street? For your children's protection, keep them from following in that fog. Have you considered the idea of sidewalks in Villamar on 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th streets? This idea may become a reality in the immediate future provided the residents are willing to contribute the labor involved in building forms necessary for sidewalks and curbs. The council would like to have the answers to a few questions: Would you be willing to provide several hours of your time in seeing this project come true? If so, how may hours are you willing to contribute towards this project? What day could you be available? Type of work you would most be suited for in this type of work? If you feel you would like to volunteer for this project and have no talent as to carpentry and cement pouring, the council feels certain, that you could be of some assistance in this project. Someone that has the knowhoww" is willing to show those that aren't endowed with this sort of ability. Remember this project is for the benefit of the children and will certainly make your part of the community more eye appealing. Don't forget the dance to be held at the Villamar Lyceum on the 19th of August for all base residents and their dependents. Dancing from 2000 to 2400 with music by Delgado and his orchestra wtih the dance team of Tony and Mary to provide several specialty dances such as the Cha Cha Cha, Mambo, etc. Admission by invitation only and the invitations will be delivered to all residents of the Naval Base. 9 Page Two m THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 13 August 1955 Mrs. James Yarber pins the gold bar of Ensign on her husband as CAPT R. R. McCracken CO, Naval Air Station, looks on. NAS Chief Receives Temporary Appointment AN To Rank Of Ensign On Friday, 5 August, Chief Aviation Machinist James Yarber culminated 18 years of service in the Navy as an enlisted man when his temporary appointment to ensign became effective. Ensign Yarber was appointed to a commissioned grade by the Selection Board which was convened by the Chief of Navy Personnel on 16 March, 1955. The date of rank was 2 July but did not become effective until 5 August. Ensign Yarber enlisted in the Navy in June, 1937, and went through boot camp in Norfolk, Virginia. On July of 1943 he made chief, and shortly afterward received his wings, which were pinned on him on Friday, the 13th of August. Since then he has attended helicopter school at Ellyson Field in Pensacola. Florida, and presently flies mainly helicopters and other search and rescue craft. In appears that Ensign Yarber was born to be a flyer, as the farm that he was born on May 18, 1920, is now the main runway of the Naval Air Station in Jacksonville, Florida. Ensign Yarber is scheduled to leave with his wife Charity and 3 year old son James for duty on 30 August with the Anti-Submarine Helicopter Squadron No. 1 in Key West, Florida. NAS Enlisted Men's Club To Hold White Hat Dance Monday Night, 15 August The Naval Air Station Enlisted Mens Club, under the direction of T. N. Douglas, ADC, is having a White Hat dance on Monday, 15 August. Music will be furnished by the Naval Base Band, and there will be ample hostesses for everyones dancing pleasure. The dance will begin at 2030, and for those who wish to dine or have some refreshments beforehand, the club will open at 1700. George Babcock, DC1, 1st Division, was selected as honor man at last Saturday's Naval Station inspection, which was held by CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station. Captain Justin A. Miller, Commander, Utility Wing, Atlantic Fleet, is welcomed by CDR S. R. Stanul, Commanding Officer of VU-10, his wife Gloria, and CDR C. C. Stamm, Executive Officer of VU-10, as he arrived here for a short 'spection tour. Registration Cont. .. (Continued from Page One) Edmond, Oklahoma. Helen Watts-B.A., from Iowa State Teachers College. Peggy Fielding -B.S., from Central State Teachers College, Edmond Oklahoma. Grace Johnson-B.A., from Oglethorpe University, Atlanta, Georgia. Dale Ward-B.S., from Appalachin State Teachers College, Boone, North Carolina. 2nd Grade-Helen Clarke-B.A. from Millikin University, Decatur, Ill. Eloise Grant-B.A. from University of California. Alfreda Syvinski-B.S. from Salem Teachers College, Salem, Mass. Mary O'Brien-B.S. from Lesley College, Cambridge, Mass. Alice MacArthur-B.A. from Bates College, Lewiston, Maine. 