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Indian
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"Govers QTMO Like Te Sunshine"

Vol. VI, No. 23 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 11 June 1955


'Blithe Spirit' Readies


For Ghosty Opening

At Marina Point 21 June

Rehearsals for the Little Theatre's forthcoming production, Noel Coward's "Blithe Spirit," have moved off stage for line rehearsals and to allow the production crew to complete set construction, lighting and other details in time for opening night, Tuesday 21 June. Meanwhile, at the line rehearsals, the rough edges are being smoothed out, and "Blithe Spirit" promises to be the best comedy yet, since "My Three Angels," but with the added wit of Noel Coward's spicy lines.
In Act II of "Blithe Spirit," Ruth, as played by Joy Graves, emphatically tells Charles, her husband, as played by actor-director Alan Wagner, "I've been doing my level best to control myself ever since yesterday morning, and I'm not going to try any more. The strain is too much. Elvira has thQ advantage of being able to say whatever she pleases, without my being able to hear her. But she can hear me all right, can't she? . . . without any modified interpretation?"
This line explains just the predicament which Ruth is in after the sudden and alarming re-appearance of Charles deceased first wife, Elvira. It proves to be a very comical predicament which evolves into one of mystery.
Later in Act II, Dr. Bradman, as played by Jerry Murphy, tells Ruth that her husband needs to get away from it all with a change and a rest. "He suddenly shouted, 'What are you doing in the bathroom?' and a little later while I was writing him a prescription, he suddenly said, 'For God's sake, behave yourself.'The remarkable part of it all, however, is that you, as an audience at the five big nights, 21 June through 25 June, can see it all. You'll be seeing ghosts, both materialized and immaterialized. You'll be able to hear these ghosts talk while the characters created so brilliantly by Noel Coward cannot see or hear them, with the exception of Charles.
"Blithe Spirit" is more than just another play or another production of the Little Theatre. It will not only amuse you as comedies are designed to do, but it will appeal to your imagination and make you leave the theatre feeling that you have a sixth sense which no one else has. And yet it all comes down to reality with a strange twist at the end, which in the fashion of good playwriting, does not show itself until the final scene, practically the final curtain.
Don't miss it. You and your imagination will both enjoy it.


Two very disgusted ghosts longing to cross back over "wherever they came from'' (Elvira at far left played by Charlotte Murphy, and Ruth at far right, played by Joy Graves) wait not too patiently as Madam Arcati, played by Evelyn Perdue, goes into a trance. Standing by hoping for the best, but not too sure of what to do is Charles, played by Alan Wagner. The scene is taken from the Little Theatre's forthcoming production. of "Blithe Spirit," scheduled to run at Marina Point 21 through 25 June.


New Sub Training Device

Uses Single Stick Steering
Gordon, Conn. (AFPS) -The Navy now has a training device to teach submariners how to operate its new single stick steering control system aboard submarines.
In the past, one man steered the sub right or left while two others were required to operate the bow planes which control the vessel's rise and descent. Now, after checking out on the new trainer, one man will be able to operate the single stick control and steer the sub alone in much the same way a pilot maneuvers an airplane.
The steering system is also new in the Navy. There are only about 10 submarine equipped with it now.
The trainer was designed by the Office of Naval Research and will be built here by the Electric Boat Div. of General Dynamics CorpIt will be mounted on a separate platform and cradle and will respond to the controls, even pitching and rolling as a submarine would in heavy seas.

Mambo Or Cha Cha Cha
If you still mambo, it could be a sign the world is passing you by . . . Word is that the longtime dance craze is finally on its way out . . . Latest step coming up from Latin America is something called the "cha cha cha" . . . It's described as something like an "American lindy with a Cuban flavor."


Naval Base Golf Gourse

Club House Officially

Opened On Memorial Day
On May 30th, Memorial Day, was the grand opening and dedication of Guantanamo Bay's new Golf Course Club House. The ceremony was conducted in the presence of the members when RADM E. B. Taylor cut the ribbon, officially opening the new building.
Following the ceremony, some 120 golfers teed off in a four ball match with each team consisting of three men and one woman, with the men using full handicaps. The team of Peddycord, CAPT McCracken, Schmitt and Mrs. Ellis, scoring 101 under par 50s tied for low net honors with Jenkins, Kidwell, Smith and Mrs. Holly for merchandise certificates w o r t h $13.10. Five other teams scored net 51s for the runner-up award of a merchandise certificate worth $2.25.


LST's Get Names

Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has given names to 158 of its tank landing ships (LST) to become effective in July. The ships will be named after counties in the U.S.


Dr, Gabriel Hauge


Visits Naval Base

Dr. Gabriel Hauge, the Economic Advisor to President Eisenhower, visited the Guantanamo Bay area and observed training exercises on the larger ships, under the control of Commander, Fleet Training Group.
Dr. Hauge is a native of Hawley, Minnesota. He graduated from Concondia College in Moorhead, Minnesota, and received his Masters Degree in Economics and his Doctors Degree at Harvard University.
He was a faculty member of Princeton University, and reported for active duty in World War I. He saw action in the Pacific as a Gunnery Officer, and returned to civilian life as a Lieutenant Cominander in the Naval Reserve. He joined the New York Banking Commission and later was with the McGraw-Hill Publishing Company. He was appointed from there to his present position by President Eisenhower.
During his visit, Dr. Hauge was on board the USS Macon, Monday, Wednesday and Thursday, and spent Tuesday aboard the USS Bennington, and from there was flown to the base via helicopter. He left for Washington, D. C. Friday morning.


RADM Burke New CNO

As Carney To Retire
Washington (AFPS) - The Navy's new nominee for Chief of Naval Operations, RADM Arleigh A. Burke will have the rank of full admiral. He will begin his two year term as CNO August 16.
The White House said that ADM Robert B. Carney, present CNO, was not reappointed because he would have reached the mandatory retirement age of 62 before being able to fill out another two-year term. He has announced that he will retire to private life upon completion of his duties as CNO.
RADM Burke, who presently commands the Navy's Atlantic Fleet Destroyer Force, is a 1923 graduate of the Naval Academy. He became known as "31 knot" during WWII in the Pacific because of the high speed he demanded of destroyer squadrons under his command.
His "little beavers"-Destroyer Squadron 23 - covered the first landings on Bougainwille in November 1943, and then went on to participate in 22 separate engagements with the enemy in the following three months.








THE INDIAN Saturday, 11 June 1955


Page Twrj


THE INDIAN

The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
RADM EDMUIND B. TAYLOR, Commander Naval Base, Guantanamo
Day, Cuba
CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba
Editorial Staff
LTJG J. D. Byerley ------------------------------ Officer-Advisor
G. L. Henderson, JOC ----------------------------------- Editor
H. L. Sisson, J03 --------------------------------- Ass't. Editor
D. C. Roberts, JOSN ------------------------------ Staff Reporter
E. J. Talen, SN ---------------------------------- Staff Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
Material marked AFPS may be used by any news medium provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part, with or without credit.
All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


Pros. Defends Commissaries

And Exchanges In Answer


Sunday, 12 June 1955
Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0980-Sunday School
o980-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Cheir Rehearsal Friday: 1900-Worship Services Friday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Christian Science
Sunday: 1000-Station Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)

The Chaplain's Corner



TEN REASONS WHY?
Sitting in my Office trying to catch up on some correspondence, one evening, a number of groups of men passed by the windows. Again and again my ears were assailed with langauge that I am sure was not intended for my ears. I am also sure that much of it was not acceptable to God, nor would it be in polite society.
That experience started me to thinking as I have often done because of similar experiences. I recalled Washington's order to the Continental Army, and also the article in Navy Regulations concerning cursing. Then I came upon the following which is a Thought provoking summary. It is a quote: TEN REASONS WHY I SWEAR
1. It pleases mother so much
2. It is a fine mark of manliness 3. It proves that I have selfcontrol
4. It indicates how clearly my
mind operates


To Hoover Negative Report

Washington (AFPS)-President Eisenhower believes it would be a "terrible injustice" to Armed Forces personnel to take away their commissary and exchange facilities.
The President was referring to recent recommendations to Congress by the Hoover Commission, known officially as the Commission on Organization of the Executive Branch of the Government.
In its report, the commission recommended that Defense Department confine exchanges and commissaries to remote localities.
At present the DOD operates 438 commissary stores in the U.S. and overseas. Of these, 199 are in the U.S. and 239 abroad. Exchange facilities are more numerous. The Armed Services now operate about 450 exchanges in the U.S. and 2,700 abroad, including branches.
President Eisenhower told a press conference he had never believed in the "uncontrolled spread" of exchanges. He also said "to take away the commissary privileges and post exchange privileges from the military, uniformed personnel, wherever they may be, when those are really needful things in order to give them the normal business of living, and giving it to them at a decent price, I belive it would be a terrible injustice to those people."

5. It makes my conversation so
pleasing to everybody
6. It leaves no doubt in any
one's mind as to my poor
breeding
7. It impresses people that I
have more than ordinary education
8. It is an unmistakable sign of
culture and refinement
9. It makes me a very desirable
personality among women and children and in respectable society
10. It is my way of honoring God
who said "Thou Shalt not take the name of the Lord
thy God in vain."
Karl G. Peterson
Chaplain, USN


1MAqtC nos VU-10 Prop Blast


by Cpl Paul A. Hoffer, USMC MARINE BARRACKS TROPHY
The Marine Barracks Trophy for the annual Pistol and Rifle meet winners was won by Naval Station. The trophy was presented to Commander V. J. Soballe by Colonel Robert E. Fojt, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks, in a ceremony held 20 May 1955 at Marine Barracks. The trophy will be held by Naval Station till the next annual meet.
SAFETY AWARD
The Secretary of the -Navy Award for Achievement in Industrial Safety was again awarded to Marine Barracks for the fourth time in the last five years. The award is in recognition of completing the calendar year 1954 without a lost-time accident.
SPORTS
After losing three games in a row the Marine Barracks baseball team have won their last two. Defeating MCB-1 12 to 2 and the Staff 9-0. It gives the team six wins and three loses. Thursday 9 June the Marines play Naval Air Station, then play Staff on Monday 13 June.
ARRIVAL
From Camp Lejeune, North Carolina came Corporal Michael Sivilli for duty. Cpl Sivilli is from New Jersey and will be attached to Security Section. "Welcome aboard, hope you enjoy your stay in Gtmo".
DEPARTURES
Last Wednesday, June 1st, Corporal Marvin Y. Holcomb departed for the states. Cpl Holcomb will report to the 2nd Marine Division at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina for duty.


