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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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9ie


-"Goevus TCMO LiLe , Sunshine"


Vol. VI, No. 30 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba


Middies, Fleet Sailors Fish Tournament Judges


Complete Annual Visit Decide Roberts' Catch
CompeteAnnul Vsit Eligible For Grand Prize


To OTMO Naval Base

Approximately 3000 Midshipand NROTC students completed their annual visit to Giantanamo Bay today as Cruise "Able", after four days of operations in the area, departed for the States this morning.
The middies, augmented by approximately 11,000 Fleet sailors from the 18 ships of the cruise, took full advantage of the facilities offered to them by the base during the time ashore.
The Fleet recreation area was a sea of bobbing blue-striped hats and the thin gold braid of the upper classmen. All recreational facilities were reserved for the middies during their time ashore. The Petty Officers Club was open for their exclusive use and an additional beer garden was set up on the lawn in front of the club.
The Navy Exchanges reported near-record sales in all the stores with perfume and firearms the largest selling items. Alligator goods followed closely in third place. On a percentage basis, the sale of sporting rifles in the Gun Shop far exceeded the sale of anything else. The Exchange daily sales increased from 3 to 6 times over an average day. Due to the increased buying as a result of the middle cruise, the Exchanges have been able to effect a reduction in prices for articles of interest mainly of interest to base personnel, and promises more sales to come.
The Public Works Transportation Department was so heavily pressed for additional bus service that they had to call on MCB-1 for help. In addition to 5 special busses being put on between the Marine ind Naval Air Station Exchanges, Public Works Transportation had to furnish a means of travel for 1000 to 1200 middies per day to and from the beaches. In addition they had to furnish busses for conducted tours of the base. It all proved too much, and MCB-1 was called upon to furnish three trailers to help lighten the load.
As a grand finale for the Midshipmen, a dance was held at the Chief Petty Officers Club last night, with music being furnished by a Cuban band and also the USS Siboney's band, and as an added attraction a Midshipman Quartet called the "Harmonizers". Hostesses were available to insure an enjoyable evening for the middies.


Once upon a time there was a fish. Now this was a large fish and he lived in a frozen locker at Leeward Point, through the courtesy ... which it probably wouldn't have appreciated ... of one V A. Roberts, CSC.
Now the name of this fish was Grouper.... No, it was Jew Fish. ... No, it says here that the distinguishing marks are....
At least - all concerned agreed that it was a very large fish.. . all 177 pounds of it. Those primarily concerned were the judges since Jew Fish had not been included in the list ol those fish eligible to be entered in the contest. The judges were... and are:~ICDR, C. E. Lee, CDR G. A. Gardes and Mr. E. H. Cavanaugh
Chief Roberts had caught his fish and in accordance with all practices for preserving fish after weighing it in, cleaned and hung it up. The gills had to be removed to prevent spoilage of the fish which could occur even though it were frozen.
The three judges studied all available literature and records ... some six volumes to be specific and finally decided upon "The Wise Fisherman Encyclopedia," by A. G. McClane, 1954.
Both the Grouper and the Jew Fish are members of the Sea Bass family resulting in very few distinguishing marks to differentiate between them. After a half day of study, the three judges came to the conclusion that the fish was either a Grouper or a Jew Fish. And, in fairness to Chief Roberts, they could no more say that it was a Jew Fish than they could that it was a Grouper.
So, the rules of the Fishing Tournament have been altered to allow the entry of both Jew Fish and Groupers in the Grouper-Snapper class. No reason could be determined as to why Jew Fish were not included originally except that they had not been in previous tournaments although both abound in the Guantanamo Bay area. At press time, Chief Roberts' catch was still in line for the grand prize to be awarded to the contestant winding up with the largest fish of all classes combined.


Rear Admiral Edmund B.
Taylor, Commander, Guantanamo Navy Base, was appointed to relieve Rear Adm miral W.G. Beecher Jr. as
Chief of Information. RADM Beecher is being retired for physical reasons on the reconimendation of the Navy physical evaluation board, and will retire with the rank
of Vice Admiral.


Saturday, 30 July 1955


Base Pistol Team Returns From



Camp Lejuene as Atlantic Champs

The Gunatanamo Naval Base .45 Caliber Pistol Team walked off with the 1955 U.S. Atlantic Fleet Conference Pistol Match last week which was held at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. The "Gtmo" team surprised everyone, including themselves, as this is the first year that the Pistol Club has been organized in Guantanamo, and also the first time that they have entered in a competitive event as a team.


Base Safety Record

Far Ahead Of Navy's

Over-All Safety Record

The safety record of Guantanamo Naval Base is far ahead of the Navy's over-all safety record, as was pointed out by Gordon F. Ward, Safety Program Specialist here on the base. The Navy's disabling injury record of 2.27 per million work hours exposed is very high when compared to the safety record of the base of .91 disabling injuries per million work hours exposed.
The Guantanamo Bay Naval Base can say with pride that it had quite a bit to do with the winning of the National Safety Council's coveted Award of Honor that was presented to the Departmient of the Navy for the fifth time in recognition of the Navy's annual safety record in reducing accident yates.
Assistant Secretary of the Navy Albert Pratt received the award plaque from Ned Dearborn, President of the National Safety Council, at a ceremony in the Pentagon on 17 June, 1955.
The Navy Department previously won the NSC Award of Honor in 1953, 1952, and 1950. In each of these years the record of the base was far below that of the Navy as a whole, and shows that the safety record here on the base is one to be proud of.



Navy Grants EM


Early School Out

Washington -Early discharges have been authorized for Navy enlisted men who are enrolled to attend colleges this fall.
EM who show evidence of acceptance to a college or university will be eligible for separation as much as 30 days before their normal expiration date. They must also furnish confirmation that their transcripts and credits from previous schools are acceptable, before they will be given the early discharge.


The team, firing against such opponents as AirSqdn. 4, ComPhibLant, AirLant, Amphib Force, Atlantic, etc., was unbeaten in the elimination matches.
The team, consisting of LCDR R. K. Minard, team captain, N. P. Walters, MRC; J. B. Jocks, A01; W. A. Fetters, ME3, and K. E. Schieble, ME2, left for the states via FLAW on 17 July, just a few days after they received their .45 caliber pistols, and returned as triumphant champions on 24 July. Two other members of the team, CDR R. V. Peterson and J. V. Allen, MEC, were unabI eto get away for the Camp Lejeune tournament.
Individual honors went to LCDR Minard, who qualified for one leg as a distinguished pistol shot, and J. B. Jecks, both who qualified for the All-Navy Rifle and Pistol Tournament to be held 1-7 August at Dam Neck, Virginia.
The team plans to try and cont'nue their success in the National Matches which will be held on 1-9 September at Camp Perry, Ohio.
In the meet at Camp Lejeune, Guantanamo Bay was the "unknown", but no longer, as they are now the proud owners of the t'tle "Atlantic Fleet Champs of 1955."
The high scores in the match were J. B. Jocks with a 269 and LCTDR Minard with a 263.
The total aggregate in individual scores is:
LCDR R. K. Minard ____ 527 J. B. Jocks, AO -------- 515
N. P. Walters, MRC ___- 477 W. A. Fetters, ME3 -_-- 476 K. E. Schieble, ME2 -___ 420


Commissary Store Recently

Installs Self-Service Meat Cases
Monday, 25 July, opened a new era of meat buying in the Commissary Store aboard the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, when the new self service meat cases were put in use.
This system has been a constant drive of LCDR W. W. Davis, Commissary Officer, since his arrival here, for faster and better service in the meat market. Mr. Davis and the butchers wish to caution patrons against freezing the meat in trays and packages as it is purchased from the Commissary Store. The meat that is to be frozen should be re-wrapped in regular freezer wrap or foil to keep it from becoming freezer burnt.


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Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 30 p955


THE INDIAN

The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
RADM EDMUND B. TAYLOR, Commander Naval Base, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba
CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba
Editorial Staff
LTJG J. D. Byerley ---------------------------------- Officer-Advisor
G. L. Henderson, JOC ---------------------------------------- Editor
D. C. Roberts, JOSN ------------------------------ Managing Editor
E. J. Talen, SN ----------------------------- ---------Staff Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
Material marked AFPS may be used by any news medium provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part, with or without credit.
All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


Sunday, 24 July 1955

Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services
Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0930-Sunday School
0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Sabbath Services Christian Science
Sunday: 1000-Station Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDRp . J. Sullivan, CHO, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)


The Chaplain's Corner




DO NOT LOITER
Hanging on the door of a church in an industrial residential section of Philadelphia was a sing "Do not loiter here." Evidently it was meant to keep the patrons of the nearby taverns off the church steps. I could never accept that sign as it is, wishing to see these woods instead, "Come inside." Who knows what miracle "God's mysterious ways" might make in mens lives. There is no sign on the chapel today other than the welcome to come in and worship God.
Many today are loitering on the steps of a rich religious experience and life. They are reluctant to pass over the threshold into the beautifully furnished room of Christ's presence and a way of life in accord with his teachings. Why do you tarry? Way wait on lifes end? Jesus loved you enough to die that the world might be redeemed through Him.
Our reasons for hesitating are


LAFRA News
The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Fleet Rseerve Association held a Membership Social at the Flamingo Room with Vice-President, Mrs. Tarwater as hostess and assisted by the President, Mrs. Hamm. The table was arranged for buffet style service with a lovely centerpiece of fruit and candles. Delicious sandwiches, pie, tea and coffee were served to the delight of all.
The many members and guests present enjoyed playing Bingo, the winners receiving gifts and cash prizes. The guests all had a good time and expressed their desires to become members.
Socials are a monthly event of the Ladies' Auxiliary and take place on the last Thursday of each month. All members and guests are cordially invited.
For the information of all those interested in joining the Ladies' Auxiliary, the aims and principles of the Association are to aid, assist and promote in all matters pertaining to welfare, social and patriotic work, for the benefit of the Fleet reserve Association, its m-embers and their families.

many. Indifference is one, because we are not aware of the need of any comforting grace. We are wholly indifferent to God and His Son. We must realize that religion is a vital necessity in our lives. Another is an unwillingness to accept tasks in the chapels and kingdom work because they might interfere with our will to read magazines or best selling fiction, to listen to the radio, to lie in bed and sleep, instead of turning to God's greater drama through Bible reading and worship. God has given us six days to use as our own, is it too much to ask that He be given the seventh day. My prayer is today that you might discover the deeper meanlags of life which gradually fill the heart of a Christianas he or she takes an active part in God's world and work.
May you pray this prayer today with the deep feeling that it so rightly deserves. "Dear God, who knows our smallest desires, cleanse us front selfish ways. Forgive us for loitering and lead us to a fuller Christian experience and more active service. In Jesus' holy name we pray. Amen.
C. C. Gaston
Chaplain, MCB-1


VU-10 Prop Blast Sailing Club Info


by F. A. Azzarita
Utron TEN has the pleasure of playing host to Captain J. A. Miller of ComUtWing, Norfolk this week. CAPT Miller and his party arrived in Gtmo on the 27th and are slated to depart tomorrow.
One visiting Midshipman is of particular interest to VU-10. Jack P. Brandel is visiting his brother LTJG W. J. Brandel. Midshipman Brandel is on the USS Iowa and will re-enter Auburn College this fall.
Two more re-enlistees for this week are Ernest L. Pennell. ADC, and Dale W. Mountford, AT1. Pennell has completed 181/ years and this is Mountford's first re-enlistment.
Three members of Utility Squadron TEN, LT W. E. Hill, M. M. Cassells, AD2, and R. K. Harnsberger, A03, recently completed the Marine Infantry Instructor's Course. Cassell's only comment: "Those hills are alot steeper than they look."
Reporting aboard this week are John T. Lynch, PHAN, Jose B. Paz, AA, and H. W. Schiavone, AA. Welcome aboard!
The VU-10 Mallards lost last Tuesday evening to the Marines, 6-3. The score however, does not give a true picture of the thriller. Gene Edgar pitched a beautiful game throughout the 11 innings, giving up only three runs. The final blow came in the bottom of the 11th when Chuck Hunter hit a home run with two men on to cinch the game.


