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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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9&~


-- G6oqers GTMO Like The Sunskine"

Vol. VI, No. 31 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 6 August 1955


_ __Base Begins PO Exams Tuesday


R. W. Dean, FT2, is congratulated by CAPT W. R. manding Officer, Naval Station, for outstanding work USS Ingraham.


Caruthers, Comin repairing the


Congress Passes NRP;



Affects Men In Service

Washington-Congress has passed a modified version of President Eisenhower's national reserve plan that exempts all men now on active duty from compulsory reserve training.
The reserve plan in its final form was a compromise measure drafted by a joint congressional committee after the House and Senate passed separate bills.
Men now in the service and veterans who were in the armed forces after June 19, 1951, will continue to have an eight-year military obligation. This includes the normal ready reserve time, but they will not have to participate in any reserve training program.
Their ready reserve obligation can be cut to one year, however, if they voluntarily enlist in the reserves for 12 months training. They would then be placed in the standby reserves and could not be called to active duty except in a national emergency. Some 200,000. veterans would be eligible for this program annually.
The act contains another inducement to obtain veterans for the reserves. Service secretaries could release men now in the armed forces after completion of 12 months active duty provided they LCDR R. K. Minard, team capagree to serve in the ready re- tain, presents the trophy won by
serves. Their combined active duty the base Pistol Team at Camp and ready reserve service would Lejeune ,North Carolina, to RADM have to total a minimum of four E. B. Taylor as the team looks on.
years. In the front row, from left to right
The main provision of the new are: N. P. Walters, MRC, LCDR act states that all men who enlist Minard, RADM Taylor, and CDR or are drafted after the reserve R.V. Peterson. In the back row plan is enacted will have a six- are: W. A. Fetters, ME3, J. B.


(Continued from Page Three)


Jocks, A01, and K. E. Schieble, ME 2.


Tests Given On 9, 16, 22 August
Its the time of year again, and in the next three weeks 504 men of the Naval Base will take the semi-annual examinations for advancement in rating to pay grades E-4, E-5, and E-6.
The first test-for pay grade E-4-will be taken by approximately 190 men on 9 August. The following Tuesday, 16 August, 195 men will try for the second class "crow", and the final test for pay grade E-6 will be held on 23 August for 157 men.
The examinations will be held in
three different places. Men from
The Bifle-Pistol Club the Naval Hospital, the Dental
Clinic, the Supply Depot, and the
Naval Station will be examined at
Io Sponsor Iurkey Shoot the Naval Station Enlisted Men's
Club. The men have been requestBetter get the old musket oiled ed to report to the E.M. Club no up and the shootin' eye in shape, later than 0745 for all examinaas you will have opportunity to tions. se both in the Labor Day Turkey Men from the Naval Air Station Shoot to be held on 5 September, and Utility Squadron Ten will take 1955. The shoot, to be held at the their examinations at the NAS new Rifle and Pistol range site, is galley commencing at 0800 Tuessponsored by the Guantanamo Bay gay com inat 080 TesRifle and Pistol Club and will be (lay. Examinations for the two opened to all hands, pay grades will be given at the
same time in the galley on the
A grand opening of the Naval 16th and 23rd of August.
Station rifle and pistol range at The Fleet Training Group and 0900 will start the day off, and will its allied commands will give all be followed by four shoots. Each three exaiinations on their reshoot will consist of five events, spective dates at 0745 in the libraand prizes will be given for ach ry of the Training Center. event. . The m o r n i n g examinations
The four shooting events will be:- hudb opetdb 10 n
1. A 50 yard pistol shoot in should be completed by 1100, and which any calir pistol swill in the afternoon, professional exwhich any caliber pistol will be aminations will be given to those allowed. reurn uh.
2. A 50 yard rifle shoot, 22 cal- requiring such.
iber only. The examiners-in the explana3. A 10 shot trap shoot, any tion before the test-will inform gauge is allowed. those concerned as to where they
4. A Turkey shoot-16 and 12 will take their professional tests.
Gauge shotguns only. The afternoon tests will begin at
______________1300 and should be completed by 1600.
Survey Of Industrial Hygiene The typing examinations for
Yeomen, Personnelmen, JournalSafely Now Being Conducted ists, Storekeepers, D i s bur s ing
Clerks, and Hospital Corpsmen will
Aboard OTMO Naval Base be held in the Naval Station PerUnder the auspices of the Base sonnel Office. At the same time Safety Department CDR Roland professional examinations for TeleE. Byrd is presently conducting a men and Radiomen will be held in survey of industrial hygiene safety the Base Communications Office. on the Guantanamo Naval Base. Results will become known on
Here on a two week training pro- 30 October and all advancements gram with his reserve unit from should become effective on 16 NoJacksonville, Florida, CDR Byrd, vember. who is employed in civilian life as
as an industrial hygienist at the
Naval Air Station in Jacksonville,
will be able to make real use of
his profession while visiting the
Base.
In his survey, CDR Byrd will
be primarily interested in potential
hazards, such as gases, solvents,


dust, noise, poor lighting, and other hazards that work a physical and mental strain on a workers health. His survey will exclude outside hazards as falling objects, and will deal with safety and medicine in close conjunction with both.
Arriving here on 31 July 1955, CDR Byrd will be conducting his surveys of the industrial areas of the Base until 13 Aug-st, when he will return to Jacksonville.
CDR Byrd expressed his appreciation of the friendly attitude and co-operation shown to him so far by the residents of the Base.


~Recently elected officers of the Holy Name Society are, front row, left to right, LT R. D. Colbert, CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, Mr. N. W. Huddy and Chief Forenchick. Back row, LCDR J. P. McFadden, LT E. P. McConnen and Chief Redman.


S









Page Two


THE INDIAN


THE


I


NDlAN


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
RADM EDMUND B. TAYLOR, Commander Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba
Editorial Staff
LTJG J. D. Byerley ------------------------------- Officer-Advisor
G. L. Henderson, JOC ------------------------------------ Editor
D. C. Roberts, JOSN ---------------------------- Managing Editor
E. J. Talen, SN ----------------------------------- Staff Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
Material marked AFPS may be used by any news medium provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part, with or without credit.
All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


Sunday, 7 August 1955

Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services
Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0930-Sunday School
0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Sabbath Services Christian Science
Sunday: 1000-Station Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)


The Chaplain's Corner




What Is Courage?
In the thick of the battle of life, in the midst of the insecurity, the baffling problems, the dire difficulties, the disappointments, we need courage. What is it?
A cat comes along the way and sees a dog. The cat arches his back, spits, and thus shows his defiance and displeasure. Is he showing evidence of true courage?
Bravado?
A father took his little boy for a walk one day. They tramped across a railway trestle. The father, thinking he might impress the lad with a real lesson in bravery, stopped in the middle of the trestle and said: "Son, if a train came along here what would you do?" He thought the boy might say he would crawl out on the end of a tie and hang over the water with his feet dangling. Maybe he might think of a place for the father also. But the lad said: "Oh, I'd just step off the track. hold out


MARINE MUSINGS

by Cpl. Paul A. Hoffer, USMC
DEPARTURES
Tuesday, 2 August, Pfc. Ronald G. Bilz departed for the states. Pfc. Bilz will report to Marine Corps Schools, Quantico, Virginia, for duty.
SPORTS - BASEBALL
Off to a good start in the playoffs the Marines defeated Naval Station 3-1. In the second game, played Monday night, the Marines dropped a 16 to 5 decision to the VU-10 Mallards.
ALL GTMO TEAM
1stLt. John A. Dowd, pitchermanager of the Marine Barracks Baseball team, has been elected to manage the All-Gtmo team to Pensacola, Florida. Six Marines will be on the team. They are: Chuck Hunter, Bill Wood, Joe Bland, Paul Hoffer, Earl Castellow and Phil Patton. The team is due to depart Guantanamo on 10 August.

my hand to stop the train, and then hold it out over the water and watch the people fall out." And then the boy added, I'd hold you in the other hand."
As they went further they eventually came to a large burned area. It was desolate. It seemed that there was not a living thing upon it. However, as they trudged on, the father was amazed to see one little red flower in full bloom amid all that desolation. "That," he pointed out to his little son, "is courage-real courage."
Keystone Of Character
No, courage is not arrogance in the face of danger. It is not bluff in the midst of disaster. It is that quality which causes us to produce in the center of desolation, difficulties, disaster. Courage might be called the keystone in the arch of character. It gives strength and stability to all our other qualities. If we are not brave, of what avail is our desire for honesty, or our hunger for purity, or our concern for righteousness? Courage is essential to give edge to our conscience, force to our convictions, and realization to our ideals.
Jerome J. Sullivan


40


Chaplain


Teenage Round-up

by Linda Thurston
The rompin' rhythm of Gtmo's favorite, Julio Delgado, set the gals and the middies into a frenzy that was supposed to be a mambo last Friday eve. at the middy dance held in the CPO Club. There were stag lines aplenty and their results were some mighty sore feet the next morning. Becky held old home week when she met some former classmates from Coronado High and Bobbie Frey received a message to "tell Chet that Zinc still loves him" (she's still looking for Chet). 'Nita was swamped with cashmere sweaters and Nancy found the ideal jitterbug partner. All the gals had a swell time and are looking forward to the next dance.
Dolores Rogoz has come back from her vacation in the states and she brought her "older" brother with her ... and we will take this opportunity to say he's a very nice looking guy. Welcome, you all!
Speaking of being back from the states, we've just about given up hope of ever seeing Eunice and Nancy Aviala again. We've been expecting them home for a month now and no luck yet. Here's hoping they'll tear themselves away before school starts (oops, I said that word... but really kids, the salt mines will open again on the 22nd of August!).
This week is the last week that I will be rounding up the teenagers for the INDIAN. I've been at it for nigh onto three years now, and I figure that Sylvia Cavanaugh and Dolores Kinchen will bring some new blood into the old column. Unless unforeseen difficulties arise (such as being bumped) I'll be heading for the promised land of los estados unidos tonight aboard the FLAW flight. To all the teen-agers I'd like to say thanks for the memories. DID 'JA SEE?????
"Red" and Dee Dee cleaning up after the mob had gone home last Sun.? ? ? .... Sylvia's good looking girlfriend from Gtmo, Jiacy, who was attacked by Jere W.'s over friendly dogs? . . . Down boys, down!.... The two new cats with crazy hair-cuts ... Freddy Swords and Ralph Sierra, Jr. ? ??? ?.... Peggy Lasiter's darling little newborn pupster that is so spoiled it has to be rocked to sleep????.... Howie sitting on Peggy Percell's lap all the way home the other night? ? ? ? ?.... Pat Fojt and Norm "together again", only this time Norm is here as a teen-ager and not a middy.... "Dirty" Heimer dancing with Ginger Shyver at the TAC the other Tuesday eve.??? .. "The Girls" having dinner at Marine Site?? .... Shar Keenan's cute new hair-do??? ... Pat Woods' new pen pal named Phil (not Keenan, thank goodness) ? ?.... Irv sweating away at his job everyday? He should get his Ditch Digging Degree out of all of this....