The spirits of LTJG Greenfield, Mrs. Greenfield, and LT Graves are not dampened by rain. They spent last Saturday and Sunday fishing and had a good turn of luck. The Greenfields, under the guidance and fishing know-how of Bill Graves, caught several Jack Fish and large barracudas, which averaged 14 pounds each.
A lonely JD-1 was flying all last weekend. LT Hawkins, who is presently with detachment in Key West, was piloting the aircraft. LT Hawkins was finishing up his check-out in the JD prior to taking it up to Key West to replace the Turkey, which he flew here. The JD will replace the two Turkeys in Key West and will be used for operational flights.
Richard Bianchi, ADI, and Daniel Dollar, AK3, recently reported to VU-10 for duty. Bianchi reported from VA-174 in Quonset Point, R.I., while Dollar came from IBTU in Pensacola, Florida. VU-10 welcomes you into the squadron and hopes that the tour here will be a pleasent one.
After last Friday's game against NAS, the Mallards were again tied for 1st place with NOB. Big Gene Edgar spun a beautiful game for himself. The NAS nine was held to one fluke hit by the Mallard fast-baller. Edgar helped his game along by getting a single in the top of the first inning. Larry (Gabby) Cabral then came up to the plate and broke his three game hitting slump by dropping the ball over the left field fence to score the only two runs in the entire game.


THE TOASTMASTER
by Joe West
Men in the learned professions know a great deal; but to know is not enough. They must be able to share their knowledge through speech, for the good of all.
Engineers are notoriously poor letterwriters and poor speakers. Today, largely as a result of Toastmasters and other post college training, this situation is being corrected. It did exist, largely because the engineer is so busy in college with his major studies that he usually has no time to worry about effective speech.
That is one of the basic errors in our conception of education. Most of us think of education as a process of acquiring information, a "pouring in," if you please, of information to the mind. The word education itself shows that this is inaccurate, as it comes from a Latin word meaning "to lead out" and not to pour in." A more accurate definition of the Toastmasters movement is hard to find. Toastmasters will lead out the sleeping potentialities which are buried deep inside every individual.
One of the most important things an engineer must do is to let people know what he is doing. This is the first place in which Toastmasters training is helpful. It gives one the self-confidence necessary to speak up and left the boss what he is doing.
As engineers, part of your job is to keep up with new developments in your field. You do this to a great extent by attending conferences. How many times have you gone to a conference or a technical meeting and actually fallen asleep? Because of the material? Because you were not interested? Absolutely not! You fell asleep because the speaker did not use Basic Training, Number 3: "Building a Speech;" or Basic Training Number 5: "Vocal Variety;" or Number 8: "Word Pictures;" or Number 9: "Working with Words."
Just because you are an engineer don't think that you cannot make your explanations in a language that can be understood by both technician and layman. Einstein explained his theory of relativity so that even his wife could understand. He said, "The theory of relativity? Very simple. It works like this: If you sit in the dentists chair for 5 minutes, it seems like 5 hours; but if you hold a beautiful blonde on your lap for 5 minutes, it seems like 5 seconds."
As engineers and as Toastmasters, you hold the world in the palm of your hand. You are the quarterback on the team of Industry. The future of the world is yours to shape. Don't fumble the ball-don't let that world slip out of your hand, for if it does your world is going tc break. Be prepared to call the right signal, be prepared technically and then put that final polish of Toastmasters. Always keep the goal in front of you, and remember-to be the winning quarterback you must look up, speak up, and move up.






40


Saturday, 11 June 1955


THE- INDIAN


Spare Time A Thing Of Past



Thru Use at Hobby Shops

-pare time hanging heavy on your hands? Chances are-if it is-that yoove not visited either the Naval Station or Naval Air Hobby Shops. Reports from both shops indicate that many have been availing themselves of the facilities, both service personnel and dependents.


The Naval Station Hobby Shop is primarily intended for anyone wanting to work in wood. The shop has all the necessary power and hand tools but does not have plans for any furniture projects. Mahogony-which may be obtained through the Hobby Shop
-runs about one third the cost that one would pay for it in the U.S. All necessary hardware must be purchased at the NAS Exchange.
Also Kits
The Naval Air Hobby Shop offers all types and sizes of kits for both the beginner and experienced. Price ranges will fit into any budget. If you like models, you can go into boats, airplanes and trains. Accessories are also offered, such as engines, hardware, fuels, fuel tanks, cements, and spray paints.
For those who prefer to start from scratch, there are complete leather working tools and leather. For those just starting out there are partially finished kits.
Small Fry Included
Children might like to start out with the simple painting kits or one of the puppet kits. Interested in rug making? You'll find that also along with complete instructions for and all the other kits.
Hours Open
Hours of operation for the NAS Hobby Shop are: Week Days, 13002100. Saturday, Sunday and holidays, 0800-2100. The Naval Station Hobby Shop hours are: week days from 1300-2100 and on Saturday from 0800-2100. Closed Sundays, Thursdays and holidays.


Shore Duty List Given

In May Issue All Hands

For All Districts
Washington (AFPS)-Like to know where you stand on the Bureau 6T Personnel shore duty eligibility list?
The May i s s u e' of ALL HANDS magazine includes a table which indicates aproximately where you stand on the waiting list. It shows all the rates for the 10 Naval districts in addition. to the Potomac River Naval Command, Severn River Naval Command, ,Chief of Naval Air Training Command, and Chief of Naval Training Experimental Command. It also shows a separate column for shore duty anywhere in the U.S.
Under each Naval district or command listed are two different dates for each rating. The first is the date the top rate awaiting assignment began his current tour of continuous sea duty. The second is the date the fourth man on the list began his tour.
- However, if only one date appears it means there are less than four men of that rate requesting that locality. If there is no date listed, an EM is waiting for that district.
This table does not include information for EM who have submitted requests for fleet shore duty eligibility lists or for recruiting or instructor duty lists.


Doug Tollefson of the Naval Station Corral, shows Stephanie Stoll (on horse) the proper method of holding the reins while riding a horse. The students are, left to right. Issac Guiolli, Michael Stafford, Susan Duffy, Kit Becker and Becky Dobbin.


. . .. ... .





Swimming instructor William Bouchard (center) gives instructions to his students in the Naval Station Swimming Pool. The students are, left to right, Wynne MacGregor, Don McCoy, Peter Soballe, Mack Gendreau, Daniel Dunlap, Stephen Soballe, and Deroy Brotherton.



Vehicle use Under Criticism



As Instructions Issued

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (Naval Base)-All commands aboard this base have been made action addresses of a recent Instruction pertaining to the utilization of Navy automotive vehicles. It is NAVBASEGTMO INSTRUCTION 11240.9B, date 6 June 1955. It is due to severe criticism that has been levelled by the Congress and other Government regulatory bodies against all government agencies, and especially the military, for wasteful automotive vehicle practices.


Camp - Out For Boy Scouts

Scheduled This Week-End

About 25 boys of Boy Scout Troop 435 and the Explorer Unit will make a camp-out this weekend in the vicinity of the Randolph Ranch area. This combined operations will be under the supervision of LT C. C. Echols, Scoutmaster; C. Lister, DT3, Ass't. Scoutmaster; and R. MacSaveny, PH3, Explorer Advisor.
The Scouts and Explorers will assemble in the Meet Hut behind Victory Hill at 8:30 A.M. Saturday morning. They will return Sunday afternoon. They will attend church services in the CB area Sunday morning.
The Boy Scout Committee, headed by LCDR F. T. Fortenberry, has scheduled this week-end's camp-out as part of an accelerated campaign of .activity for the boys. This will include additional camp-outs, jamborees and camp-fire get-togethers. Also on the agenda is completion of the Villamar Scout Shack and Cub Scout Shack.


Smarter Than User

Flint Mich. (AFPS)-Fire that destroyed the lakeside cottage of C. M. Hardway cost him $8,000 because the property wasn't insured.
He is manager of the National Life and Accident Insurance Co. in Detroit.


Instructions have made clear the fact that unless an improvement is noted and wasteful practices eliminated, the control of administrative vehicles will be taken from the military departments completely.
Assignment Important
The framework for proper utilization of vehicles is already in existence at this Base, requiring only the proper implementation and decision, according to the Instruction. For example, Recreational trips in official vehicles shall be authorized only when equipment is available and in compliance with the provisions contained in 1OND Instruction 11240.12B.
Be Prepared
When it has been determined that an off-Base trip is feasible, considering the condition of the vehicle and conditions to be encountered, the following preparations are considered necessary:
(1) equip vehicle with jack, tire tools and spare tire.
(2) have vehicle checked by competent automotive authority to ascertain mechanical fitness of the vehicle for the trip.
Dispatcher: Key Man
The Dispatchers should make sure before assignment that vehicles will not remain idle during work hours at pier sides, clubs, recreation areas, etc.
Neither should vehicles be assigned indiscriminately to transient personnel. Full regard shall be had of driver qualifications, familiarity with local operating instructions and other applicable information. Base Police are empowered to stop and check vehicles which do not appear to be used in compliance with existing instructions.