3rd Grade-Fay Yarbro-B.S. from Texas State Teachers College. Doris Giddings -B.S. from Sam Houston State Teachers College, Huntsville, Texas. Gertrude Gordyce-B.A. from State Teachers College, Valley Stream, New York. Elizabeth Hoyser-B.S. from Oregon College of Education, Mammouth, Oregon. 4th Grade-Jessie Penner-B.A. from Western State Teachers College, Gunnison, Colo. Anna Easler-B.A. from University of South Carolina. Thomas Chambers-B.S. from University of Tennessee. 5th Grade-Dorothy Bush-B.S. from Alabama Polytechnic Intitute, Auburn, Ala. Nellie Walker -B. A. from Womens College, University of North Carolina. 6th Grade-Wave Hummel-B.A. from Indiana University. Carrie Howell -B. S. from Florida Southern Col eg e, -Lakeland, Fla. High School: Math and Commerce -Iraida Davis-B.S. from Ball State Teachers College, Muncie, Indiana. Librarian-Lydia Stagnaro-B. A. from College of William and Mary. Social Sciences-Ruth Liveakos -Masters Degree from University of Alabama. School Registration English -Madelon Schwartz Masters Degree from Mississippi Southern College. Girls Physical Education-Ann Tillman-B.S. from University of Florida. Boys Physical Education-William C. Naylor-Masters Degree from Texas Arts and Industries College, Kingsville, Texas. Spanish -Carmen Ward -B.A. from Syracuse University. Home Economics -Lois Young -B. S. f r o m Pennsylvania State Colloge. Kindergarten -Lucille Burke University of Southern California. Ruth GroeneveldColorado University, Graduate Nurse. Shirley Talen-Calvin College, Grand Rapids, Mich. Eleanor Moschella-B.S. from Regis College, Weston, Mass. Nursery School--Jean Blakeman and Louise McNeal will again be in charge of the Nursery School. Jacksonville Reserve Unit On Training Duty Aboard Gtmo NavBase If you have been seeing a group of officers making a tour of the base in the last two weeks, more than likely it was part of the Reserve Unit here on training duty from Jacksonville, Florida. Consisting of 17 officers under the command of LCDR J. E. Kurtright, the Advanced Base Acorn Command Division 6-2 arrived here 31 July to gather data and experience that will be used in writing an Ad vanced Base Organizational Book. The Acorn Command Division has been working on this project for over six years, and as a group have made three trips to Davisville, Rhode Island, one to the Naval Air Station in Key West, Florida, and now to Guantanamo Naval Base. The project itself is quite complicated, as the Division is given a location with no connective transportation ,and has to figure out the fastest and most economical way to set up an advanced base on that location. The officers were assigned to various commands on the base to gain as much experience as is possible in their short stay here. AsLCDR R. R. Rice, and LCDR J. S. McIntyre, attached to the reserve unit at Jacksonville, give the equipment of NSD the once over during their two week training signed to the Operations Department of NAS were LCDR J. E. Kurtright, Commanding Officer of Division 6-2, LCDR H. L. King, Executive Officer, LCDR R. M. Schaughency, LT J. I. Hendesron, and LT W. N. Ross. A unique feature of their trip here was when LCDR W. A. Stanul was assigned to VU-10. LCDR Stanul is a brother to the commanding officer of VU-10-CDR S. R. Stanul. Assigned to the Public Works Department were four CEC officers: LCDR E. Eden, LT A. Frye, LT W. Daugherty, and LT M. Akel. CDR R. E. Byrd was assigned to the base hospital, while LT W. Lockwood was working at the Ordnance Department. The Provost Marshal had an assistant "sheriff" in LT R. E. Rourke. LCDR R. M. Proctor was assigned to Naval Station Communications while NSD claimed LCDRs J. S. McIntyre, and R. R. Rice. LCDR P. 0. McCoy spent his time with the Naval Station Special Services. The Commanding Officer, LCDR Kurtright spoke for his division and said that they enjoyed their short stay here immensely. The division was very pleased with the cooperation shown them, and all were impressed with the fine facilities of the base. U THE INDIAN Page Three