Hospital Notes

by P. R. Haberstroh HEIRPORT NEWS
Congratulations to HM3 and Mrs. Henry Keim upon the arrival of their third child, a boy Mark James. Other births recorded in the Gtmo Birth Parade gave the young ladies the lead, after two months of male supremacy. Our new members are: Pamela Louis to AT1 and Mrs. James Nolan; Garrison Owens Jr. to T/Sgt. and Mrs. Garrison Schuler; Carl Alfonso to BM3 and Mrs. Jamnes Billington; Allison Colleen to FT2 and Mrs. Gillifoid Sweeney; Susan Kim to BM3 and Mrs. Donald Berman; Sandra Kay to EN1 and Mrs. Robert Wolf; Rochelle Marie to ENI and Mrs. Harry DuBois; Melissa Victoria to LT and Mrs. Edward Kellog; Kenneth Walter to BMC and Mrs. Charles Wilson; Linda Ann to Sgt. and Mrs. Barnard Lee; Carol Ann to AB1 and Mrs. John Ingram.
ARRIVALS
Many new faces are to be seen at the hospital as a welcome aboard is extended to seven new arrivals. LTJG Jasper F. Rawl Jr., MC, who came here from MCB-1. Four of the seven new arrivals came from the U.S. Naval Station, Trinidad, British West Indies, LT Dorothy I. Schweiger, NC, LTJG Katherine Chadwick, NC, HM2 John McGurrin, and HM3 Donald Lapp. Arriving from the U.S. Naval Air Station, Anacostia, D.C. was HM3 William Miller, as HN John Nunn III came here from the Naval Hospital at Camp Lejeune, N.C.
DEPARTURES
LTJG S. E. Lavin, MC, left the hospital, and returned to his old duty station MCB-1. Armand Ward, HM1, departed by FLAW to the U.S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida for release to inactive duty. Robert Malo, HM3, another old timer, left Saturday on the USNS Johnson for transportation to the U.S. Naval Receiving Station, Brooklyn, New York. Bob is expecting to enter the Physical Therapy Technician School in his home state of Conn., after his separation from the service. We wish all of you luck in your new jobs and assignments.
SIDELIGHTS
Chief Wertly hands are at last healed, but he still has that fish story to tell.... Agen will you try and explain to George just how he looses his water glass so much.... At this time we would like to congratulate all members of the Staff baseball team. Although the scores and records were not on the winning side, we salute all of you for the sportmanship you have shown.
MEET THE STAFF
Being here at Gtmo for twentyone months, we feel it is time to meet Stanley Garrett HN. Born in New York City, he later moved with his parents to Burlington, Vermont. Garrett entered the Navy October 1951, going thru Boot Camp and Hospital Corps School at Bainbridge, Md. After graduating from Corps School he stayed at the U.S. Naval Hospital Bainbridge, and was later transferred to one of the Training Center's dispensary. On the 16th of September 1953 he left Bainbridge for the first time since his enlistment, and came here to Gtmo. Now with only 20 more days to do down here, Garrett is looking forward, for his separation from the service. His plans for the future are to enter the field of radio and television.


Saturday, 6 August 1955








Saturday, 6 August 1955


Saturday, 6 August 1955 THE INDIAN Page Three


Modern Traffic Code To Go



Into Affect In Cuba Today

Cuba's new and modern traffic code will go into effect as of 12:01 A.M. today, 6 August, 1955. Since there are many Americans who have occasion to drive in Cuba, some of the more important sections are translated below.
The Cuban Government hopes that the new traffic code will serve to halt the wave of accidents which has swept Cuba lately. Aimed at imi-roving the general traffice situation, a nation-wide publicity campaign through the press, radio, TV, etc. has been launched to impress tne pullic with the importance of observing traffic rules.
The Cuban press reports that
last night, 5 August, ceremonies
were held at the Presidential or edge to your right on even days,
Ppl- . t tat ereion Prsi-and to your left on odd days. Do Pelcn At that ceremony Presi- not park your vehicle no less than dent Batista made a special nation- 10 meters from a corner, nor opwide appeal through the press, posite police stations, Army or radio and TV to the public to Naval Posts, fire departments, al ide by the new traffic code to public shows, schools, ministries, cut down on accidents. The en- and in a spot within 8 meters from
forcement of any rules or laws the entrance of public offices,
that tend to benefit humanity can- banks, hotels embassies, temples, not be emphasized, and on this churches, clinics, hospitals, first particular subject of traffic, a sin- aid stations. Do not park at loadcere effort must be made to reflect ing section on a work day during our cooperation, as a driver and 8 and 1 A.M. and 2 to 5 P.M. pedestrian alike. Of the 129 articles Unattended automobiles: Stop contained in the new code, an at- motor, take key out, set hand tempt is made to bring to your brake, and engage low gear. Hand
attention, as pointers, such rules signals are similar to those on the that will invite application of base, except provision for allowing severe penalties to guilty parties. another vehicle to pass ahead by These pointers over mainly you making a forward motion with the
as a driver of a private vehicle, arm. Absolutely no horn blowing The code, however, incorporates all during the night in the city. To go classes of vehicles, motor propelled, through intersections, lighting syshorse-drawn and covers pedestrians tem only will be used, on high beam also. and low beam according to degree
First of all, carry with you, at of visibility. Only in imminent and all times, your Tourist Permit, justified danger, or to summon help Drivers License, Insurance Poll- will the horn be used during the cies, I.D. Cards, and any other hours indicated. No horn blowing documents you believe necessary for making calls, or giving signals, to have with you while traveling nor in cases of traffic jam for any through Cuba. reason. Sirens or whistles absoObey the authorities. Drivers of lutely prohibited, and mufflers are motor vehicles or others, in public mandatory on motor vehicles. thoroughfares, are to be held re- The lighting system will consponsible, both in criminal and form to Naval Base standards. civil actions, for deaths, injuries Low beam light within the city or damages caused directly or in- limits, parking lights When vehicle directly. Come to a full stop before is parked on busy streets, and at entering or crossing main through- any point where vehicle is renderfares. Slow down and take ap- ed invisible at 150 meters because
propriate precaution on entering of poor illuminaiton of street or crossing secondary lanes. Make lights. A certificate of vehicle ina full stop at all railroad crossings, spection is called for, to be carried before proceeding. at all times. This is covered by
Overall speed limits, within city Safety Inspection Base Stickers. or town: 20 kilometers (app. 121 Spot lights are prohibited on vemiles) per hour through school and hiles, except vehicles of the Armed silent areas, in front of shows, Forces, Security Vehicles, Fire fairs, meeting places, etc.-30 Department, and those others spekilometers (app. 18% miles) per cifically authorized by Traffic Comhour during working hours thru mission.
public commercial lanes from 6:00 Other requirements, such as A.M. and during all hours on holi- windshield wipers, brakes, etc., to days. Outside city limits, no ve- conform to base standards. Busses hicle will travel at speeds in ex- and trucks to have a fire extincess of: 80 kilometers (app. 50 guisher, loading capacity to conmiles) per hour for buses, autos form to vehicle manufacturer speand motorcycles-60 kilometers cification. Those persons driving (app. 37 miles) per hour for trucks, a vehicle in a state of alcoholic inmotor bikes, scooters, etc. toixcation or under the influence
When leaving garages, buildings, of narcotic drugs will upon conprivate lanes, etc., speed should viction be subject to imprisonment not exceed 5 kilometers per hour. for 3 months to one year. Same Do not cross over fire department penalty will apply to owner of a hoses unless the hose is duly pro- vehicle who knowingly allows antected to avoid damage to same. other person who is in a state Report all accidents to authority of intoxication or is a minor under in immediate vicinity of accident. 18 to drive the vehicle. Do not cross or drive across air- ENGLISH SPANISH
fields, except duly authorized by Stop Pare
airport control. Park in direction Go Slow Despacio
of traffice at a distance not greater Detour Desvio than 10 centimeters from the edge Caution Precaucion
of sidewalk, leaving 50 centimeters anger Peligro
between vehicles, except at loca- No Thoroughfare No Hay Paso tions in parking areas having ap- nO Not Pass No Pase proximate markings. Double lane Used to indicate No No Pase parking. Park in direction of traf- Trespassing fic on two lane avenues; on single Right Derecha
lane avenues, park near sidewalk (Continued from Page Five)

S


Mrs. & Mrs. D. B. Clay (left) of RH-28, Nob Hill, are congratulated by G. Liveakos, MMC, and M. Gordon, HM1, of the Community Council after their yard was selected as the most improved for the month of June. The winners were presented with a $10.00 award for a job "well done."


Rifle-Pistol Club


Hi - Lites

by Fay Yarbro
WOW! There was many a POW released when the Guantanamo Bay Pistol Team won the Atlantic Championship at Camp Lejeune, N.C. So, how about coming to the big Pow Wow Monday evening, 8 August, at 7:00 P.M. When the moon rises, watch for smoke signals announcing heap big intertribal plans for future interest of all braves concerned! ! All squaws come and weave your interest, enthusiasm and ideas for the support of the big brave of your tent.
And don't forget the big Turkey Shoot which is scheduled for Labor Day, 5 September, being sponsored by the Rifle-Pitsol Club. The Shoot will be open to All Hands of the Naval Base, with a prize for the winner of each event.
The gala event will be hi-lighted with the grand opening of the Naval Station 100 yard rifle and pistol range. Due to the type of recreation proposed, no alcoholic beverages will be sold or consumed

Reserve Bill ...
(Continued from Page One)
year military obligation. A total of five years must be spent on active duty and in the ready reserves. The final year would be spent in a non-training unit.
Ready reservists will be required to participate in 48 scheduled drills or training periods and not more than 17 days of active duty training yearly. As an alternative they could spend a miximum of 30 days on active duty during each year of their ready reserve obligation.
Other key provisions of the Act authorize the President to:
Call as many as 1,000,000 ready reservists to active duty in an emergency without congressional approval.
Permit annually up to 250,000 men under 18 and one-half years of age to enlist in any of the services for eight years. This would include six months on active duty and seven and one-half years in the ready reserves. (AFPS)


S


Ole Fire Inspector

This writer, I thought, would never be necessary, but it looks like my thinking on the think was just as wrong as my choice of winning race horses or good liquor.
When I took my examination for a drivers operator permit I seem to remember that all emergency vehicles would have the right of way. Now I haven't seen anything in writing that has changed this regulation but perhaps a few have.
When an emergency vehicle is answering a call, it is for the purpose of helping someone who cannot cope with the emergency and I can't for the life of me see why people driving cars cannot offer the courtesy of at least pulling over to the side of the road and stopping.
Or is it like the fellow on the sinking ship. When he was told about the ship sinking he said "let er sink, it ain't mine."
Just because you don't have need for the Base Police, or you don't have someone hurt or sick, or your house isn't on fire, is no reason to stop the progress of those who are rushing to the aid of someone not so fortunate.
In the states in cold climates when the drivers have all the car windows rolled up, there is reason to believe the siren can't be heard, but on Gtmo where every breath of cool air is appreciated, the car windows are not rolled up, and the sirens should be observed.
Why folks, taking an emergency piece of equipment on the roads of Gtmo is just like taking an old maid to the circus, you don't know what will happen.
There is such a thing as "road equity." Let's all observe the existing rules and directive. Don't cause undue animosity with other car operators.