Page Three


me





46


THE INDIAN


Saturday. 11 June 1955


Marines Move Back Into Contention


ith Staff, SeaBee, Flyer Wins

by Bud Sisson
The Marine Leathernecks, fighting to get back into contention with the VU-10 Mallards and Naval Station Indians-still tied for the league lead at the Indian sports deadline-had a big week, taking the field three times and walking home happy victors after each contest. The Leathernecks finished off play last week with a 9-0 shutout over the Staff Corps. The Marines were first to shut out Staff. Saturday, the Marines again continued in their
winning way, trouncing the MCB-1 Bees finally broke back into the Bees 12-2, in a game that was
called because of rain after six win column with a bang, pracitcally full innings. Thursday night, the burying the Staff Corps 22-3. fulariness.e Thusyet, he fKeasey took the win for the Bees. Marines spoiled the upset hopes of The remarkable part of the game the Naval Air Station Flyers, best- was that if you add up the Staff ing them 7-4, in what proved to be was at y add hp t still the best played game of the week. erors and the SeaBee hits, it still MARINES SHUT OUT STAFF only comes to 20.
Still carrying their bruises from R H E
the 7-2 defeat by the VU-10 Mal- MCB-1 22 1 4
lards, the Marine Leathernecks Staff 3 5 9
started back in their winning ways MARINES TOP NAS
Friday night, 3 June, when they
shut out Staff Corps 9-0. With As- Tuesday night the M a r i n e sistant Manager John Dowd on the Leathernecks played heads-up ball mound, the Marine Barracks Squad behind the pitching of John Dowd played errorless ball while pitcher to top the NAS Flyers 7-4. For the Dowd gave up only two hits. Dowd first three innings, it was a pitchstretched his earned run average ers' duel between Dowd and Flyer considerably, giving up no runs, hurler Paul Snyder. earned or unearned in nine innings. Snyder, who has turned in some
tiad gas on themound fok fine performances and has been the Staff, and gave up 12 hits, walked victim of bad luck many times, got nine men, and his team-mates com- into trouble in the fourth inning. mitted three errors.R H E Two runs came across, and with
R H E two out it looked as if we were on
Staff 0 2 3 his way out of the mess when a
Marines 9 12 0 fly ball was dropped and allowed
MARINES TOP SEABEES twmoerntocei.
Saturday night, after six full two more runs to come in.
innings, the Marine Leathernecks The Marines rounded out their headed back home, damp but not seven runs with two runs in the unhappy after downing the MCB-1 sixth and one more in the seventh. Bees 12-2. Rain stopped play in the In the bottom of the seventh, the seventh inning. Flyers came into action, pushing
The Leathernecks pushed their one run across. In the bottom of 32 runs across while Tuttle and the eighth, the Flyers again scored, Joseph were on the mound for the this time marking up three runs. Bees. In two innings, Tuttle gave But the errorless infielding, and up four hits and five runs. In three the fine pitching of John Dowd innings, Joseph gave up seven hits wrapped up the game for the
-o the Marine sluggers and allowed Leathernecks in the ninth. seven runs to come in. Stork, Callins, Haffer, and Ligget were
doubling at first base, and DeBarips, the big bats for the Marines, each gave up one hit apiece. chalking up two hits. Rice led NAS
At the plate for the Marines, at the plate, going three for four. Dowd, Castello, Hunter, and Hoffer The outstanding play of the game were the big bats. Patton was on was in the seventh inning when the mound for the Marines and Leatherneck outfielder Clark pulled
took the win. Tuttle took the loss in Sherlacher's line drive with a for the Bees. backhanded, running, shoestring
R H E catch. After rolling over three
MCB-1 2 5 2 times, Clark came up with the ball
Marines 12 13 1 in hand.
Sunday afternoon, the Staff
Corps came to life and forced the R H E
NAS Flyers to "sweat it out" until Marines 7 9 0
the final inning when the Flyers NAS 4 6 4
finally came out the victors 7-6.
The Flyers took a one-run lead At this point in league play, in the second inning. Staff took anything could happen. If the Naover the lead in the third with two val Station Indians and the VU-10 runs, only to have the Flyers come Mallards split in their contests back with three runs in the fourth (last night and the 15th) the Mawhile Staff scored one to make the irnes would be very much back in score 4-3, NAS the running. Marine pitcher John
In the seventh inning, the Air Dowd has proved himself on the Station pushed three insurance mound, and with some good relief, runs across the plate, and their he could be the man to upset either insurance paid off as the Staffers the Mallards or the Indians or both rallied with two in the eighth and and throw the league back into a one in a ninth inning surge that three-way tie. However, if either fell short by one run. the Indians or the Mallards take
Nixon was on the mound for Air both contests, the winner will be Station and took credit for the well on the way to a pennant. win, striking out nine, walking The Air Station is out of contenthree, and giving up eight hits. tion for the pennant, but a wellMeyerson took the loss for Staff, placed upset here and there could striking out three, walking nine, be disaster with a capital "D." The and giving up seven hits. SeaBees, who haven't yet played
R H E the ball they are capable of, could
NAS 7 7 2 come in as a threat for an upset
Staff 6 8 6 any time. And as for Staff-they're
SEABEES WALLOP STAFF doing their best to paint up the
Wednesday night, the MCB-1 cellar and make it liveable.


10


Ladies' Bowling

The first half of the summer bowling league has been completed with Team No. 1, captained by A. Farester, in first place.-Teams No.
2 and No. 3 are tied for second. Most improved beginner at the close of the first half of the league is Marie Rahberg with an everage of 128.
We are losing alot of old timers and alot of new faces are around, so the second half promises to be full of upsets and surprises as the finals draw near.
High Average
J. King 162
F. Grounds 155
E. Griffin 155
C. Godbout 146
S. Wenderlick 144
A. Farester 141
M. Pugh 141
P. Way 140
E. Saunders 140
S. Cohanski 136
High Games
J. King 200
M. Zucher 190
E. Saunders 190


LTJG Oyerley Becomes

Member of Gtmno Aces'
LTJG J. D. Byerley, Naval Station Special Services Officer, joined the elite "Hole in One" Club Man 29th when he "aced" the 15th hole of the Naval Base Golf Course. The first of his golfing experience. Mr. Byerley used a No. 3 iron on the 160 yard hole.
The "Hole in One" was witnessed by LTJG Doss, who preceded Mr. Byerley as a "Gtmo Ace" just a month ago when he one stroked the 6th hole, LTJG Maxwell, who also witnessed
Doss' shot, and LCDR Sandness. "Hole in One's" are unusual in themselves, but Mr. Byerley"s was exceptionally so, in that his was made on the fly, which is rarely ever heard of. As LTJG Byerley said, "it is something you always hope for but really never expect."
It is the 5th time No. 15 has been aced, and thus makes Mr. Byerley number 27 of the "Gtmo Aces".


Home Run Leaders
(Including Wednesday's game) PLAYER TEAM H.R.
Madden VU-10 4
Hunter Marines 3
Vieceli SeaBees 2
Morgan NavSta 1
Cabral VU-10 1
Hoffer Marines 1
Costello Marines 1
Wood Marines 1
Stork SeaBees 1


PLAYER Madden Morgan Ianeiro Hunter Mandis T. Clark Bailey Castello Haley Schreck


TEAM VU-10
NavSta NavSta Marines NavSta VU-10
Staff Marines NavSta Marines


0


Guantanamo Bay Golf Club

Celebrate National Golf Day

45 Entries Awarded Medals
Thirty-six men and nine ladies from the Guantanamo Bay Golf Club shot net scores good enough to beat U.S. Open Champion, Ed Furgol and Patty Berg last Saturday during the Fourth Annual National Golf Day.
Based on past percentages, the sponsors estimated that approximately 35,000 golfers beat the champions with the help of handicaps, while competing on their home courses. Furgal and Miss Berg played at San Francisco's Olympic Course, site of this year's Open. They shot 72 and 77 respectively.
Paul Gibbons, with a gross 90 and 33 handicap, gave him a net 57 to lead the men and Mrs. Polly Hering's 86 with a 20 handicap, lead the ladies here at Guantanamo Bay.
Wright North, club professional, led the field in gross scores with a 69, with no handicap to also win a medal.


Name Gross
P. E. Gibbons 90
J. D. Kelly 71
Dr. Bryan 77
A. J. McGowan 83
W. A. Gerko 75
E. C. Monte 78
R. E. Smith 87
CDR Rothenberg 85 W. H. Anderson 84
L. G. Fuerst 85
H. H. Bush 75
R. E. Adams 71
A. L. Schmitt 92
E. Harville 90
P. S. King 79
Peddycord 72
W. G. White 82
Mrs. Polly Hering 86 P. H. Dunmire 89
J. W. Doulin 78
CAPT McCracken 85
Mrs. Rothenberg 115 Mrs. Ellis 123
CDR Scott 76
D. E. Leschak 78
Michel Dote 91
P. H. Savage 89
L. B. Dickson 82
W. S. Lackey 85
LT Drace 76
W.A. Johnson 88
W. R. North 69
Miss Strubble 100
H. Broughton 84
L. E. Rogers 74
M. B. Clemons 87
R. J. Aven 93
W. A. Jenkins 97
LCDR Dempsey 79
Dr. Moschella 90
Mrs. Caruthers 91
Mrs. Hall 122
Mrs. Scott 94
Mrs. Monte 123
Mrs. McCracken 95


Hep. 33 13 18 23 15
1' 26
24 21 22 12
7 28 25
14
7 16
20 22 11 18
48 56
9
11
2 22 15 17
8
20
0
31 15
5
17
22 26
8
19 19
48 19
49 19


Net 57 58 59 60 60 61 61 61 63 63 63
64 64 65 65 65 66 66 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 68 68 68 69 69 69 69 70 71 71 71 71 72
74 75 75 76


