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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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90emTMO LU6 T6e Su~nshine"

Vol. V1, No. 21 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 28 May 1955


Villamar-Bargo Council PTA Recreation Program


Holds Business Meeting Has Large Enrollment For Summer Activities


The newly-elected Villamar-Bargo Council held their first business meeting Wednesday night to formulate a policy and make plans for the coming six months. Presided over by Mayor J. R. Ralston, the council reviewed the records and files of the retiring council and made a list of new proposals to be submitted to the Commanding Officer, Naval Station, CAPT W. R. Caruthers, for consideration.
Carrying through the policy of the retiring council, the new group wvill continue work on the proposed projects already set up. Among these are a new swimming pooi for the Villamiar-Bargo area-which is still in the proposed stage but is presently under consideration hy naval authorities-off -street parking in Villamnar-which will include paving alleyways and making gravel driveways-and also to improve the showings, sound, and screen at the Villamar Lyceum.
New proposals by the council were brought up, considered, and formulated for submission to CAPT W. R. Caruthers at a later date. Amoung these proposals were:
1. A c ommunity Cosmopolitian Social Club in the housing area. This club would be-as one councilman put it-"a browabaggers club" with no distinction of rank or rate, but strictly for personnel of the housing area and their families.
2. Construction of maids' quarters in the housing area. At present there are no facilities for housing maids working in the Villamiar or Bargo areas, other than in the home itself.
3. Improved Commissary facilities in the housing areas.
4. Extension of sales hours at the Navy Exchange Filling Station.
5. Construction of sidewalks and curbs in the housing area. At present, children riding bicycles, tricycles, wagons, etc. or roller skating, have to play in the street, which presents a safety hazard. By constructing sidewalks and curbs, this would give the children a safer place to play and still be close to home.
6. Planting of fruit and fastgrowing shade trees.
7. Additional playground facilities in the housing areas. Also, during the meeting, the council discussed the possibility of bringing television to Guantanamo Bay.
Other proposals included bringing a yard- of -th e-month contest with cash awards for the most improved lawn, best kept lawn, etc.
The next meeting of the council is scheduled for Wednesday, 1 June.


The summer recreation program, sponsored by the Parent-Teachers Association of the Naval Base School, has enrolled an unexpectedly large number of participants for the summer activity program. Included in the schedule for the children of the Naval Base during the summer months is horseback riding, swimming, sailboating, handi-craft, nature study, music study and general sports.
The largest enrollment of students for the summer activities was in the swimming classes. At present a total of 395 students have enrolled for these classes, which are to be held during the morning. The training period will last for five weeks with a total of twelve classes.
Instruction classes on horseback riding and sailboating are also being offered as summer activities for the school children. Riding instruction will be given in the morning with a total of eleven classes. Twenty-five students have signed up for the riding instruction and 5 have enrolled in the sailboating class.
The afternoon activities, which are to be held at the Naval Base School, commencing on June 6, has a total of 170 enrolled, in grades 1 through 12. The classes will be held in the afternoons, Monday through Friday, and offer instructions in such activities as music study, handi-craft, nature study and general sports. The classes will last approximately two hours each afternoon until they are discontinued on July 1.


Command Hurricane Drill

Scheduled For Today

A Command Post Drill will be held this morning, Saturday, May 28, and Hurricane Condition TwoBaker xvii be set a 9:00 A.M. The object of the drill is to test the adquacy and effectiveness of procedures and hurricane bills of individual activities, to insure that all personnel are familiar with their duties, to makes sure that required supplies and equipment are available and suitably located and to test the emergency (hurricane) communications circuit and procedure.
There will be no evacuation to the hurricane shelters nor will action be required of forces afloat. The fire alarm will not be sounded during the drill for drill purposes.


Five Base Co land's Win SecNav



Safety Awards For Past Year

The coveted Secretary of the Navy Safety Award for Achievement in Industrial Safety in 1954 has been won by the Naval Base, Naval Station, Naval Air Station, Naval Hospital, and Naval Supply Depot.
___________________________ Naval Station, Naval Hospital, and Naval Supply Depot also won
Ten Cent Boat Fare the Secretary of the Navy Award
Mo iotor Vehicle Safety in 1954.
Again in Effect -The awards were received this
week from the Commandant,
The long-time boat fare of ten TENTH Naval District, who recents per trip between Cainxanera quested that the Base Commander, as a representative of the Secand the Base again became effective retary of the Navy and the Comlast Monday after heats operated mandant, present the awards to for a xveek at fifteen cents per trip, the respective commands.
Action was taken last Friday by Presentation xvill be made in apthe Cuban Minister of Transporta- propriate ceremonies at each action to suspend the resolution au- tivity.
thoizig te fre ncrase afer RADM G. B. H. Hall, USN, Disthoizig te fre ncrase afer trict Comimandant, expressed cona protest of the increase was pres- gratulations to the winning comented by Dr. Humberto S. Villalon, m-ands. His letter forwarding the Secretary General of the Union of awv ards said, in part: Base Workers and Employees. Ac- "I note with considerable pleascording to Dr. Villalon, a further tie hecnsetl fne aey
investigation to determine whether recrs the Nsenly finel saety or not a fare increase is justified the Naval H-ospital, the Naval Stawill be conducted by the Minister tion, and the Naval Air Station. of Transportation. These Commands have earned
Few employees rode the boats at either one or both of these coveted the increased fares. Most of them awards consecutively each year for came by train to Boqueron, thence a number of years. Their efforts by foot to the North boundary of are particularly commendable." the Base, and from that point by
trucks and buses to the Industrial The Secretary of the Navy
are. Oher drveprivate vehicles Award for Achievement in Indusaieao therBsde. trial Safet'y is made annually to inomte Bras. tto ifiute bureaus, offices, and shore activities
-wer exerincedlas Moday f or an improvement in the accident morning, but boat operations re- frequency and severity rates ovrer turned to normal Monday after- those of the preceding calendar
noon. year, or for the maintenance of a
_______________previously established outstanding industrial safety record. The award
Services consists of a letter of commendaAnnual Memorial Sevcs tion and a certificate, both signed
by the Secretary of the Navy.
To Be Held Monday The Secretary of the Navy
Award for Motor Vehicle Safety
Monday, 30 May 1955, Memorial is issued annually to bureaus, Day, the American Legion, the offices and shore activities which Fleet Reserve, the American Leg- have motor vehicle accident, casualion Auxiliary and the Fleet Reserve ty, and damage cost rates that Auxiliary will honor the dead of are better than the continental two world wars and the dead of Navy-wide average. The award
Guantanamo Bay when they will consists of a letter of commendahold their annual Memorial Services tion and a certificate, both signed at the Naval Base Cemetery at by the Secretary of the Navy.
Cuczo Beach. _________