The Guantanamo Bay Sailing Club was organized on July 15th under the leadership of CDR George A. Gardes, USN for the purpose of racing sailboats. On July 23rd and 24th the first of a series of races was held. During the current racing series, which ends on September 17th, each participating skipper must compete in 5 races. At the end of the series the skipper with the highest number of points will be the winner. Points are awarded in each race as follows; First place-5; Second place-4; Third place-3; Fourth place-2; Fifth place-1.
Races will be held each Saturday afternoon commencing at 1300. All holders of Guantanamo Bay Skipper's Cards are eligible and welcome to compete in these sailing races. Persons desiring to compete should contact CDR A. S. Archie, the Chairman of the Racing Committee, at 8524.
Point standings for races conducted through July 24th are:
No of Total
Skipper Races Points
A. S. Archie 2 10
C. R. Collins 2 8
B. Weber 1 5
G. Leach 1 4
A. Furlong 1 4
G.A. Gardes 1 4
P. F. Wells 1 4
F. Myers 1 3
H. Henry 1 3
R. J. Matchens 1 3


THE TOWN CRIER

by M. Gordon
ATTENTION RESIDENTS OF VILLAMAR
Would you like to have a sidewalk for your children to play on instead of in the street? If you are interested in seeing curbs and sidewalks layed on 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th streets in Villamar, contact your concilman. This may indeed provide the opportunity to keep the youngsters off the streets and out of dangers way.
Captain Caruthers has informed the council that he has recommended to the Base Eng"ieer to make a study relative to the feasibility of designating 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th streets as "ONE-WAY" streets, traffic to flow in alternate directions.
Captain Caruthers has also informed the council that he has made reccjnmendations to have the Commissary Store and Navy Exchange Service Station remain open until 2100 on Wednesdays. This should alleviate the burden imposed on the many non-driving wives and mothers as to their Commissary Store shopping problems.
Other things under consideration and wholeheartedly approved by Captain Caruthers are: Emergency telephones in Nob Hill, fire alarm boxes in Nob Hill and who knows, perhaps, a fire station nearer to the housing area. Perhaps we will see these things materialize in the very near future.
Due to the great success of the dance held at the Villamar Lyceum on 15 July, and the many enthusiastic requests for more of the same, the Community Council would like to announce that Captain Caruthers has approved another "Special Uniform" dance to be held. WHEN: 19 August 1955. Dancing time will be from 2000 to 2400 and will be held at the Villamar movie lyceum with music being provided by Delgado and his orchestra, who will have as an added feature, a specialty dance team. Admission by invitation only which will be delivered to residents of the housing area.
IMPROVEMENT OF LAWNS
How much improvement have you made on your lawn? Remember the Council awards to the yard of the month, a prize of $10.00 in cash. Make your yard and lawn area more attractive to the eye. Perhaps YOU will be the winner for the month of July.
In case you have forgotten or misplaced the name of your councilmen, here they are again by precinct: Precinct 1, T. L. Trimble; Precinct 2, M. Gordon; Precinct 3, B. H. Carr; Precinct 4, G. Liveakos; Precinct 5, W. A. Schnake; Precinct 6, J. B. Ralston; Precint 7, R. W. Twining; and Precinct 8, R. K. Marshall.
Remember if you have any questions or ideas for or about the improvement of YOUR community, see or contact any of the above councilmen and they will be glad to co-operate with you.


14


Page Two


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 30 Ju 1955








Saturday, 30 July 1955


THE INDIAN


Teenage Round-up

by Linda Thurston
Greetings kiddies, from your local gossip monger. This week I have all sorts of goodies to report about your usual carrying-on. Last week-end you w e r e observed swarming down to the sea in cars ( ? ?) to devour Peggy Lassiter's gobs of goodies at a picnic at Windmill. Also reported was Rueben i1acQuarrie for trying to bury Shar Keenan in the sand. That may be exceptable in some parts of the world, but must you bury your victim alive? ? A near riot was started when a couple of seasirens (namely "Head"-Painter Bobbie Stone and Swab-Slingin' Judy Inman) appeared in their new dangerous-curve type bathing suits. Incidentally, the girls confided to me that they keep in shape at the Teen Age Club, employed at such tasks as trimming grass, swabbing floors, rejuvenation of the head and other envigorating chores. Any of you chicks that are interested in the StoneInman Slenderizing Course will be received with open arms. Apply at the TAC any Saturday night.
DID 'JA SEE? ? ? ? ?
Norman Huddy? ? ? ? We haven't but we know he's here somewhere ... Caesar sweating out last week's INDIAN? ?? ? Edgar walking back from the beach at eight o'clock Sunday eve.??.... He sang to the wild dogs all the way home.... Pat W., Irv., Jackie S., and Shar horseback riding Sat. aft, ? ? ? ?. .. Pete's great love for the beach? Why I've heard that he just loves to spend every minute of his spare time out there. . . . Carl Heimer scaring the "night" lights out of one of Gtmo's most unshakeable characters the other midnight? ? .... Marilyn Davis and Pat Fojt turning down rides from Keenan's taxi service every five minutes Mon. eve.???.... The welcome addition of two basketball stars to the high school in the forms of a new junior boy and a SENIOR?????
WORD HEARD FROM THE STATES... That Stan "The Man" Hutchinson is now stationed at Camp Lejeune, N.C. with the Marine Corps. The irony of it all, IF he got his first duty station in Gtmo. The best of luck to you Stan.... That Jimmy Cavanaugh is throughly entrenched at the Academy hnd has already smashed his finger in his M-1 rifle while cleaning it. We wish him the quickest of recoveries . .. That Pat W. is employed in Lexington Park, Md. at a hotel while wating to start her fall term to the U of Md. . . . . .



Off Base Liberty

Military base personnel have an opportunity to see Kingston, Portau-Prince, Santiago, and other scenic spots by taking advantage of the opportunity to travel there on ships visiting these places over the week-end. Check Wednesday's Papoose for any last m i n u t e changes. Ships going to liberty ports next week-end are:

SHIP
USS Cassin Young (DD793)
PORT DATE
Santiago 5 August-7 August


ki J




Recent returnees to the Naval Base after a brief vacation to the British West Indies were LTJG and Mrs. Maxwell and LTJG and Mrs. Morgan. While vacationing in Jamaica, B.W.I. the two couples resided at the Tower Isle Hotel. (Picture by Pierre Chong, Kingston.)


Congress Approves


2,753 Housing Units


At 25 Naval Bases

Washington-Congress has approved 2,753 navy family housing units at 25 stations in Alaska, Canal Zone, Cuba, French Morocco, H a w a i o, Japan, Newfoundland, Philippine Islands and other unspecified locations.
The stations and number of units to be constructed are listed below.
NAAS Brown Field, Calif., 15; Naval Hospital, Corona, Calif., 23; MCAAS Mojave, Calif., 162; MC T r a i n i n g Center. Twenty-Nine Palms, Calif., 2; Naval Underwater Sound Laboratory, New London, Conn., 5; Naval Fuel Depot, Jacksonville, Fla., 1; NAAS Sanford, Fla., 13; Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Mass., 15.
Also MC Aux. Landing Field, Edenton, D.C., 105; NAAS Chase Field, Texas, 40; Navy Department, D.C., 3; Naval Communications Station, Adak, 71; Naval Communications Station, Kodiak, 80; 15th ND, Canal Zone, 40; NAS Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, 27.
Also NAS Port Lyautey, French Morocco, 108; Naval Communications Facity, French Morocco, 122; MCAS Kaneoche Bay, Hawaii, 55; NAS Atsugi, Japan, 90; Naval Radio Facility, Kami-Seya, Japan, 151; Fleet Activities, Yokosuka, Japan, 408.
At NAS Argentia, Nfld., 300; Naval Communication Facility, P. , 296; Naval Station, Sangley Pt., P.1., 26; Naval Base, Subic Bay, P.I., 373, classified locations, 222, (AFPS)

The number of cars and trucks on the nation's roads has hit a new peak . . . More than 59.5 million were registered last year, and increase of over two million compared to 1953 . . . California leads the parade with five million autos . . . An average of about one Californian in every two operates a motor vehicle. (AFPS).


NSD Supply Line

ENS James R. Pope, the Administrative Officer, is visiting with his family in Richton, Mississippi. ENS Pope left the base on 20 July via FLAW and plans to return within ten days.
LT and Mrs. Kenneth A. Woolard and their two sons spent the Carnival Weekend in Santiago de Cuba. They stayed at the newly remodeled Casa Grande Hotel, visited such interesting and scenic spots as Puerto Boniato, San Juan Hill and many of Santiago's famed clubs. They participated in the street dancing and experienced driving along the Santiago-Guantanamo Highway which is now under construction.
William M. McGee, SKC, NSD's former household goods storekeeper left on the 20th via FLAW to return to the states for a short stay at the Receiving Station, Brooklyn, New York. He will be in Brooklyn to await further transfer to the USS Mercury, where he has been ordered to duty.
Miles W. White, who was formerly employed in the backing section of the Material Division Traffic Branch has also drawn a tour of sea dutv. White was transferred on the 24th of July to the USS Orion (AS-16).
Joseph R. Banker, SKGC, is a newcomer to GTMO. He has just reported aboard from the USS Wyandot (AKA-92). Banker reported aboard on 22 July 1955 and has been assigned to duty in the Issue Control Branch of the Control Division.
NSD has received a new Personnelman Chief. Flen W. Vencill, PNC reported aboard on 22 July 1955. Chief Vencill has a long career behind him, having over eighteen years in the Navy. He has come from a tour of duty at the Navy Recruiting Station, Pittsburg, Pa.
NSD Fuel Division held the grand opening of the New Fuel Office at Oil Point. The affair was celebrated with coke, coffee and cake. The cakes were baked by the Depot girls and wives and were very delicious. The dedication was a complete success and was thoroughly enjoyed by all who attended. The new Fuel Office is very spacious and cool. We wish LCDR McFadden and his crew buena suerte and buena fortuna in their new office space.


A A l



.w
A


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Page Three


I


Submarine Amberjack


To Hold 'Open House'


For All Base Personnel

The USS Amberjack (SS522) will hold open house from 1300 to 1700 tomorrow, 11 July, 1955, and extends an invitation to all base personnel to come aboard.
The USS Amberjack, under the command of LCDR R. H. Gibson, USN, arrived here on Wednesday, 13 July, to act as a target for training our own anti-sub-marine forces.
On her way here, the Amberjack rendered the base a service when she went to the rescue of the Wanderer, who was unable to find her way due to the break down of the master gyro. She escorted the Wanderer to a few miles outside of the harbor.
Since her arrival at Guantanamo Naval Base from her home port of Key West, Fla., the Amberjack has had liberty in both Santiago and Kingston. The submarine, which is 306 feet long, carries a complement of 63 men and 8 officers.
Commissioned on 4 March 1946, at Boston Naval Shipyard, the Amberjack joined the fleet too late for service in World War II. She carries a fighting name, however. Her predecessor, the first Amberjack (SS219), sunk or damaged over 40,000 tons of Japanese shipping before being lost on her third war patrol on 22 March, 1943.
After a shakedown cruise to Panama and an Attic cruise in November of 1946 the Amberjack was converted to her present steamlined "Guppy" design by the Portsmouth (New Hampshire) Naval Shipyard. These extensive alterations included installation of a high capacity battery for high speed submerged operation and the addition of a "snorkel". This devise enables a submarine to run submerged on her diesel engines, provides fresh air for ventilation and for charging the ships high pressure air banks. With this device it is possible to remain submerged for a great length of time. A sister ship of the Amberjack traveled 5200 miles from Hong Kong to Pearl Harbor in 21 days completely submerged.


Ladies Golf Shots

by Pat Aldridge
There will be a meeting of the Ladies Golf Association at 11:30 A.M. on August 3rd at the Golf Club. Please try to attend.
On Tuesday the ladies played their first team match. Although Wares Wigglers defeated by Shorits Shimmiers by the score of 6% to 21/2 points, everyone enjoyed playing. We hope to have bigger and better teams.
Wednesday Ladies Day Tournament was Low Putts for all flights. Winners were: 1st Flight-tieEdie Ware and Vina Bryan. 2ndMaryann Pennel. Second Flight1st-Audrey Page-2nd-Cynthia Holley. Third Flight-ist-Doris Rothenberg,- 2nd -tie-Florence Fortenberry and Dee Stadnick.