AB 40 31 27 39
22 27
24 35
14 20


H
20 14 12 17
9 11
9
13
5
7


RBI 14 11
9 15 10
7
9
8
7
3


AGV. .500
.452 .444 .436 .409 .407 .375 .371 .357 .350


Page Four


Top Ton Batters


Saturday, 11 June 1955


a







Saturday. 11 June 1955


0


THE INDIAN


FTG Bulletin

by Ron Federman
On the unfortunate side of the news since our last get-together, RMC Perry, accompanied by his wife and two children, departed Gtmo on Emergency Leave last Saturday, 4 June. The Perry Family left the Naval Base in haste to the bedside of Mrs. Perry's mother, who was suddenly besieged with a serious illness. Here's hoping for a quick recovery!
As we turn our eyes to the brighter side of the picture, our attention is directed toward the Gnad Family. Daniel Ginad, ETi, won $50.00 at Bingo Tuesday Evening, 31 May, and his good fortune was enhanced even more the following day when Mrs. Gnad gave birth to a baby boy weighing 5V2 lbs. Congratulations to Mrs. and Mrs. Gnad!
With the birth rate apparently in full swing at FTG, a contribution was made by Mrs. Clarke, wife of LTJG Clarke, attached to the Damage Control Department, at 0755, 25 May. To prove that babies come in various sizes, Mrs. Clarke gave birth to a baby girl, weighing in at 7 lbs. 15/2 ozs. Congratulations!
Along the same lines of maternal developments, on the morning of Tuesday, 7 June, CDR Manning, ASW Officer, was overheard uttering forth in jubilant style, "it's another boy"! The baby, named Robin Irwin, checked in just thirty minutes past midnight. Robin 7 lbs. 6 ozs. at birth. Congratulations!
Leaving FTG today, but not going very far, EMC E. M. Dougherty, was trasferred to the Naval Station, Gtmo, for duty on board the AFDL 47. See you around Chief!
Now that the "school vacation season" is in progress, Irving Page, son of LCDR Page, of the Air Department, is spending his vacation with his family at Gtmo. On Sunday, 29 May, Irv arrived from Florida, and was greeted by his mother and father. Upon termination of the vacation, he will return to Florida State University, where he is attending school. Welcome to Gtmo!
Also visiting his family on vacation. or we should say "leave", Ed Stafford, Airman Third Class, U.S. Air Force, arrived here on Tuesday, 31 May. Ed's father, LCDR Stafford, is currently attached to the Damage Control Department at FTG. The younger Stafford recently completed a Course of Instruction at the Air Police School, Parks Air Force Base, Calif. Sometime in the latter part of June he will depart Gtmo for a tour of duty in Germany. Welcome to Gtmo, and best of luck with the Air Force!
BASEBALL
The Staff Baseball Team, composed of Hospital and FTG personnel, lost a closely contested ballgame at the hands of the Naval Air Station this past Sunday by the score of 7 to 6. Despite a slight precipitation throughout most of the game, the full nine innings was played w i t h o u t- interruption. Goerge Rogina, HN, hit the first circuit clout of the season for the Staff Team in the ninth inning, but
it was in a losing cause.
Related congratulations to Mr. id Mrs. Dominicci occassioned by ihe birth of their son, David Albert, on 14 May. The new arrival tipped ibe scales at 6 lbs. 6 ozs. Dominicci, RD1, is attached to Fleet Training Center.


NSD Supply Line
The officers of the Naval Supply Depot entertained CDR and Mrs. Suetherling at a farewell cocktail and buffet party on the patio of the Officers' Club las Monday evening. The Suetherling's plan to leave on June 19th for duty in Washington, D. C.
LCDR Cecil C. Allen left Gtmo last Sunday for a series of conferences in Washington, D. C. Mrs. Allen in the meantime is becoming increasingly more aware that father does help rear little Susan, especially when its time to baby sit.
Mrs. Audrey McGee, the wife of Chief Storekeeper McGee, and
son John journeyed on the "Johnson" to the States last Monday. Mrs. McGee is going to briefly visit their daughter Joan Parr in Indiana and then continue the journey on to Los Angeles. Chief McGee who is the Depot's Household Effects Storekeeper will also be leaving in the near future.
LT and Mrs. Kenneth Woolard left on the "Johnson" for a five day visit to San Juan, Puerto Rico. They plan to stay at the Normandy Hotel, and we hope that they have an enjoyable five days in picturesque San Juan.
LCDR Bill Shehan has been enjoying a week's leave, undoubtedly he has spent most of it on the golf course. Live it up, Bill, you don't have much longer to go.
CHPCK Colston, the Assistant Fuel Division Officer celebrated his
-th birthday on the 6th of June. Happy Birthday "Tip" and may you have many more.
Mary Wakefield, the Clerk Steno ni the Planning Office, sailed on the "Johnson" which left for New York on the 27th of May. Mary will spend six weeks with her folks in Concord, N.H. Robert and David stayed behind at Gtmo with Papa Wakefield.


Teenage Round-up

by Linda Thurston
HEADLINES: "COOKIE DEEGAN SWINMS ENGLISH CHANNEL". It's not current events but a suppressed desire that is printed above. In passing Cookie the other day I heard her claim that someday she's going to do just that . . . swim the Channel-but not like the guy who swam half way across and discovered he was tired again, turned around and swam back again. We want to wish the best of luck in your future ambitions and in your new home in Camp Lejeune. We'll iniss both Cookie and Monica.
Again in the "Supressed Desire Dept." we have Stan H. who hopes that when he dies he can come back to the base and haunt everybody until he drives us sane! Ah well, so much for that.
Eddie Stafford, boy graduate of Gtmo High, Class of 54, has retuined to his old stomping grounds and really set this place on its ear. Aside from recruiting half the girls on the base to join the Air Force, he and Pat Burke and followers have been having a big ball.
DID YOU SEE . . . "Athletic Ethyl" (yes, I mean you Lucille) insisting that the windows be kept down on the bus the other night! A real outdoor type. But we didn't really mind the night air (gasp, wheeze, cough) ... Anita's strange malady ? . . . Bobbie and "dirty Edwin haggling over five dollars"?
Judy Inman and Sylvia fishing . . . The kids shuffling off to Becky and Maryalice's party ... Mike Maddox and his large Cuban vocabulary . . . Rueben and his "you know how it is" Pat Fojt's plans for marriage . . . Mary Jane recuperating from her "going away party"? We'll sure miss ya, gal... Irv Page and his followers on water skiis.


Contest For Cartoonist

Open For All On Active

Outy: All-Navy Scope
The call is out for all cartoonists with an urge to compete with others in pen and ink. A contest has been announced for all naval personnel on active duty, according to BuPers Notice 1700, dated 18 May 1955. It is known as the AllNavy Couic Cartoon Contest with entries to be submitted in sufficient time to be judged by 1 September 1955.
Comic cartoons, gag or situation, must have a Navy theme or background, must be in good taste, and suitable for general consumption. They must be in black ink on 8 x 101 white paper or illustration board. Entries will not be acknowledged and will become the property of the Department of the Navy for use as desired and will not be returned.
A contestant may enter as many cartoons as desired but each entry must contain the following information and statements securely attached directly to the back of the entry:
(1) Full name or originator.
(2) Rate or rank.
(3) Serial or file number.
(4) Duty station.
(5) Hometown and hometown
paper.
(6) A brief statement certifying
the cartoon as original.
(7) "All claims to the attached


entry are waived and I understand the Department of the Navy may use as desired.
Signed:
(Contestant)
(8) "Forwarded." Signed by C.O.
or his representative.
All-Navy Championship trophies will be forwarded to the respective C.O.'s for presentation to the first five place winners. In addition, certificates will be awarded to those deserving honorable mention. The winning cartoons will be published in ALL HANDS magazine.


Colonel Robert E. Fojt, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks, presents the Marine Barracks Pistol and Rifle Trophy to Commander V. J. Soballe and the winners of the annual Pistol and Rifle Meet, Naval Station.


0 9


Page Five


,~tra 11Jn-15








Saturday, 11 June 1955 THE INDIAN Navy-DPPO-1OND----Gtno.-0951


MOVIES

Saturday, 11 June
NO ESCAPE
Lew Ayres Sonny Tufts
A down and out songwriter becomes involved in a murder case and clears himself with the help of a girl. He and the girl look forward to the future with a song hit in prospect.
Sunday, 12 June KISS ME KATE
Howard Keel Kathryne Grayson
This is a musical based on Shakespere's play "The Taming of the Shrew" with music by Cole Porter.
Monday, 13 June TERROR STREET
Dan Duryea Alsy Albin
A U.S. Air Force pilot has only 36 hours to clear himself of a murder charge of killing his wife. He is helped in his escape by a mission worker and through her is able to find the real killer.
Tuesday, 14 June
SUSAN SLEPT HERE
Debbie Reynolds Dick Powell
A romantic comedy about a teenage "problem girl" who is dropped into the household of a Hollywood writer and after falling in love with him reorganizes his household and his life. Involved is a Pasadena girl who wants to add the name of the writer to her list of husbands.
Wednesday, 15 June
ROUGE COP
Robert Taylor Janet Leigh
When the gangsters, with whom he has been working for years, kill the brother of a crooked detective, he sets out to even the score.
Thursday, 16 June CHINA VENTURE
Barry Sullivan Edmond O'Brien
A Japanese Admiral is a prisoner of the Chinese guerillas in 1945. The United States wants him for questioning and sends a force of Marines and Navy personnel to buy him from the gerillas. The force finally achieve their goal after facing many dramatic problems.
Friday, 17 June ARROW HEAD
Charlton Heston Jack Palance
No Information Available.

Actor: The death scene was a riot.
Actress: How come?
Actor: The corpse had the hiccoughs.
Song title that won't make the hit parade: Was It Malice, Alice, When You Sent Me That Vitalis?

A gossip is a person who talks to you about others; a bore is one who talks to you about himself; a brilliant conversationalist is one who talks to you about yourself.


Radio's 'Tops' of the Week

SATURDAY, 11 June . . . THEATRE ROYAL ... 9:00 P.M.
Sir Lawrence Olivier re-creates the H. G. Wells story "The Country of the Blind". It's a story which gives the lie to the old adage "In the country of the blind-the one-eyed man is king."
SUNDAY, 12 June ... HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE ... 10:00 P.M.
"Goodbye My Fancy" starring Rosalind Russell and Robert Young brings forth a blooming romance as a congresswoman returns to her alma mater to receive an honorary degree and finds the spark of an old flame rekindled.
MONDAY, 13 June . .. STAR PLAYHOUSE . . . 9:00 P.M.
Star Playhouse replaces Best Plays this evening with its first production of the American Classic, Herman Meville's "Moby Dick". Fredric will portray Ahab, master of ihe whaler Peuqod, who engages in a whaling expedition. Ahab hunts down a whale called Moby Dick for revenge and a fierce battle ensues in the Pacific.
TUESDAY, 14 June . . . THE CHASE . . . 9:00 P.M.
Murder finished off a predatory woman who had pursued wealth and a career, but made three mortal enemies during her life. Naturally the suspicion of murder falls on the former enemies.
WEDNESDAY, 15 June . . . ON STAGE . . . 9:00 P.M.
Some guys wouldn't in "A Month of Sundays"; but when Cathy Lewis, as a girl who was just a "looker" not a "buyer" of houses, exasperates Elliot Lewis, a real estate salesman who didn't know the girl's phobia, he becomes so confused he ends up falling in love with her. The "looker" becomes the "buyer" and the salesman becomes a husband.
THURSDAY, 16 June ... FAMILY THEATRE . . . 9:00 P.M.
"At a Hundrd and Fifty-five Pounds" stars Michael O'Shea in a humorous fantasy in which a professor's time machine transports a punchy prize-fighter back to the days of Ancient Rome, with amazing results.
FRIDAY, 17 June . . . RADIO WORSHOP . . . 10:00 P.M.
An unusual drama of a strange triangle that results in tragedy, "Broadway Here I Come" concerns a rich old man, his pretty, fun-loving young wife, and an unscrupulous young man with too much ambition. When the wife and her lover decide to get rid of the old man, they find themselves on the run from a pursuer they cannot escape.