Beginning at 1200 with the Bugler sounding assembly, and RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, and CAPT G. M. Holley, Chief of Staff, as guests of honor, the four organizations will hold their solemn services. All commnanding officers of Naval Base command have been invited as well as anyone on the Naval Base who wishes to attend.
The program for the services xvill include decorating of the graves with wreaths by the four organizations and a rifle salute by an honor
(Continued on Page Five)


Bold Buttons For EM's

N'low Up For Approval
Washington (AFPS)- Navy enlisted men may soon have 'brass" of their own to polish if a recent econimendation is approved by the Permanent Naval Uniform Board.
Thc "brass" would be gold buttons for peacoats, a recommendation made by Vice Adm. James L. Hlfoloxvay Jr., Chief of the Bureau
(Continued on Page Two)








THE INDIAN


Op~turday, 28 May 1955


The Indian's mission-To inform
and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentmnent of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Specifil Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9616
Saturday, 21 May 1955
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay. Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M1. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LTJG J1. D. Byerley ----Officer-Advisor H. E& Davis, 300------------------ Editor
H. L. Sisson, JOB------------------ News
D. C. Roberts. JOSN -------------Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-85, Revised Nov. 1944, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
THE INDIAN Is a members of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit Is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.




What's Doin' Stateside

People will be flying from the U. S. to Europe in half an hour, possibily within our lifetime... They'll do it in atomic-powered airplanes_ That's the prediction of John Jay Hopkins, head of the company which built the nuclear submarine Nautalus for the Navy . . . Hopkins says that atomic transportation is at about the same stage as diesel power was at the turn of the century.
President Eisenhower wants to remodel the Capitol building to correct some architectural shortcomings which have existed since the dome was placed on the famed structure shortly before the Civil War . . . The dome extends some 40 feet over the east central front of the building on which it rests . . . The remodeling job would move forward this portion of the Capitol's front bringing it into line with the two wings which house the Senate and the House of Representives
..The President has asked Congress for five million dollars to do the job.
In which of America's five leading cities-those with more than two million population-do inhabitants breathe the purest air?
The laurels go to Philadelph~ia, according to tests conducted by the U. S. Public Health Service . . . Next in effectiveness of air pollution control is New York followed by Chicago and Los Angeles . . . Detroiters inhale the dirtiest air.
A new synthetic food-called lysine-is about to hit the market
....It's one of the tissuebuilding acids considered essential to nutrition . . . Meat, fish, eggs and m1-ilk are naturally rich in lysine. but wheat isn't . . . Experts believe adding synthetic lysine to bread and cereals will increase their protein value 70 per cent.


The Toastmaster Protestant Sunday School

by Joe West To Make Changes Tomorrow _____ _____


In spite of our claims to independence of thought and action, most of us are confirmed conformists, which is a polite way of saying that we are "copycats."
We do not want to be different. We want to be in style. We are unwilling to stand out from the crowd. Our regular test of any line of different action is likely to be, "Is it being done?"
If a popular movie star comes out with a new type of hair-do, all the girls hurry to get their hair arranged in that style. If a hero of the athletic field appears in some special kind of sweater or slacks, the boys follow his lead. Someone devises a new style and announces, "This is what the well-dressed man
-or woman-will wear," and we flock to the stores to make ourselves conform. The net result is that we are governed, in large measure, by slogans, the cliches, the mannerisms of popular persons. We are conformists at heart, in spite of our boasted individuality.
We even talk like other people. We borrow the style and the pronunciations of the company we may be in.
That is not a bad idea when we are in the company of intelligent and cultured people. It may lead us to improve ourselves. But if we permit ourselves to be influenced by those of lower intelligence and of poorer speech, it is not good for us.
Speakers are subject to this handicap, for it really is a handicap to permit oneself to he an imitator, instead of seeking to develop one's own best style. Too many speakers try to imitate some popular talker, and in the imitation lose whatever they may have possessed of individual distinction.
It is no great compliment to say of some speaker, "He is another Will Rogers." He will do better to be his own self and create his own style.
In the Toastmasters Club, the constant insistance is on using your best style and developing and improving it. Sometimes an insistent or influential critic leads to overemphasis on some particular style of speech, to the detriment of all those who heed his remarks.
Conformity is a good thing in its place. But conformity which causes us to submerge our personalities and our originality to become blind followers of leaders is a bad thing for all of us.
The wise man dares to be different when he sees the crowd is taking a wrong path, or an inferior one. You need not be a conformist. You may have in yourself the qualities of leadership if you will permit them to be developed for use.

Gold Buttons For EM's
(Continued from Page One)
of Navy Personnel, who said that they would improve the smartness of the enlisted uniform.
The Bureau said notices have been sent to all fleet and shore commanders asking for recommendations and comments on the gold button proposal.
The changeover will be considered by the Uniform Board after the recommendations have been made, the Bureau said.
The present pricQ of a set of eight standard gold buttons, which would fit peacoats, is $1.50.