THE INDIAN


Saturday, 30 July 1955


Naval Station


Takes League


Title


Mallards In 2nd, Leathernecks 3rd

by Joe Duff y
The Naval Base Baseball League finished its regular season play last Wednesady night under the arcs when VU-10 defeated the SeeBees to remain one game ahead of the Marines and hold their position in the league two games behind the pennant winning Naval Station Indians.
The post-season double elimination tournament gets underway this afternoon on Diamond No. 1 at 1400 when the Naval Station squad meets the dangerous Marines nine in the first game. The second game will be played tomorrow afternoon with VU-10 opposing the Naval Air Station Flyers. The third game will be played Monday night under the lights when the winners of the first two
games meet, game time will be ninth innings to send the game
1900. Tuesday night the two losers into extra innings. Tanzi's tenth of the first two games will play, inning single with runners on secthe loser being eliminated from the ond and third put the Flyers ahead tournament, the winner to meet 5-3, but only temporarily as the Monday nights loser. From that Seabees rallied in their half of the point on, the losing team will be inning to knot the count again at eihninated until all but one team 5-5 as a base-hit, two errors and remains to be crowned the tourna- a passed ball scored Moser and ment champions. Peterson. "Doc" Waldrop hurled
TEAM W L Pet GB final four innings to gain third
Naval Station 17 3 .850 - victory in four decisions.
VU-10 15 5 .750 2
Marines 14 6 .700 3 R H E
Naval Air Station 8 12 .400 9 NAS 6 10 3
MCB-1 5 15 .250 12
Staff 1 19 .050 16 MCB-1 5 7 1
With two outs in the Marine's Five runs in the first inning,
half of the eighth inning, Hoffer three in the fourth, and four in the clouted a long home run over right sixth inning gave Naval Station field fence to score Wood and Cas- win number seventeen against tellow ahead of him and give the three defeats for the season, as Marines a 4-1 lead over the Flyers. Dale Buss pitched three-hit shutMarines started scoring in first in- out ball, striking out fifteen batning when Hunter singled in Lig- ters while issuing only one walk. gett from second. Flyers tied it This brought his strike out total up in their half of the second in- to 109 for 73 innings, and win numning, when Rice singled and later ber seven against no defeats. Douscored on Washington's infield bles by Ianiero, Buss, and Markgrounder. The score remained tied ham were the only extra base hits until the eighth inning when Hof- of the game. The closest Staff came fer connected for his second four- to scoring was when Vescovi atbagger of the year. Marines added tempted to steal home in the one more run in the ninth inning fifth-inning with a left-handed batwhen Collins singled, stoled second ter in the hatter's box, an almost base and came on Dowd's base hit impossible feat.
R H E
R4 H E


NAS 1 5 2
MARINES 5 8 2
Seabees scored 6 runs in the third inning and 8 more in the sixth as they took advantage of 5 hits, 10 walks, and seven errors to hand the Staff another setback by the score of 16-2. Disregarding these two disastrous innings, the Staff played the Seabees on even terms. Their pitcher started the inning by walking the first three batters to face him, then helped matters a little by tossing two wild pitches to score two runs. Taking the cue from there, his
infield started to boot the ball around. Same thing happened in the sixth inning, when the pitcher got erratic the whole team fell apart. The Seabee's pitcher, Jack Keasey, had a two-hit shut out going into the ninth inning when Staff scored two runs on two singles walk and infield error. Keasey struck out 11 and issued
2 walks.
R H E
STAFF 2 4 7
MCB-1 16 5 4
Tom Rice scored from third base on a wild pitch in the twelthinning to break a 5-5 tie and enable NAS Flyers to clinch fourthplace in the league standings and gain a play-off berth in the postseason tournament. Rice had gained third base via a walk and two stolen bases, as the winning run was scored without the benefit of a hit. The Seabees took a 3-1 lead in the fourth-inning when Stork blasted a pitch out of the park with two mates aboard. NAS scored single runs in the eighth and


NavSta 12 15 2
Staff 0 3 8
Chick Hunter, Marines first baseman, hit a three-run homer in tenth inning to give Marines 6-3 win over VU-10 Mallards. Hunter's home run was his sixth of the season to give him the lead in that department, it also increased his RBI total to 39 to give him the high mark in run producing. VU-10 overcame a 3-1 Marine lead in sixth inning when Hall walked and came home on Moe Morri's three-base blow. Morris later stole home to tie the score at 3-3. The game stayed tied until the tenth when Hunters's blast ended the game.
R H E
VU-10 3 8 2
Marines 6 10 2
VU-10 Mallards defeated the Seebees in 6-0 contest that saw a total of 27 strikeouts, as the Mallards clinched their second place position in the league standings. Hits were scarce as the Mallard's Bill Madden struck out 16 batters, and the Bee's Al Stork wihffed 11. The Mallards plated single runs in the first and second innings, and added three more in the third to take commanding lead. Postal's third-inning single with runners on second and third base scored two runs to prove to be the only runs to score as a result of a base hit. The other scores were results of walks, errors and wild pitches.


MCB-1 VU-10


$p


Men's Golf Championship Baseball Team Selected Tournament Now Underway To Represent GomTen With 110 Men Qualifying In Southeastern Tourney


The 1955 Men's Golf Championship Tournament is now underway at the Guantanamo Bay Country Club. One hundred and ten qualifiers whacked their way around the local links to enter the current tournament and try to capture one of the many prizes being offered for the respective flights. Lee Rogers was the qualifying medalist (72), with LCDR Jim Dempsey (73) the runner-up, followed by Hubie Broughton (75) and the rest of the field. The entrants are divided in flights as follows:
First 32 qualifiersChampionship flight.
Defeated 16 in
championship flightFirst flight.
33rd to 64th QualifiersSecond flight.
65th to 87th QualifiersThird flight.
88th and above-Fourth flight.
Defeated 8 in 2nd round of Championship flight compose the Consolation Flight.
This tournament is being played under match play rules of golf as laid down by the USGA of which the Gtmo club is a member. All tournament matches have the right of way over non-tournament play Pt all times. Players have one week in which to finsh each match as scheduled on the tournament board at the Clubhouse. The final match to determine the club Champion will be a 36 hole match and spectators will be permitted to watch this match. All other matches are 18 hole matches.


by Joe Duffy
The top three teams in the Naval Base League dominated the recently selected All Guantanamo Naval Base Baseball team that was chosen by player vote to represent the Base in the forth-coming Southeastern Conference Tournament to be held at Pensacola, Fla. commencing 14 August 1955. The first nine as selected by player vote proved to be:


Tanzi Mandis Hunter Clark Postal Morgan McCowan
Bland Wood


NAS
NavSta Marines VU-10 VU-10
NavSta NavSta Marines Marines


catcher pitcher first base second base third base shortstop right field left field center field


The manager, also chosen by vote, will be 1stLt Jack Dowd of the Marine team, a capable player in his own right. The manager will have the right to select additional substitutes from available players to round out his squad of eighteen players. The team will be recognized as the COMTEN champions and will meet representing teams of the districts in the southeastern are. No player from the MCB-1 team was selected since the battalion is scheduled to depart from this area on rotation in the near future. VU-10s stellar ballplayer, Bill Madden, also was eliminated from the voting due to the expiration of his enlistment. Madden would have been on the squad along with Bennett and Keasey of the Seebees, if they had been eligible. Manager Dowd will make his selections and call the team together for practice as soon as the postseason tournament is over, and prior to their expected departure about August 10th.


The top ten batters of the


NAME Hunter Mandis Madden Dowd Wood laniero Hoffer Morgan Costello Bland


TEAM Marines
NavSta VU-10 Marines Marines
NavSta Marines
NavSta Marines Marines


Baseball
AB 85 69 89 68 51 67 76
82 70 67


League for
H 38 28 35 25 18 23 26 27
22 21


the HR
6
1
4
0
1
0
2
1
2
1


season are:
RBI
39 26 23 13
8
18 17 16
14 17


PCT.
.447 .406 .393 .368 .353 .343
.342 .329 .314 .313


Pitching Records

The top six pitchers of the Baseball League based on ERA, at the end of the season:


NAME Madden Dowd Buss


R H E Edgar
0 2 6 Patton
6 3 2 Mandis


TEAM VU-10 Marines
NavSta VU-10 Marines
NavSta


IP 83 58 73 89 57 68


SO
112 44 109 99 39 97


W
8
5
7
7
5
6


L
3
2
0
2
2
2


ERA 1.95
2.02 2.10 2.12 2.68 3.04


Page Four


M


Batting Records







Saturday, 30 July 1955 THE INDIAN Page Five


The Fish Tale (s)

by P. J. Aldridge
Them there fish over in that there river is the golddurndest, dadrattenist, temperementalist critters what ever was created.' If'n I didn't think I'd be called plum loco I'd swear and be durned them Tarpon has been informed about this here tournament and they is just being' downright ornery so as not to give no one the satisfaction of nabbin' and weighin' one in. Why, them devils'll jump right up in your face and dang near spit in your eye. You can almost hear 'em laughin' as they go leapin' by. There you be with all kinds of bait, lures and bobble abouts to entice 'em so what do they do ? Roll a.^ around your boat with them great silver scales ashinin' in the sun just kind of lazy and tauntin' like. The Snook have been takin' lessons, too, but they ain't so bad. At least one of them gets careless once't in a while.
Out to ATC dump they been haulin' in some nice pan size Snappers and they're beginnin' to bite again around Granadillo. Ain't no mammoth giants but right lip smackin' good for fryin'. There's some plenty big ones at ATC though ... big enough to part a shot line several times. Several shot lines, that is. Jew fish and Wahoo wallow around the rocks a takin' after the little yellow jack and snappers for supper.
If'n you're new around here and you get something on your hook which comes up lookin' like a great, ugly, flat wing with a long tail, let her go, leave her be, cut her loose, boy! That there is a nasty Sting Ray which ain't no good no how and you don't want some of any! One whip of that tail and you will have had the course.
Here's a tip for you as is lucky fishin' and has a freezer. Don't never freeze no fish with the gills still in. That there critter will spoil even when all iced up solid if you don't get them gills out as well as his innards. They did it correct like that with that hundred and seventy seven pound what-chamacallit hanging' in the ice house over ot Leeward Point. The judges xho all three trekked over to take a look see to all confused as to what to call the whatchamacallit. Commander Gardis, Mr. Lee and Commander Cavanaugh studied the fish, consultted the Encycopedia for Wise Fishermen, listened to the kibitzers and finally decided to heck with it. That there fish can be any goldurned thing it wants to be and still come out the leading weight snatcher in the contest so far. And that leaves NAS Chief Roberts right gleeful.
Well kids, I'm off to Miami for a few bless'd days so you can drool while you pikcher me a settin' on one of them yacht type boats a swillin' a Big Orange while I angle for one of them cotton pickin' Tarpon which is ignoring' me in Gtmo. Then, slippin' across to Havana by way of Key West, I'll tangle with more Tarpon and maybe mangle a Marlin or King Mackerel just for kicks. You all keep castin' and divin' for these babies though. Take advantage of havin' the REAL expert out of the territory for a few days. I'm just goin' to give you all a chance. If'n you glance at the standin's in this here tourney you can see who's kiddin' now.
BARRACUDA
15 lbs. 4 oz. Sid Davenport 15 lbs. w. B. Robinson
14 lbs. 11 oz. G. K. Giggy


THE TOASTMASTER

by Joe West
The kingdom of mind and heart is under a law similar to the law of growth in the world of nature and although we may shape our own lives, it is this law that molds them. We may misshape the substance with which we work, forming it imperfectly. Thoughts that are formed by hate instead of love turn out life that is lacking in beauty and symmetry. Words that are lacking in truth create forms that shatter at a touch, without strength of usefulness. Mistaken conduct misshapes our work from the beginning, so that it must be done again.
We have the capacity for perfection. Though we do not always choose the conditions that we must meet, we can choose the mental state in which we shall meet them, and by a wise choice develop selfdominion, which, is, after all, the ultimate goal of life on this planet.
All thoughts, whether religious or not, must be true if they are to build anything worth having into our characters and lives. A person comes to be known by his habitual conduct as one who is to be trusted or distrusted, according to the standard of right that he upholds or disavows. He who cares more for what is right and who is more concerned with finding right in every situation than to reap any temporary gain realizes the greates gain of all-a life than is symmetrical because it is in harmony with divine law.
The law of cause and effect is operative in human affairs, and it should be recognized and taken into consideration. If we do not wish to lose the battle of life, it is our prerogative to dedicate ourselves a new to kseeping the law of life.
Divine Law is constant and unvarying but we benefit by it only as we keep its conditions. If we live by it, we reap its rewards If we go counter to it, we reap its penalties. We should stir our perceptive faculties or develop our imagination to the point that we can perceive the rewards of obedience and secure them.