THE INDIAN


Page Three








THE INDIAN


Saturday, 6 August 1955


Post Season Tourney Underway; Ladies Golf Shots Little Leaguers To Play
9by Audrey Page T ..n - n * ll


Mallards Wins rirsi Two Games

by Joe Duffy
The VU-10 Mallards showed plenty of power at the plate to win their first two tournament games and forge to the front in the race for the tournament title. After defeating the Naval Air Station 13-2, they came back the next day to lamblast the high flying Marine squad by a 16-5 score and emerge as the only team without a defeat on its record. The Naval Station Indians, after dropping their first game to the Marines 3-1, came back on Tuesday night to defeat the NAS Flyers and eliminate them


from any further play, and qualify to meet the Marines for th semifinal tussle. The winner of the Naval Station-Marine game goes against the leading VE-10 team. Since VU-10 has not bet a game in the tournament, the challengers must defeat them in two games to take the title, on the other hand, VU-10 has only to win one game to be declared the titlist.
FIRST GAME - Naval Station vs Marines. The Marine "Leathernecks" rallied behind the four-hit pitching of Jack Dowd to score a 3-1 victory over the league leaders and take the tournament opener. The Marines scored two runs in the fourth-inning to take a 2-0 lead when Castellow walked and Liggett, Plante and Collins followed with consecutive singles. Naval Station scored their lone run in the top of the eighth when with two outs, McCowan singled and came home on Morgan's triple. The Marines scored their final talley in the bottom of the eighth when Castellow poled a home run over the left field fence with the bases empty. Winning pitcher Dowd gave up one walk while striking out two, while loser Dale Buss walked four and struck out six to suffer his first setback of the year. The line score:


SECOND GAME-VU-10 vs Naval Air Station. The second-place Mallards banged out fifteen hits to score a decisive 13-2 victory over the fourth-place Flyers of NAS in the second game of the tourney. Trailing by 2-1 after four innings of play, the Mallards rallied for four runs in the fifth inning before any outs were made as a result of three walks, two singles, an error and a wild pitch. The Mallards increased their lead with two runs in each of the seventh and eighth innings, and four more in the ninth as Edgar and Gidson kept the Flyers scoreless after the third inning. Edgar started on the mound for VU-10, but was relieved by Gibson in the seventh-inning in order to rest their ace pitcher for next day's game. Moe Morris was the big stick for VU-10, getting four for six to register five RBIs. The line score:
R H E
VU-10 13 15 1
NAS 2 6 6
THIRD GAME-Marine vs VU10. The two tournament winners met in the third contest in what was supposed to be a tight ball-


game, however, V pounding the ball in her that they had NAS the day befo two runs in the fi six in the second-i an early 8-2 lead an ing Marine hurler, the box. He was su mound by Dowd, Yo mes, but the Mall their hit pace by more runs in each and sixth innings to into a rout. Eels bat with a triple an as everybody in th nected for at least o apparently well res previous day, went VU-10. Although h for eleven hits, he k scattered, and nullifi with eight strikeout strikeouts ended inn the Marines were t


U-10 continued the same manoverwhelmed re to rack up rst-inning and inning to take d knock start-


1


FOURTH GAME vs Naval Air Statio stoked out sixteen Morgan's homerun eliminate the Flyers nament in a lopside started on the mou dians, but retired a nings with a 9-0 l took up the mound next five inning's to


ball and gain credit f In the ninth-inni switched from first the final inning and all the FlyerYs runs two, hit one batter three hits. This not b standard for succe Kennedy will hence playing first base gaines. In scoring the Indians scored except the fourth an gan's home run ca mates aboard in the The line score:


Scotch Foursome w Sunday. Results were: 1st low grosstie beween
CDR and Mrs. Wa LT(jg) Byerley an

2nd low gross-tie between
LT and Mrs. Brya CDR and Mrs. Scot 3rd low grossYN2 Peddycord an

1st low netAT1 Payne nad M 2nd low netAEC and Mrs. Dic


Patton, out of 3rd low netceeded on the tie between
ungs and Holards continued LCDR Kuba and
scoring four Mrs. Brotherton
of the fourth Mr. Kidwell and Mrs. Pennell
turn the game Longest drive on #1led VU-10 at
d two singles, CDR Scott and Mrs. Larson
e lineup con- Longest putt on #9ne hit. Edgar, Miss Maryalice Murphy
ted from the Closest to pin on 2nd shot #18the route for M Nels
e was touched rs. son
ept them well The tables were turned on Tuesed their threat day when the Ware Wigglers des, four of the fated the Sharit Shimiers 61/2 to ings in which
hreatening. 2%. The team matches are now
H E scheduled to be played on Fridays,
so Ladies be sure to be there for
5 11 5 your games.
6 13 2 On Wednesday a Blind Five
-Naval Sation Tournament was held for all n. The Indians flights. Winners were: hits paced by 1st flight: tie: for first
and double, to Kay Sharit
for the tour19-5 win. Buss Mary Ann Pennell
id for the In- tie for second after three in- Edie Ware
ead. Amborski Vin ra
duties for the ma Bryan
pitch scoreless 2nd Flight: tie for first or the victory. Vivian Soballe
ng, Kennedy Annette Forester
base to pitch Doris Dickson
vas rapped for
as he walked 2nd: Billie Nelson
and gave up 3rd flight:
eing the usual 1st: Audrey Ellis
ssful pitcher, 2nd: Doris Rothenberg
forth stick to
in all future We are very sorry to announce
their 19-runs, that two of our members are leavin all innings ing us. Catherine MacGregor leaves d sixth. Mor- for Massachusetts in the near fume with two ture, and Sue Scott will'be on her
ninth inning. way to Teaxs. Both will be greatly missed in GTMO. Here wishing you good golfing in the States. .. R1 H E
9 16 3
-1 REAR RANK


1


a 6 5Z


The 1955 All-Star team that will represent Guantanamo Naval Base in the Southeastern Confere1ce tournament in Jacksonville,
Florida, will play the Oriente k
Naval District Headquarters team from Santiago de Cuba today. The game will be t
played at the Fleet Recreation Area, Diamond #1 and will start at 1400. "You a nd your Army regulanons!'


.:. .- -4 .... - -f.


as held last re


TIree 8 e sries WItH Cuban Little Leaguers

by Joe Duff y


dU The Naval Base Little Leaguers
Mrs. Leach will play a three-game series with
a Cuban boy's team on the Villamar diamond. The series will take I place on three succeeding Sundays,
t first game to be played tomorrow,
August 7th, at 1400. The local nine d will consist of players picked from
Mrs. Larson the four teams that made up the
league during the past season. rs. Forester Last year the local team dropped
all three contests to their Cuban irson rivals, and are out to even the
score this ya


CDR Archie, President of the Little League, has stated that he will present all the boys who took part as team members of the Little League and Pee Wee League with a baseball pin at the next meeting of the League officials. He also stated that there would not be any trophies given to the winning teams this year, because he theorized that the true spirit of the Little League becomes lost when the teams fight for trophies. Since trophies have been awarded in the past, this decision by the President should be an unpopular one.





What's Doin' Stateside

The day may soon come when we'll be able to order a house to fit our personality. It's all possible in the world of the future, says Jerry Luss, a New York architect, who is convinced that in 2000 AD "houses, like the human body, will be machines for living. And like the body, they will be built from the inside out." . . . . Luss, who works for Designs for Business, sees houses of the future with foundations made up of a material similar to foam rubber. Rooms will be set up on this material and snapped together. Like ham, they'll he available at your nearest corner store.
The Federal Communications Commission, in its recently published statistics for the fiscal year 1954, reveals that America has a lot of glib takers. Telephone company officials estimate that in three minute calls the number of words exchanged may range from 450 to 750 words, averaging about 500 words a call. Statistically speaking, this means that the nation's telephone conversations represent approximately 185 million addresses and soliloquis a day.
Hewitt-Robbins, Inc. recently put on a public demonstration of V new type of moving sidewalk that can swirl around curves, carry passengers and baggage in any direction- all on an endless red carpet. The company said it "clears the way for increased mechanization of pedestrian traffic at airports, large shopping centers, railroad terminals and subways."... Three of the new conveyors will be installed in the new $10 million air terminal at Love Field, Dallas, Tex. They will have a total length of 1,406 feet. (AFPS)


Page Four


eo


Marines VU-10


NavSta Marines


R H E
1 4 3
3 6 2


NavSta NAS






Ge Page Five


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 6 August 1955


Gtmo Golf Club Championship


Continues Second Round Of Play

Divots, dust, and rocks flew thick and fast in the second round of the 1955 Guantanamo Golf Club Championship matches as local linksters teed off this week in hopes of gaining the next bracket in their respective flights. In the championship flight, the match of the week was played last Sunday between ADC Lee Rogers, NAS, the qualifying medalist, and LT Tom Drace, VU-10. Rogers edged LT Drace one up as both golfers pushed par all the way to the last hole. Rogers' brilliant wedge wizardry won the 17th hole
to put him one up in what proved
to be the clincher after both play..ers had battled for the lead for the The Fish Tale s)
previous 16 holes, with neither man
getting more than a one hole lead.
In the second flight, Chief Gra- Commencing Monday, 8 August', bowski, FTG, downed CAPT Car- the Sailboat Locker will resume
uthers, NavSta, one up on the 19th its regular schedule. It will be hole. LTJG Don "Hot Putter" open 24 hours a day, seven days Byerley, NavSta, trimmed Dr. a week. Doohen, NavHosp, one up to ad- At present there is only two
vance to the second round. more weeks left in the GuantanDown in the third flight, Mr. amo Fishing Tournament. The
Aven, NavSta, came from behind Sailboat Locker now has six new to eliminate Capt. Jack Swords, motors so all you tournament
MarBks, one up on the 19th hole fishermen shouldn't have any trouin another hard fought match. The ble, getting either a motor or boat toughest battle of the third flight, to go out and catch that prize however, saw Chief Allen, NavSta, winner. going to the 21st hole to beat A new price has been set on the
Hamilton, one up. rental of sailboats. From the hours
Dr. Nelson, NAS, defeated AD of 1630 until sunset, the price is
Mullins, VU-10, one up in the only now $1.00. closely contested match in the Here are the standings in the fourth flight tournament as of Monday, 1 AuThe first round losers (defeated gust: 16) in the championship flight now
become the first flight and still BARRACUDA
have a chance to take home some 15 lbs. 4 oz. Sid Davenport
of the trophies offered for this 17 lbs. 11 oz. E. W. Watkins event.
Results of all first round match- 15 lbs. W. B. Robinson es as follows: 14 lbs. 11 oz. G. K. Giggy


Championship


Winner Rogers I
Richards Dr. Bryan Broughton Kidwell Adams
Clemons LCDR Dempsey Dustin Peddycord Harville
Doulin Gurka Halentic

Lackey Cohanski Payne Campbell Corliss Grabowski I
CAPT Moe CDR Soballe Dickson Stowe Roberts Savage Hairston LT Byarley Kelley d
LT Noga


up over 7-6 over
-4 over default
1 up
4-3 3 up 6-5
2-1 2-1 Def.
2-1 Def.
1-up
2nd Flig
Def.
3-2 1 up 8-7
4-2 up 19th
6-4 Def.
6-4
Def.
over over 7-6 1 up
efeated default
3rd Flig


Loser
LT Drace Trytek Collins CAPT McCracken Scherlacher LT Larson Ferenchak Lachtara
Pugh CHPCLK Goolsby CDR Scott CDR Lawlor King LTJG Morgan
ht
Griffin Walters Dr Doss LCDR Minard
Magas CAPT Caruthers Dr Mochella
Naegle Johnson Parker Galkiewicz CDR Manning DiMaggio Dr Doohen Monte CWOHC Dote
ht


Arnold over Corriveau
Trotter 8 up Crampton
CDR Rothenberg bye
Fuerst bye
Aven 1 up 19th CAPT Swords
Sparks bye
LCDR Pierce bye
Walker bye
Dickson bye
White bye
Kenyon defeated Knight
Jenkins bye
Surges bye
Allen 1 up 21 holes Hamilton
CDR Skadowski bye
Fourth Flight
Lee 3-2 Freeburg
Frantz defeated Ellis


Forester M arkhami Smith B. E. Brown Thorley CAPT Murphy Dr. Nelson Schmitt Backcock Hicks Roberts C C. James Choate LT Pavlow


bye bye
defeated Gibson
bye bye bye
1 up Mullins
Ilye
7-6 LCDR
bye
defeated LTJG
i9-8 Plourde
over Kadles
9-8 Gosnell


Richmond 4axwell


SNAPPER - GROUPER Grouper 177 lbs. v. A. Roberts Snapper 57 lbs. D. Johnson Grouper 42 lbs. 14 oz. J. F. Robson
JACK - POMPANO Jack 20 lbs. D. E. Olson
Jack 19 lbs. 14 oz. R. E. Seagle Jack 17 lbs. Mrs. S. Davenport
SNAPPER-GROUPER-JEWFISH Jack 17 lbs. Mrs. D. Davenport
LADYFISH - BONEFISH Ladyfish 4 lbs. 6 oz. R. E. Seagle Ladyfish 3 lbs. 15/ oz. G. M. Ewing Bonefish 3 lbs. L. E. Hallman
SNOOK
19 lbs. 6 oz. D. E. Thomas
18 lbs. 11/ oz. Doris Seagle 14 lbs. 2 oz. Pat Aldridge
13 lbs. 12 oz. R. L. Prichett
BONEFISH - LADYFISH Ladyfish 4 lbs. 6 oz. R. E. Seagle Ladyfish 3 lbs. 15/_ oz. G. M. Ewing Bonefiish 3 lbs. L. E. Hallman
CROAKER
1 lb. 3/, oz. Mrs. Hilda Potts
1 lb. L. E. Hallman
MACKEREL-1 lb. 5 oz. A. D. Nelson.
SHARK
204 lbs. G. T. Palms
LARGEST BY CHILDREN
Barracuda 7 lbs. 4% oz. James Page SHARK-79 lbs. E. B. Rooff. LARGEST LADIES-17 lbs. Jack-Mrs. Davenport. LARGEST CHILDREN-7 lbs. 4/ oz. Barracuda-James Page.
SPEAR FISHING
Grouper 43 lbs. A. P. Ahlberg
Goruper 17 lbs. 8 oz. J. L. Reif Barracuda 16 lbs. 10 oz. R. H. Anderson


I The former commanding
officer of the U. S. Naval ^ Supply Depot, CDR E. W.
u ering, recently received his fourth stripe. Rear Admiral Joel D. Parks, Deputy Chief of the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts pinned the silver eagle on his collar.