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Page Four Page Four THE INDIAN Saturday, 13 August 1955 VU-10 Mallards Wi n1 Tournment Playoffs All Guantanamo Team Leaves For Florida Today by Joe Duffy The Mallards oX Utility Squadron Ten took the rubber game of the post-season tournament Monday night by defeating the Naval Station Indians 5 to 3 in the season's most tensely fought contest, to emerge the victors of the tournament play and become the 1955 C ampions. Manager Charles W. King of VU-10 was forced to call on his ace pitcher, Gene Edgar, to pitch the final two contest with the runner-up Indian squad, and Ed came through with mound work seldom before equaled in this league. Finishing second in the regular season play behind Naval Station, VU-10 did not figure to present any threat in the post-season tournament due to the lost of their top hitter and pitching star, Bill Madden. In addition to losing a .400 hitter, it meant that full seven games. The Mallards the pitching burden had fallen enneeded this one to win the title, te on Edgarn .A situation such the Indians needed the win to stay as this t tre in contentation. Naval Station ga n de rw y o r th 29th started their rally in eighth after chanesW.However, a combined team were out, when Haley gained effort to fill in the loss of batting first base on Postal's bad throw power, and Edgar's yeoman like to retire him on what should have work onJthe m und not only overbeen the third out. Capitalizing on came their loss but actually proved dga Mallardae right e to be the winning spark they needthie brak t Inians chore the Kenedyforfirtcbsewu, tyingthi dwinnnth tournsamfentE ed to capture the base, third out was eventually registered aseall aslo a shrl dearasppafr inathed fiannin Mwen ture from the local scene as the the nd an lae thesbasesiafter abevated silcdul comesd, Ves and Morgnfl hit. sucesiveningee cobviland anhdue Mc to a to counter two runs. VU-10 had close. The schedule was shortened broken into the scoring column to this year to enable this command inkb a -2 score evfuthto field a team in the forthcoming ning at 10 allea s tphed te inw southeastern conference torna -ning Merls open sting mont weebeing he eld in Pensacola, Fob ecigfrtbs nPtnk dan whether Guantanamo Bay s o misplay on third base. Hall adteam will reprsen teTnhNvanced second on a sacrifice bunt, thisDstrit teems the Sth stored third, and reached home on Eihh n Feet Districts tasfothSithe' a passed ball. Mandis pitched final four representing teams will en: fin ret deciding gage in a double elimination tournament, the winner to go on as H E southeastern champion in the folVU1 3 1 lowing tournament to determine NavSta 2 5 3 the East Coast Champions. The Seventh game-VU-10, Naval East Coast Championship set will Station 3. get underway on August 29th, also The VU-10 Mallards took the in Pensacola. final game of the post-season tourLTJG C. W. King of VU-10, will nament as they stopped a ninthtake the local nine to Pensacola inning rally by Naval Station to as their officer-in-charge, and will become the victors in another have LTJG Jerry Morgan of Nathriller by these two teams. Gene val Station as player-manager, Edgar, Mallard's ace righthander, The squad will have Hunter and pitched brilliantly in notching his Kennedy for first base duty, Clark third win of the tournament. Edand Mandis at second base, Morgar's effectiveness was even more gan and Castellow at short, and apparent in the final inning when Postal and Keasey on third to the Indians loaded the bases after round out the infield. In the outtwo were out on two infield errors field they will carry Wood, Yesand an infield hit. The inning ended covi, Bland and McGowan. Tanzi, without a run scoring as Morris Ianiero and Skipper are listed as fielded laniero's ground ball to catchers .The pitching staff will force the runner at second. Trailconsist of Buss, Edgar, Stork and ing by a 3-2 score in the fourthMandis. The versatility of most of inning, the Mallards plated two the team members gives Manager runs on Merling's sharp single to Morgan depth at every spot. At right field scoring Hall and Edgar this stage it seems that his biggest from second and third base in base problem will be in picking the best in what proved to be the deciding combination, markers. The team will depart this weekR H E end when they will board an RIB V 5 7 6 transport at the Naval Air Station NavSta 3 8 2 for a direct flight to PenGsocla, where they will have ample to get in shape for the opening contest Ladies SGolf ts on August 22nd. We have no ideasGol what the strength of their opposition will be, but we can tell you by Audrey Page that Morgan's "Raiders" will bowl them over, because we think we We wish to welcome four new have a mighty fine ball team. Go members to the Ladies Golf Asget them "Big Teame", bring home sociation. They are Betty Gardner, that blue ribbon. Etta Harville, P Aarts and BerPost -season tournamentfifth nice Doohen. game -Naval Station 9, Marines A Low Gross-Low Net Tourna0 (forfeit). Sixth game -Naval ment was held last Wednesday. Station 2, VU-10 1. Winners were: The Naval Station Indians threw 1st Flight -Low Gross -Mary the tournament into a tie when Goolsby -Low Net -Alma Mcthey came from behind in the Cracken. 