Guantanamo Bay has taken pride for some time in the fact that it has the largest Protestant Sunday School in the Navy. It is not resting on its laurels, but is continuing to grow-not only in numbers, but in improving its facilities, teaching, and organization. Growth in numbers inevitably requires more materials, equipment and teachers. It also requires other changes to meet these increased demands to provide the best possible Christian Education for the children on the Base.
The contributions made by so many who have served and are serving in the Sunday School can not he fully evaluated, nor can we adequately express our gratitude for their faithful and devoted services. The growth of the Sunday School and the response on the part of the children is a living testimony to their consecration and their ability.
The time has come for a number of changes which it is hoped will improve the Sunday School. First, it has become necessary to move the Pre-School age children (Nursery - Kindergarten Departments) from Chapel Hill to Victory Hill. This change will take place on Sunday 29 May 1955. The Nursery Department under the supervision of Mrs. Christie will meet in the School Nursery on Victory Hill. The Kindergarten Department under the supervision of Mrs. Byerley will meet in Room of the First Grade Buildings on Victory Hill. LCDR Douglas will be the Superintendent of these Departments.
The I Grade Primary Department, Mrs. Yarboro Superintendent, will meet in Room 15 on Chapel Hill. The II and III Grades of the Primary Department will have their Worship Services in Room 17 on Chapel Hill. They will use classrooms number 1, 2, 3 and 19. Mrs. Nelson is the Superintendent of this Department.
The Junior Department will meet in Room 8 on Chapel Hill for their Worship Service. Mr. Wilkinson will be the Superintendent of this Department.
A new department composed of Jr-Sr High Shcool students has been formed with LCDR Fortenberry as Superintendent. This department will have their Worship Service in the Music Room on Chapel Hill.
A new Pre-Nursery Department will be formed about 1 July under the leadership of Mrs. McNeal. This department will be composed of children two (2) years of age. New equipment for the department is being purchased by the Adult Bible Class.
The Adult Bible Class will meet in the School Assembly. Commander Gardes is the President of the class.
These changes have made it possible to divide some of the larger classes and by means of re-location has made possible better classroom f acilities.
In order to provide more adequate transportation for the many children and to encourage more people to use the bus facilities, a new bus schedule will go into effect also on 29 May. The regular school buses and drivers will be used and they will make the same stops in Housing Areas. In addition, cer-


Sunday, 22 May 1955 Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday 1210-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1641-Naval Base Chapel Saturday. 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services
Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0910-Sunday School
0910-Adult Bible Class 1010-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1910-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Christian Science
Sunday: 1000-Station Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J.3J. Sullivan, CHC. USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Paterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)


The Chaplain's Corner



The other day I sent a 50-word night letter home to inform my folks as to when I would he detached from the battalion and about when they could expect me. It took me a great deal of time and effort to write this telegram. For one thing, I wanted to pick the words which would convey the most m-eaning. Secondly, I was careful not to go over the 50-word limit because I did'nt want to pay any more than I had to. (I'm Scotch, you know.)
Then I began to wonder - if God were to send a night letter to me, what would He write? If He had to squeeze the essence of the whole Bible into the carefully counted confines of the 50-word night letter, what would it be?
Paraphrasing John 3:16; Job 19 .25, 26, Phillipians 4:8 1 belive that it woud read something like this:
TELEGRAM
NIGHT LETTER
"I love you and the whole world so much that I gave my Son, that whosoever believeth on Him should not perish but have everlasting life
...Though your body be destroyed,' yet shall you see me, because you know that 1, your Redeemer, liveth . . .Meanwhile, whatsoever things are true, lovely, of good report, think on these things.
Chaplain M. E. Roberts MCB-1

tamn of the buses, as indicated on the schedule pubilshed in the papoose, will make trips by the Wharf Area and the Marine Barracks. Members of the Adult Bible Class will serve as conductors on the Trailer Buses.
Pre School children riding the buses will be tagged with colored tags as they board the buses in order to assist the teachers in putting them on the correct buses for the return trips.
This increased and more rapid bus service will be in effect for the 0900 Roman Catholic Mass, the 0930 Protestant Sunday School, and the 1100 Service of Divine Worship.


Page Two


r7n









Saturday, 28 May i95~ Page Thi~ee


Base Cub Scouts Have

Outing"With Cuban Troop
The Cub Souts of Guantanamo Bay had an outing Saturday, 14 May with Cub Souts of Guantanamio City and Caimanera. Over 40 Cubs from the Naval Base joined with 40 Cubs of Cuba in a full day of events with cokes, candy, gum, games, and contests between the three Cub groups. Prior to leaving Cuba, the Cubs from the Base, Guantanamo City, and from Cairnanera went to Guantanamo City where a representive of each group placed a wreath of flowers at the monument of Jose Marti in the City square.
The ride over, in Cuban buses, was especially enjoyed by the Cubs, but in the running contests, knot tying contests and others, the Cuban Cubs bested the Naval Base Cubs in every contest.
Cub Pack Leader W. A. Johnson, Den Mothers, Den Fathers, and parents accompanied the scouts to Cuba.


RADM E. B. Taylor Presented First Poppy


Mrs. Peggy Way of the American Legion Auxiliary pins the first on RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander Naval Base. The American Auxiliary will distribute Poppy's throughout the entire Naval Base and will accept contributions f or the aid and benefit of war-veter


Nurse Corps Celebrates Birthday


Pictured above is CDR E. W. Sutherling, Commanding Officer, Naval Supply Depot, extending congratulations to James E. Harris, SK3, on his recent advancement in rating. Harris is presently attached to the Issue Control Branch at the Naval Supply Depot.


H. P. McNeal Completes

Reserve Training Tour

Mr. H. P. McNeal, Naval Base Industrial Relations Officer, recently completed his annual tour of reserve training here on the Naval Base. Mr. McNeal, a lieutenant commander in the reserves, was attached to the Naval Base Legal Office during his reserve duty. Mr. Ralph Sierra, Assistant Industrial Relations Officer, assumed the duties of Industrial Realtions officer during Mr. McNeal's training period.
Pictured above is CDR E. W. Sutherling, Commanding Officer, Naval Supply Depot, extending congratulations to James E. Harris, SK3, on his recent advancement in rating. Harris is presently attached to the Issue Control Branch at the Naval Supply Depot.


2


The officers of the Nurse Corps, U. S. Navy, celebrated the 47th day of Nurse Corps at quarters "1H" at the Naval Hospital on 20 May. Left to right: LTJG Barbara Courtright; LTJG M'ary bowicz; Capt. Tilden I. Moe, MC USN; Commanding Officer U LTJG Arlene Coffin; LTJG Florence Meyer; and LT Dee Law shown cutting the Birthday cake.