VU-10 Prop Blast

by F. A. Azzarita

Three couples took advantage of the Saturday night dance held at the "0" Club. Although small as a representative group, their presence was well established. What better could one ask for? A tunefull band on an open patio, broadleaf palms under an open sky, with colored lights and blinking stars to illuminate the merriment, and the soft breeze coming off the bay are all part of the pretty picture. The more the merrier so take advantage of the opportunity and join the gang at the VU-10 table.

The VU-10 jet line looked fine this week. All five Cougars were up and ready to fly. Chief O'Conner and his men of the Leeward Point Detachment deserve a hearty "Well-Done".

LTJG Dick Palmer up to Norfolk, Va. to pick up a new JD-1. Dick returned last Saturday with the aircraft. The JD has already received its trimmings and the new number 22 has been painted on its side.

The Greenfields returned from fifteen days leave. While on their vacation, they bought a jeep station wagon and used it to sightsee through Cuba. Dick and Nancy visited many of the small towns and hamlets which dot Cuba. They marveled at many of the sights and throughly enjoyed themselves. I imagine, however, that now the Greefields are honorary members of the "Oh My Aching 'Back Club".

Santiago de Cuba was in all its splendor these last two weeks. The city was gayly decorated and excitingly alive for the festive carnival holidays. All the giaety, humor ,and splendor of any Mardi Gras was evident. The week-end spent in Santiago by several of the bachelors was summed up with a big "Cha-Cha-Cha-Magnifico".



Cuban Laws . . .

(Continued from Page Three)


Left
Keep Right Keep Left
Cross
Railroad Crossing
Enger Exit
No Parking No Parking Speed Limit ? ?
Reserved Parking Official Parking Taxi Parking
Silence Children Pedestrian Traffic Signal
Be Careful Traffic Traffic
One-Way Traffic


Izquierda Conserve su Derecha
Conserve su Izquierda Cruce Crucero Ferrocarril Entrada
Salida No Parqueo No Auto Velocidad ? ? Auto Particular Auto Oficiales Piquera
Silencio Ninios Peaton
Semaforo Cuidado Traffico Transito Arrow used alone Arrow used alone or with word TRANSITO


"Name?"
"Joe Popupopupopupopulas."
"Occupation?"
"I drive a motorboat."
* * *
Reader: "You make up these jokes youreslf?"
Editor: "Yes, indeed, out of my head."
Reader: "You must be!"
* * *

"It must have cost a fortune."
"No, it only cost a kiss."
"The one you gave your husband."
"Oh, no. One that he gave the
maid."


40


FTG Bulletin

CWO J. A. Jones, recently of the Engineering Department, departed Guantanamo Bay Saturday, 30 July. Mr. Jones will report to the Commandant, FOURTH Naval District for temporary duty in connection with the conversion of the USS Boston (CAG-1) at the New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey and will be on board the Boston for duty when placed in commission. USS Boston is a Guided Missile Cruiser and will receive training here next year.
Willy Mathis, SOl having rereived orders will depart GTMO in the very near future. Mathis will report for duty to Commanding Officer, (Helicopter) Anti-Submarine Squadron ONE for duty.
Ron Federman, YN2, was transferred from FTG Saturday, 27 July. Federman will proceed to the Receiving Station, Brooklyn, New York to await discharge from the naval service.
Their leave having expired in the states, Dick Fetterhof, SN, Norm Perron, YNSN and R. Carrigan made the return trip by means of the USS Amphion (AR 13). The Amphion spent four days in wonderful New Orleans before getting underway for GTMO.
Also returning from leave in the U.S. were Charley Mayes, PN1, Gene Sukonic, ETR2, Joe Russek, RMSN, and Will Gleason, RD1. The four-some arrived in GTMO last Sunday stepping from the gangway of the USS Shakori (ATF 162) which provided transportation for their return to paradise.
CWO Peter Schwindt reported for duty Wednesday, 31 July. Mr. Schwindt is assigned to the Engineering Department and will perform duties as Shipboard Instructor for that department. Mr. Schwindt was formerly on duty with MSTS Office, Yokohama, Japan. WELCOME ABOARD!
LT E. Dent, J. Dimaggio, GM1, and R. Gugliemo, BMC completed two weeks TAD at the Marine Barracks, Naval Base, GTMO. They received training in infantry tactics and are now qualified to run up any hill in the area.
Mrs. Getzewich, wife of CDR J. Getzewich, and two sons arrived on the base Monday, 22 July. Mrs. Getzewich formerly resided in Garfield, New Jersey. They will reside at quarters M-114, Marine Site.
Mr. Marvin Black, public relations officer of the University of Mississippi took a days leave from the Midshipmen Cruise and was escorted about the base by CDR K. Skadowski. Mr. Black was highly impressed in the manner the Base School was arranged and praised the beautiful flowers and trees in the school patio.
Robert Eric Minard opened his eyes to the world last Saturday, at 1445. Little Bob somewhat resembles his father weighing in at an even nine pounds. This is the fifth child for CDR and Mrs. R. K. Minard.
The Fleet Training Group Golf Team defeated the team from the USS Des Moines in their third match by a score of 29 to 7. The USS Des Moines - Fleet Training Group Golf Trophy will remain in the possession of the Training Group and each time the Des Moines is in the area a match will be played. The event was honored by the presence of Rear Admiral E. N. Parker, Comcrudiv SIX, who presented the cup to CAPT. F. S. Habecker.








Saturday, 6 August 1955


THE INDIAN


Navy-DPPO-10ND-Gtmo.-2056


lNOoK

by Ed Talen, SN
THE LAST TEMPTATION
by Joseph Viertel
An interesting novel which cen ters around a young couple who are people of means, education, and taste. Under ordinary circumstances they probably would have lived in a pleasent, rather fashionable suburb. But things were no, ordinary in Europe in 1938, and they are stripped of security and pleasures and flung into a world of crushing degradation and fear
Fleeing for survival, they take the wrong path and soor are enmeshed in such a pattern of deceit and wrongdoing that they lose ail decency of living.
EXCELSIOR
by Paul Hyde Bonner
Capitalizing on a fascinating locale that is relatively fresh im fiction-the Swiss city of Zurichthe author has given a vivid reality to a picturesque background. The hero of the story is an 80 year old tyrant who is the head of the international Swiss banking house. He dominates everyone around him to the point that they do not dare venture an independent thought. That is, everyone but his young American grandson Robert, who has inhehited the strength of character and independant nature of his grandfather. The scrapes that the two run into forms a rapidly moving and interesting novel. An interesting aspect of the book is the way it makes the reader see with a new respect the necessity for neutrality in world affairs on the part of the Swiss goyernment.
TIGER OF THE SNOWS
by James Ramsey Ullman
This is the autobiography of Tenzing Norgay, the first man ever to reach the top of Mt. Everest. Told with modesty and quiet humor, it is a warm, simple, and moving story of his life and the greatest achievement of his lifethe conquering of Mt. Everest.
ONIONS IN THE STEW
by Betty MacDopald
Written by the author of the best seller "The Egg and I", and written with the same wit and temerity found in her previous best seller, this is an uproariously funny story about the MacDonald family and their isolated life on an island. Not only humorous, the story creates a beautiful picture of the vibrant Northwest.
CAPTAIN COOK AND THE
SOUTH PACIFIC
by John Gwyther
The story centers around the voyage of the Endeavour in 1768. Captained by Lieutenant James Cook, the ship puts out from Plymouth, England to explore the South Pacific. A well told adventure, it is a tale that will satisfy both scholors and adventures.

Millionaire: "My boy, when I was your age, I carried water for a gang of bricklayers."
Son: "I'm mighty proud of you, Dad. If it hadn't been for your pluck and perseverance, I might have had to do something like that myself."


The latest style in the country this season, especially for as modeled here by the lovely and curvavious Elaine Stewart. P of hay in her hat and you have a real hayseed, hey? ?



Radio's 'Tops' of the W

SATURDAY, August 6 ... GRAND OLE OPRY ... 9:30 P.M
For a half-hour of the finest in folk, country and western sure to join Cowboy Copas, the Louvin Brothers,,and Dell W they beam your way from Nashville, Tennessee. Rod Bra Minnie Pearl provide the laughs. SUNDAY, August 7 ... HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE ...
Van Heflin and Nancy Gates star in "The Big Trees", an act story of lumbermen versus settlers in 1900. The setting is the California redwood forests.
MONDAY, August 8 ... STAR PLAYHOUSE... 9:00 P.M.
Lewis Carrol's whimsical tale for children of all ages, Wonderland" will come to life when Margaret O'Brien enact of the little girl of wonderful adventures. Also on hand will be Hatter, the Queen of Hearts, the Cheshire Cat and 'all the oth ful characters of this classic.
TUESDAY, August 9 ... THE CHASE ... 9:00 P.M.
Tonights' Chase is one of greed with an ironic ending. A n and marries a widow for her money only to find that she is that the game he plays has no consolation prize for losers. WEDNESDAY, August 10 ... ON STAGE... 9:00 P.M.
Kathy and Elliot Lewis bring to the sound stage a bea tender love story of a Greewich Village writer and a lovely title, "Take My Hand, My Love". THURSDAY, August 11 ... FAMILY THEATRE... 9:00 P
"The Thin Red Line" is a story of a former news comment loses his sight while a combat paratrooper and sinks into morass of bitterness and hatred until an understanding girl c his life to restore his confidence. George Nader stars. FRDIAY, August 12 ... RADIO WORKSHOP... 10:00 P.M.
What causes a man in perfect health to suddenly pass aw prime of his life just as success in his work seems imminent, w is nothing organically wrong with him? Listen as the Radio players dramatize "Th( Strange Death of Jonathan Judd".


0


P4


of


MOVIES

Saturday, 6 August BLACKBOARD JUNGLE
Glenn Ford Anne Francis
The story of a young school
teacher just out of the Navy who gets his first job teaching in a big city manual training school. Located in a tough section of the city, he has a class of juvenil delinquents who have no respect for a teacher or for his authority.
The picture shows the odds which the young teacher has to overcome, including being beaten up in an alley and having a knife pulled
on him in the classroom.
Sunday, 7 August THE SILVER CHALICE
Virginia Mayo Pier Angeli
Simon, a magician, claims that
1 car 'n greater miracles than Christ. He tries to get ahold of the Chalice, which is taken to Rome by a slave. While there, the -lave becames a Christian, and upon his return to Antioch is the cause of the persecution of Chrisgardening, tians by Simon. ut a piece Monday, 8 August
MAD AT THE WORLD
Frank Lovejoy Keefe Basselle
The viciousness of juvenile delinquents is presented when three
V k boys, traveling together as rateek packs, attack an innocent :an, his
wife, and their baby. The angry man attempts to take matters into his own hands but is forced to music, be call on the police. oods when Tuesday, 9 August
sfield and JUMP INTO HELL
Jack Sernas Marcel Dalio
Col. Arnold Moss, defending the 10:00 P.M. French fort at Dienbienphu, is surrounded by Communists and wires ion packed Paris for officers. Four officers beautiful jumping from an airplane into a mile square area still under French control, join the French forces who
prove unable to defend the fort.
Wednesday, 10 August
"Alice in A NIGHT AT THE OPERA
s the part Marx Brothers Kitty Caruse
The Mad The story begins in Europe with
er delight- the Marx brothers trying to promote a young unknown opera singer into stardom.
Thursday, 11 August CANYON CROSSROADS
an courts Richard Basehart_ Phillis Kirk
broke, and Richard Basehart is a lone prospector for uranium, but finally makes a 50-50 proposition with a rich prospector, whose daughter, dutiful and Phillis Kirk, insists on going along. rtist. The A rich uranium vein is discovered
in a cave, but before they can cash in on it, they are imprisioned .M. by a dynamite blast set by an
enemy prospector.
tator who Friday, 12 August
a mental
ies into Eret MARTY
Earnest Borguine Betsy Blair
A butcher, who has never been
married, even though his friends and mother keep urging him to do ay in the so, meets a wall flower at a dance. hen there In trying to arrange a date the Workshop bashful butcher goes through one
hilarious escapade after another.