Beautiful Elaine Stewart spends many of her leisure hours on the beach, whenever she isn't starring in one of MGM's production. They failed to mention which beach that she spent those leisure hours on.


po


5B00K-NOOK
by Ed Talen, SN
For Your Information ...
THE LIVING FAITH by Lloyd C. Douglas
The faith and teaching of Lloyd C. Douglas went back always to the fundamentals that Christ laid down in the Sermon on the Mount. For him they were not the pattern of an abstract ideal but a definate plan for living-a plan within the reach of all men. It is never too late to set past mistakes right, and a nian can always find a new life, he states, if he has the will to work for it. He feels strongly that most churches spend too much time on the forms of religion, and fails to play a positive role in man's everyday life. According to the author, it is not enough to say "Our doors are always open". The good christian must go out to teach his fellow men and to those who are likely never to enter a church. This novel is a basic statement of Lloyd C. Douglas' belief and faith.
RUN SILENT, RUN DEEP by CDR Edward L. Beach, USN This is the story of the silent service - the submarine c r e w s which destroyed the Japanese merchant marine during World War II. A narrative taut with drama, told with the intimacy of confession, it deals with two strong headed men: their loves, their jealousies, and their destinies in the lonely struggle between the hunters and the hunted. Unlike many war novels, here is a story that deals with the perspective of command.
FALSE COLORS by Richard Powell
This is a mystery novel wherein the hero is a young Philadeluhia art dealer who gets mixed up in dirty work in the field of art collecting. He is not the typical type of hero, but is slow and cautious. He gets scared in tight spots. As always, the hero has a jetpropelled blond partner, sort of a workman's compensation for his injuries, as he wins her by battling strong arm guys, gunmen, and a murderer. The book has a Philadelphia flavor to it. Richard Powell's knowledge of art is very impressive. All in all it is a very fine book.
THE SPEAR
by Louis De Wohl
This rich, panoramic novel opens in Rome. Young Cassius Longiuus, just back from the German Wars, is reveling in every delight of civilization. Just as his life is rising to a gloriously happy climax, sudden, totally unexpected disaster turns it all to ashes. Cassius learns almost over night that betrayal and brutality are the routes to success. Believing neither in gods nor in men, he lives only to avenge his wrongs. As a centurion stationed in Jerusalem, Cassius plays a part in the three cornered struggle betweef the priestly caste, the people clamoring for liberation from Rome, and Rome itself, represented by the procurator, Pontius Pilate.
THE WORLD IS SIX FEET
SQUARE
by Allan Caillou
This is a true adventure of two young men caught behind enemy in the desert-of escape, recapture, imprisonment, and eventual release. Early in the war for North Africa, Allan Caillou and one companion were captured in the Western Desert. Then began a weird adventure. The author takes the reader through this adventure and makes him share an intense and exciting experience.


10


Saturday, 11 June 1955


THE INDIAN


Navy-DPP0--10N'D-Gtmo.-0951




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". a 9& C "Govers (TMO Like The Sunshine'"' Vol. VI, No. 23 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 11 June 1955 'Blithe Spirit' Readies For Ghosty Opening At Marina Point 21 June Rehearsals for the Little Theatre's forthcoming production, Noel Coward's "Blithe Spirit," have moved off stage for line rehearsals and to allow the production crew to complete set construction, lighting and other details in time for opening night, Tuesday 21 June. Meanwhile, at the line rehearsals, the rough edges are being smoothed out, and "Blithe Spirit" promises to be the best comedy yet, since "My Three Angels," but with the added wit of Noel Coward's spicy lines. In Act II of "Blithe Spirit," Ruth, as played by Joy Graves, emphatically tells Charles, her husband, as played by actor-director Alan Wagner, "I've been doing my level best to control myself ever since yesterday morning, and I'm not going to try any more. The strain is too much. Elvira has the advantage of being able to say whatever she pleases, without my being able to hear her. But she can hear me all right, can't she? ...without any modified interpretation?" This line explains just the predicament which Ruth is in after the sudden and alarming re-appearance of Charles deceased first wife, Elvira. It proves to be a very comical predicament which evolves into one of mystery. Later in Act II, Dr. Bradman, as played by Jerry Murphy, tells Ruth that her husband needs to get away from it all with a change and a rest. "He suddently shouted, 'What are you doing in the bathroom?' and a little later while I was writing him a prescription, he suddenly said, 'For God's sake, behave yourself.'-" The remarkable part of it all, however, is that you, as an audience at the five big nights, 21 June through 25 June, can see it all. You'll be seeing ghosts, both materialized and immaterialized. You'll be able to hear these ghosts talk while the characters created so brilliantly by Noel Coward cannot see or hear them, with the exception of Charles. "Blithe Spirit" is more than just another play or another production of the Little Theatre. It will not only amuse you as comedies are designed to do, but it will appeal to your imagination and make you leave the theatre feeling that you have a sixth sense which no one else has. And yet it all comes down to reality with a strange twist at the end, which in the fashion of good playwriting, does not show itself until the final scene, practically the final curtain. Don't miss it. You and your imagination will both enjoy it. Two very disgusted ghosts longing to cross back over "wherever they came from'' (Elvira at far left played by Charlotte Murphy, and Ruth at far right, played by Joy Graves) wait not too patiently as Madam Arcati, played by Evelyn Perdue, goes into a trance. Standing by hoping for the best, but not too sure of what to do is Charles, played by Alan Wagner. The scene is taken from the Little Theatre's forthcoming production. of "Blithe Spirit," scheduled to run at Marina Point 21 through 25 June. New Sub Training Device Uses Single Stick Steering Gordon, Conn. (AFPS) -The Navy now has a training device to teach submariners how to operate its new single stick steering control system aboard submarines. In the past, one man steered the sub right or left while two others were required to operate the bow planes which control the vessel's rise and descent. Now, after checking out on the new trainer, one man will be able to operate the single stick control and steer the sub alone in much the same way a pilot maneuvers an airplane. The steering system is also new in the Navy. There are only about 10 submarine equipped with it now. The trainer was designed by the Office of Naval Research and will be built here by the Electric Boat Div. of General Dynamics CorpIt will be mounted on a separate platform and cradle and will respond to the controls, even pitching and rolling as a submarine would in heavy seas. Mambo Or Cha Cha Cha If you still mambo, it could be a sign the world is passing you by ..Word is that the longtime dance craze is finally on its way out ...Latest step coming up from Latin America is something called the "cha cha cha" .. It's described as something like an "American lindy with a Cuban flavor." Naval Base Golf Gourse Club House Officially Opened On Memorial Day On May 30th, Memorial Day, was the grand opening and dedication of Guantanamo Bay's new Golf Course Club House. The ceremony was conducted in the presence of the members when RADM E. B. Taylor cut the ribbon, officially opening the new building. Following the ceremony, some 120 golfers teed off in a four ball match with each team consisting of three men and one woman, with the men using full handicaps. The team of Peddycord, CAPT McCracken, Schmitt and Mrs. Ellis, scoring 101 under par 50s tied for low net honors with Jenkins, Kidwell, Smith and Mrs. Holly for merchandise certificates w o r t h $13.10. Five other teams scored net 51s for the runner-up award of a merchandise certificate worth $2.25. LST's Get Names Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has given names to 158 of its tank landing ships (LST) to become effective in July. The ships will be named after counties in the U.S. Dr. Gabriel Hauge Visits Naval Base Dr. Gabriel Hauge, the Economic Advisor to President Eisenhower, visited the Guantanamo Bay area and observed training exercises on the larger ships, under the control of Commander, Fleet Training Group. Dr. Hauge is a native of Hawley, Minnesota. He graduated from Concondia College in Moorhead, Minnesota, and received his Masters Degree in Economics and his Doctors Degree at Harvard University. He was a faculty member of Princeton University, and reported for active duty in World War II. He saw action in the Pacific as a Gunnery Officer, and returned to civilian life as a Lieutenant Commander in the Naval Reserve. He joined the New York Banking Commission and later was with the McGraw-Hill Publishing Company. He was appointed from there to his present position by President Eisenhower. During his visit, Dr. Hauge was on board the USS Macon, Monday, Wednesday and Thursday, and spent Tuesday aboard the USS Bennington, and from there was flown to the base via helicopter. He left for Washington, D. C. Friday morning. RAOM Burke New CNO As Carney To Retire Washington (AFPS) -The Navy's new nominee for Chief of Naval Operations, RADM Arleigh A. Burke will have the rank of full admiral. He will begin his two year term as CNO August 16. The White House said that ADM Robert B. Carney, present CNO, was not reappointed because he would have reached the mandatory retirement age of 62 before being able to fill out another two-year term. He has announced that he will retire to private life upon completion of his duties as CNO. RADM Burke, who presently commands the Navy's Atlantic Fleet Destroyer Force, is a 1923 graduate of the Naval Academy. He became known as "31 knot" during WWII in the Pacific because of the high speed he demanded of destroyer squadrons under his command. His "little beavers"-Destroyer Squadron 23 -covered the first landings on Bougainwille in November 1943, and then went on to participate in 22 separate engagements with the enemy in the following three months. I