S1


Ladies Golf Shots

This week we are finally qualS ifying for the Base Ladies Champ;iionship Tournament. Last week's
~(May 18th) scores were:
First Flight
Low Gross-tie-Polly Herring, Jane McElory.
Low Net- Sue Scott
Second Flight
SLow Gross-Billie Nelson
Low Net-Katherine McGregor
Third and fourth flights played
blind five tournament.
Third Flight
First-Sara Brotbers
SSecond-Cynthia Holleq
Fourth Flight
First-Dottie Brandel Second-Chris Guyer
Our tournament starts next week.
he Wednesday players have qualified and we want to remind all weeked players to be sure to qualify
today or tomorrow.


Betty Dalton to Present

Solo Music Recital Sunday

R The solo recital debut of Miss
'K Lynn Dalton will be presented Sun~' day, May 29, at 8:00 P. M. at the * Community Auditorium on Marina
Point. Betty, who was 15 years old this March, was born in San Francisco, California and is the daughter
of LT and Mrs. Lionel Dalton.
Guest performers in the recital
will be Jim Dalton and Kathy Dalton. Jim's a trumpet student now poppy in the 11th grade at the Naval Base Legion School. Kathy is a piano class of today Mrs. H. P. McNeal.
Betty has studied piaino four ans. years and marimba four years. Her
program will consist of four groups
- of piano classic favorites, including
the complete Beethoven Moonlight Sonata. Betty will also present one
group of marimba numbers.
The recital is open to the public
- and everyone is cordially invited
to attend.


CB Reserve Personnel

Here for Training Duty
The Polit Group of Reserve CEO
and CB personnel from the First Naval District arrived aboard the Naval Base on May 14 from South Weymouth, Massachusetts to begin a two weeks course of training duty
aboard an overseas installation.
CDR R. G. Witherell, former
Commanding Officer of MCB-8 and now Reserve CB Program Officer of the First Naval District, expressed his appreciation of the cordial welcome given the Reserves by the
officres and men of MCB-1.
The group consist of most all of
the eight rates and these men have been intergated with men of the
p battalion and ar enow getting "on ~2 the job" training in order to develop the CB "Know How". The success of this group will determine teh extent that the Bureal of PerBirth- sonnel will develop this reserve
?rdy project in the future.


NieluSN'H
son is


The height of bad luck-seasickness with lockjaw?


S


Saturday, 28 May 1965


THE INDIAN


Page Thvee


to


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P.








Page our HE IDIANSaturday. 28 May 1955


Naval Station Indians In First Place Position


As First Round of League Play Is Completed

by Hal Davis
As the six teams in the Naval Base League completed the first round of play in the 1955 season, the field narrowed down to what looks like a three club race for the championship between the Naval Station Indians, currently holding down the top-dog position, the VU-10 Mallards, only a half a game behind, and the faltering Marine Leathernecks, a game and a half behind the leaders.
The second division could possibly turn out to be a tighter race
than the senior section with the pitches and hit three Staff-men. Naval Air Station Flyers holding Edgar allowed only two more hits a one game lead over both the and no runs for the rest of the way.
MCB-1 Bees and the Staff corps.
During the week, the Naval Sta- R H E
tion Indians, backing up the 6-hit Mallards 17 18 7
hurling of Mandy Mandis with Staff 6 5 8
eight safeties of their own, wreak- So at this stage of the game it's ed a little sweet havoc and revenge anybody's guess at who will on the Marine Leathernecks with emerge at the end of the season a 13 to 4 win. The Braves clouted holding the championship trophy. four Marine hurlers from the The Indians are currently on a mound by taking a 7-run lead in rampage of six straight wins, and the bottom of the first inning, all Manager Dempsey said they would 6ff Patton, and all unearned. As- take the rest of them. The Malsistant Manager Johnny Dowd took lards, very strong this year, are the mound from Patton and held not to be counted out the least bit. it for five more innings before the In their first encounter of the seaIndians' attack finally routed him son the Mallards went down at the in favor of I-rhlmes after Dowd had hands of Naval Station, 9 to 8. given up five hits for five more At that time, Dempsey admitted runs. Hbrlmes let another unearned the Mallards were his only worry. run in before Schreck took over And the VU-10 men have beaten in the last inning to put out the all other comers by very lopsided fire. Seven Marine errors made the scores. Tbe closest game they've game a loose one and helped the had was with the Leathernecks, and Braves to their 5th straight vic- they won with a 5-run margin. tory. The Marines, currently in a


R H E
Indians 13 8 0
Marines 4 6 7
The Marines also fell victim to the rampaging Mallards to close out last week's schedule, 10 to 5. Edgar and Madden teamed up on the mound to give the Leathernecks their three hits for their five runs. All the Marine base knocks came off Edgar. Madden not only held the Marines hitless for 4 1/3 innings, but also rapped a homer to aid the Mallard cause. The Marines started the game with Ron Plante on the mound. He lasted 2 1/3 frames and reliefer Dowd came in after Plante had allowed four hits for 8 runs. Dowd gave up five more hits and the other two runs for the Mallards over the rest of the distance.
R H E,
Mallards 10 10 4
Marines 5 3 4
Dale Buss blanked the MCB-1 Bees on Sunday's day game to give the Indians a 10 to 0 win over their country rivals. The Bees, starting the season with a win over the Flyers, haven't been able to break into the victory column since. Keasey gave up eight hits and went the route for the Bees. Buss lasted the entire way for the Indians and gave up 4 scattered hits to shut out the Bees.
R H E
Indians 10 8 2
Bees 0 4 8
Monday night the VU-10 Mallards smothered a Staff uprising to emerge on the lopsided end of a 17 to 6 score. Staff fought neck and neck with the Mallards up until the sixth inning with a tied score at 6-all. Bailey was doing the mound chores for Staff when the Mallards reached him in the bottom of the 6th for 4 runs. Rogina went in to handle the relief duty and Mallards rapped him for eight more hits and seven more runs in the 7th and 8th frames. King started for the Mallards but gave way to Gene Edgar in the 4th inning. King had allowed only three hits, but had chalked up three wild


slump, have never given up without a struggle .Even with the Indian victory of 13 to 4, it was still a good game with plenty of action. Marine pitching is their big weakness this season, but they can make up for it, in part, with their slugging power.
The Indians have the best of the pitching deal in the league with Mandis, Buss, Wolgamuth, and Byerley. Combine their hurling with the devastating effect of their powerful hitters-Mandis, Morgan, McGowan, Guillemette, Mawhinney and Petinak-and the Indians have the decided edge on the rest of the clubs.
So, if the nod of Lady Luck and the smile of Dame Fortune were to be bestowed at this particular time, they would undoubtedly have to go to the Indians. And that's all they'd need.