2nd Flight-Low Grosseighth inning to score two runs Ann Forester-Low Net-Cynthia and edge out the Mallards 2 to 1 Holley. 3rd Flight-Low Grossin a closely fought contest, thus Doris Rothenberg -Low Net extending tournament play to the Sarah Brotherton. RADM E. N. Parker, ComCruDiv SIX presents the golf trophy to CAPT F. S. Habecker ComFltTraGru; winners of the USS DesMoinesFleet Training Group Golf Team matches. FTG won the third match by a score of 29-7. Members of the team are, left ot right, standing, LCDR F. J. Pne'ton, F. S. Cohanski, ENC, CDR R. M. Ware, RADM E. N. Parker, CAPT E. J. Burke, Capt. C. H. Smith, USMC, W. F. Malkowski, B ., CAPT F. S. Habecker, CDR K. E. Skadowski LTJG W. M. Hyler, CVO F. W. Singer, CAPT C. R. Adams, and E. C. Monte, QMC. Kneeling, CDR D. A. Scott, R. K. Wilson, QMC, CAPT 0. B. Murphy and LCDR M. F. Kuba The Fish Tale (s) Well, Monday sees the finish of the Guantanamo Fishing Tournai:nt for another year. so for you fishermen, or women, who haven't yet caught that winner, best get on the ball because time is really growing short. The largest one to be caught so far this year in the tournament is in the Shark Divisicn and hooked by G. J. Palm, FA, of the AFDL. The shark weighed in at 204 pounds and 100 inches in length and a waist of 42 inches. Chief V. A. Roberts, of NAS, still holds down the lead in the other division, with his 177 pound grouper, or jewfish, whichever it may be, which he caught at the mouth of the Guantanamo River. Lets have a look at the complete standings, as of 0800, Monday 8 August: SNAPPER -GROUPER -JEWFISH Grouper 177 lbs. V. A. Roberts Snapper 57 lbs. D. Johnson Grouper 42 lbs. 14 oz. J. F. Robson BARRACUDA 20 lbs. 8 oz. J. W. Wilson 17 lbs. 11 oz. E. W. Watkins 15 lbs. 4 oz. Sid Davenport JACK -POMPANO Jack 20 lbs. E. D. Olson Jack 19 lbs. 14 oz. R. E. Seagle Jack 17 lbs. Mrs. D. Davenport SNOOK 19 lbs. 6 oz. D. E. Thomas 18 Ibs. 8 oz. R. E. Seagle 18 lbs. 11 oz. Doris Seagle LADYFISH -BONEFISH Ladyfish 4 lbs. 6 oz. R. E. Seagle Ladyfish 3 lbs. 15% oz. G. M. Ewing Bonefish 3 lbs. L. E. Hallman CROAKER 1 lb. 3 oz. Mrs. Hilda Potts 1 lb. L. E. Hallman MACKEREL 1 lb. 5 oz. A. D. Nelson SHARK 204 lbs. G. J. Palm 1 0 Base Golf Championship The first round winners in the race for the crown of Guantanamo's No. 1 golfer tightened their belts and backswings this week in the 2nd round play-offs of the Club Championships. Championship Flight Winner Loser Rogers 6-5 LCDR Kuba Richards 6-5 Dr. Bryan Kidwell 2 ip Broughton Adams 5-4 Clemons LCDR Dempsey 3-2 Dustin Peddycord 6-5 Harville Doulin 2-1 Wilson Gurka 1 up 20 holes Halentic 2nd Plight Cohanski 2-1 Lackey Campbell 5-4 Payne Grabowski 3-2 Corliss CAPT Moe 6-5 CDR Soballe Dickson 8-7 LCDR Stowe Roberts 3-2 Savage LTJG Byerley 5-4 Hairston LT Noga I up Kelley 3rd Flight Arnold 5-4 Trotter Fae rt over CDR Rotehnberg LCDR Pierce won by default Walker Dickson won by default White Kenyon 2-1 Jenkins Allea 6-5 Sarges CUR Skadowski Sre Consolation Flight Harville 3-1 Dustin Following now compose First Flight, matched as indicated: (LT Drace -Trytek) (Scherladher -LT Larson) (Latchtara -CHPCLK Goolsby) iCDR Lawlor/CHMACH BushLT J G Morgan). LARGEST BY LADIES Snook 18 lbs. 1% oz. Doris Seagle LARGEST BL CHILDREN Barracuda 7 lbs. 4 oz. J. R. Page SPEAR FISHING Grouper 55 lbs. J.5. Dundore Grouper 43 lbs T. P. Ahlberg Spotted Jewfish 42 lbs. J. W. Kroger THE INDIAN Saturday, 13 August 1955