MARINE MUSINGS

by Cpl Paul A. Hoffer, USMC
T/Sgt G. 0. Shuler and Sgt B. R. Lee proudly announce the arrival of new additions to the family. T/Sgt Schuler's wife presented him with a 8 pound baby boy. Sgt and Mrs. Lee are the proud parents of a 5 pound 15 ounce baby girl. Both Mrs. Schuler and Mrs. Lee and the babies are doing fine. The whole command gives their most sincere congratulations.
Baseball season is now over and the Marines will be looking forward to the play-offs which begin next week. Marine Barracks wishes to extend their congratulations to Naval Station on winning the Base title. The Marine ended the season Tuesday night against VU-10, by winning 6 to 3. In the 10th, inning Chuck Hunter ended the game with a three run homer. Hunter has captured the batting, RBI's and homerun title. The Marines ended up with a 14 and 6 record.

SNAPPER - GROUPER Grouper 177 lbs. V. A. Roberts Snapper 57 lbs. D. Johnson Grouper 42 lbs. 14 oz. J. F. Robson
JACK - POMPANO
Jack 20 lbs. D. E. Olson Jack 19 lbs. 14 oz. R. E. Seagle Jack 17 lbs. Mrs. D. Davenport
LADYFISH - BONEFISH Ladyflsh 4 lbs. 6 oz. R. E. Seagle Ladyfish 31 lbs. 15% oz. G. M. Ewing Bonefish 3 lbs. L. E. Hallman
SNOOK
19 lbs. 6 oz. D. E. Thomas 14 lbs. 2 oz. Pat Aldridge 13 lbs. 12 oz. R. L. Prichett
CROAKER
1 b. 31/ oz. Mrs. Hilda Potts
1 lb. L. E. Hallman
MACKEREL-1 lb. 5 oz. A. D. Nelson. SHARK-79 lbs. E. B. Rooff. LARGEST LADIES-17 lbs. Jack-Mrs. Davenport. LARGEST CHILDREN-7 lbs. 4%/ oz. Barracuda-James Page.
SPEAR FISHING
Grouper 43 lbs. A. P. Ahlberg Goruper 17 lbs. 8 oz. J. L. Reif Barracuda 16 lbs. 10 oz. R. H. Anderson


Ole Fire Inspector

Was out on the job tother day trying to make an honest buck, so I can get the "little woman" and the house ape off the cracker and water diet, when I saw something which I don't think should be allowed. I saw beds in buildings which I know darn well wasn't meant to be used for sleeping quarters. I know there are times and conditions which may warrant such things but when I ask if these places were authorized for sleeping quarters, no one seemed to know. When I ask if the fire department had been notified of sleepers in those buildings, I could not get an answer to that either.
Now if it is necessary to have personnel sleeping in buildings not designed for quarters whether it is for security or emergencies, it looks to me like whoever gave the order or permission would take it upon himself to sit down, or stand up for that matter, and write a letter to the Fire Chief to let him know about the sleepers, so i case of an emergency all efforts would be made to see that all sleepers were out of the building.
I have reasons to know that very serious results can happen by permitting personnel to sleep in unauthorized quarters.
I also know why the ones who use of the unauthorized quarters would rather sleep there than in quarters provided for them.
Tother day I saw a fellow rubbing his eyes and being one to try and help my fellow man I ask him what was the matter. He said he had been watching some sparrows laying brick. I ask, "how do you know they were laying brick?" He said, "they must have been, cause one of them dropped some mortar in my eye."
Which brings me to the point of sayin', don't let let anything
blind you to the fact of the possibility of fire. Be on the look out for fire causes with "mortar" free eyes. Don't be like the fellow who couldn't see the forest for the trees.
As for fire prevention lets "get on the ball or on the boat." Guys and gals you can beat a fire so "jine" those who are fire safety minded.
Form a safe habit on Gtmo.


FTG Bulletin

by Ron Federman
There are a number of new faces around FTG! On 22 July, CDR John D. Patterson reported to FTG from the Gunnery Officer's Ordnance School, Washington, D. C., where he served for a period of about three years. CDR Patterson's hometown is New Bern, North Carolina; he is married to the former Pattie Guion, also of New Bern. Rounding out the Patterson Family are two girls, ages 8 and 5, named Sarah and Nancy. Our new Gunnery Officer attended the U. S. Naval Academy, and graduated in the Class of 1942. He previously served with such ships as the USS Wichita, USS Fall River, USS Franklin, USS Marlboro, USS Bordelon, and the USS Laning. Glad to have you aboard CDR!
The ASW Department is one officer richer with the arrival of LT Richard A. Zyvoloski, who checked in on Wednesday, 20 July, from the USS Remey (DD 688). His hometown is Lakewood, Ohio; he is married to the former Eileen G. Cramer, a resident of LakeWood. Mr. and Mrs. Zyvoloski are the parents of four children; James, 8 years old, Jane 7, Richard 21/2, and the youngest addition to the family, Mary Elizabeth, only six months old. Shortly after graduating from Hyattsville High School, Maryland, in 1939, Mr. Zyvoloski attended the U.S. Naval Academy, and graduated in 1945. His former ship, the USS Remey, is scheduled to undergo training at Gtmo in the near future, and he will undoubtedly take delight in inspecting the ASW Department in his old ship, when the occasion arises. Welcome aboard!
On 22 July, another new arrival was assigned to the Gunnery Department, in the person of Albert V. Stermer, FTl, after serving with the USS Ross (DD 563), prior to his transfer to FTG. Al's hometown is Millersburg, Pa., where his wife, the former Betty Gene Spotts, hails from. Other niembers of the Stermer Family are Sandria, age 11, Edward, Age 3, and Ronald, five monts old. His initial enlistment in the U. S. Navy dates back to 1940. Happy to have you with us Al!
Unfortunately, at a time when new men report to FTG for duty, we usually have personnel leaving us to join other commands throughout the world. We bid farewell to LCDR Usey, who departed FTG and the CIC Department on Sunday, 24 July. He will report to the Airborne Early Warning Squadron 11, at the U.S. Naval Air Station, Patuxant River, Md. Best wishes for a successful and enjoyable tour of duty in Maryland!
Another sad farewell to Gammon, GM1, who was transferred on Thursday, 28 July, to Yorktown, Va., where he will attend a course of instruction at Mineman Class "A" and "B" Schools for a period of about twenty-five weeks. Gammon desires to convert to the Mineman rate soon after completion of the course. Prior to reporting to Yorktown, he will meet his wife in Pennsylvania, and Mr. and Mrs. Gammon will travel to California on vacation. Gammon was granted 23 days delay in reporting to his next station. Best of luck!
Frank Hawkins, ET3, better known as "Hawkshaw", was quite happy last Monday night, as the result of winning $40.00 at Bingo.


9








THE INDIAN


Page


MOVIES

Saturday, 30 July
THE GOLDEN MASK
Van Heflin Wanda Hendrix
An American archaeologist journalist joins an expedition in London. The guest is a priceless golden mask, believed to be buried in a Roman tomb near Algiers, and which has had a curse down through the centuries.
Sunday, 31 July
LUCKY ME
Doris Day Robert Cummings
Doris Day and her friends find themselves stranded When their show closes. They experience a number of humorous dificulties before necessary funds are raised to continue their try to land on Broadway.
Monday, 1 August
NAKED ALIBI
Gloria Grahame Sterling Hayden
Sterling Hayden, a police lieutenant, is dismissed from the force because of "brutality" charges by politicians. As a private citizen he persues the arrest of elusive criminals so that he can regain his position with the police force.
Tuesday, 2 August
YOU KNOW WHAT SAILORS ARE
Akim Tamiroff Donald Sinden
The British Navy hears of a secret weapon on the deck of a foreign destroyer. Sinden is sent by the Admiral to learn about the secret weapon. Sinden is caught and held prisoner by a harem of beautiful girls, and he has a hard time trying to decide whether to escape if possible.
Wednesday, 3 August
IT CAME FROM BENEATH
THE SEA
Faith Domergue Kenny Tobex
This is a sicence fiction story of an incredibly large octopus. Two experts are assigned to dispose of the monster.
Thursday, 4 August
THE VIOLENT MEN
Glenn Ford Barbara Stanwyck
A bloody warfare develops between the small dirt farmers and little cattle ranchers against a powerful land baron who tries to drive them out. Heading their group is a former Civil War cavalry officer, who decides to take over when he sees how the people are being terrorized.
Friday, 5 August
WYOMING RENEGADES
Phil Carey Martha Hyer
A former member of a notorious gang who terrorized Wyoming in the 1890's finds that all his efforts to go straight only gets him into more difficulty.


Radio's 'Tops' of the Week

SATURDAY, 30 July ... AMERICA'S POPULAR MUSIC... 5:00 P.M.
One cf America's foremost record collectors and an imminc;t -Ithority on jazz and it's history, Andy Mansfield, will dip generously into his own -Lacks to present a full-hour "biography in shellac" of Woody Hcrn. in. From the first fumbling start to the final triumphant bar you are sure to enjoy this display of jazz at it's finest. SUNDAY, 31 July ... HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE... 10:00 P.M.
A contemporary miracle is re-enacted when Ann Blythe and Charles Bickford star in "Song of Bernadette". A young girl sees a vision of THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION and from her divine experience stems a religious controversy with repercussions down to the present day. MONDAY, 1 August ... STAR PLAYHOUSE... 9:00 P.M.
Rex Harrison and Anna Lee star in a bright, sophisticated comedy entitled, "The Second Man". The play concerns a novelist who finds out that his alter-ego or 'man within' is a cynical opportunist. Inner conflict and laughs are the result.
TUESDAY, 2 August ... THE CHASE ... 9:00 P.M.
Science fiction and the world of the future set the stage for this weeks presentation when creatures from a far-off planet invade earth, only to find themselves betrayed from within by other planet grabbing spies. Involved, but interesting to the end. WEDNESDAY, 3 August ... ON STAGE... 9:00 P.M.
"The Great Dane" is a football player who knows all the rules of sportsmanship and fair play on the field, but thinks they do not apply in everyday living. Cathy and Elliot Lewis will star. THURSDAY, 4 August ... FAMILY THEATRE... 9:00 P.M.
Frank Lovejoy portrays a young man with great ambitions who graduates from drama school but never finds that elusive road to success in the Family Theatre presentation of "Old Friends". FRIDAY, 5 August ... RADIO WORKSHOP ... 10:00 P.M.
An old newspaperman tries desperately to save the people of the world from self destruction. Together with his young daughter and a reporter with faith, he overcomes the objections of a cynical publisher to give to the world "One Happy Headline".


Want a date with Martha Hyer of Hollywood? All you have to do is see "Francis In The Navy", latest comedy about that talking mule, and there's Martha, trimmest craft in the service, playing the role of Navy nurse. She stars with Donald O'Conner and Francis himself, other Hollywood craft featured including Leigh Snowden, Myrna Hansen and Jane Howard.


by Ed Trn
THE LONZLY SKY
by William Bridgeman
This is a powerful and thrilling story about America's foremost experimental test pilot. The substance of the story deals with his d iv-by-day life with the plane that ne is sent out to test, shows how he risks his life to push back the frontiers of scientific knowledge, and also how he accepts the challenge that lies in the lonely region beyond the speed of sound. It is a story that will find it's rightful place in the field of aviation.
DEPENDENT BAGGAGE by Marie Di Mario Wann
The story of an American housewife as she follows her husband who is stationed in Germany during the occupation immediately following World War II. Accepting the challenge, she attempts to make the most of being forced to live in abnormal conditions in the midst of a recently defeated foe. The reader that allows himself to share her experiences will definately be entertained as her account is not only amusing, but also enlightening.
A TRAIN OF POWDER
by Rebecca West
Consisting of five stories, this is the authors reaction as she recreates the drama of famous trials, including the Nuremberg trials of 1946, and the brutal murder trial for the lynching of a colored youth in North Carolina. Using the means at hand, the authors's powerful pursuit of truth gives us a dynamic narrative of psychological detection.
BURNT OFFERINGS
by Richard and Frances Lockridge
Fans of spine-tingling murder mysteries will find perfection in this one. Based on the passions of the old American institution, the town meeting, it is the story of how a peaceful town meeting turns into a wake. Full of action and violence, it is a thriller that will keep you in suspense.
GUNSMOKE MESA
by Dan James
An unusual Western, it deals with the story of the first-born sons of the judge and sheriff who were responsible for the sentence of life imprisonment upon two criminals. The criminals kidnap the two boys and raise them to turn against their fathers, only to have it boomerang when they try to carry out the revenge conceived in their twisted minds.
IN PASSING: Around the U.S.A. in 1000 Pictures by A. Milton and Vilma Bergane . . . a preview of things you may someday wish to see, and also a momento of things you have enjoyed, it covers the high spots of the 48 States.