League Standings


(Including Friday TEAM W
Naval Station 6 VU-10 5
Marines 4
Naval Air 2
MCB-1 1
Staff 1


night's game.) L GB PCT 1 - .857 1 1/ .833 2 1 Y2 .666 4 31/2 .333 5 41/2 .166 5 4 / .166


Baseball Schedule
Sun., 29 May-Marines vs VU-10 Mon., 30 May-Naval Air vs Naval Station
Tues., 31 May-OPEN Wed., 1 June-Marines vs MCB-1 Thurs., 2 June-Naval Air vs VU-10
Fri., 3 June-Marines vs Staff Sat., 4 June-OPEN

Little League Schedule
LITTLE LEAGUE SCHEDULE: Sat., 28 May Bears vs Colts Sun., 29 May-Tigers vs Hawks Tues., 31 May-Tigers vs Bears Thurs., 2 June-Colts vs Hawks
Sat., 4 June-Hawks vs Tigers


0


The Naval Station Indians of 1955-Rear, left to right: Dempsey (manager), Hemnman, Cordice, Haley, Amibroski, Kennedy, Blakelock, Janiero, Guillemette Petinak Morgan. Front row, left to right: Dempsey (batboy), Mancuso, Shaffer, Wolgamuth, Byerley, Mandis, McGowan, Kelley and Mawhinney.


Rifle-Pistol Club, NRA

To Have Busy Schedule
The Guantanamo Bay Rifle-Pistol Club, now affiliated with the Nationnal Rifle Association, is preparing for a heavy summer of events as a busy schedule is planned for the next meeting on 6 June, at the 'Community Hall on Marina Point at 1900. At this meeting it is planned to discuss and arrange details on three important events.
First of all, the Rifle-Pistol Club will further plans for a tentative match with shooters of ComTEN. A dispatch has already been forwarded to San Juan inviting CoinTEN shooters to compete against Gtmo shooters.
Also, at this meeting, preliminary arrangements and plans will begin for the National Rifle Association's Inter-Service regional and national championship matches. Arrangements to be made include a possible elimination qualification match for military personnel of Guantanamo Bay.
The Regional Match will be held in Jacksonville this year on 29, 30,' and 31 July. The Guantanamo Bay Rifle-Pistol Club plans to enter a team, but membership on the team is not limited to club members only, which is the purpose of planning an elimination qualification match.
The National Contest will be held at Camp Perry, Ohio, beginning 20 August and closing 6 September. Further details for interested persons-who should attend the meeting on 6 June-about the National Championships are as follows.
Eligibility
All officers and enlisted personnel ordered to active duty for a period of 90 days or more are eligible to participate. Reserve and ROTC competitive classes are also provided. Marine Corps policy is that no Marine Corps personnel will participate in a firing capacity with Navy teams in these matches. Suggested qualificatio.,s for participation are as follows:
Be capable of equaling the following scores:
Pistol: .45 automatic, service ammunition, National Match Course,


S


TOP TEN BATTERS
(Based on 15 or more times at bat)


Player Team


Madden Ianeiro Clark Morgan Mandis Hunter Kraft Snyder Bland Postal


AB H AVG.


VU-10
Naval Station VU-10
Naval Station Naval Station Marines Staff N.A.S.
Marines VU-10


31
21 19
24 19 27 16
21 22 31


16 10
9 11
8 11
6
8
8 10


.516
.476 .473 .458 .421 .407 .400 .380 .363 .322


LITTLE LEAGUE STANDINGS


Colts Bears Hawks Tigers


w
7
6
6
1


L
3
4
4
9


LITTLE LEAGUE RESULTS


Saturday
Bears 12-Tigers
Sunday
Hawks 13-Colts
Tuesday
Hawks 7-Bears
Thursday Colts 4-Tigers


4
4


245, or Navy Expert Course E, 350.
Small-Bore Rifle: Metallic sights, Dewar Course, 370.
High-Power Rifle: Service, National Trophy Rifle Course, 220, or Navy Expert Course B, 320.
Expenses
Individual expenses for the National Championship matches are allowable from command or unit recreation funds. Match registration and entry fees will total per individual approximately the following:
High-Power Rifle - $51.0 Pistol -$47.00
Small-Bore Rifle -$63.00
Quarters
Enlisted participants will be quartered and.nmessed with the Marine Battalion at no cost to the individual. Officer participants, upon application to the Marine Battalion Commander, will be quartered and messed with the Marine Corps Officers at an individual cost of $1.60 per day.


4"