. .. ...... ...


.......... .. ........ ....


.X1 .5




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PAGE 1

V VI,.ove s NaaMO Like T Bu6 shine" Vol. VI, No. 31 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 6 August 1955 R. W. Dean, FT2, is congratulated by CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, for outstanding work in repairing the USS Ingraham. Congress Passes NRP; Affects Men In Service Washington-Congress has passed a modified version of President Eisenhower's national reserve plan that exempts all men now on active duty from compulsory reserve training. The reserve plan in its final form was a compromise measure drafted by a joint congressional committee after the House and Senate passed separate bills. Men now in the service and veterans who were in the armed forces after June 19, 1951, will continue to have an eight-year military obligation. This includes the normal ready reserve time, but they will not have to participate in any reserve training program. Their ready reserve obligation can be cut to one year, however, if they voluntarily enlist in the reserves for 12 months training. They would then be placed in the standby reserves and could not be called to active duty except in a national emergency. Some 200,000 veterans would be eligible for this program annually. The act contains another inducement to obtain veterans for the reserves. Service secretaries could release men now in the armed forces after completion of 12 months active duty provided they LCDR R. K. Minard, team capagree to serve in the ready retam, presents the trophy won by serves. Their combined active duty the base Pistol Team at Camp and ready reserve service would Lejeune North Carolina, to RADM have to total a minimum of four E. B. Taylor as the team looks on. years. In the front row, from left to right The main provision of the new are: N. P. Walters, MRC, LCDR act states that all men who enlist Minard, RADM Taylor, and CDR or are drafted after the reserve R. V. Peterson. In the back row plan is enacted will have a sixare: W. A. Fetters, hE3, J. B. (Continued from Page Three) oc s, and K. E. Sch2e.le, ME 2. Base Begins PO Exams Tuesday Tests Given On 9, 16, 22 August Its the time of year again, and in the next three weeks 504 men of the Naval Base will take the semi-annual examinations for advancement in rating to pay grades E-4, E-5, and E-6. The first test-for pay grade E-4-will be taken by approximately 190 men on 9 August. The following Tuesday, 16 August, 195 men will try for the second class "crow", and the final test for pay grade E-6 will be held on 23 August for 157 men. The examinations will be held in ip} (tthsee different places. Men from The Rifle-Pistol Club the Naval Hospital, the Dental Clinsc. the Supply Depot, and the ToNaval Station will be examined at T Spnso Turey ~ "~ the Naval Station Enlisted Men's Bettr e theoldmuskt oled Club. The men have been requestBetter get the old musket oiledto the EM. Club no up and the shootin' eye in shape, later than 0745 for all examinaas you will have opportunity to tons. "se both in the Labor Day Turkey Men from the Naval Air Station Shoot to be held on 5 September, 1955. The shoot, to be held at the and Uti adon te v A new Rifle and Pistol range site, is the examnins at T e s sponsored by the Guantanamo Bay gay com ing at ts Rifle and Pistol Club and will be d ay. Examinations nfor the openedsame time in the galley on the A grand opening of the Naval 16th and 23rd of August. Station rifle and pistol range at The Fleet Training Group and 0900 will start the day off, and will its allied commands will give all be followed by four shoots. Each shoot will consist of five events, thre e ats on theirrand prizes will be given for each event. ry of the Training Center. The four shooting events will be: The m a r n in g examinations 1. A 50 yard pistol shoot in should be completed by 1100, and ch ay clibr pitolwil be in the afternoon, professional exwhich any caliber pistol will e aminations will be given to those allowed. 2. A 50 yard rifle shoot, 22 calrequiring such. iber only. The examiners-in the explana3. A 10 shot trap shoot, any tion before the test-will inform gauge is allowed. those concerned as to where they 4. A Turkey shoot-16 and 12 will take their professional tests. Gauge shotguns only. The afternoon tests will begin at ______________1300 and should be completed by 1600. Survey Of Industrial Hygiene The typing examinations for SafetyYeomen, Personnelmen, JournalSafly ow ein Coduced ists, Storekeepers, D i a b u r a i ng Clerks, and Hospital Corpsmen will Aboard GTM Naval Bs Abar TMO ava Base be held in the Naval Station PerUnder the auspices of the Base sonnel Office. At the same time Safety Department CDR Roland professional examinations for TeleE. yrdispreenly onuctnga men and Radiomen will be held in E. Byrd is presently conducting tha aeCmuiain fie survey of industrial hygiene safety on the Guantanamo Naval Base. Results will become known on Here on a two week training pro30 October and all advancements gram with his reserve unit from should become effective on 16 NoJacksonville Florida CDR Byrd member. who is employed in civilian life as as an industrial hygienist at the Naval Air Station in Jacksonville, will be able to make real use of his profession while visiting the Base. In his survey, CDR Byrd will be primarily interested in potential hazards, such as gases, solvents, dust, noise, poor lighting, and other hazards that work a physical and mental strain on a workers health. His survey will exclude outside hazards as falling objects, and will deal with safety and medicine in close conjunction with both. Arriving here on 31 July 1955, CDR Byrd will be conducting his surveys of the industrial areas of the Base until 13 August, when he will return to Jacksonville. CDR Byrd expressed his appreciation of the friendly attitude and co-operation shown to .him so far by the residents of the Base. Recently elected officers of the Holy Name Society are, front row, left to right, LT R. D. Colbert, CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, Mr. N. W. Huddy and Chief Forenchick. Back row, LCDR J. P. McFadden, LT E. P. McConnen and Chief Redman. 0 9 ea e '! .P

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Saturday, 6 August 1955 THE INDIAN THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM EDMUND B. TAYLOR, Commander Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Editorial Staff LTJG J. D. Byerley ------------------------------Officer-Advisor G. L. Henderson, JOC -----------------------------_--Editor D. C. Roberts, JOSN ---------------------------Managing Editor E. J. Talen, SN ----------------------------------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Material marked AFPS may be used by any news medium provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part, with or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. Sunday, 7 August 1955 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon, thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Sabbath Services Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CH, USN (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner What Is Courage? In the thick of the battle of life, in the midst of the insecurity, the baffling problems, the dire difficulties, the disappointments, we need courage. What is it? A cat comes along the way and sees a dog. The cat arches his back, spits, and thus shows his defiance and displeasure. Is he showing evidence of true courage? Bravado? A father took his little boy for a walk one day. They tramped across a railway trestle. The father, thinking he might impress the lad with a real lesson in bravery, stopped in the middle of the trestle and said: "Son, if a train came along here what would you do?" He thought the boy might say he would crawl out on the end of a tie and hang over the water with his feet dangling. Maybe he might think of a place for the father also. But the lad said: "Oh, I'd just step off the track. hold out MARINE MUSINGS by Cpl. Paul A. Hoffer, USMC DEPARTURES Tuesday, 2 August, Pfc. Ronald G. Bilz departed for the states. Pfc. Bilz will report to Marine Corps Schools, Quantico, Virginia, for duty. SPORTS -BASEBALL Off to a good start in the playoffs the Marines defeated Naval Station 3-1. In the second game, played Monday night, the Marines dropped a 16 to 5 decision to the VU-10 Mallards. ALL GTMO TEAM 1stLt. John A. Dowd, pitchermanager of the Marine Barracks Baseball team, has been elected to manage the All-Gtmo team to Pensacola, Florida. Six Marines will be on the team. They are: Chuck Hunter, Bill Wood, Joe Bland, Paul Hoffer, Earl Castellow and Phil Patton. The team is due to depart Guantanamo on 10 August. my hand to stop the train, and then hold it out over the water and watch the people fall out." And then the boy added, I'd hold you in the other hand." As they went further they eventually came to a large burned area. It was desolate. It seemed that there was not a living thing upon it. However, as they trudged on, the father was amazed to see one little red flower in full bloom amid all that desolation. "That," he pointed out to his little son, "is courage-real courage." Keystone Of Character No, courage is not arrogance in the face of danger. It is not bluff in the midst of disaster. It is that quality which causes us to produce in the center of desolation, difficulties, disaster. Courage might be called the keystone in the arch of character. It gives strength and stability to all our other qualities. If we are not brave, of what avail is our desire for honesty, or our hunger for purity, or our concern for righteousness? Courage is essential to give edge to our conscience, force to our convictions, and realization to our ideals. Jerome J. Sullivan Chaplain Teenage Round-up by Linda Thurston The rompin' rhythm of Gtmo's favorite, Julio Delgado, set the gals and the middies into a frenzy that was supposed to be a mambo last Friday eve. at the middy dance held in the CPO Club. There were stag lines aplenty and their results were some mighty sore feet the next morning. Becky held old home week when she met some former classmates from Coronado High and Bobbie Frey received a message to "tell Chet that Zinc still loves him" (she's still looking for Chet). 'Nita was swamped with cashmere sweaters and Nancy found the ideal jitterbug partner. All the gals had a swell time and are looking forward to the next dance. Dolores Rogoz has come back from her vacation in the states and she brought her "older" brother with her. and we will take this opportunity to say he's a very nice looking guy. Welcome, you all! Speaking of being back from the states, we've just about given up hope of ever seeing Eunice and Nancy Aviala again. We've been expecting them home for a month now and no luck yet. Here's hoping they'll tear themselves away before school starts (oops, I said that word. but really kids, the salt mines will open again on the 22nd of August!). This week is the last week that I will be rounding up the teenagers for the INDIAN. I've been at it for nigh onto three years now, and I figure that Sylvia Cavanaugh and Dolores Kinchen will bring some new blood into the old column. Unless unforeseen difficulties arise (such as being bumped) I'll be heading for the promised land of los estados unidos tonight aboard the FLAW flight. To all the teen-agers I'd like to say thanks for the memories. DID 'JA SEE????? "Red" and Dee Dee cleaning up after the mob had gone home last Sun.? ? ? .Sylvia's good looking girlfriend from Gtmo, Jiacy, who was attacked by Jere W.'s over friendly dogs? ...Down boys, down' .The two new cats with crazy hair-cuts .Freddy Swords and Ralph Sierra, Jr.?????. Peggy Lasiter's darling little newborn pupster that is so spoiled it has to be rocked to sleep? ???. Howie sitting on Peggy Percell's lap all the way home the other night? ? ? ? ?. Pat Fojt and Norm "together again", only this time Norm is here as a teen-ager and not a middy. "Dirty" Heimer dancing with Ginger Shyver at the TAC the other Tuesday eve. ? ? ? ."The Girls" having dinner at Marine Site? .Shar Keenan's cute new hair-do ? ? ? Pat Woods' new pen pal named Phil (not Keenan, thank goodness) ? ?. Irv sweating away at his job everyday? He should get his Ditch Digging Degree out of all of this. Hospital Notes by P. R. Haberstroh HEIRPORT NEWS Congratulations to HM3 and Mrs. Henry Keim upon the arrival of their third child, a boy Mark James. Other births recorded in the Gtmo Birth Parade gave the young ladies the lead, after two months of male supremacy. Our new members are: Pamela Louis to AT1 and Mrs. James Nolan; Garrison Owens Jr. to T/Sgt. and Mrs. Garrison Schuler; Carl Alfonso to BM3 and Mrs. James Billington; Allison Colleen to FT2 and Mrs. Gillifoid Sweeney; Susan Kim to BM3 and Mrs. Donald Berman; Sandra Kay to EN1 and Mrs. Robert Wolf; Rochelle Marie to EN1 and Mrs. Harry DuBois; Melissa Victoria to LT and Mrs. Edward Kellog; Kenneth Walter to BMC and Mrs. Charles Wilson; Linda Ann to Sgt. and Mrs. Barnard Lee; Carol Ann to AB1 and Mrs. John Ingram. ARRIVALS Many new faces are to be seen at the hospital as a welcome aboard is extended to seven new arrivals. LTJG Jasper F. Rawl Jr., MC, who came here from MCB-1. Four of the seven new arrivals came from the U.S. Naval Station, Trinidad, British West Indies, LT Dorothy I. Schweiger, NC, LTJG Katherine Chadwick, NC, HM2 John McGurrin, and HM3 Donald Lapp. Arriving from the U.S. Naval Air Station, Anacostia, D.C. was HM3 William Miller, as HN John Nunn III came here from the Naval Hospital at Camp Lejeune, N.C. DEPARTURES LTJG S. E. Lavin, MC, left the hospital, and returned to his old duty station MCB-1. Armand Ward, HM1, departed by FLAW to the U.S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida for release to inactive duty. Robert Malo, HM3, another old timer, left Saturday on the USNS Johnson for transportation to the U.S. Naval Receiving Station, Brooklyn, New York. Bob is expecting to enter the Physical Therapy Technician School in his home state of Conn., after his separation from the service. We wish all of you luck in your new jobs and assignments. SIDELIGHTS Chief Wertly hands are at last healed, but he still has that fish story to tell. Agen will you try and explain to George just how he looses his water glass so much. At this time we would like to congratulate all members of the Staff baseball team. Although the scores and records were not on the winning side, we salute all of you for the sportmanship you have shown. MEET THE STAFF Being here at Gtmo for twentyone months, we feel it is time to meet Stanley Garrett HN. Born in New York City, he later moved with his parents to Burlington, Vermont. Garrett entered the Navy October 1951, going thru Boot Camp and Hospital Corps School at Bainbridge, Md. After graduating from Corps School he stayed at the U.S. Naval Hospital Bainbridge, and was later transferred to one of the Training Center's dispensary. On the 16th of September 1953 he left Bainbridge for the first time since his enlistment, and came here to Gtmo. Now with only 20 more days to do down here, Garrett is looking forward, for his separation from the service. His plans for the future are to enter the field of radio and television. Page Two