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Saturda. 13l August 1955 THE INDIAN Ole Fire Inspector Did you ever make a telephone call and think, "Gosh it take an awfully long time to get your party ? Well, are you sure you have the correct numbers? Did you have to look up the nunther in the phone book ? If you know the telephone number, especially the number of the Base Police, the Hospital or the Fire Department it will cut the time down to a bare minimum, and the call can be consumated without loss of time. It look to me, like all emergency numbers should be memorized or these numbers be conspicuously displayed, where by, it would not be necessary to look for a phone directory for the numbers. Our view is, moments lost in reporting a -fire, are moments lost in combating same. The first five minutes of a fire generally determines the loss caused by fire. Know how to report a fire. If by telephone, the number to call is 9333. Take a look at your telephone, you will see in the center of the dial, it says, "In Case of Fire Call 9333". Then it says "Your Fire Alarm Box is number so & so". Its nice to know what your fire alarm box number, is, but it is more important to know where the nearest fire alarm box is located regardless of the number. If you should go to a box and it does not have the numbers listed on your telephone please use that box and don't try to find the box so listed on your telephone. Regardless to the alarm box used, after you "pull the box" remain there and direct the fire ladders to the fire, inform them whats burning and the shortest route to the fire. If the fire is reported by telephone, remain calm, be sure the fire dispatcher receives the location correctly, as per sample "There is a fire at Villamar, Building Number so & so". All fires on the base are to be reported whether they are extinguished without the aid of the fire department or not. Be sure to call the fire department in case of any and all fires. There is a man on duty 24 hours a day at the fire station dispatcher's office and will receive any calls properly made. Any delay in making such calls could be caused by an improperly dialed phone. It could possibly be your fault in dialing. Remember, in case of fire dial 9333, for business or any other reason dial 8222. First aid fire fighting equipment, installed thru-out the base, is to be used after the fire department has been informed about the fire. Fire extinguishers are false security when used untimely and a fire could gain great head way by using them before the fire department is called. To stop or control all fire lets all work as a unit. Form a safe habit on Gtmo. Absent-minded Prof: Madam, what are you doing in my bed?" She: "I like your bed, I like your house and I like your neighborhood. Furthermore, I'm your wife." Little Boy: "Ain't going to school, tomorrow." Mother: "Why not, dear?" Little Boy: "I can't read'n I cant' write'n they won't let me talk-so what's the use?" The Championship team of the Ladies Bowling League proudly pose with their trophies: Left to right are, V. Flood, A. Forester, W. Payne, M. Spelce, and R. Garaudy. The runnerup team of the Ladies Bowling League proudly display their trophies: Left to right. B. Nichols, M. Pugh, D. Aumann, S. Wenderlich, and T. Hollifield. Four individual trophies were awarded in the Ladies Bowling League. Left to right: P. Way-High Score, F. Grounds-High Average, Nora Zaborski-Mos improved, and C. Godbout-2nd High Average. 9 9 FTG Bulletin Donald Vescovi, YN2, has been chosen to accompany the All Gtmo baseball team to Pensacola for the Southeastein Championships. He is one man in the Group that ought to be "on the ball". No news seems to be good news these days for the ASW Department. Undercomplemented as they are in personnel, new orders are still coming in releasing some of their top shipriders. On or about 1 September, LT Murphy will be leaving for his new assignment as instructor at the NROTC Unit, University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. Since the Murphys have their families residing in that part of the country, they are very pleased with this new billet. We wish you the best of luck on your new tour of duty! "Pappy" Lunsford, SO1, and Bill Mathis, SO1, also in ASW, are both in receipt of orders to report to Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 1 at Key West. Twirlybirds here we come! Due to return from leave in his home in Boston any day now is Chief Barter of ASW. Softball practice has started for the Fleet Trading Group "Trainers". Some new blood has been added since the baseball season started and with a little more practice to eliminate errors they ought to do some damage this time. Carl Meyer, FTI, left Tuesday for a normal tour of shore duty at the Fleet Gunnery and Torpedo School, U.S. Naval Station, San Diego. He will be an instructor in Fire Control subjects. LTJG Jeff B. Jones, joined the Damage Control Department staff on