PAGE 2

Page ~Wfj THE INDIAN Saturday, 11 June 1955 THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. RADM EDMUND B. TAYLOR, Commander Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT G. M. HOLLEY, Chief of Staff CAPT WILLIAM R. CARUTHERS, C.O. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Editorial Staff LTJG J. D. Byerley ------------------------------Officer-Advisor G. L. Henderson, JOC -------------------------------------Editor HI. L. Sisson, 103 ---------------------------------Ass't. Editor D. C. Roberts, JOSN ----------------------------Staff Reporter E. J. Talen, SN --------------------------------Staff Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. Material marked AFPS may be used by any news medium provided credit is given. Features marked "copyright" may not be used. All material originated by THE INDIAN may be used in whole or in part, with or without credit. All photographs are official U.S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. Pres Defends Commissaries And Exchanges In Answer Sunday, 12 June 1955 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 170--1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930-Sunday School 0980-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900--Chair Rehearsal Friday: 1900-Worship Services Friday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR .J. Sullivan. CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHO, USN (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner T TEN REASONS WHY? Sitting in my Office trying to catch up on some correspondence, one evening, a number of groups of men passed by the windows. Again and again my ears were assailed with langauge that I am sure was not intended for my ears. I am also sure that much of it was not acceptable to God, nor would it be in polite society. That experience started me to thinking as I have often done because of similar experiences. I recalled Washington's order to the Continental Army, and also the article in Navy Regulations concerning cursing. Then I came upon the following which is a thought provoking summary. It is a quote: TEN REASONS WHY I SWEAR 1. It pleases mother so much 2. It is a fine mark of manliness 3. It proves that I have selfcontrol 4. It indicates how clearly my mind operates To Hoover Negative Report Washington (AFPS) -President Eisenhower believes it would be a "terrible injustice" to Armed Forces personnel to take away their commissary and exchange facilities. The President was referring to recent recommendations to Con. gress by the Hoover Commission, known officially as the Commission on Organization of the Executive Branch of the Government. In its report, the commission recommended that Defense Department confine exchanges and commissaries to remote localities. At present the DOD operates 438 commissary stores in the U.S. and overseas. Of these, 199 are in the U.S. and 239 abroad. Exchange facilities are more numerous. The Armed Services now operate about 450 exchanges in the U.S. and 2,700 abroad, including branches. President Eisenhower told a press conference he had never believed in the "uncontrolled spread" of exchanges. He also said "to take away the commissary privileges and post exchange privileges from the military, uniformed personnel, wherever they may be, when those are really needful things in order to give them the normal business of living, and giving it to them at a decent price, I belive it would be a terrible injustice to those people." 5. It makes my conversation so pleasing to everybody 6. It leaves no doubt in any one's mind as to my poor breeding 7. It impresses people that I have more than ordinary education 8. It is an unmistakable sign of culture and refinement 9. It makes me a very desirable personality among women and children and in respectable society 10. It is my way of honoring God who said "Thou Shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain." Karl G. Peterson Chaplain, USN by Cpl Paul A. Hoffer, USMC MARINE BARRACKS TROPHY The Marine Barracks Trophy for the annual Pistol and Rifle meet winners was won by Naval Station. The trophy was presented to Commander V. J. Soballe by Colonel Robert E. Fojt, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks, in a ceremony held 20 May 1955 at Marine Barracks. The trophy will be held by Naval Station till the next annual meet. SAFETY AWARD The Secretary of the Navy Award for Achievement in Industrial Safety was again awarded to Marine Barracks for the fourth time in the last five years. The award is in recognition of completing the calendar year 1954 without a lost-time accident. SPORTS After losing three games in a row the Marine Barracks baseball team have won their last two. Defeating MCB-1 12 to 2 and the Staff 9-0. It gives the team six wins and three loses. Thursday 9 June the Marines play Naval Air Station, then play Staff on Monday 13 June. ARRIVAL From Camp Lejeune, North Carolina came Corporal Michael Sivilli for duty. Cpl Sivilli is from New Jersey and will be attached to Security Section. "Welcome aboard, hope you enjoy your stay in Gtmo". DEPARTURES Last Wednesday, June 1st, Corporal Marvin Y. Holcomb departed for the states. Cpl Holcomb will report to the 2nd Marine Division at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina for duty. VU 10 Prop Blast The spirits of LTJG Greenfield, Mrs. Greenfield, and LT Graves are not dampened by rain. They spent last Saturday and Sunday fishing and had a good turn of luck. The Greenfields, under the guidance and fishing know-how of Bill Graves, caught several Jack Fish and large barracudas, which averaged 14 pounds each. A lonely JD-1 was flying all last weekend. LT Hawkins, who is presently with detachment in Key West, was piloting the aircraft. LT Hawkins was finishing up his check-out in the JD prior to taking it up to Key West to replace the Turkey, which he flew here. The JD will replace the two Turkeys in Key West and will be used for operational flights. Richard Bianchi, AD1, and Daniel Dollar, AK3, recently reported to VU-10 for duty. Bianchi reported from VA-174 in Quonset Point, R.I., while Dollar came from IBTU in Pensacola, Florida. VU-10 welcomes you into the squadron and hopes that the tour here will be a pleasant one. After last Friday's game against NAS, the Mallards were again tied for 1st place with NOB. Big Gene Edgar spun a beautiful game for himself. The NAS nine was held to one fluke hit by the Mallard fast-bailer. Edgar helped his game along by getting a single in the top of the first inning. Larry (Gabby) Cabral then came up to the plate and broke his three game hitting slump by dropping the ball over the left field fence to score the only two runs in the entire game. THE TOASTMASTER by Joe West Men in the learned professions know a great deal; but to know is not enough. They must be able to share their knowledge through speech, for the good of all. Engineers are notoriously poor letterwriters and poor speakers. Today, largely as a result of Toastmasters and other post college training, this situation is being corrected. It did exist, largely because the engineer is so busy in college with his major studies that he usually has no time to worry about effective speech. That is one of the basic errors in our conception of education. Most of us think of education as a process of acquiring information, a "pouring in," if you please, of information to the mind. The word education itself shows that this is inaccurate, as it comes from a Latin word meaning "to lead out" and not to pour in." A more accurate definition of the Toastmasters movement is hard to find. Toastmasters will lead out the sleeping potentialities which are buried deep inside every individual. One of the most important things an engineer must do is to let people know what he is doing. This is the first place in which Toastmasters training is helpful. It gives one the self-confidence necessary to speak up and left the boss what he is doing. As engineers, part of your job is to keep up with new developments in your field. You do this to a great extent by attending conferences. How many times have you gone to a conference or a technical meeting and actually fallen asleep? Because of the material? Because you were not interested? Absolutely not! You fell asleep because the speaker did not use Basic Training, Number 3: "Building a Speech;" or Basic Training Number 5: "Vocal Variety;" or Number 8: "Word Pictures;" or Number 9: "Working with Words." Just because you are an engineer don't think that you cannot make your explanations in a language that can be understood by both technician and layman. Einstein explained his theory of relativity so that even his wife could understand. He said, "The theory of relativity? Very simple. It works like this: If you sit in the dentists chair for 5 minutes, it seems like 5 hours; but if you hold a beautiful blonde on your lap for 5 minutes, it seems like 5 seconds." As engineers and as Toastmasters, you hold the world in the palm of your hand. You are the quarterback on the team of Industry. The future of the world is yours to shape. Don't fumble the ball-don't let; that world slip out of your hand, for if it does your world is going to break. Be prepared to call the right signal, be prepared technically and then put that final polish of Toastmasters. Always keep the goal in front of you, and remember-to be the winning quarterback you must look up, speak up, and move up. p Page T1wrj THE INDIAN Saturday, 11 June 1955