Girl: (at her front gate with sailor): "I'd ask you in for a while, only mother's out and father is upstairs with rheumatism of the legs."
Sailor: "Both legs?"
Girl: "Yes."
Sailor: "Then I'll come in."


40


y- 0
Navy-DP'PO-1OND-Gtmo.-20S16


I, yA


Q qud 0 Jul 1955


a




Full Text

PAGE 1

9Cg "(6osies QFMO Li L T6e Sunshi ne" Vol. VI, No. 30 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Middies, Fleet Sailors Fish Tournament Judges Complete Annual Visit Decide Roberts' Catch CompeteAnnul Vsit Eligible For Grand. Prize To GTMO Naval Base Approximately 3000 Midshipand NROTC students completed their annual visit to Guantanamo Bay today as Cruise "Able", after four days of operations in the area, departed for the States this morning. The middies, augmented by approximately 11,000 Fleet sailors from the 18 ships of the cruise, taok full advantage of the facilities offered to them by the base during the time ashore. The Fleet recreation area was a sea of bobbing blue-striped hats and the thin gold braid of the upper classmen. All recreational facilities were reserved for the middies during their time ashore. The Petty Officers Club was open for their exclusive use and an additional beer garden was set up on the lawn in front of the club. The Navy Exchanges reported near-record sales in all the stores with perfume and firearms the largest selling items. Alligator goods followed closely in third place. On a percentage basis, the sale of sporting rifles in the Gun Shop far exceeded the sale of anything else. The Exchange daily sales increased from 3 to 6 times over an average day. Due to the increased buying as a result of the middie cruise, the Exchanges have been able to effect a reduction in prices for articles of interest mainly of interest to base personnel, and promises more sales to come. The Public Works Transportation Department was so heavily pressed for additional bus service that they had to call on MCB-1 for help. In addition to 5 special busses being put on between the Marine and Naval Air Station Exchanges, Public Works Transportation had to furnish a means of travel for 1000 to 1200 middies per day to and from the beaches. In addition they had to furnish busses for conducted tours of the base. It all proved too much, and MCB-1 was called upon to furnish three trailers to help lighten the load. As a grand finale for the Midshipmen, a dance was held at the Chief Petty Officers Club last night, with music being furnished by a Cuban band and also the USS Siboney's band, and as an added attraction a Midshipman Quartet called the "Harmonizers". Hostesses were available to insure an enjoyable evening for the middies. Once upon a time there was a fish. Now this was a large fish and he lived in a frozen locker at Leeward Point, through the courtesy ..which it probably wouldn't have, appreciated .-. of one V A. Roberts, CSC. Now the name of this fish was Grouper. No, it was Jew Fish. .No, it says here that the distinguishing marks are. At least all concerned agreed that it was a very large fish .all 177 pounds of it. Those primarily concerned were the judges since Jew Fish had not been included in the list o' those fish eligible to be entered in the contest. The judges were. and are: CDR C. E. Lee, CDR G. A. Gardes and Mr. E. H. Cavanaugh Chief Roberts had caught his fish and in accordance with all practices for preserving fish after weighing it in, cleaned and hung it up. The gills had to be removed to prevent spoilage of the fish which could occur even though it were frozen. The three judges studied all available literature and records ... some six volumes to be specific and finally decided upon "The Wise Fisherman Encyclopedia," by A. G. McClane, 1954. Both the Grouper and the Jew Fish are members of the Sea Bass family resulting in very few distinguishing marks to differentiate between them. After a half day of study, the three judges came to the conclusion that the fish was either a Grouper or a Jew Fish. And, in fairness to Chief Roberts, they could no more say that it was a Jew Fish than they could that it was a Grouper. So, the rules of the Fishing Tournament have been altered to allow the entry of both Jew Fish and Groupers in the Grouper-Snapper class. No reason could be determined as to why Jew Fish were not included originally except that they had not been in previous tournaments although both abound in the Guantanamo Bay area. At press time, Chief Roberts' catch was still in line for the grand prize to be awarded to the contestant winding up with the largest fish of all classes combined. Rear Admiral Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Guantanamo Navy Base, was appointed to relieve Rear Admiral W. G. Beecher Jr. as Chief of Information. RADM Beecher is being retired for physical reasons on the recommendation of the Navy physical evaluation board, and will retire with the rank of Vice Admiral. Saturday, 30 July 1955 Base Pistol Team Returns From Camp Lejuene as Atlantic Champs The Gunatanamo Naval Base .45 Caliber Pistol Team walked off with the 1955 U.S. Atlantic Fleet Conference Pistol Match last week which was held at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. The "Gtmo" team surprised everyone, including themselves, as this is the first year that the Pistol Club has been organized in Guantanamo, and also the first time that they have entered in a competitive event as a team. Base Safety Record Far Ahead Of Navy's Over-All Safety Record The safety record of Guantanamo Naval Base is far ahead of the Navy's over-all safety record, as was pointed out by Gordon F. Ward, Safety Program Specialist here on the base. The Navy's disabling injury record of 2.27 per million work hours exposed is very high when compared to the safety record of the base of .91 disabling injuries per million work hours exposed. The Guantanamo Bay Naval Base can say with pride that it had quite a bit to do with the winning of the National Safety Council's coveted Award of Honor that was presented to the Department of the Navy for the fifth time in recognition of the Navy's annual safety record in reducing accident Yates. Assistant Secretary of the Navy Albert Pratt received the award plaque from Ned Dearborn, President of the National Safety Council, at a ceremony in the Pentagon on 17 June, 1955. The Navy Department previously won the NSC Award of Honor in 1953, 1952, and 1950. In each of these years the record of the base was far below that of the Navy as a whole, and shows that the safety record here on the base is one to be proud of. Navy Grants EM Early School Out Washington -Early discharges have been authorized for Navy enlisted men who are enrolled to attend colleges this fall. EM who show evidence of acceptance to a college or university will be eligible for separation as much as 30 days before their normal expiration date. They must also furnish confirmation that their transcripts and credits from previous schools are acceptable, before they will be given the early discharge. The team, firing against such opponents as AirSqdn. 4, ComPhibLant, AirLant, Amphib Force, Atlantic, etc., was unbeaten in the elimination matches. The team, consisting of LCDR R. K. Minard, team captain, N. P. Walters, MRC; J. B. Jocks, AO1; W. A. Fetters, ME3, and K. E. Schieble, ME2, left for the states via FLAW on 17 July, just a few days after they received their .45 caliber pistols, and returned as triumphant champions on 24 July. Two other members of the team, CDR R. V. Peterson and J. V. Allen, MEC, were unab1 eto get away for the Camp Lejeune tournament. Individual honors went to LCDR Minard, who qualified for one leg as a distinguished pistol shot, and J. B. Jocks, both who qualified for the All-Navy Rifle and Pistol Tournament to be held 1-7 August at Dam Neck, Virginia. The team plans to try and continue their success in the National Matches which will be held on 1-9 September at Camp Perry, Ohio. In the meet at Camp Lejeune, Guantanamo Bay was the "unknown", but no longer, as they are now the proud owners of the t tle "Atlantic Fleet Champs of 1955." The high scores in the match were J. B. Jocks with a 269 and LCBR Minard with a 263. The total aggregate in individual scores is: LCDR R. K. Minard ____ 527 J. B. Jocks, AO1 --------515 N. P. Walters, MRC 477 W. A. Fetters, ME3 476 K. E. Schieble, ME2 420 Commissary Store Recently Installs Self-Service Meat Cases Monday, 25 July, opened a new era of meat buying in the Commissary Store aboard the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, when the new self service meat cases were put in use. This system has been a constant drive of LCDR W. W. Davis, Commissary Officer, since his arrival here, for faster and better service in the meat market. Mr. Davis and the butchers wish to caution patrons against freezing the meat in trays and packages as it is purchased from the Commissary Store. The meat that is to be frozen should be re-wrapped in regular freezer wrap or foil to keep it from becoming freezer burnt.

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Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 30 p955 THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM EDMUND B. TAYLOR, Commander Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Editorial Staff LTJG J. D. Byerley ----------------------------------Officer-Advisor G. L. Henderson, JOC ---------------------------------------Editor D. C. Roberts, JOSN ------------------------------Managing Editor E. J. Talen, SN ----------------------------,--------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station accordance with NavExos P.35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Material marked AFPS may be used by any news medium provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part, with or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. Sunday, 24 July 1955 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Sabbath Services Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner DO NOT LOITER Hanging on the door of a church in an industrial residential section of Philadelphia was a sing "Do not loiter here." Evidently it was meant to keep the patrons of the nearby taverns off the church steps. I could never accept that sign as it is, wishing to see these words instead, "Come inside." Who knows what miracle "God's mysterious ways" might make in mens lives. There is no sign on the chapel today other than the welcome to come in and worship God. Many today are loitering on the steps of a rich religious experience and life. They are reluctant to pass over the threshold into the beautifully furnished room of Christ's presence and a way of life in accord with his teachings. Why do you tarry? Way wait on lifes end? Jesus loved you enough to die that the world might be redeemed through Him. Our reasons for hesitating are LAFRA News The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Fleet Rseerve Association held a Membership Social at the Flamingo Room with Vice-President, Mrs. Tarwater as hostess and assisted by the President, Mrs. Hamm. The table was arranged for buffet style service with a lovely centerpiece of fruit and candles. Delicious sandwiches, pie, tea and coffee were served to the delight of all. The many members and guests present enjoyed playing Bingo, the winners receiving gifts and cash prizes. The guests all had a good time and expressed their desires to become members. Socials are a monthly event of the Ladies' Auxiliary and take place on the last Thursday of each month. All members and guests are cordially invited. For the information of all those interested in joining the Ladies' Auxiliary, the aims and principles of the Association are to aid, assist and promote in all. matters pertaining to welfare, social and patriotic work, for the benefit of the Fleet reserve Association, its members and their families. many. Indifference is one, because we are not aware of the need of any comforting grace. We are wholly indifferent to God and His Son. We must realize that religion is a vital necessity in our lives. Another is an unwillingness to accept tasks in the chapels and kingdom work because they might interfere with our will to read magazines or best selling fiction, to listen to the radio, to lie in bed and sleep, instead of turning to God's greater drama through Bible reading and worship. God has given us six days to use as our own, is it too much to ask that He be given the seventh day. My prayer is today that you might discover the deeper meanings of life which gradually fill the heart of a Christianas he or she takes an active part in God's world and work. May you pray this prayer today with the deep feeling that it so rightly deserves. "Dear God, who knows our smallest desires, cleanse us from selfish ways. Forgive us for loitering and lead us to a fuller Christian experience and more active service. In Jesus' holy name we pray. Amen. C. C. Gaston Chaplain, MCB-1 VU-10 Prop Blast Sailing Club Info by F. A. Azzarita Utron TEN has the pleasure of playing host to Captain J. A. Miller of ComUtWing, Norfolk this week. CAPT Miller and his party arrived in Gtmo on the 27th and are slated to depart tomorrow. One visiting Midshipman is of particular interest to VU-10. Jack P. Brandel is visiting his brother LTJG W. J. Brandel. Midshipman Brandel is on the USS Iowa and will re-enter Auburn College this fall. Two more re-enlistees for this week are Ernest L. Pennell. ADC, and Dale W. Mountford, AT1. Pennell has completed 18/2 years and this is Mountford's first re-enlistment. Three members of Utility Squadron TEN, LT W. E. Hill, M. M. Cassells, AD2, and R. K. Harnsberger, A03, recently completed the Marine Infantry Instructor's Course. Cassell's only comment: "Those hills are alot steeper than they look." Reporting aboard this week are John T. Lynch, PHAN, Jose B. Paz, AA, and H. W. Schiavone, AA. Welcome aboard! The VU-10 Mallards lost last Tuesday evening to the Marines, 6-3. The score however, does not give a true picture of the thriller. Gene Edgar pitched a beautiful game throughout the 11 innings, giving up only three runs. The final blow came in the bottom of the 11th when Chuck Hunter hit a home run with two men on to cinch the game. The Guantanamo Bay Sailing Club was organized on July 15th under the leadership of CDR George A. Gardes, USN for the purpose of racing sailboats. On July 23rd and 24th the first of a series of races was held. During the current racing series, which ends on September 17th, each participating skipper must compete in 5 races. At the end of the series the skipper with the highest number of points will be the winner. Points are awarded in each race as follows; First place-5; Second place-4; Third place-3; Fourth place-2; Fifth place-1. Races will be held each Saturday afternoon commencing at 1300. All holders of Guantanamo Bay Skipper's Cards are eligible and welcome to compete in these sailing races. Persons desiring to compete should contact CDR A. S. Archie, the Chairman of the Racing Committee, at 8524. Point standings for races conducted through July 24th are: No of Total Skipper Races Points A. S. Archie 2 10 C. R. Collins 2 8 B. Weber 1 5 G. Leach 1 4 A. Furlong 1 4 G. A. Gardes 1 4 P. F. Wells 1 4 F. Myers 1 3 H. Henry 1 3 R. J. Matchens 1 3 THE TOWN CRIER by M. Gordon ATTENTION RESIDENTS OF VILLAMAR Would you like to have a sidewalk for your children to play on instead of in the street? If you are interested in seeing curbs and sidewalks layed on 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th streets in Villamar, contact your concilman. This may indeed provide the opportunity to keep the youngsters off the streets and out of dangers way. Captain Caruthers has informed the council that he has recommended to the Base Engsieer to make a study relative to the feasibility of designating 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th streets as "ONE-WAY" streets, traffic to flow in alternate directions. Captain Caruthers has also informed the council that he has made rectjnmendations to have the Commissary Store and Navy Exchange Service Station remain open until 2100 on Wednesdays. This should alleviate the burden imposed on the many non-driving wives and mothers as to their Commissary Store shopping problems. Other things under consideration and wholeheartedly approved by Captain Caruthers are: Emergency telephones in Nob Hill, fire alarm boxes in Nob Hill and who knows, perhaps, a fire station nearer to the housing area. Perhaps we will see these things materialize in the very near future. Due to the great success of the dance held at the Villamar Lyceum on 15 July, and the many enthusiastic requests for more of the same, the Community Council would like to announce that Captain Caruthers has approved another "Special Uniform" dance to be held. WHEN: 19 August 1955. Dancing time will be from 2000 to 2400 and will be held at the Villamar movie lyceum with music being provided by Delgado and his orchestra, who will have as an added feature, a specialty dance team. Admission by invitation only which will be delivered to residents of the housing area. IMPROVEMENT OF LAWNS How much improvement have you made on your lawn? Remember the Council awards to the yard of the month, a prize of $10.00 in cash. Make your yard and lawn area more attractive to the eye. Perhaps YOU will be the winner for the month of July. In case you have forgotten or misplaced the name of your councilmen, here they are again by precinct: Precinct 1, T. L. Trimble; Precinct 2, M. Gordon; Precinct 3, B. H. Carr; Precinct 4, G. Liveakos; Precinct 5, W. A. Schnake; Precinct 6, J. B. Ralston; Precint 7, R. W. Twining; and Precinct 8, R. K. Marshall. Remember if you have any questions or ideas for or about the improvement of YOUR community, see or contact any of the above councilmen and they will be glad to co-operate with you. 0 Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 30 Ju y1955