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Saturday, 6 August 1955 Saturday, 6 August 1955 THE INDIAN Page Three Modern Traffic Code To Go Into Affect In Cuba Today Cuba's new and modern traffic code will go into effect as of 12:01 A.M. today, 6 August, 1955. Since there are many Americans who have occasion to drive in Cuba, some of the more important sections are translated below. The Cuban Government hopes that the new traffic code will serve to halt the wave of accidents which has swept Cuba lately. Aimed at imi roving the general traffic situation, a nation-wide publicity campaign through the press, radio, TV, etc. has been launched to impress tne public with the importance of observing traffic rules. The Cuban press reports that last night, 5 August, ceremonies were beld at the Presidential od to your rit onv days, Pa spo.eial ntinot park your vehicle no less than dent Batista made a10 meters from a corner, nor opwide appeal through the press, polite police stations, Army or radio and TV to the public to Naval Posts, fire departments, abide by the new traffic code to public shows, schools, ministries, cut down on accidents. The enand in a spot within 8 meters from forcement of any rules or laws the entrance of public offices, that tend to benefit humanity canbanks, hotels embassies, temples, not be emphasized, and on this churches, clinics, hospitals, first particular subject of traffic, a sinaid stations. Do not park at loadcere effort must be made to reflect lug section on a work day during our cooperation, as a driver and S and 1 A.M. and 2 to 5 P.M. pedestrian alike. Of the 129 articles Unattended automobiles: Stop contained in the new code, an atmotor, take key out, set hand tempt is made to bring to your brake, and engage low gear. Hand attention, as pointers, such rules signals are similar to those on the that will invite application of base, except provision for allowing severe penalties to guilty parties. another vehicle to pass ahead by These pointers over mainly you making a forward motion with the as a driver of a private vehicle. arm Absolutely no horn blowing The code, however, incorporates all during the night in the city. To go classes of vehicles, motor propelled, through intersections, lighting syshorse-drawn and covers pedestrians tam only will be used, on high beam also. First of all, carry with you, atdegree Firs of ll, arr wit you at of visibility. Only in imminent and all times, your Tourist Permit, justified danger, or to summon help Drivers License, Insurance Poliwill the horn be used during the cies, I.D. Cards, and any other hours indicated. No horn blowing documents you believe necessary for making calls, or giving signals, to have with you while traveling nor in cases of traffic jam for any through Cuba. reason. Sirens or whistles absoObey the authorities. Drivers of lately prohibited, and mufflers are motor vehicles or others, in public mandatory on motor vehicles. thoroughfares, are to be held reThe lighting system will consponsible, both in criminal and form to Naval Base standards. civil actions, for deaths, injuries Low beam light within the city or damages caused directly or inlimits, parking lights when vehicle directly. Come to a full stop before is parked on busy streets, and at entering or crossing main throughany point where vehicle is renderfares. Slow down and take apad invisible at 150 meters because propriate precaution on entering of poor illumination of street or crossing secondary lanes. Make lights. A certificate of vehicle ina full stop at all railroad crossings, section is called for, to be carried before proceeding. at all times. This is covered by Overall speed limits, within city Safety Inspection Base Stickers. or town: 20 kilometers (app. 12% Spot lights are prohibited on yemiles) per hour through school and hides, except vehicles of the Armed silent areas, in front of shows, Forces, Security Vehicles, Fire fairs, meeting places, etc.-30 Department, and those others spkilometers (app. 18/2 miles) per cifically authorized by Traffic Coihour during working hours thru mission. public commercial lanes from 6:00 Other requirements, such as A.M. and during all hours on holiwindshield wipers, brakes, etc., to days. Outside city limits, no veconform to base standards. Busses hicle will travel at speeds in exand trucks to have a fire extincess of: 80 kilometers (app. 50 gusher, loading capacity to conmiles) per hour for buses, autos form to vehicle manufacturer spaand motorcycles-60 kilometers cification. Those persons driving (app. 37 miles) per hour for trucks, a vehicle in a state of alcoholic inmotor bikes, scooters, etc. toixcation or under the influence When leaving garages, buildings, of narcotic drugs will upon conprivate lanes, etc., speed should eviction be subject to imprisonment not exceed 5 kilometers per hour. for 3 months to one year. Same Do not cross over fire department penalty will apply to owner of a hoses unless the hose is duly provehicle who knowingly allows antected to avoid damage to same. other person who is in a stats Report all accidents to authority of intoxication or is a minor under in immediate vicinity of accident. i8 to drive the vehicle. Do not cross or drive across airENGLISH SPANISH fields, except duly authorized by Stop Pare airport control. Park in direction Go Siow nespscio of traffic at a distance not greater Detour Desvio than 10 centimeters from the edge Caution Precaucion of sidewalk, leaving 50 centimeters Danger Peiigro between vehicles, except at locaNo Thoroughfare No Hay Pass tions in parking areas having apno Not Paos No Pase proximate markings. Double lane Used to indicate No No Pase parking. Park in direction of trafToepaooing fic oin two lane avenues; on single Right lereeha lane avenues, park near sidewalk (Continued fiom Page Five) 0 Mrs. & Mrs. D. B. Clay (left) of RH-28, Nob Hill, are congratulated by G. Liveakos, MMC, and M. Gordon, HM1, of the Community Council after their yard was selected as the most improved for the month of June. The winners were presented with a $10.00 award for a job "well done." Rifle-Pistol Club HiLites by Fay Yarbro WOW! There was many a POW released when the Guantanamo Bay Pistol Team won the Atlantic Championship at Camp Lejeune, N.C. So, how about coming to the big Pow Wow Monday evening, 8 August, at 7:00 P.M. When the moon rises, watch for smoke signals announcing heap big intertribal plans for future interest of all braves concerned! All squaws come and weave your interest, enthusiasm and ideas for the support of the big brave of your tent. And don't forget the big Turkey Shoot which is scheduled for Labor Day, 5 September, being sponsored by the Rifle-Pitsol Club. The Shoot will be open to All Hands of the Naval Base, with a prize for the winner of each event. The gala event will be hi-lighted with the grand opening of the Naval Station 100 yard rifle and pistol range. Due to the type of recreation proposed, no alcoholic beverages will be sold or consumed Reserve Bill .. (Continued from Page One) year military obligation. A total of five years must be spent on active duty and in the ready reserves. The final year would be spent in a non-training unit. Ready reservists will be required to participate in 48 scheduled drills or training periods and not more than 17 days of active duty training yearly. As an alternative they could spend a miximum of 30 days on active duty during each year of their ready reserve obligation. Other key provisions of the Act authorize the President to: Call as many as 1,000,000 ready reservists to active duty in an emergency without congressional approval. Permit annually up to 250,000 men under 18 and one-half years of age to enlist in any of the services for eight years. This would include six months on active duty and seven and one-half years in the ready reserves. (AFPS) 9 Ole Fire Inspector This writer, I thought, would never be necessary, but it looks like my thinking on the think was just as wrong as my choice of winning race horses or good liquor. When I took my examination for a drivers operator permit I seem to remember that all emergency vehicles would have the right of way. Now I haven't seen anything in writing that has changed this regulation but perhaps a few have. When an emergency vehicle is answering a call, it is for the purpose of helping someone who cannot cope with the emergency and I can't for the life of me see why people driving cars cannot offer the courtesy of at least pulling over to the side of the road and stopping. Or is it like the fellow on the sinking ship. When he was told about the ship sinking he said "let 'er sink, it ain't mine." Just because you don't have need for the Base Police, or you don't have someone hurt or sick, or your house isn't on fire, is no reason to stop the progress of those who are rushing to the aid of someone not so fortunate. In the states in cold climates when the drivers have all the car windows rolled up, there is reason to believe the siren can't be heard, but on Gtmo where every breath of cool air is appreciated, the car windows are not rolled up, and the sirens should be observed. Why folks, taking an emergency piece of equipment on the roads of Gtmo is just like taking an old maid to the circus, you don't know what will happen. There is such a thing as "road equity." Let's all observe the existing rules and directive. Don't cause undue animosity with other car operators. Page Three THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 6 August 1955 THE INDIAN Post Season Tourney Underway; Ladies GolfShots Little Leaguers To Play Mallards Wins First Two Cames by Joe Duffy The VU-10 Mallards showed plenty of power at the plate to win their first two tournament games and forge to the front in the race for the tournament title. After defeating the Naval Air Station 13-2, they came back the next clay to lamblast the high flying Marine squad by a 16-5 score and emerge as the only team without a defeat on its record. The Naval Station Indians, after dropping their first game to the Marines 3-1, came back on Tuesday night to defeat the NAS Flyers and eliminate them from any further play, and qualify to meet the Marines for th semifinal tussle. The winner of the Naval Station-Marine game goes against the leading VL-10 team. Since VU-10 has not lost a game in the tournament, the challengers must defeat them in two games to take the title, on the other hand, VU-10 has only to win one game to be declared the titlist. FIRST GAME -Naval Station vs Marines. The Marine "Leathernecks" rallied behind the four-hit pitching of Jack Dowd to score a 3-1 victory over the league leaders and take the tournament opener. The Marines scored two runs in the fourth-inning to take a 2-0 lead when Castellow walked and Liggett, Plante and Collins followed with consecutive singles. Naval Station scored their lone run in the top of the eighth when with two outs, McCowan singled and came home on Morgan's triple. The Marines scored the in the bottom of th Castellow poled a home run over the left field fence with the bases empty. Winning pitcher Dowd gave up one walk while striking out two, while loser Dale Buss walked four and struck out six to suffer his first setback of the year. The line score: R H E NavSta 1 4 3 Marines 3 6 2 SECOND GAME-VU-10 vs Naval Air Station. The second-place Mallards banged out fifteen hits to score a decisive 13-2 victory over the fourth-place Flyers of NAS in the second game of the tourney. Trailing by 2-1 after four innings of play, the Mallards rallied for four runs in the fifth inning before any outs were made as a result of three walks, two singles, an error and a wild pitch. The Mallards increased their lead with two runs in each of the seventh and eighth innings, and four more in the ninth as Edgar and Gidson kept the Flyers scoreless after the third inning. Edgar started on the mound for VU-10, but was relieved by Gibson in the seventh-inning in order to rest their ace pitcher for next day's game. Moe Morris was the big stick for VU-10, getting four for six to register five RBIs. The line score: RH E VU-10 13 15 1 NAS 2 6 6 THIRD GAME-Marine vs VU10. The two tournament winners met in the third contest in what was supposed to be a tight ballgame, however, VU-10 continued pounding the ball in the same manner that they had overwhelmed NAS the day before to rack up two runs in the first-inning and six in the second-inning to take an early 8-2 lead and knock starting Marine hurler, Patton, out of the box. He was suceeded on the mound by Dowd, Youngs and Holmes, but the Mallards continued their hit pace by scoring four more runs in each of the fourth and sixth innings to turn the game into a rout. Eels led VU-10 at bat with a triple and two singles, as everybody in the lineup connected for at least one hit. Edgar, apparently well rested from the previous day, went the route for VU-10. Although he was touched for eleven hits, he kept them well scattered, and nullified their threat with eight strikeouts, four of the strikeouts ended innings in which the Marines were threatening. R H E Scotch Foursome was held last Three Game Series Wi h are and Mrs. Leach n ,tt nd Mrs. Larson Sunday. Results were: 1st low grosstie beween CDR and Mrs. W LT(jg) Byerley a 2nd low grosstie between LT and Mrs. Brya CDR and Mrs. Sco 3rd low grossYN2 Peddycord a 1st low netATi Payne nad Mrs. Forester 2nd low netAEC and Mrs. Dickson 3rd low nettie between LCDR Kuba and Mrs. Brotherton Mr. Kidwell and Mrs. Pennell Longest drive on #1CDR Scott and Mrs. Larson Longest putt on #9Miss Maryalice Murphy Closest to pin on 2nd shot #18Mrs. Nelson The tables were turned on Tuesday when the Ware Wigglers defeated the Sharit Shimiers 6/2 to 2/2. The team matches are now scheduled to be played on Fridays, Cuban Little Leaguers by Joe Duffy The Naval Base Little Leaguers will play a three-game series with a Cuban boy's team on the Villamar diamond. The series will take place on three succeeding Sundays, first game to be played tomorrow, August 7th, at 1400. The local nine will consist of players picked from the four teams that made up the league during the past season. Last year the local team dropped all three contests to their Cuban rivals, and are out to even the score this year. CDR Archie, President of the Little League, has stated that he will present all the boys who took part as team members of the Little League and Pee Wee League with a baseball pin at the next meeting of the League officials. He also stated that there would not be any trophies given to the winning teams this year, because he theorized that the true spirit of the Little League becomes lost when the teams fight for trophies. Since trophies have been awarded in the past, this decision by the President should be an unpopular one. What's Doin' Stateside The day may soon come when we'll be able to order a house to fit our personality. It's all possible in the world of the future, says Jerry Luss, a New York architect, who is convinced that in 2000 AD "houses, like the human body, will be machines for living. And like the body, they will be built from the inside out." ....Luss, who works for Designs for Business, sees houses of the future with foundations made up of a material similar to foam rubber. Rooms will be set up on this material and snapped together. Like ham, they'll be available at your nearest corner store. The Federal Communications Commission, in its recently published statistics for the fiscal year 1954, reveals that America has a lot of glib takers. Telephone company officials estimate that in three minute calls the number of words exchanged may range from 450 to 750 words, averaging about 500 words a call. Statistically speaking, this means that the nation's telephone conversations represent approximately 185 million addresses and soliloquis a day. Hewitt-Robbins, Inc. recently put on a public demonstration of a new type of moving sidewalk that can swirl around curves, carry passengers and baggage in any directionall on an endless red carpet. The company said it "clears the way for increased mechanization of pedestrian traffic at airports, large shopping centers, railroad terminals and subways." Three of the new conveyors will be installed in the new $10 million air terminal at Love Field, Dallas, Tex. They will have a total length of 1,406 feet. (AFPS) so Ladies be sure to be there for 5 11 5 your games. 16 13 2 On Wednesday a Blind Five FOURTH GAME-Naval Sation vs Naval Air Station. The Indians stoked out sixteen hits paced by Morgan's homerun and double, to eliminate the Flyers for the tournament in a topside 19-5 win. Buss started on the mound for the Indians, but retired after three innings with a 9-0 lead. Amborski took up the mound duties for the next five innings to pitch scoreless ball and gain credit for the victory. In the ninth-iniing, Kennedy switched from first base to pitch the final inning and was rapped for all the Flyer's runs as he walked two, hit one batter and gave up three hits. This not being the usual standard for successful pitcher, Kennedy will henceforth stick to playing first base in all future games. In scoring their 19-runs, the Indians scored in all innings except the fourth and sixth. Morgan's home run came with two mates aboard in the ninth inning. The line score: R H E 19 16 3 5 6 8 Tournament was held for flights. Winners were: 1st flight: tie: for first Kay Sharit Mary Ann Pennell tie for second Edie Ware Vina Bryan 2nd Flight: tie for first Vivian Soballe all Annette Forester Doris Dickson 2nd: Billie Nelson 3rd flight: 1st: Audrey Ellis 2nd: Doris Rothenberg We are very sorry to announce that two of our members are leaving us. Catherine MacGregor leaves for Massachusetts in the near future, and Sue Scott will 'be on her way to Teaxs. Both will be greatly missed in GTMO. Here wishing you good golfing in the States! ! Page Four Marines VU-10 ir final talley ie eighth when NavSta NAS The 1955 All-Star team that will represent Guantanaino Naval Base in the Southeastern Conferenice tournament in Jacksonville, Florida, will play the Oriente Naval District Headquarters i team from Santiago de Cuba today. The game will be played at the Fleet Recreation Area, Diamond #1 and -will start at 1400.