Page Vour


THE INDIAN









Oa - .yaa 9Qi M~a 195TE5NINPaeFv


NSD Supply Line Hospital Notes


Dorothy Jones, wife of Benjamin C. Jones ,SA, is a welcomed newcomer to the Gtmo area. Mrs. Jones flew down to Guantanamo City
-an experience of a life time in itself-from her home in Ashland, Ky. The couple has established residence in Caimanera.
Mr. Robert Radcliffe is back at NSD feeling good as new, after a 12 day stay in the hospital. Bob is glad to be back, but we bet there is some regret in living the awfully nice scenery the nurses create.
John N. Wright will bid farewell to Guantanamo on 27 May and journey on the Johnson to the Receiving Station for separation. Wright, too has fallen prey to the propagandist and has decided to go to California.
CDR and Mrs. C. E. Lee and their daughter Linda had a very pleasant journey on the Johnson "RoundRobin". They visited San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Port of Spain. Trinidad. Although the trip was a very scenic and exiting one for the Lees, they all expressed their happiness to be back again at their present home away from home at Gtmo.
Robert W. Baily, DK8 is one of the Disbursing Office's happier DKs since the arrival of Clea, his wife, and their children, Joan and Robert. Guantanamo should prove a pleasant change in temperature for the Bailey family, which hails from Washington, Pa.
Roscoe H. Gabbert, BM3, will depart May 27 on the Johnson for the Receiving Station, Brooklyn for separation. His plans are to re-enlist and spend his leave with his wife and son in Hugteston, W. Virginia. Gabbert spent a very active tour here at Gtmo and has won a place in the hearts of everyone at NSD and many of the local populace. The boat trips to Calmanera won't be the same without Gabbert's smiling face.
The Control Division Officer and the Fiscal Officer are no longer "baching it" at BOQ 8. Mrs. Cecil Allen and daughter Susan, who had been recently residing in Hartsville, S. C. with Mrs. Allen's mother,
-arrived on the same Johnson trip with Mrs. John Bayer and children Ben and Susan. The Bayer's home is in Camp Hill, Pa. LCDR John P. McFadden ,the Fuel Division Officer at NSD left Sunday via FLAW. He will be in Washington D. C. and Norfolk ,Virginia for sevveral days discussing fuel matters.


.OPERATION BLONDE


eECaR$TJMef TAK6 YOU ANYpLACE WE END UP SuRROU0LNDED - -THIS 71M E
6CrGO IT REAj


by D. W. Degen
HEIRPORT NEWS
Belated congratulations to HMC and Mrs. Redick on their new arrival, a son, John Garland. Also presented by the stork the past two weeks were: John Anthony to AM3 and Mrs. Florence Willis; William Ora Young VII to DC2 and Mrs. Irene Young; Paula Gail to AD2 and Mrs. Grace Kebble; Gerald Edward to FN and Mrs. Martha Paulton; Katherine Sue to RM3 and Mrs. Phyllis Saforek; Vicki Lynn to AMi and Mrs. Nancy Berry; Corlis Ann to MEC and Mrs. Phyllis Dellafiora; David Albert to RD1 and Mrs. Raquel Dominicci; Joan Theresa to YN1 and Mrs. Theresa Williams; Earnest Everett to AGC and Mrs. Blanch Whittemore; Lynn Marie to TE3 and Mrs. Joananne Thomas.
ARRIVALS
Welcome aboard to: LT (MSC) C. H. Johnson, arriving from USNH Philadelphia; LT (MC) D. J. Doohen from NNMC Bethesda; HMC L. B. Whited reporting from the USS Kleinsmith; HMC R. W. Lacy from the USS Putman; and 11M8 J. F. Betrone from. NAS Pensacola, Florida.
DEPARTURES
Bon Voyage is extended to many of the "olde timers" of Gtmo. Transferred to Jacksonville, Florida for separation were: LCDR (MC) E. D. Grady; HM1 C. A. Barnes and HN R. A. Moran. Also departing were: HM2 R. Miller for duty at Naval Shipyard, Brooklyn, and HM8 Carl J. Fickes to Naval Supply Depot, Crane, Ind.
MEET THE STAFF
HM3 Mario "Nick", Greco, a compartively newcomer to USNH with 5 months longevity in Gtmo. Nick attended Corps School at Portsmouth, Va. and has been stationed at Pensacola, Florida and Parris Island, S.C. The major part of his duties have been with Optical Dispensing Units, currently he was acquiring experience in office procedures to coincide with his future plans of attending Seaton Hail, West Orange, N.J. and majoring in Business Administration. He is now attached to the Food Service Department.

(Continued from Page One)
MEMORIAL SERVICES
guard from the Marine Barracks. After the salute, taps will echo across the cemetary in honor of the dead, and the ceremony will conclude with the playing of the Naional Anthem by the Naval Base Band.


yotu up TOONEY,/'


Teenage Round-up

by Linda Thurston
Now that the Summner vacation is really upon us, the kids are sitting around wondering what to do with all the spare time on their hands. There are no jobs available for the teenagers right now and the prospects don't look so good over the summer, so the big question is where to spend the vacation. It's a long, long walk to the beaches, and the Teenage Club is fine at night, but in the daytime you feel like a roast beef inside and a grilled pork chop outside. The newly organized Parents Advisory Council to the Teenage Club, headed by Mr. Sierra, may come up an answer and we sincerely hope so.
Did Ya' See . . . All the kids having a ball at John McGee's going-away party . .. Frank and Penny counting the days until they leave . . . Neil's strenuous job at the pool . .. Cavie's graduation cap that doesn't fit anymore... Wormie' s crazy sun tan . . . Howie bidding Pistole a fond farewell at the plane . . . Pat Kennedy leaving yesterday for the grand tour of "los Estados" . . . Frances Linder trying to rush home in ten minutes time . . . Judy B's original bathing suit . .. Bobby and Edwin doing the "Chia-Chia-Chia" in Gtmo
...Judy Inman's cute pigtails ... Navy H getting her back scratched by an unknown admirer . . . Phil leaving his enormous tip to a gratewaiter . . . Maryalice going sailing with a cute ensign . .. Becky's trials and tribulations . . . Kids wondering if Eunice is still with us. We haven't seen her since school closed...


IN FLANDERS FIELD
by Colonel John McCrae
In FlaLnder's fields the poppies blow,
Between the crosses, row on row, That mark our places: and in the sky,
The larks still bravely singing fly,
Scarce heard amidst the guns below.
We are the dead.
Short days ago we lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved and now wve lie
In Flanders' Field
Take up our quarrel with the foe, To you from failing hands we throw
The Torch be yours to hold it high:
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders' Field