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Saturday, 30 July 1955 THE INDIAN Page Three Teenage Round-up by Linda Thurston Greetings kiddies, from your local gossip monger. This week I have all sorts of goodies to report about your usual carrying-on. Last week-end you were observed swarming down to the sea in cars ( ? ?) to devour Peggy Lassiter's gobs of goodies at a picnic at Windmill. Also reported was Rueben MacQuarrie for trying to bury Shar Keenan in the sand. That may be exceptable in some parts of the world, but must you bury your victim alive? ? A near riot was started when a couple of seasirens (namely "Head"-Painter Bobbie Stone and Swab-Slingin' Judy Inman) appeared in their new dangerous-curve type bathing suits. Incidentally, the girls confided to me that they keep in shape at the Teen Age Club, employed at such tasks as trimming grass, swabbing floors, rejuvenation of the head and other envigorating chores. Any of you chicks that are interested in the StoneInman Slenderizing Course will be received with open arms. Apply at the TAC any Saturday night. DID 'JA SEE? ? ? ? ? Norman Huddy? ? ? ? We haven't but we know he's here somewhere .Caesar sweating out last week's INDIAN? ? ? ? Edgar walking back from the beach at eight o'clock Sunday eve.??. He sang to the wild dogs all the way home. Pat W., Irv., Jackie S., and Shar horseback riding Sat. aft.? ? ? ?. Pete's great love for the beach? Why I've heard that he just loves to spend every minute of his spare time out there. ...Carl Heimer scaring the "night" lights out of one of Gtmo's most unshakeable characters the other midnight? ? .Marilyn Davis and Pat Fojt turning down rides from Keenan's taxi service every five minutes Mon. eve. ? ? ?. The welcome addition of two basketball stars to the high school in the forms of a new junior boy and a SENIOR????? WORD HEARD FROM THE STATES. That Stan "The Man" Hutchinson is now stationed at Camp Lejeune, N.C. with the Marine Corps. The irony of it all, IF he got his first duty station in Gtmo. The best of luck to you Stan .That Jimmy Cavanaugh is throughly entrenched at the Academy and has already smashed his finger in his M-1 rifle while cleaning it. We wish him the quickest of recoveries ...That Pat W. is employed in Lexington Park, Md. at a hotel while wating to start her fall term to the U of Md. Off Base Liberty Military base personnel have an opportunity to see Kingston, Portau-Prince, Santiago, and other scenic spots by taking advantage of the opportunity to travel there on ships visiting these places over the week-end. Check Wednesday's Papoose for any last in i n u t e changes. Ships going to liberty ports next week-end are: SHIP USS Cassin Young (DD793) PORT DATE Santiago 5 August-? August Recent returnees to the Naval Base after a brief vacation to the British West Indies were LTJG and Mrs. Maxwell and LTJG and Mrs. Morgan. While vacationing in Jamaica, B.W.I. the two couples resided at the Tower Isle Hotel. (Picture by Pierre Chong, Kingston.) Congress Approves 2,753 Housing Units At 25 Naval Bases Washington-Congress has approved 2,753 navy family housing units at 25 stations in Alaska, Canal Zone, Cuba, French Morocco, H a w a i o, Japan, Newfoundland, Philippine Islands and other unspecified locations. The stations and number of units to be constructed are listed below. NAAS Brown Field, Calif., 15; Naval Hospital, Corona, Calif., 23; MCAAS Mojave, Calif., 162; MC Training Center. Twenty-Nine Palms, Calif., 2; Naval Underwater Sound Laboratory, New London, Conn., 5; Naval Fuel Depot, Jacksonville, Fla., 1; NAAS Sanford, Fla., 13; Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Mass., 15. Also MC Aux. Landing Field, Edenton, D.C., 105; NAAS Chase Field, Texas, 40; Navy Department, D.C., 3; Naval Communications Station, Adak, 71; Naval Communications Station, Kodiak, 80; 15th ND, Canal Zone, 40; NAS Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, 27. Also NAS Port Lyautey, French Morocco, 108; Naval Communications Facity, French Morocco, 122; MCAS Kaneoche Bay, Hawaii, 55; NAS Atsugi, Japan, 90; Naval Radio Facility, Kami-Seya, Japan, 151; Fleet Activities, Yokosuka, Japan, 408. At NAS Argentia, Nfld., 300; Naval Communication Facility, P. I., 296; Naval Station, Sangley Pt., P.I., 26; Naval Base, Subic Bay, P.I., 373, classified locations, 222, (AFPS) The number of cars and trucks on the nation's roads has hit a new peak ...More than 59.5 million were registered last year, and increase of over two million compared to 1953 ...California leads the parade with five million autos .. An average of about one Californian in every two operates a motor vehicle. (AFPS). NSD Supply Line ENS James R. Pope, the Administrative Officer, is visiting with his family in Richton, Mississippi. ENS Pope left the base on 20 July via FLAW and plans to return within ten days. LT and Mrs. Kenneth A. Woolard and their two sons spent the Carnival Weekend in Santiago de Cuba. They stayed at the newly remodeled Casa Grande Hotel, visited such interesting and scenic spots as Puerto Boniato, San Juan Hill and many of Santiago's famed clubs. They participated in the street dancing and experienced driving along the Santiago-Guantanamo Highway which is now under construction. William M. McGee, SKC, NSD's former household goods storekeeper left on the 20th via FLAW to return to the states for a short stay at the Receiving Station, Brooklyn, New York. He will be in Brooklyn to await further transfer to the USS Mercury, where he has been ordered to duty. Miles W. White, who was formerly employed in the packing section of the Material Division Traffic Branch has also drawn a tour of sea duty. White was transferred on the 24th of July to the USS Orion (AS-16). Joseph R. Banker, SKGC, is a newcomer to GTMO. He has just reported aboard from the USS Wyandot (AKA-92). Banker reported aboard on 22 July 1955 and has been assigned to duty in the Issue Control Branch of the Control Division. NSD has received a new Personnelman Chief. Flen W. Vencill, PNC reported aboard on 22 July 1955. Chief Vencill has a long career behind him, having over eighteen years in the Navy. He has come from a tour of duty at the Navy Recruiting Station, Pittsburg, Pa. NSD Fuel Division held the grand opening of the New Fuel Office at Oil Point. The affair was celebrated with coke, coffee and cake. The cakes were baked by the Depot girls and wives and were very delicious. The dedication was a complete success and was thoroughly enjoyed by ail who attended. The new Fuel Office is very spacious and cool. We wish LCDR McFadden and his crew buena suerte and buena fortuna in their new office space. Submarine Amberjack To Hold 'Open House' For All Base Personnel The USS Amberjack (SS522) will hold open house from 1300 to 1700 tomorrow, 11 July, 1955, and extends an invitation to all base personnel to come aboard. The USS Amberjack, under the command of LCDR R. H. Gibson, USN, arrived here on Wednesday, 13 July, to act as a target for training our own anti-sub-marine forces. On her way here, the Amberjack rendered the base a service when she went to the rescue of the Wanderer, who was unable to find her way due to the break down of the master gyro. She escorted the Wanderer to a few miles outside of the harbor. Since her arrival at Guantanamo Naval Base from her home port of Key West, Fla., the Amberjack has had liberty in both Santiago and Kingston. The submarine, which is 306 feet long, carries a complement of 63 men and 8 officers. Commissioned on 4 March 1946, at Boston Naval Shipyard, the Amberjack joined the fleet too late for service in World War II. She carries a fighting name, however. Her predecessor, the first Amberjack (SS219), sunk or damaged over 40,000 tons of Japanese shipping before being lost on her third war patrol on 22 March, 1943. After a shakedown cruise to Panama and an Artic cruise in November of 1946 the Amberjack was converted to her present steamlined "Guppy" design by the Portsmouth (New Hampshire) Naval Shipyard. These extensive alterations included installation of a high capacity battery for high speed submerged operation and the addition of a "snorkel". This devise enables a submarine to run submerged on her diesel engines, provides fresh air for ventilation and for charging the ships high pressure air banks. With this device it is possible to remain submerged for a great length of time. A sister ship of the Amberjack traveled 5200 miles from Hong Kong to Pearl Harbor in 21 days completely submerged. Ladies Golf Shots by Pat Aldridge There will be a meeting of the Ladies Golf Association at 11:30 A.M. on August 3rd at the Golf Club. Please try to attend On Tuesday the ladies played their first team match. Although Wares Wigglers defeated by Shorits Shimmiers by the score of 6/2 to 2% points, everyone enjoyed playing. We hope to have bigger and better teams. Wednesday Ladies Day Tournament was Low Putts for all flights. Winners were: 1st Flight-tieEdie Ware and Vina Bryan. 2ndMaryann Pennel. Second Flight-1st-Audrey Page-2nd-Cynthia Holley. Third Flight-1st-Doris Rothenbergi2nd-tieFlorence Fortenberry and Dee Stadnick. Saturday, 30 July 1955 THE INDIAN Page Three