Wednesday. LTJG Jones, native of Forsan, Texas, entered the Navy in Houston, Texas in April 1953 and received his initial training at the Officer's Candidate School, Newport, R.I. He has since attended Damage Control School in Philadelphia and served on the USS Thomas E. Fraser (DM-24) from September 1953 until July this year. Mrs. Jones, also a native Texan, is making her home in Edenberg, Texas while awaiting housing facilities here. They are the proud parents of a two year old boy. W-elcome to our happy home. The Air Department is not so fortunate as Damage Control. CDR Scott and family have departed via the air route for duty in Texas. The Scotts will be sorely missed by the whole Training Group and by many people on the Base. The Fleet Training Group Officers' Wives luncheon last Friday was one of the most exciting ever held. A quick downpour sent the participants scurrying for shelter and we imagine that 40 ladies with wet hair was a sight to see. Despite the interruption an enjoyable time was had by all. The TAD orders are still flying around. LT Darby returned from school in Norfolk in time to see LCDR Wild and LT Dent depart for the same area. "Here's a photo of my wife. She's the fattest woman I've ever seen." "Who's that standing beside her?" "Don't be silly, that's still my wife!" Saturday 13 Augus 5 THE INDIAN Page Five

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Saturday, 13 August 1955 THE INDIAN Navy-DPPO-1OND-Gtmo.-2163 MOVIES Saturday, 13 August MARTY Earnest Borguine Betsy Blair A butcher, who has never married, even though his friends and mother keep urging him to do so, meets a wall flower at a dance. In trying to arrange a date the bashful butcher goes through one hilarious escapade after another. Sunday, 14 August MADAME CURIE Greer Garson Walter Pidgeon Greer Garson, an aspiring young scientist meets and marries Walter Pidegon, a scientist. Through their combined efforts, after four years of exhausting experiments, they discover radium and give it to the world free of charge. Walter Pidgeon is killed and Greer Garson as Madame Curie, attempts to carry on their work. Monday, 15 August NAUGHTY MARIETTA Jeanette MacDonald Nelson Eddy A princess is being forced into marriage against her will. Before the ceremony starts she stows away aboard a ship loaded with women who are headed for New Orleans. The ship is overtaken by pirates, but the women are saved by settlers headed by Captain Warrington. The captain sets the princess up in his house and attempts to make her love him. Tuesday, 16 August GENEVIEVE John Gregson Dinah Sheridan "Genevieve" is the name of a 1904 vintage automobile belonging to a young barrister. He is a normal, happily married man in all respects excepting those pertaining to old cars. He and his friend enter their cars in the London to Brighton commeration run, a trip which ordinarily would take several hours, but in a 1904 Darraco, takes two days. Wednesday, 17 August FLAT TOP Sterling Hayden Richard Carlson An Air Group Commander and the carrier captain stand on a flight deck in Korean waters and recall arrival on the same carrier deck in 1943. The story moves through many exciting actions to the time of the strike to regain the Philippines. Thursday, 18 August VERA CRUZ Gary Cooper Burt Lancaster Two American freebooters in Mexico join Emperor Maximilian and his sweetheart to help them through rebel lines with their belongings. They discover that there is a fortune in gold in which Maximilian is trying to smuggle out of the country. There is plenty of trouble as the freebooters try to return the money to the rightful owners. Friday, 19 August TEN WANTED MEN Randolph Scott Jocelyn Brando After building a cattle empire in Arizona, a rancher finds his property being attacked by a gang A trim young actress, who's picture would look very well adorning the inside of any sailor's locker door, is the lovely and curvavicious Jarma Lewis, up and coming starlet of Metro-Goldywn-Mayers Studio. NSD Supply Line What's Doing Stateside D. F. Lowe, SA, reported aboard on 2 August from the USS Pandemus. Lowe has been assigned to duty in the Issue Control Branch of the Control Division. Ralph A. MacNeal, SK3, and William J. Devaney, SK3, were presented with Good Conduct Medals by CDR R. A. Williams, Commanding Officer, NSD, in a recent ceremony. K. J. Kadlez, SKCA, was recently transferred to the Receiving Station, Philadelphia, for a