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Saturday, 6 August 1955 Gtmo Golf Club Championship Continues Second Round Of Play Divots, dust, and rocks flew thick and fast in the second round of the 1955 Guantanamo Golf Club Championship matches as local linksters teed off this week in hopes of gaining the next bracket in their respective flights. In the championship flight, the match of the week was played last Sunday between ADC Lee Rogers, NAS, the qualifying medalist, and LT Tom Drace, VU-10. Rogers edged LT Brace one up as both golfers pushed par all the way to the last hole. Rogers' brilliant wedge wizardry won the 17th 1)ole to put him one up in what proved to be the clincher after both players had battled for the lead for the Roger ede T rc )oeu previous 16 holes, with neither man getting more than a one hole lead. Commencing Monday, 8 August, In the second flight, Chief Grathe Sailboat Locker will resume bowski, FTG, downed CAPT Caruthers, NavSta, one up on the 19th its regur shdle. Iwlb hole. LTJG Don "Hot Putter" ope s e Byerley, NavSta, trimmed Dr. Doohen, NavHosp, one up to adAt present there is only two vance to the second round. more weeks left in the GuantanDown in the third flight, Mr. amo Fishing Tournament. The Aven, NavSta, came from behind Sailboat Locker now has six new to eliminate Capt. Jack Swords, motors so all you tournament MarBks, one up on the 19th hole fishermen shouldn't have any trouin another hard fought match. The ble, getting either a motor or boat toughest battle of the third flight, to go out and catch that prize however, saw Chief Allen, NavSta, winner. going to the 21st hole to beat A new price has been set on the Hamilton, one up. rental of sailboats. From the hours Dr. Nelson, NAS, defeated AD of 1630 until sunset, the price is Mullins, VU-10, one up in the only now $1.00. closely contested natch in the Here are the standings in the fourth flight. tournament as of Monday, 1 AuThe first round losers (defeated gust: 16) in the championship flight now become the first flight and still BARRACUDA have a chance to take home some 15 lbs. 4 o. Sid Davenport of the trophies offered for this 17 lbs. 11 oz. K. W. Watkins event. Results of all first round matches as follows: 14 lbs. 11 so. .K. Giggy Championship Winner Loser Rogers 1 up over LT Drace Richards 7-6 over Trytek Dr. Bryan 5-4 over Collins Broughton default CAPT McCrac Kidwell l up Scherlacher Adams 4-3 LT Larson Clemons 3 up Ferenchak LCDR Dempsey 6-5 Lachtara Dustin 2-1 Pugh Peddycord 2-1 CHPCLK Gool Harville Def. CDR Scott Doulin 2-1 CDR Lawlor Gurka Def. King Halentic 1-up LTJG Morgan 2nd Flight Lackey Def. Griffin Cobanski 3-2 Walters Payne 1 up Dr Doss Campbell 8-7 LCDR Minard Corliss 4-2 Magas Grabowski 1 up 19th CAPT Caruthe CAPT Moe 5-4 Dr Mochella CDR Soballe Def. Naegle Dickson 6-4 Johnson Stowe Def. Parker Roberts over Galkiewicz Savage over CDR Manning Hairston 7-6 DiMaggio LT Byerley 1 up Dr Doohen Kelley defeated Monte LT Noga default CWOHC Dote 3rd Flight Arnold over Corriveau Trotter 8 up Crampton CDR Rothenberg bye Fuerst bye Aven 1 up 19th CAPT Swords Sparks bye LCDR Pierce bye Walker bye Dickson bye White bye Kenyon defeated Knight Jenkins bye Surges bye Allen 1 up 21 holes Hamilton CDR Skadowski bye Fourth Flight Lee 3-2 Freeburg Frants defeated Ellis Forester bye Markham bye Smith B. E. defeated Gibson Brown bye Thorley bye CAPT Murphy bye Dr. Nelson 1 up Mullins Schmitt bye Backeock 7-6 LCDR Richmo Hicks bye Roberts C C. defeated LTJG Maxwell James 9-8 Plourde Choate over Kadlez LT Pavlow 9-8 Gosnell ken sby rs SNAPPER -GROUPER Grouper 177 lbs. V. A. Roberts Snapper 57 lbs. D. Johnson Grouper 42 lbs. 14 oz. J. F. Robson JACK -POMPANO Jack 20 lbs. D. E. Olson Jack 19 lbs. 14 oz. R. E. Seagle Jack 17lbs. Mrs. S. Davenport SNAPPER-GROUPER-JEWFISH Jack 17 lbs. Mrs. D. Davenport LADYFISH -BONEFISH Ladyfish 4 lbs. 6 oz. R. E. Seagle Ladyfish 3 lbs. 15/ oz. G. M. Ewing Bonefish 3 lbs. L. E. Hallman SNOOK 19 lbs. 6 oz. D. E. Thomas 18 lbs. 1%/_ oz. Doris Seagle 14 lbs. 2 oz. Pat Aldridge 13 lbs. 12 oz. R. L. Prichett BONEFISH -LADYFISH Ladyfish 4 lbs. 6 oz. R. E. Seagle Ladyfish 3 lbs. 151,% oz. G. M. Ewing Boneflish 3 lbs. L. E. Hallman CROAKER 1 lb. 318 oz. Mrs. Hilda Potts 1 lb. L. E. Hallman MACKEREL-1 lb. 5 o. A. D. Nelson. SHARK 204 lbs. G. T. Palms LARGEST BY CHILDREN Barracuda 7 lbs. 41/ oz. James Page SHARK-79 lbs. E. B. Rooff. LARGEST LADIES-17 lbs. Jack-Mrs. Davenport. LARGEST CHILDREN-7 lbs. 41 oz. Barracuda-James Page. SPEAR FISHING Grouper 43 lbs. A. P. Ahlberg Goruper 17 lbs. 8 oz. J. L. Reif Barracuda 16 lbs. 10 oz. R. H. Anderson The former commanding officer of the U. S. Naval Supply Depot, CDR E. W. Sutherling, recently received his fourth stripe. Rear Admiral Joel D. Parks, Deputy Chief of the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts pinned the silver eagle on his collar. VU-10 Prop Blast by F. A. Azzarita Three couples took advantage of the Saturday night dance held at the "0" Club. Although small as a representative group, their presence was well established. What better could one ask for ? A tunefull band on an open patio, broadleaf palms under an open sky, with colored lights and blinking stars to illuminate the merriment, and the soft breeze coming off the bay are all part of the pretty picture. The more the merrier so take advantage of the opportunity and join the gang at the VU-10 table. The VU-10 jet line looked fine this week. All five Cougars were up and ready to fly. Chief O'Conner and his men of the Leeward Point Detachment deserve a hearty "Well-Done". LTJG Dick Palmer up to Norfolk, Va. to pick up a new JD-1. Dick returned last Saturday with the aircraft. The JD has already received its trimmings and the new number 22 has been painted on its side. The Greenfields returned from fifteen days leave. While on their vacation, they bought a jeep station wagon and used it to sightsee through Cuba. Dick and Nancy visited many of the small towns and hamlets which dot Cuba. They marveled at many of the sights and throughly enjoyed themselves. I imagine, however, that now the Greefields are honorary members of the "Oh My Aching Back Club". Santiago de Cuba was in all its splendor these last two weeks. The city was gayly decorated and excitingly alive for the festive carnival holidays. All the giaety, humor ,and splendor of any Mardi Gras was evident. The week-end spent in Santiago by several of the bachelors was summed up with a big "Cha-Cha-Cha-Magnifico". Cuban Laws .. (Continued from Page Three) Left Keep Right Keep Left Cross Railroad Crossing Enger Exit No Parking No Parking Speed Limit ? ? Reserved Parking Official Parking Taxi Parking Silence Children Pedestrian Traffic Signal Be Careful Traffic Traffic One-Way Traffic Izquierda Conserve so Derecha Conserve so Izquierda Cruce Crucero Ferrocarril Entrada Salida No Parqueo No Auto Velocidad ? ? Auto Particular Auto Oficiales Piquera Silencio Nifios Peaton Semaforo Cuidado Traffic Transito Arrow used alone Arrow used alone or with word TRANSITO "Name?" "Joe Popupopupopupopulas." "Occupation?" "I drive a motorboat." Reader: "You make up these jokes youreslf?" Editor: "Yes, indeed, out of my head." Reader: "You must be!" "It must have cost a fortune." "No, it only cost a kiss." "The one you gave your husband." "Oh, no. One that he gave the maid." FTG Bulletin CWO J. A. Jones, recently of the Engineering Department, departed Guantanamo Bay Saturday, 30 July. Mr. Jones will report to the Commandant, FOURTH Naval District for temporary duty in connection with the conversion of the USS Boston (CAG-1) at the New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey and will be on board the Boston for duty when placed in commission. USS Boston is a Guided Missile Cruiser and will receive training here next year. Willy Mathis, SO1 having rereived orders will depart GTMO in the very near future. Mathis will report for duty to Commanding Officer, (Helicopter) Anti-Submarine Squadron ONE for duty. Ron Federman, YN2, was transferred from FTG Saturday, 27 July. Federman will proceed to the Receiving Station, Brooklyn, New York to await discharge from the naval service. Their leave having expired in the states, Dick Fetterhof, SN, Norm Perron, YNSN and R. Carrigan made the return trip by means of the USS Amphion (AR 13). The Amphion spent four days in wonderful New Orleans before getting underway for GTMO. Also returning from leave in the U.S. were Charley Mayes, PN1, Gene Sukonic, ETR2, Joe Russek, RMSN, and Will Gleason, RD1. The four-some arrived in GTMO last Sunday stepping from the gangway of the USS Shakori (ATF 162) which provided transportation for their return to paradise. CWO Peter Schwindt reported for duty Wednesday, 31 July. Mr. Schwindt is assigned to the Engineering Department and will perform duties as Shipboard Instructor for that department. Mr. Schwindt was formerly on duty with MSTS Office, Yokohama, Japan. WELCOME ABOARD! LT E. Dent, J. Dimaggio, GM1, and R. Gugliemo, BMC completed two weeks TAD at the Marine Barracks, Naval Base, GTMO. They received training in infantry tactics and are now qualified to run up any hill in the area. Mrs. Getzewich, wife of CDR J. Getzewich, and two sons arrived on the base Monday, 22 July. Mrs. Getzewich formerly resided in Garfield, New Jersey. They will reside at quarters M-114, Marine Site. Mr. Marvin Black, public relations officer of the University of Mississippi took a days leave from the Midshipmen Cruise and was escorted about the base by CDR K. Skadowski. Mr. Black was highly impressed in the manner the Base School was arranged and praised the beautiful flowers and trees in the school patio. Robert Eric Minard opened his eyes to the world last Saturday, at 1445. Little Bob somewhat resembles his father weighing in at an even nine pounds. This is the fifth child for CDR and Mrs. R. K. Minard. The Fleet Training Group Golf Team defeated the team from the USS Des Moines in their third match by a score of 29 to 7. The USS Des Moines -Fleet Training Group Golf Trophy will remain in the possession of the Training Group and each time the Des Moines is in the area a match will be played. The event was honored by the presence of Rear Admiral E. N. Parker, Comcrudiv SIX, who presented the cup to CAPT. F. S. Habecker. THE INDIAN aem Page Five nd