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S0 Saturday, 11 June 1955 THE INDIAN Page Three Spare Time A Thing Of Past Thru Use of Hobby Shops Spare time hanging heavy on your hands? Chances are-if it is-that l. 1:-->-^,>
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Page Four Page Four THE INDIAN Satu~~y. 11 June 1955 Marines Move Back Into Contention With Staff, SeaBee, Flyer Wins by Bud Sisson The Marine Leathernecks, fighting to get back into contention with the VU-10 Mallards and Naval Station Indians-still tied for the league lead at the Indian sports deadline-had a big week, taking the field three times and walking home happy victors after each contest. The Leathernecks finished off play last week with a 9-0 shutout over the Staff Corps. The Marines were first to shut out Staff. Saturday, the Marines again continued in their winning way, trouncing the MCB-1 Bees finally broke back into the Bees 12-2, in a game that was win column with a bang, pracitcally called because of rain after six burying the Staff Corps 22-3. full innings. Thursday night, the Keasey took the win for the Bees. Marines spoiled the upset hopes of The remarkable part of the game the Naval Air Station Flyers, bestwas that if you add up the Staff ing them 7-4, in what proved to be errors and the SeaBee hits, it still the best played game of the week. oe t 0 MARINES SHUT OUT STAFF only comes Still carrying their bruises from R H E the 7-2 defeat by the VU-10 MalMCB-1 22 1 4 lards, the Marine Leathernecks Staff 3 5 9 started back in their winning ways MARINES TOP NAS Friday night, 3 June, when they shut out Staff Corps 9-0. With AsTuesday night the M a r i n e sistant Manager John Dowd on the Leathernecks played heads-up ball mound, the Marine Barracks Squad behind the pitching of John Dowd played errorless ball while pitcher to top the NAS Flyers 7-4. For the Dowd gave up only two hits. Dowd first three innings, it was a pitchstretched his earned run average era' duel between Dowd and Flyer considerably, giving up no runs, hurler Paul Snyder. earned or unearned in nine innings. Rogina was on the mound for performances and has been the Staff, and gave up 12 hits, walked victim of bad luck many times, got nine men, and his team-mates cominto trouble in the fourth inning. emitted three errors. Two runs came across, and with R H E two out it looked as if we were on Staff 0 2 3 his way out of the mess when a Marines 9 12 0 fy ball was dropped and allowed MARINES TOP SEABEES Saturday night, after six full innings, the Marine Leathernecks The Marines rounded out their headed back home, damp but not seven runs with two runs in the unhappy after downing the MCB-1 sixth and one more in the seventh. Bees 12-2. Rain stopped play in the In the bottom of the seventh, the seventh inning. Flyers came into action, pushing The Leathernecks pushed their one run across. In the bottom of 2 runs across while Tuttle and the eighth, the Flyers again scored, Joseph were on the mound for the this time marking up three runs. Bees. In two innings, Tuttle gave But the errorless infielding, and up four hits and five runs. In three the fine pitching of John Dowd innings, Joseph gave up seven hits wrapped up the game for the to the Marine sluggers and allowed Leathernecks in the ninth. seven runs to come in. Stork, Callins, Haffer, and Ligget were doubling at first base, and DeBarips, the big bats for the Marines, each gave up one hit apiece. chalking up two hits. Rice led NAS At the plate for the Marines, at the plate, going three for four. Dowd, Castello, Hunter, and Hoffer The outstanding play of the game were the big bats. Patton was on was in the seventh inning when the mound for the Marines and Leatherneck outfielder Clark pulled took the win. Tuttle took the loss in Sherlacher's line drive with a for the Bees. backhanded, running, shoestring RCH E catch. After rolling over three MCB-1 2 5 2 times, Clark came up with the ball Marines 12 13 1 in hand. Sunday afternoon, the Staff Corps came to life and forced the R H E NAS Flyers to "sweat it out" until Marines 7 9 0 the final inning when the Flyers NAS 4 6 4 finally came out the victors 7-6. The Flyers took a one-run lead At this point in league play, in the second inning. Staff took anything could happen, If the Naover the lead in the third with two val Station Indians and the VU-10 runs, only to have the Flyers come Mallards split in their contests back with three runs in the fourth (last night and the 15th) the Mawhie Saffscoed ne o mkethe irnes would be very much back in while Staff scored oe tomake the running. Marine pitcher John score 4-3, NAS. In the seventh inning, the Air Dowd has proved himself on the Station pushed three insurance mound, and with some good relief, ustatio s puheplad three he could be the man to upset either runs across the plate, and their insurance paid off as the Staffers the Mallards or the Indians or both rallied with two in the eighth and and throw the league hack into a one in a ninth inning surge that three-way tie. However, if either fell short by one run. the Indians or the Mallards take Nixon was on the mound for Air both contests, the winner will be Station and took credit for the well on the way to a pennant. win, striking out nine, walking The Air Station is out of contenthree, and giving up eight hits. tion for the pennant, hut a wellMeyerson took the loss for Staff, placed upset here a 5d there could striking out three, walking nine, be disaster with a capital "D" The and giving up seven hits. SeaBees, who haven't yet played R H E the ball they are capable of, could NAS 7 7 2 come in as a threat for an upset Staff 6 8 6 any time. And as for Staff they're SEABEES WALLOP STAFF doing their best to paint up the Wednesday night, the MCB-1 cellar and make it liveable. vk Ladies' Bowling The first half of the summer bowling league has been completed with Team No. 1, captained by A. Farester, in first place. Teams No, 2 and No. 3 are tied for second. Most improved beginner at the close of the first half of the league is Marie Rahberg with an everage of 128. We are losing alot of old timers and alot of new faces are around, so the second half promises to be full of upsets and surprises as the finals draw near. High Average J. King 162 F. Grounds 155 E. Griffin 155 C. Godbout 146 S. Wenderlick 144 A. Farester 141 M. Pugh 141 P. Way 140 E. Saunders 140 S. Cohanski 136 High Games J. King 200 M. Zucher 190 E. Saunders 190 LTJG Byerley Becomes Member of 'Stmo Aces' LTJG J. D. Byerley, Naval Station Special Services Officer, joined the elite "Hole in One" Club Man 29th when he "aced" the 15th hole of the Naval Base Golf Course. The first of his golfing experience. Mr. Byerley used a No. 3 iron on the 160 yard hole. The "Hole in One" was witnessed by LTJG Doss, who preceded Mr. Byerley as a "Gtmo Ace" just a month ago when he one stroked the 6th hole, LTJG Maxwell, who also witnessed Doss' shot, and LCDR Sandness. "Hole in One's" are unusual in themselves, but Mr. Byerley"s was exceptionally so, in that his was made on the fly, which is rarely ever heard of. As LTJG Byerley said, "it is something you always hope for but really never expect." It is the 5th time No. 15 has been aced, and thus makes Mr. Byerley number 27 of the "Gtmo Aces". Home Run Leaders (Including Wednesday's game) PLAYER TEAM H.R. Madden VU-10 4 Hunter Marines 3 Vieceli SeaBees 2 Morgan NavSta 1 Cabral VU-10 1 Hoffer Marines 1 Costello Marines 1 Wood Marines 1 Stork SeaBees 1 PLAYER Madden Morgan Ianeiro Hunter Mandis T. Clark Bailey Castello Haley Schreck TEAM VU-10 NavSta NavSta Marines NavSta VU-1O Staff Marines NavSta Marines 0 Guantanamo Bay Golf Club Celebrate National Golf Day 45 Entries Awarded Medals Thirty-six men and nine ladies from the Guantanamo Bay Golf Club shot net scores good enough to beat U.S. Open Champion, Ed Furgol and Patty Berg last Saturday during the Fourth Annual National Golf Day. Based on past percentages, the sponsors estimated that approximately 35,000 golfers beat the champions with the help of handicaps, while competing on their home courses. Furgal and Miss Berg played at San Francisco's Olympic Course, site of this year's Open. They shot 72 and 77 respectively. Paul Gibbons, with a gross 90 and 33 handicap, gave him a net 57 to lead the men and Mrs. Polly Hering's 86 with a 20 handicap, lead the ladies here at Guantanamo Bay. Wright North, club professional, led the field in gross scores with a 69, with no handicap to also win a medal. Name Gross Hep. Net P. E. Gibbons 90 33 57 J. D. Kelly 71 13 58 Dr. Bryan 77 18 59 A. J. McGowan 83 23 60 W. A. Gerko 75 15 60 E. C. Monte 78 1' 61 R. E. Smith 87 26 61 CDR Rothenberg 85 24 61 W. H. Anderson. 84 21 63 L. G. Fuerst 85 22 63 H.H. Bush 75 12 63 R. E. Adams 71 7 64 A. L. Schmitt 92 28 64 E. Harville 90 25 65 P. S. King 79 14 65 Peddycord 72 7 65 W. G. White 82 16 66 Mrs. Polly Hering 86 20 66 P. H. Dunmire 89 22 67 J. W. Doulin 78 11 67 CAPT McCracken 85 18 67 Mrs. Rothenberg 115 48 67 Mrs. Ellis 123 56 67 CDR Scott 76 9 67 D. E. Leschak 78 11 67 Michel Dote 91 2 67 P. H. Savage 89 22 67 L. B. Dickson 82 15 67 W. S. Lackey 85 17 68 LT Drace 76 8 68 W. A. Johnson 88 20 68 W. R. North 69 0 69 Miss Strubble 100 31 69 H. Broughton 84 15 69 L. E. Rogers 74 5 69 M. B. Clemons 87 17 70 R. J. Aven 93 22 71 W. A. Jenkins 97 26 71 LCDR Dempsey 79 8 71 Dr. Moschella 90 19 71 Mrs. Caruthers 91 19 72 Mrs. Hall 122 48 74 Mrs. Scott 94 19 75 Mrs. Monte 123 49 75 Mrs. McCracken 95 19 76 AB 40 31 27 39 22 27 24 35 14 20 H 20 14 12 17 9 11 9 13 5 RBI 14 11 9 15 10 7 9, 8 7 AGV. .500 .452 .444 .436 .409 .407 .375 .371 .357 3 .350 Top Ten Batters Saturday, 11 June 1955 THE INDIAN

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a 0Sturdav 11 June 1955 FTG Bulletin by Ron Federman, On the unfortunate side of the news since our last get-together, RMC Perry, accompanied by his wife and two children, departed Gtmo on Emergency Leave last Saturday, 4 June. The Perry Family left the Naval Base in haste to the bedside of Mrs. Perry's mother, who was suddenly besieged with a serious illness. Here's hoping for a quick recovery! As we turn our eyes to the brighter side of the picture, our attention is directed toward the Gnad Family. Daniel Gnad, ET1, won $50.00 at Bingo Tuesday Evening, 31 May, and his good fortune was enhanced even more the following day when Mrs. Gnad gave birth to a baby boy weighing 5!/2 lbs. Congratulations to Mrs. and Mrs. Gnad! With the birth rate apparently in full swing at FTG, a contribution was made by Mrs. Clarke, wife of LTJG Clarke, attached to the Damage Control Department, at 0755, 25 May. To prove that babies come in various sizes, Mrs. Clarke gave birth to a baby girl, weighing in at 7 lbs. 15%2 ozs. Congratulations! Along the same lines of maternal developments, on the morning of Tuesday, 7 June, CDR Manning, ASW Officer, was overheard uttering forth in jubilant style, "it's another boy"! The baby, named Robin Irwin, checked in just thirty minutes past midnight. Robin 7 lbs. 6 ozs. at birth. Congratulations! Leaving FTG today, but not going very far, EMC E. M. Dougherty, was trasferred to the Naval Station, Gtmo, for duty on board the AFDL 47. See you around Chief! Now that the "school vacation season" is in progress, Irving Page, son of LCDR Page, of the Air Department, is spending his vacation with his family at Gtmo. On Sunday, 29 May, Irv arrived from Florida, and was greeted by his mother and father. Upon termination of the vacation, he will return to Florida State University, where he is attending school. Welcome to Gtmo! Also visiting his family on vacation. or we should say "leave", Ed Stafford, Airman Third Class, U.S. Air Force, arrived here on Tuesday, 31 May. Ed's father, LCDR Stafford, is currently attached to the Damage Control Department at FTG. The younger Stafford recently completed a Course of Instruction at the Air Police School, Parks Air Force Base, Calif. Sometime in the latter part of June he will depart Gtmo for a tour of duty in Germany. Welcome to Gtmo, and best of luck with the Air Force! BASEBALL The Staff Baseball Team, composed of Hospital and FTG personnel, lost a closely contested ballgame at the hands of the Naval Air Station this past Sunday by the score of 7 to 6. Despite a slight precipitation throughout most of the game, the full nine innings was played w i t h o u t. interruption. Goerge Rogina, HN, hit the first circuit clout of the season for the Staff Team in the ninth inning, but it was in a losing cause. related congratulations to Mr. snd Mrs. Dominicci occassioned by he birth of their son, David Albert, oi 14 May. The new arrival tipped the scales at 6 lbs. 6 ozs. Dominicci, RD1, 'is attached to Fleet Training Center. NSD Supply Line The officers of the Naval Supply Depot entertained CDR and Mrs. Suetherling at a farewell cocktail and buffet party on the patio of the Officers' Club las Monday evening. The Suetherling's plan to leave on June 19th for duty in Washington, D. C. LCDR Cecil C. Allen left Gtmo last Sunday for a series of conferences in Washington, D. C. Mrs. Allen in the meantime is becoming increasingly more aware that father does help rear little Susan, especially when its time to baby sit. Mrs. Audrey McGee, the wife of Chief Storekeeper McGee, and son John journeyed on the "Johnson" to the States last Monday. Mrs. McGee is going to briefly visit their daughter Joan Parr in Indiana and then continue the journey on to Los Angeles. Chief McGee who is the Depot's Household Effects Storekeeper will also be leaving in the near future. LT and Mrs. Kenneth Woolard left on the "Johnson" for a five day visit to San Juan, Puerto Rico. They plan to stay at the Normandy Hotel, and we hope that they have an enjoyable five days in picturesque San Juan. LCDR Bill Shehan has been enjoying a week's leave, undoubtedly he has spent most of it on the golf course. Live it up, Bill, you don't have much longer to go. CHPCK Colston, the Assistant Fuel Division Officer celebrated his -th birthday on the 6th of June. Happy Birthday "Tip" and may you have many more. Mary Wakefield, the Clerk Steno ni the Planning Office, sailed on the "Johnson" which left for New York on the 27th of May. Mary will spend six weeks with her folks in Concord, N. H. Robert and David stayed behind at Gtmo with Papa Wakefield. Teenage Round-up by Linda Thurston HEADLINES: "COOKIE DEEGAN SWINMS ENGLISH CHANNEL". It's not current events but a suppressed desire that is printed above. In passing Cookie the other day I heard her claim that someday she's going to do just that .. swim the Channel-but not like the guy who swam half way across and discovered he was tired again, turned around and swam back again. We want to wish the best of luck in your future ambitions and in your new home in Camp Lejeune. We'll miss both Cookie and Monica. Again in the "Supressed Desire Dept." we have Stan H. who hopes that when he dies he can come back to the base and haunt everybody until he drives us sane! Ah well, so much for that. Eddie Stafford, boy graduate of Gtmo High, Class of 54, has returned to his old stomping grounds and really set this place on its ear. Aside from recruiting half the girls on the base to join the Air Force, he and Pat Burke and followers have been having a big ball. DID YOU SEE ..."Athletic Ethyl" (yes, I mean you Lucille) insisting that the windows be kept down on the bus the other night! A real outdoor type. But we didn't really mind the night air (gasp, wheeze, cough) .Anita's strange malady? ...Bobbie and "dirty Edwin haggling over five dollars"? ? ? .Judy Inman and Sylvia fishing ...The kids shuffling off to Becky and Maryalice's party Mike Maddox and his large Cuban vocabulary ...Rueben and his "you know how it is" Pat Fojt's plans for marriage ...Mary Jane recuperating from her "going away party"? We'll sure miss ya, gal. Irv Page and his followers on water skis. Contest For Cartoonist Open For All On Active Duty: All-Navy Scope The call is out for all cartoonists with an urge to compete with others in pen and ink. A contest has been announced for all naval personnel on active duty, according to BuPers Notice 1700, dated 18 May 1955. It is known as the AllNavy Conic Cartoon Contest with entries to be submitted in sufficient time to be judged by 1 September 1955. Comic cartoons, gag or situation, must have a Navy theme or background, must be in good taste, and suitable for general consumption. They must be in black ink on 8 x 10/Z white paper or illustration board. Entries will not be acknowledged and will become the property of the Department of the Navy for use as desired and will not be returned. A contestant may enter as many cartoons as desired but each entry must contain the following information and statements securely attached directly to the back of the entry: (1) Full name or originator. (2) Rate or rank. (3) Serial or file number. (4) Duty station. (5) Hometown and hometown paper. (6) A brief statement certifying the cartoon as original. (7) "All claims to the attached entry are waived and I understand the Department of the Navy may use as desired. Signed: (Contestant) (8) "Forwarded." Signed by C.O. or his representative. All-Navy Championship trophies will be forwarded to the respective C.O.'s for presentation to the first five place winners. In addition, certificates will be awarded to those deserving honorable mention. The winning cartoons will be published in ALL HANDS magazine. Colonel Robert E. Fojt, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks, presents the Marine Barracks Pistol and Rifle Trophy to Commander V. J. Soballe and the winners of the annual Pistol and Rifle Meet, Naval Station. 0 THE INDIAN Page Five