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m Page Four Naval Station THE INDIAN Takes League Saturday, 30 July 1955 Title Mallards In 2nd, Leathernecks 3rd by Joe Duffy The Naval Base Baseball League finished its regular season play last Wednesady night under the arcs when VU-10 defeated the SeeBees to remain one game ahead of the Marines and hold their position in the league two games behind the pennant winning Naval Station Indians. The post-season double elimination tournament gets underway this afternoon on Diamond No. 1 at 1400 when the Naval Station squad meets the dangerous Marines nine in the first game. The second game will be played tomorrow afternoon with VU-10 opposing the Naval Air Station Flyers. The third game will be played Monday night under the lights when the winners of the first two games meet, game time will be ninth innings to send the game 1900. Tuesday night the two losers into extra innings. Tanzi's tenth of the first two games will play, inning single with runners on seethe loser being eliminated from the end and third put the Flyers ahead tournament, the winner to meet 5-3, hut only temporarily as the Monday nights loser. From that Seabees rallied in their half of the point on, the losing team will be inning to knot the count again at eliminated until all but one team 5-5 as a base-hit, two errors and remains to be crowned the tournaa passed hall scored Moser and ment champions. Peterson. "Doe" Waldrop hurled TEAM W L Pet GB final four innings to gain third Naval Station 17 3 .850 -victory in four decisions. VU-10 15 5 .750 2 Marines 14 6 .700 3 R H E Naval Air Station 8 12 .400 9 NAS 6 10 3 MCB-1 5 15 .250 12 Staff 1 19 .050 16 MCB5 7 1 With two outs in the Marine's Five runs in the first inning, half of the eighth inning, Hoffer three in the fourth, and four in the clouted a long home run over right sixth inning gave Naval Station field fence to score Wood and Caswin number seventeen against tellow ahead of him and give the three defeats for the season as Marines a 4-1 lead over the Flyers. Dale Buss pitched three-hit shutMarines started scoring in first inout bail, striking out fifteen batning when Hunter singled in Ligters while issuing only one walk. gett from second. Flyers tied it This brought his strike out total up in their half of the second into 109 for 73 innings, and win numning, when Rice singled and later her seven against no defeats. Douscored on Washington's infield bios hy Ianiero, Buss, and Markgrounder. The score remained tied ham were the only extra base hits until the eighth inning when Hofof the game. The closest Staff came fer connected for his second fourto scoring was when Vescovi atbagger of the year. Marines added tempted to steal home in the one more run in the ninth inning fifth-inning with a left-handed batwhen Collins singled, stoled second ter in the batter's hex, an almost base and came on Dowd's base hit. impossible feat. R H E NAS 1 5 2 R H E MARINES 5 8 2 NavSta 12 15 2 Seabees scored 6 runs in the Staff 0 3 8 third inning and 8 more in the Chick Hunter, Marines first basesixth as they took advantage of ta n n tenth 5 his, 0 wl, an seen rros mni sigl therunnoers in teth to hathe Stwaffs another setbackr inning to give Marines 6-3 win toh the coref 16-2.e Dseain over VU-10 Mallards. Hunter's home run was his sixth of the these two disastrous innings, the season to give him the lead in Staff played the Seabees on even ta eatet tas nrae inning byewalkintche fste the his RBI total to 39 to give him the batters to faceim, then hee high mar in run producing. VU-10 matters atlitte bym, tossngto overcame a 3-1 Marine lead in sixth wildatcs littoe sc toig r inning when Hall walked and came wil piche toscoe to rns.home on Moe Morrn's three-base ie blow. Morris later stole home to infield started to boot the ball te the score at 3-3. The game around. Same thing happened instayed tied until the tenth when the sixth inning, when the pitcher tthe got erratic the whole team fell deR H E VU-10 3 8 2 Keasey, had a two-hit shut out Mrns6 1 going into the ninth inning when M rns eft Seeeees in 6-0 contest that saw singles walk and infield error, a total of 27 strikeouts, as the reasey struck out 11 and issued walksDalelBus plitched theit shutnd tes hiwisuiglnyknewak ofithe posime. inhe lseagu Stao-m R H E STAFF 2 4 7 MCB-1 16 5 4 Tom Rice scored from third base on a wild pitch in the twelthinning to break a 5-5 tie and enable NAS Flyers to clinch fourthplace in the league standings and gain a play-off berth in the postseason tournament. Rice had gained third base via a walk and two stolen bases, as the winning run was scored without the benefit of a hit. The Seabees took a 3-1 lead in the fourth-inning when Stork blasted a pitch out of the park with two mates aboard. NAS scored single runs in the eighth and place position in the league standings. Hits were scarce as the Mallard's Bill Madden struck out 16 batters, and the Bee's Al Stork wihffed 11. The Mallards plated single runs in the first and second innings, and added three more in the third to take commanding lead. Postal's third-inning single with runners on second and third base scored two runs to prove to be the only runs to score as a result of a base hit. The other scores were results of walks, errors and wild pitches. MCB-1 VU-10 R H 0 2 6 3 E 6 2 Men's Bolf Championship Baseball Team Selected Tournament Now Underway To Represent ComTen With 110 Men Qualifying In Southeastern Tourney The 1955 Men's Golf Championship Tournament is now underway at the Guantanamo Bay Country Club. One hundred and ten qualifiers whacked their way around the local links to enter the current tournament and try to capture one of the many prizes being offered for the respective flights. Lee Rogers was the qualifying medalist (72), with LCDR Jim Dempsey (73) the runner-up, followed by Hubie Broughton (75) and the rest of the field. The entrants are divided in flights as follows: First 32 qualifiersChampionship flight. Defeated 16 in championship flightFirst flight. 33rd to 64th QualifiersSecond flight. 65th to 87th QualifiersThird flight. 88th and above-Fourth flight. Defeated 8 in 2nd round of Championship flight compose the Consolation Flight. This tournament is being played under match play rules of golf as laid down by the USGA of which the Gtmo club is a member. All tournament matches have the right of way over non-tournament play at all times. Players have one week in which to fish each match as scheduled on the tournament board at the Clubhouse. The final match to determine the club Champion will be a 36 hole match and spectators will be permitted to watch this match. All other matches are 18 hole matches. by Joe Duffy The top three teams in the Naval Base League dominated the recently selected All Guantanamo Naval Base Baseball team that was chosen by player vote to represent the Base in the forth-coming Southeastern Conference Tournament to be held at Pensacola, Fla. commencing 14 August 1955. the first nine as selected by player vote proved to be: Tanzi Mandis Hunter Clark Postal Morgan McCowan Bland Wood NAS NavSta Marines VU-10 VU-10 NavSta NavSta Marines Marines catcher pitcher first base second base third base shortstop right field left field center field The manager, also chosen by vote, will be 1stLt Jack Dowd of the Marine team, a capable player in his own right. The manager will have the right to select additional substitutes from available players to round out his squad of eighteen players. The team will be recognized as the COMTEN champions and will meet representing teams of the districts in the southeastern are. No player from the MCB-1 team was selected since the battalion is scheduled to depart from this area on rotation in the near future. VU-10s stellar ballplayer, Bill Madden, also was eliminated from the voting due to the expiration of his enlistment. Madden would have been on the squad along with Bennett and Keasey of the Seebees, if they had been eligible. Manager Dowd will make his selections and call the team together for practice as soon as the postseason tournament is over, and prior to their expected departure about August 10th. Batting Records The top ten batters of the Baseball League for the season are: NAME Hunter Mandis Madden Dowd Wood Ianiero Hoffer Morgan Costello Bland TEAM Marines NavSta VU-10 Marines Marines NavSta Marines NavSta Marines Marines AB 85 69 89 68 51 67 76 82 70 67 H 38 28 35 25 18 23 26 27 22 21 HR 6 1 4 0 1 0 2 1 2 1 RBI 39 26 23 13 8 18 17 16 14 17 PCT. .447 .406 .393 .368 .353 .343 .342 .329 .314 .313 Pitching Records The top six pitchers of the Baseball League based on ERA, at the end of the season: NAME Madden Dowd Buss Edgar Patton Mandis TEAM VU-y0 Marines NavSta VU-10 Marines NavSta IP 83 58 73 89 57 68 SO 112 44 109 99 39 97 W 8 5 7 7 5 6 L 3. 2 0 2 2 2 ERA 1.95 2.02 2.10 2.12 2.68 3.04 r