74






15S


NAS Crosswinds

by Paul Snyder
LCDR J. L. Stowe reported aboard the Air Station last week from NAAS Saufley Field, Pen sacola, Fla. LCDR Stowe is the prospective Officer-in- Charge of Leeward Point Field.
Leaving last week were CHGUN J. D. Sentz and family aboard FLAW to Norfolk where they will begin a cross-country drive to NAAS El Centro, Cal. for duty with Fleet Air Gunnery Unit Pacific. The Sentz family were known in Gtmo for their interest in Cub scouting. CHGUN Sentz was a Cub Master, top bowler on NAS Team No. 2 and an ardent rifle and pistol team supporter while heading the Ordnance Division. Mrs. Sentz served as a Den Mother with the local Cub scouting group.
William J. Hart, ACi, left Gtmo via FLAW for NAMC, Naval Base, Philadelphia last Tuesday. Also on that flight was Nathan Williams, 5D3, enroute to VA-16 via FasRon 5, Oceana.
Destined for Receiving Station, Brooklyn and discharge on MSTS are John T. Page AC2, Pete Hl. Bielitz RMSN, William L. Nicoll TE3, Henry R. Triebeneck SN, Sheldon Conner SN, Francis J. Ewing SN and Samuel A. Laxton Jr. AT2. Warren D. Nelson, C52 is also sailing to Brooklyn and eventual duty aboard the USS ROANOKE. Richard F. Richter ADC left on FLAW yesterday for PhotoRon 62 at NAS Sanford, Fla.
Leaving Gtmo this week will be Clayton T. Hopkins AKi for CoinFairShipWing One, Naval Air Facility, Weeksville, North Carolina; Richard G. Chappecll AKi for NAS, Memphis and David L. Bohn AES for NAS, Pensacola, Fla.
The friends of Mrs. Nancy Greenjleld wish her a speedy recovery and return from her twoweek stay at the Base Hospital.
It has been learned that CAPT Frank Bruner, ex-Commanding Officer of N.A.S. has been assigned to the University of Minnesota as Professor of Naval Science.
L. P. Andrade, YNC, has been assigned to Central Office on McCalla Hill. Chief Andrade recently reported here from the Naval Proving Grounds at Dahigren, Va. ATTENTION EM AND WIVES Chief Tom Douglass, Manager of the N.A.S. EM Club, announced that Monday nights will be "Brown Bagger" night at the EM Club beginning June 6. Mondays were closed nights in the past but will now be open reservedly for couples. Arrangements are being made for a combo for your listening and dancing pleasure. All other facilities will be open with an extra-attraction of pizza-pie to be served on these nights.
Also, Douglass would like to announce a "Happy Hour" at the club starting this Tuesday from 1700-1880 when all drinks will be sold for 100.
TWO MEN ADVANCED
Robert E. Stroinwall has been advanced to AT3 effective May 16. Jerome Rizzo was also advanced and will don his AB3 crow July 16. Congratulations men.

"Pilot to control tower Pilot to control tower: I'm coming in, please give landing instructions."
"Control tower to pilot Control tower to pilot! Why are you yelling so loud?" "Pilot to control tower! I don't have a radio!"


Page Five


THE INDUN









Page ~ix THE INDIAN Saturday, 28 May 1955


MOVIES
Saturday, 28 May
THE SILVER LODE
Dan Duyrea Lizabeth Scott
John Payne's wedding is interrupted when self-styled U. S. Marshall Dan Duyrea and three deputies arrive and charge him with murdering Duyrea's brother by shooting him in the back.
Sunday, 29 May
KINGS ROW
Ann Sheridan Robert Cummings
Since he was a kid he was in love with this girl. She finally dies and he is still in love with her. He goes away to medical school and while there falls in love again.
Monday, 30 May
THE SWORD AND THE ROSE
Richard Todd Glynis Johns
This is based on Charles Majors novel "When Knighthood was in Flower" It is a story of the love affair between Mary Tudor of Britain and a member of the palace guard.
Tuesday, 31 May
BAD FOR EACH OTHER
Charlton Heston Lizabeth Scott
A Medical Colonel home from Korea meets and becomes engaged to a wealthy divorcee. He resigns his comission and becomes a "society " doctor. It takes an explosion and deaths in his small hometown to make him realize he wants to be a real doctor.
Wednesday, 1 June
FORBIDDEN
Tony Curtis Joanne Dru
No information available.
Thursday, 2 June
FOREVER FEMALE
Wililamn Holden Ginger Rogers
Casting a Broadway play producer gets mixed up with a 19 year old girl and her domineering mother, His ex-wife also wants the part. Both women fall in love with the youthful playwright.
Friday, 3 June
BLACK HORSE CANYON
Joel McCrea Mari Blanchard
A lady rancher gets two cowpokes to help her capture her beautare handicaped by a neighboring iful black stallion. Their efforts are handicapped by a neighboring rancher who also entertains plans for capturing the horse.


Mrs. Brown (with newspaper)
-"John, it refers here to some gunmen taking a man for a ride. What kind of ride?"
"A slay ride, my dear," replied Mr. Brown.


Radio's 'Tops' of the Weel

SATURDAY, 28 May . .. BOB HOPE ... 7:00 P.M.
It's a laugh a m-inute time as Bob Hope and his mirth mate, Jac Kirkwood, go slumming on skid row, wind up in the jajihouse, and thei cnly visitor is Margaret Whiting.
SUNDAY, 29 May ... HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE ... 10:00 P.1%
James M. Cain's story, "Mildred Pierce" is featured tonight as Clair Trevor and Zachary Scott co-star in a story of a marriage which turne into a scandal.
Jazz International at 8:30 P.M. this evening replaces Gary Crosb as Stan Kenton acts as your disc jockey offering music for jaz enthusiasts.
MONDAY, 30 May . .. BEST PLAYS . . . 9:00 P.M.
**Iron Curtain Express", an exciting drama of Communist intrigi that leads up to a thrilling chase. A top Communist diplomat commi suicide aboard a European train, the body is found by a foreign co respondent. Communist aides, anxious to hush up the suicide, first tr to prove the reporter mudered him, then try to eliminate the corresponded as "The Chase" begins.
WEDNESDAY, 1 June . . . ON STAGE ...9:00 P.M.
Living out on the hot, burning Mojave Desert with an invalid wil because of her illness, wells up a lot of emotion in a man. Then th mian falls in love with a girl from the city and they leave to get marrie Fate, in the form of an accident, steps in and they are both killed. A old Veterans Insurance Policy provides the invalid widow with the ne~ sum of ten thousand dollars as she starts on "The Fling". THURSDAY, 2 June . . . FAMILY THEATRE .. . 9:00 P.M.
Family Theatre presents Cameron Mitchell in "Stay Up for th Sunrise". Mitchell, playing the part with intense emotion, tells the stor of you love. He portrays an immature romantic who dreamed too Ion
-and too late.
FRIDAY, 3 June . . . RADIO WORKSHOP . .. 10:00 P.M.
Another highlight of the week comes along as members of our ow~ community appear in The Radio Workshop's production of "The Assigi ment". This is the story of a cynical newspaper reporter who goes oi on "The Assignmnent" and ends up falling in love.