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Saturday, 11 June 1955 THE INDIAN Navy-DPPO-S5ND-Gtmo.555s MOVIES Saturday, 11 June NO ESCAPE Lew Ayres Sonny Tufts A down and out songwriter becomes involved in a murder case and clears himself with the help of a girl. He and the girl look forward to the future with a song hit in prospect. Sunday, 12 June KISS ME KATE Howard Keel Kathryne Grayson This is a musical based on Shakespere's play "The Taming of the Shrew" with music by Cole Porter. Monday, 13 June TERROR STREET Dan Duryea Alsy Albin A U.S. Air Force pilot has only 36 hours to clear himself of a murder charge of killing his wife. He is helped in his escape by a mission worker and through her is able to find the real killer. Tuesday, 14 June SUSAN SLEPT HERE Debbie Reynolds Dick Powell A romantic comedy about a teenage "problem girl" who is dropped into the household of a Hollywood writer and after falling in love with him reorganizes his household and his life. Involved is a Pasadena girl who wants to add the name of the writer to her list of husbands. Wednesday, 15 June ROUGE COP Robert Taylor Janet Leigh When the gangsters, with whom he has been working for years, kill the brother of a crooked detective, he sets out to even the score. Thursday, 16 June CHINA VENTURE Barry Sullivan Edmond O'Brien A Japanese Admiral is a prisoner of the Chinese guerillas in 1945. The United States wants him for questioning and sends a force of Marines and Navy personnel to buy him from the gerillas. The force finally achieve their goal after facing many dramatic problems. Friday, 17 June ARROW HEAD Charlton Heston Jack Palance No Information Available. Actor: The death scene was a riot. Actress: How come? Actor: The corpse had the hiccoughs. Song title that won't make the hit parade: Was It Malice, Alice, When You Sent Me That Vitalis? A gossip is a person who talks to you about others; a bore is one who talks to you about himself; a brilliant conversationalist is one who talks to you about yourself. Radio's 'Tops' of the Week SATURDAY, 11 June ..THEATRE ROYAL .9:00 P.M. Sir Lawrence Olivier re-creates the H. G. Wells story "The Country of the Blind". It's a story which gives the lie to the old adage "In the country of the blind-the one-eyed man is king." SUNDAY, 12 June .HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE. 10:00 P.M. "Goodbye My Fancy' starring Rosalind Russell and Robert Young brings forth a blooming romance as a congresswoman returns to her alma mater to receive an honorary degree and finds the spark of an old flame rekindled. MONDAY, 13 June .STAR PLAYHOUSE .9:00 P.M. Star Playhouse replaces Best Plays this evening with its first production of the American Classic, Herman Meville's "Moby Dick". Fredric will portray Ahab, master of the whaler Peuqod, who engages in a whaling expedition. Ahab hunts down a whale called Moby Dick for revenge and a fierce battle ensues in the Pacific. TUESDAY, 14 June ..THE CHASE .9:00 P.M. Murder fnisheo off a predatory woman who had pursued wealth and a career, but made three mortal enemies during her life. Naturally the suspicion of murder falls on the former enemies. WEDNESDAY, 15 June ..ON STAGE .9:00 P.M. Some guys wouldn't in "A Month of Sundays"; but when Cathy Lewis, as a girl who was just a "looker" not a "buyer" of houses, exasperates Elliot Lewis, a real estate salesman who didn't know the girl's phobia, he becomes so confused he ends up falling in love with her. The "looker" becomes the "buyer" and the salesman becomes a husband. THURSDAY, 16 June .FAMILY THEATRE .9:00 P.M. "At a Hundrd and Fifty-five Pounds" stars Michael O'Shea in a humorous fantasy in which a professor's time machine transports a punchy prize-fighter back to the days of Ancient Rome, with amazing results. FRIDAY, 17 June ..RADIO WORSHOP ...10:00 P.M. An unusual drama of a strange triangle that results in tragedy, "Broadway Here I Come" concerns a rich old man, his pretty, fun-loving young wife, and an unscrupulous young man with too much ambition. When the wife and her lover decide to get rid of the old man, they find themselves on the run from a pursuer they cannot escape. Beautiful Elaine Stewart spends many of her leisure hours on the beach, whenever she isn't starring in one of MGM's production. They failed to mention which beach that she spent those leisure hours on. 0 0 by Ed Talen, SN For Your Information THE LIVING FAITH by Lloyd C. Douglas The faith and teaching of Lloyd C. Douglas went back always to the fundamentals that Christ laid down in the Sermon on the Mount. For him they were not the pattern of an abstract ideal but a definate plan for living-a plan within the reach of all men. It is never too late to set past mistakes right, and a man can always find a new life, he states, if he has the will to work for it. He feels strongly that most churches spend too much time on the forms of religion, and fails to play a positive role in man's everyday life. According to the author, it is not enough to say "Our doors are always open". The good christian must go out to teach his fellow men and to those who are likely never to enter a church. This novel is a basic statement of Lloyd C. Douglas' belief and faith. RUN SILENT, RUN DEEP by CDR Edward L. Beach, USN This is the story of the silent service -the submarine cre ws which destroyed the Japanese merchant marine during World War II. A narrative taut with drama, told with the intimacy of confession, it deals with two strong headed men: their loves, their jealousies, and their destinies in the lonely struggle between the hunters and the hunted. Unlike many war novels, here is a story that deals with the perspective of command. FALSE COLORS by Richard Powell This is a mystery novel wherein the hero is a young Philadelphia art dealer who gets mixed up in dirty work in the field of art collecting. He is not the typical type of hero, but is slow and cautious. He gets scared in tight spots. As always, the hero has a jetpropelled blond partner, sort of a workman's compensation for his injuries, as he wins her by battling strong arm guys, gunmen, and a murderer. The book has a Philadelphia flavor to it. Richard Powell's knowledge of art is very impressive. All in all it is a very fine book. THE SPEAR by Louis De Wohl This rich, panoramic novel opens in Rome. Young Cassius Longiuus, just back from the German Wars, is reveling in every delight of civilization. Just as his life is rising to a gloriously happy climax, sudden, totally unexpected disaster turns it all to ashes. Cassius learns almost over night that betrayal and brutality are the routes to success. Believing neither in gods nor in men, he lives only to avenge his wrongs. As a centurion stationed in Jerusalem, Cassius plays a part in the three cornered struggle between the priestly caste, the people clamoring for liberation from Rome, and Rome itself, represented by the procurator, Pontius Pilate. THE WORLD IS SIX FEET SQUARE by Allan Caillou This is a true adventure of two young men caught behind enemy in the desert-of escape, recapture, imprisonment, and eventual release. Early in the war for North Africa, Allan Caillou and one companion were captured in the Western Desert. Then began a weird adventure. The author takes the reader through this adventure and makes him share an intense and exciting experience. Saturday, 11 June 1955 THE INDIAN Navy-DPPO-10ND-Gtmo.-0951