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Saturday, 30 July 1955 THE INDIAN Page Five The Fish Tale(s) by P. J. Aldridge Them there fish over in that there river is the golddurndest, dadrattenist, temperementalist critters what ever was created.' If'n I didn't think I'd be called plum loco I'd swear and be durned them Tarpon has been informed about this here tournament and they is just being' downright ornery so as not to give no one the satisfaction of nabbin' and weighin' one in. Why, them devils'll jump right up in your face and dang near spit in your eye. You can almost hear 'em laughin' as they go leapin' by. There you be with all kinds of bait, lures and bobble bouts to entice 'em so what do they do ? Roll aT around your boat with them great silver scales ashinin' in the sun just kind of lazy and tauntin' like. The Snook have been takin' lessons, too, but they ain't so bad. At least one of them gets careless once't in a while. Out to ATC dump they been haulin' in some nice pan size Snappers and they're beginnin' to bite again around Granadillo. Ain't no mammoth giants but right lip smackin' good for fryin'. There's some plenty big ones at ATC though .big enough to part a shot line several times. Several shot lines, that is. Jew fish and Wahoo wallow around the rocks a takin' after the little yellow jack and snappers for supper. If'n you're new around here and you get something on your hook which comes up lookin' like a great, ugly, flat wing with a long tail, let her go, leave her be, cut her loose, boy! That there is a nasty Sting Ray which ain't no good no how and you don't want some of any! One whip of that tail and you will have had the course. Here's a tip for you as is lucky fishin' and has a freezer. Don't never freeze no fish with the gills still in. That there critter will spoil even when all iced up solid if you don't get them gills out as well as his innards. They did it correct like that with that hundred and seventy seven pound what-chamacallit hangin' in the ice house over ot Leeward Point. The judges Nwho all three trekked over to take a look see to all confused as to what to call the whatchamacallit. Commander Gardis, Mr. Lee and Commander Cavanaugh studied the fish, consultted the Encycopedia for Wise Fishermen, listened to the kibitzers and finally decided to heck with it. That there fish can be any goldurned thing it wants to be and still come out the leading weight snatcher in the contest so far. And that leaves NAS Chief Roberts right gleeful. Well kids, I'm off to Miami for a few bless'd days so you can drool while you pikeher me a settin' on one of them yacht type boats a swillin' a Big Orange while I angle for one of them cotton pickin' Tarpon which is ignorin' me in Gtmo. Then, slippin' across to Havana by way of Key West, I'll tangle with more Tarpon and maybe mangle a Marlin or King Mackerel just for kicks. You all keep castin' and divin' for these babies though. Take advantage of havin' the REAL expert out of the territory for a few days. I'm just goin' to give you all a chance. If'n you glance at the standin's in this here tourney you can see who's kiddin' now. BARRACUDA 15 lbs. 4 oz. Sid Davenport 15 lbs. W. B. Robinson 14 lbs. 11 oz. G. K. Giggy THE TOASTMASTER by Joe West The kingdom of mind and heart is under a law similar to the law of growth in the world of nature and although we may shape our own lives, it is this law that molds them. We may misshape the substance with which we work, forming it imperfectly. Thoughts that are formed by hate instead of love turn out life that is lacking in beauty and symmetry. Words that are lacking in truth create forms that shatter at a touch, without strength of usefulness. Mistaken conduct misshapes our work from the beginning, so that it must be done again. We have the capacity for perfection. Though we do not always choose the conditions that we must meet, we can choose the mental state in which we shall meet them, and by a wise choice develop selfdominion, which, is, after all, the ultimate goal of life on this planet. All thoughts, whether religious or not, must be true if they are to build anything worth having into our characters and lives. A person comes to be known by his habitual conduct as one who is to be trusted or distrusted, according to the standard of right that he upholds or disavows. He who cares more for what is right and who is more concerned with finding right in every situation than to reap any temporary gain realizes the greates gain of all-a life than is symmetrical because it is in harmony with divine law. The law of cause and effect is operative in human affairs, and it should be recognized and taken into consideration. If we do not wish to lose the battle of life, it is our prerogative to dedicate ourselves a new to seeping the law of life. Divine Law is constant and unvarying but we benefit by it only as we keep its conditions. If we live by it, we reap its rewards If we go counter to it, we reap its penalties. We should stir our perceptive faculties or develop our imagination to the point that we can perceive the rewards of obedience and secure them. MARINE MUSINGS by Cpl Paul A. Hoffer, USMC T/Sgt G. 0. Shuler and Sgt B. R. Lee proudly announce the arrival of new additions to the family. T/Sgt Schuler's wife presented him with a 8 pound baby boy. Sgt and Mrs. Lee are the proud parents of a 5 pound 15 ounce baby girl. Both Mrs. Schuler and Mrs. Lee and the babies are doing fine. The whole command gives their most sincere congratulations. Baseball season is now over and the Marines will be looking forward to the play-offs which begin next week. Marine Barracks wishes to extend their congratulations to Naval Station on winning the Base title. The Marines ended the season Tuesday night against VU-10, by winning 6 to 3. In the 10th, inning Chuck Hunter ended the game with a three run homer. Hunter has captured the batting, RBI's and homerun title. The Marines ended up with a 14 and 6 record. SNAPPER -GROUPER Grouper 177 lbs. V. A. Roberts Snapper 57 lbs. D. Johnson Grouper 42 lbs. 14 oz. J. F. Robson JACK -POMPANO Jack 20 lbs. D. E. Olson Jack 19 lbs. 14 oz. R. E. Seagle Jack 17 lbs. Mrs. D. Davenport LADYFISH -BONEFISH Ladyfish 4 lbs. 6 oz. R. E. Seagle Ladyftsh 3 lbs. 15% oz. G. M. Ewing Bonefish 3 lbs. L. E. Hallman SNOOK 19 lbs. 6 oz. D. E. Thomas 14 lbs. 2 oz. Pat Aldridge 13 lbs. 12 oz. R. L. Prichett CROAKER 1 lb. 3/, oz. Mrs. Hilda Potts 1 lb. L. E. Hallman MACKEREL-1 lb. 5 oz. A. D. Nelson. SHARK-79 lbs. E. B. Rooff. LARGEST LADIES-17 lbs. Jack-Mrs. Davenport. LARGEST CHILDREN-7 lbs. 41s oz. Barracuda-James Page. SPEAR FISHING Grouper 43 lbs. A. P. Ahlberg Goruper 17 lbs. S oz. J. L. Reif Barracuda 16 lbs. 10 on. R. H. Anderson Ole Fire Inspector Was out on the job tother day trying to make an honest buck, so I can get the "little woman" and the house ape off the cracker and water diet, when I saw something which I don't think should be allowed. I saw beds in buildings which I know darn well wasn't meant to be used for sleeping quarters. I know there are times and conditions which may warrant such things but when I ask if these places were authorized for sleeping quarters, no one seemed to know. When I ask if the fire department had been notified of sleepers in those buildings, I could not get an answer to that either. Now if it is necessary to have personnel sleeping in buildings not designed for quarters whether it is for security or emergencies, it looks to me like whoever gave the order or permission would take it upon himself to sit down, or stand up for that matter, and write a letter to the Fire Chief to let him know about the sleepers, so i case of an emergency all efforts would be made to see that all sleepers were out of the building. I have reasons to know that very serious results can happen by permitting personnel to sleep in unauthorized quarters. I also know why the ones who use of the unauthorized quarters would rather sleep there than in quarters provided for them. Other day I saw a fellow rubbing his eyes and being one to try and help my fellow man I ask him what was the matter. He said he had been watching some sparrows laying brick. I ask, "how do you know they were laying brick?" He said, "they must have been, cause one of them dropped some mortar in my eye." Which brings me to the point of sayin', don't let let anything blind you to the fact of the possibility of fire. Be on the look out for fire causes with "mortar" free eyes. Don't be like the fellow who couldn't see the forest for the trees. As for fire prevention lets "get on the ball or on the boat." Guys and gals you can beat a fire so "jine" those who are fire safety minded. Form a safe habit on Gtmo. FTG Bulletin by Ron Federman There are a number of new faces around FTG! On 22 July, CDR John D. Patterson reported to FTG from the Gunnery Officer's Ordnance School, Washington, D. C., where he served for a period of about three years. CDR Patterson's hometown is New Bern, North Carolina; he is married to the former Pattie Guion, also of New Bern. Rounding out the Patterson Family are two girls, ages 8 and 5, named Sarah and Nancy. Our new Gunnery Officer attended the U. S. Naval Academy, and graduated in the Class of 1942. He previously served with such ships as the USS Wichita, USS Fall River, USS Franklin, USS Marlboro, USS Bordelon, and the USS Laning. Glad to have you aboard CDR! The ASW Department is one officer richer with the arrival of LT Richard A. Zyvoloski, who checked in on Wednesday, 20 July, from the USS Remey (DD 688). His hometown is Lakewood, Ohio; he is married to the former Eileen G. Cramer, a resident of LakeWood. Mr. and Mrs. Zyvoloski are the parents of four children; James, 8 years old, Jane 7, Richard 21/2, and the youngest addition to the family, Mary Elizabeth, only six months old. Shortly after graduating from Hyattsville High School, Maryland, in 1939, Mr. Zyvoloski attended the U.S. Naval Academy, and graduated in 1945. His former ship, the USS Remey, is scheduled to undergo train91g at Gtmo in the near future, and he will undoubtedly take delight in inspecting the ASW Department in his old ship, when the occasion arises. Welcome aboard! On 22 July, another new arrival was assigned to the Gunnery Department, in the person of Albert V. Stermer, FT1, after serving with the USS Ross (DD 563), prior to his transfer to FTG. Al's hometown is Millersburg, Pa., where his wife, the former Betty Gene Spotts, hails from. Other members of the Stermer Family are Sandria, age 11, Edward, Age 3, and Ronald, five monts old. His initial enlistment in the U. S. Navy dates back to 1940. Happy to have you with us Al! Unfortunately, at a time when new men report to FTG for duty, we usually have personnel leaving us to join other commands throughout the world. We bid farewell to LCDR Usey, who departed FTG and the CIC Department on Sunday, 24 July. He will report to the Airborne Early Warning Squadron 11, at the U.S. Naval Air Station, Patuxant River, Md. Best wishes for a successful and enjoyable tour of duty in Maryland! Another sad farewell to Gammon, GM1, who was transferred on Thursday, 28 July, to Yorktown, Va., where he will attend a course of instruction at Mineman Class "A" and "B" Schools for a period of about twenty-five weeks. Gammon desires to convert to the Mineman rate soon after completion of the course. Prior to reporting to Yorktown, he will meet his wife in Pennsylvania, and Mr. and Mrs. Gammon will travel to California on vacation. Gammon was granted 23 days delay in reporting to his next station. Best of luck! Frank Hawkins, ET3, better known as "Hawkshaw", was quite happy last Monday night, as the result of winning $40.00 at Bingo.

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Page Saturday, 30 July 1955 THE INDIAN Navy-DPPO-10ND-Gtmo.-2056 MOVIES Saturday, 30 July THE GOLDEN MASK Van Heflin Wanda Hendrix An American archaeologist journalist joins an expedition in London. The guest is a priceless golden mask, believed to be buried in a Roman tomb near Algiers, and which has had a curse down through the centuries. Sunday, 31 July LUCKY ME Doris Day Robert Cummings Doris Day and her friends find themselves stranded when their show closes. They experience a number of humorous dificulties before necessary funds are raised to continue their try to land on Broadway. Monday, 1 August NAKED ALIBI Gloria Grahame Sterling Hayden Sterling Hayden, a police lieutenant, is dismissed from the force because of "brutality" charges by politicians. As a private citizen he persues the arrest of elusive criminals so that he can regain his position with the police force. Tuesday, 2 August YOU KNOW WHAT SAILORS ARE Akim Tamiroff Donald Sinden The British Navy hears of a secret weapon on the deck of a foreign destroyer. Sinden is sent by the Admiral to learn about the secret weapon. Sinden is caught and held prisoner by a harem of beautiful girls, and he has a hard time trying to decide whether to escape if possible. Wednesday, 3 August IT CAME FROM BENEATH THE SEA Faith Domergue Kenny Tobex This is a sicence fiction story of an incredibly large octopus. Two experts are assigned to dispose of the monster. Thursday, 4 August THE VIOLENT MEN Glenn Ford Barbara Stanwyck A bloody warfare develops between the small dirt farmers and little cattle ranchers against a powerful land baron who tries to drive them out. Heading their group is a former Civil War cavalry officer, who decides to take over when he sees how the people are being terrorized. Friday, 5 August WYOMING RENEGADES Phil Carey Martha Hyer A former member of a notorious gang who terrorized Wyoming in the 1890's finds that all his efforts to go straight only gets him into more difficulty. Radio's 'Tops' of the Week SATURDAY, 30 July .AMERICA'S POPULAR MUSIC. 5:00 P.M. One cf America's foremost record collectors and an imminent authority on jazz and it's history, Andy Mansfield, will dip generously into his own .tacks to present a full-hour "biography in shellac" of Woody Horn! in. From the first fumbling start to the final triumphant bar you are sure to enjoy this display of jazz at it's finest. SUNDAY, 31 July .HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE. 10:00 P.M. A contemporary miracle is re-enacted when Ann Blythe and Charles Bickford star in "Song of Bernadette". A young girl sees a vision of THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION and from her divine experience stems a religious controversy with repercussions down to the present day. MONDAY, 1 August .STAR PLAYHOUSE. 9:00 P.M. Rex Harrison and Anna Lee star in a bright, sophisticated comedy entitled, "The Second Man". The play concerns a novelist who finds out that his alter-ego or 'man within' is a cynical opportunist. Inner conflict and laughs are the result. TUESDAY, 2 August .THE CHASE. 9:00 P.M. Science fiction and the world of the future set the stage for this weeks presentation when creatures from a far-off planet invade earth, only to find themselves betrayed from within by other planet grabbing spies. Involved, but interesting to the end. WEDNESDAY, 3 August .ON STAGE .9:00 P.M. "The Great Dane" is a football player who knows all the rules of sportsmanship and fair play on the field, but thinks they do not apply in everyday living. Cathy and Elliot Lewis will star. THURSDAY, 4 August .FAMILY THEATRE. 9:00 P.M. Frank Lovejoy portrays a young man with great ambitions who graduates from drama school but never finds that elusive road to success in the Family Theatre presentation of "Old Friends". FRIDAY, 5 August .RADIO WORKSHOP. 10:00 P.M. An old newspaperman tries desperately to save the people of the world from self destruction. Together with his young daughter and a reporter with faith, he overcomes the objections of a cynical publisher to give to the world "One Happy Headline". Want a date with Martha Hyer of Hollywood? All you have to do is see "Francis In The Navy", latest comedy about that talking mule, and there's Martha, trimmest craft in the service, playing the role of Navy nurse. She stars with Donald O'Conner and Francis himself, other Hollywood craft featured including Leigh Snowden, Myrna Hansen and Jane Howard. 50 0K-NOO by Ed Te.ln THE LOI'XtLY SKY by William Bridgeman This is a powerful and thrilling story about America's foremost experimental test pilot. The substance of the story deals with his d iv-by-day life with the plane that be is sent out to test, shows how he risks his life to push back the frontiers of scientific knowledge, and also how he accepts tie challenge that lies in the lonely region beyond the speed of sound. It is a story that will find it's rightful place in the field of aviation. DEPENDENT BAGGAGE by Marie Di Mario Wann The story of an American housewife as she follows her husband who is stationed in Germany during the occupation immediately following World War II. Accepting the challenge, she attempts to make the most of being forced to live in abnormal conditions in the midst of a recently defeated foe. The reader that allows himself to share her experiences will definately be entertained as her account is not only amusing, but also enlightening. A TRAIN OF POWDER by Rebecca West Consisting of five stories, this is the authors reaction as she recreates the drama of famous trials, including the Nuremberg trials of 1946, and the brutal murder trial for the lynching of a colored youth in North Carolina. Using the means at hand, the authors's powerful pursuit of truth gives us a dynamic narrative of psychological detection. BURNT OFFERINGS by Richard and Frances Lockridge Fans of spine-tingling murder mysteries will find perfection in this one. Based on the passions of the old American institution, the town meeting, it is the story of how a peaceful town meeting turns into a wake. Full of action and violence, it is a thriller that will keep you in suspense. GUNSMOKE MESA by Dan James An unusual Western, it deals with the story of the first-born sons of the judge and sheriff who were responsible for the sentence of life imprisonment upon two criminals. The criminals kidnap the two boys and raise them to turn against their fathers, only to have it boomerang when they try to carry out the revenge conceived in their twisted minds. IN PASSING: Around the U.S.A. in 1000 Pictures by A. Milton and Vilma Bergane ...a preview of things you may someday wish to see, and also a memento of things you have enjoyed, it covers the high spots of the 48 States. Girl: (at her front gate with sailor): "I'd ask you in for a while, only mother's out and father is upstairs with rheumatism of the legs." Sailor: "Both legs?" Girl: "Yes." Sailor: "Then I'll come in."


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