tour of shore duty. Mrs. Margaret Emory, Cash Accounting Clerk left NSD, Friday, 12 August. Marge and her husband, Doug, are returning to the States and civilian life. A party was given in Marge's honor by the Depot girls to wish her and Doug much good luck in their new life. J. N. Devereaux, EN3, and J. E. Harris, SK3, departed for the good old USA to spend a 30 day leave with their families in Savannah, Georgia, and Dexter, Kentucky, respectively. Robert H. Griffith, SK3, has been busily passing out cigars in celebration of his recent promotion to SK2. Congratulations, Griff. Mr. E. M. Nichols, Storage Branch Supervisor, and his family are presently vacationing in Wilmington, Delaware. of professional gunmen who are imported by a jealous next door neighbor. There is murder and the usual difficulties in the attempt to restore law and order. According to an Agriculture Dept. project just finished-two people really can live as cheaply as one. Department experts cooked up a three-week diet research project with a young college couple as guinea pigs. The couple ate heartily of chuck roast, potatoes, carrots, cottage cheese, peanut, pancakes, cabbage, fish, eggs and other nourishing low-priced foods. They finished the project in good health and with no loss of weght. .It boiled down to $4.28 a person a week. The Handwriting Foundation, Inc. of America, is making a fuss o'er the romantic aspect of the lost art of penmanship. But it's more concerned that poor handwriting is responsible for a loss of more than $70 million a year to U.S. business. A midwestern telephone company lost $50,000 in a single year because of mistakes made by employees such as scribbling illegible figures and notations on call slips. Since 1940, California has gained many more people through migration than any other state in the union. According to Metropolitan Life Insurance statistics, the net emigration of civilians to California averaged 385,000 a year from April 1940 through June 1945, when defense production was booming. Even in recent years, the average has been 284,00 a year. (AFPS) *0 OK N OOK GREAT HOUSE by Kate Thompson A story about a colorful family told against the fascinating background of two family estates near Capetown, Africa, offers some interesting and pleasant reading. Told with a sense of continuity, the author depicts a South Africa that is the opposite of the natural conception of Africa of an average American. THE BLACKBOARD JUNGLE by Evan Hunter For those of you who have seen the movie which is adapted from this novel, not much has to be said, other than that the book is clearer and much more gripping. The first novel written to dramatize one of the top social problems of our day, it is written so that the reader is not only gripped by the plot, but also is forced to think seriously of the implication involved. UNDERSTANDING TEEN-AGERS by Paul H. Landis Basing his writing and reasoning heavily on the autobiographies of over a thousand college students, the author presents a book that is intended to be of help to both parents and teen-agers alike. Discussing such timely subjects as Dating, Religion and Moral Maturity, Physical Growth and Moral Problems, the author is helpful in bridging the gap between parents, teachers, and teen-agers. HOW TO LIVE 365 DAYS A YEAR by John Schnider MD Written for those who feelhat they are not getting all out of life that they could, the author brings out a tested method for living without fatigue, fear, or nervous stress. Pe-'d on his lifes exnerience as a Mid-Western doctor, the author explains the six basic needs for living and how they can be fulfilled. THE DARKEST HOUR by William P. McGivern A thrilling mystery, it centers around a framed cop who lost everything that he valued in lifehis career, his wife, and his reputation as an honest cop. Following the hero as he struggles to find and destroy the killers that framed him for murder, the reader finds a down to earth realism and an upward spiral of suspense that makes it an impressive novel. IN PASSING ....for all the fans of Western Fiction. .. Showdown Creek by Lucas Todd; Big T. Ramrod by Leslie Ernenwein; and Good-by to Gunsmoke by Ralph Catlin. Master at Arms: "What's your job sailor?" Sailor: "Locksmith, sir." MAA: "What were you doing in the galley when we raided that dice game?" Sailor: "Making a bolt for the door, sir."


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