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6b Saturday, 6 August 1955 THE INDIAN Navy-DPPO-1OND-Gtmo.-2056 by Ed Talen, SN THE LAST TEMPTATION by Joseph Viertel An interesting novel which cen ters around a young couple who are people of means, education, and taste. Under ordinary circumstances they probably would have lived in a pleasent, rather fashionable suburb. But things were no' ordinary in Europe in 1938, and they are stripped of security and pleasures and flung into a world of crushing degradation and fear Fleeing for survival, they take the wrong path and soon are enmeshed in such a pattern of deceit and wrongdoing that they lose ail decency of living. EXCELSIOR by Paul Hyde Bonner Capitalizing on a fascinating locale that is relatively fresh in fiction-the Swiss city of Zurichthe author has given a vivid reality to a picturesque background. The hero of the story is an 80 year old tyrant who is the head of the international Swiss banking house. He dominates everyone around him to the point that they do not dare venture an independant thought. That is, everyone but his young American grandson Robert, who has inhehited the strength of character and independant nature of his grandfather. The scrapes that the two run into forms a rapidly moving and interesting novel. An interesting aspect of the book is the way it makes the reader see with a new respect the necessity for neutrality in world affairs on the part of the Swiss government. TIGER OF THE SNOWS by James Ramsey Ullman This is the autobiography of Tenzing Norgay, the first man ever to reach the top of Mt. Everest. Told with modesty and quiet humor, it is a warm, simple, and moving story of his life and the greatest achievement of his lifethe conquering of Mt. Everest. ONIONS IN THE STEW by Betty MacDopald Written by the author of the best seller "The Egg and I", and written with the same wit and temerity found in her previous best seller, this is an uproariously funny story about the MacDonald family and their isolated life on an island. Not only humorous, the story creates a beautiful picture of the vibrant Northwest. CAPTAIN COOK AND THE SOUTH PACIFIC by John Gwyther The story centers around the voyage of the Endeavour in 1768. Captained by Lieutenant James Cook, the ship puts out from Plymouth, England to explore the South Pacific. A well told adventure, it is a tale that will satisfy both scholors and adventures. Millionaire: "My boy, when I was your age, I carried water for a gang of bricklayers." Son: "I'm mighty proud of you, Dad. If it hadn't been for your pluck and perseverance, I might have had to do something like that myself." The latest style in the country this season, especially for gardening, as modeled here by the lovely and curvavious Elaine Stewart. Put a piece of hay in her hat and you have a real hayseed, hey? ? Radio's 'Tops' of the Week SATURDAY, August 6 .GRAND OLE OPRY. 9:30 P.M. For a half-hour of the finest in folk, country and western music, be sure to join Cowboy Copas, the Louvin Brothers, and Dell Woods when they beam your way from Nashville, Tennessee. Rod Brasfield and Minnie Pearl provide the laughs. SUNDAY, August 7 .HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE .10:00 P.M. Van Heflin and Nancy Gates star in "The Big Trees", an action packed story of lumbermen versus settlers in 1900. The setting is the beautiful California redwood forests. MONDAY, August 8 .STAR PLAYHOUSE. 9:00 P.M. Lewis Carrol's whimsical tale for children of all ages, "Alice in Wonderland" will come to life when Margaret O'Brien enacts the part of the little girl of wonderful adventures. Also on hand will be The Mad Hatter, the Queen of Hearts, the Cheshire Cat and all the other delightful characters of this classic. TUESDAY, August 9 .THE CHASE. 9:00 P.M. Tonights' Chase is one of greed with an ironic ending. A man courts and marries a widow for her money only to find that she is broke, and that the game he plays has no consolation prize for losers. WEDNESDAY, August 10 .ON STAGE. 9:00 P.M. Kathy and Elliot Lewis bring to the sound stage a beautiful and tender love story of a Greewich Village writer and a lovely artist. The title, "Take My Hand, My Love". THURSDAY, August 11 .FAMILY THEATRE. 9:00 P.M. "The Thin Red Line" is a story of a former news commentator who loses his sight while a combat paratrooper and sinks into a mental morass of bitterness and hatred until an understanding girl comes into his life to restore his confidence. George Nader stars. FRDIAY, August 12 .RADIO WORKSHOP. 10:00 P.M. What causes a man in perfect health to suddenly pass away in the prime of his life just as success in his work seems imminent, when there is nothing organically wrong with him? Listen as the Radio Workshop players dramatize "Th< Strange Death of Jonathan Judd". MOVIES Saturday, 6 August BLACKBOARD JUNGLE Glenn Ford Anne Francis The story of a young school teacher just out of the Navy who gets his first job teaching in a big city manual training school. Located in a tough section of the city, he has a class of juvenillo delinquents who have no respect for a teacher or for his authority. The picture shows the odds which the young teacher has to overcome, including being beaten up in an alley and having a knife pulled on him in the classroom. Sunday, 7 August THE SILVER CHALICE Virginia Mayo Pier Angeli Simon, a magician, claims that hcan 'greater miracles than Christ. He tries to get ahold of the Chalice, which is taken to Rome by a slave. While there, the slave becames a Christian, and upon his return to Antioch is the cause of the persecution of Christians by Simon. Monday, 8 August MAD AT THE WORLD Frank Lovejoy Keefe Basselle The viciousness of juvenile delinquents is presented when three boys, traveling together as ratpacks, attack an innocent man, his wife, and their baby. The angry man attempts to take matters into his own hands but is forced to call on the police. Tuesday, 9 August JUMP INTO HELL Jack Sernas Marcel Dalio Col. Arnold Moss, defending the French fort at Dienbienphu, is surrounded by Communists and wires Paris for officers. Four officers jumping from an airplane into a mile square area still under French control, join the French forces who prove unable to defend the fort. Wednesday, 10 August A NIGHT AT THE OPERA Marx Brothers Kitty Caruse The story begins in Europe with the Marx brothers trying to promote a young unknown opera singer into stardom. Thursday, 11 August CANYON CROSSROADS Richard BasehartPhillis Kirk Richard Basehart is a lone prospector for uranium, but finally makes a 50-50 proposition with a rich prospector, whose daughter, Phillis Kirk, insists on going along. A rich uranium vein is discovered in a cave, but before they can cash in on it, they are imprisioned by a dynamite blast set by an enemy prospector. Friday, 12 August MARTY Earnest Borguine Betsy Blair A butcher, who has never been married, even though his friends and mother keep urging him to do so, meets a wall flower at a dance. In trying to arrange a date the bashful butcher goes through one hilarious escapade after another.