Actually you don't need a caption to describe the lovely features Launa Lee - - you need a book!


C


FTG Bulletin

by M. Vandesteen


Chief Torpedoman Henry C. k Leimes arrived via the Johnson on r 18 May. He was formerly attached
to the Naval Schools Commiand,
SNewport, Rhode Island. He will
relieve Chief Torpedoman F. J. e Vaughn, who is to depart Guand tanamo Bay in the near future.
Mr. Leimas claims Houston, Texas
yas his hometown.
~z CDR G. A. Gardes departed the
area ' last Sunday on TAD orders to report to the Staff of Commander, Trinidad Command, U.S. Atie lantic Fleet pertaining to Training ts matters. CDR Gardes is expected r- to return on this evening's iny coming FLAW flight. it
J. L. Atwood, MMC was transferred yesterday. He will report to Commanding Officer, U. S. Naval Receiving Station, Brooklyn, New fe York for transfer to the Fleet ReSserve and release to inactive duty. d. Chief Atwood will retire after .n having completed 20 years and 9 atmonths of active service. Mrs.
Atwood and three children hoarded the Johnson enroute to New York
with her husband.
e On Friday, 20 May, Bill Carson, YN2 departed GTMO via FLAW
*y accompanied by his wife and daugh.g ter. Bill was ordered to report to
the Commanding Officer, U.S. Naval Communications Stations, New Orleans, Louisiana for duty. The Carso,n family planned to spend a na few days leave in Hialeah, Florida n- before resuming their trip to New it Orleans. They will travel by car
from Florida to Louisiana.
- LT Williams of the Gunnery Department and CDR Getzewich, Engineering Officer, will return on this evening's FLAW flight having completed a 4 day course at the Special W e a p o n a Orientation
School, Norfolk, Virginia.
LCDR Stafford returned to duty
after having spent a brief period of time in the Naval Hospital here
in Guantanamo Bay.
* J. H. Beach, YNCA arrived in
* Guantanamo Bay on 19 May via
FLAW for duty with the Fleet
Training Group. Chief Beach was formerly on duty with the Flag Allowance, Commander, Training Command, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. He hails, from Henderson County,
Kentucky.
On Friday, 3 June the Staff Team
comprised of FTG, Hospital, Dental and Supply Depot will meet the Marines on Diamond No. 1, Naval Station at 1900. This will be their second meeting with the Marines this season. Having lost five and won one the Staff Team will be out for another victory in hopes to even their wins and losses. With
*our support the teamn will have a
better chance of upsetting the confident Marines. Lets have a good showing of FTG fans in the
bleachers Friday night.
SHIPS DEPARTURES
USS WILHOITE (DER 397)
(To depart 1 June)
USS MITSCHER (DL 2)
(To depart 1 June)
USS CORPORAL (SS 346)
(To depart 2 June)

~f It's easy to control your temper when the other fellow is bigger
than you.


Page Six


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 28 May 1955


40




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PAGE 1

" GoVevs NaaMO L e Te CSunshine" Vol. VI, No. 21 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 28 May 1955 Villamar-Bargo Council PTA Recreation Program Holds Business Meeting Enrollment For Summer Activities The newly-elected Villamar-Bargo Council held their first business meeting Wednesday night to formulate a policy and make plans for the coming six months. Presided over by Mayor J. R. Ralston, the council reviewed the records and files of the retiring council and made a list of new proposals to be submitted to the Commanding Officer, Naval Station, CAPT W. R. Caruthers, for consideration. Carrying through the policy of the retiring council, the new group will continue work on the proposed projects already set up. Among these are a new swimming pool for the Villamar-Bargo area-which is still in the proposed stage but is presently under consideration by naval authorities-off-street parking in Villamar-which will include paving alleyways and making gravel driveways-and also to improve the showings, sound, and screen at the Villamar Lyceum. New proposals by the council were brought up, considered, and formulated for submission to CAPT W. R. Caruthers at a later date. Amoung these proposals were: 1. A community Cosmopolitian Social Club in the housing area. This club would be-as one councilman put it-"a brownbaggers club" with no distinction of rank or rate, but strictly for personnel of the housing area and their families. 2. Construction of maids' quarters in the housing area. At present there are no facilities for housing maids working in the Villamar or Bargo areas, other than in the home itself. 3. Improved Commissary facilities in the housing areas. 4. Extension of sales hours at the Navy Exchange Filling Station. 5. Construction of sidewalks and curbs in the housing area. At present, children riding bicycles, tricycles, wagons, etc. or roller skating, have to play in the street, which presents a safety hazard. By constructing sidewalks and curbs, this would give the children a safer place to play and still be close to home. 6. Planting of fruit and fastgrowing shade trees. 7. Additional playground facilities in the housing areas. Also, during the meeting, the council discussed the possibility of bringing television to Guantanamo Bay. Other proposals included bringing a yard-of-the-month contest with cash awards for the most improved lawn, best kept lawn, etc. The next meeting of the council is scheduled for Wednesday, 1 June. The summer recreation program, sponsored by the Parent-Teachers Association of the Naval Base School, has enrolled an unexpectedly large number of participants for the summer activity program. Included in the schedule for the children of the Naval Base during the summer months is horseback riding, swimming, sailboating, handi-craft, nature study, music study and general sports. The largest enrollment of students for the summer activities was in the swimming classes. At present a total of 395 students have enrolled for these classes, which are to be held during the morning. The training period will last for five weeks with a total of twelve classes. Instruction classes on horseback riding and sailboating are also being offered as summer activities for the school children. Riding instruction will be given in the morning with a total of eleven classes. Twenty-five students have signed up for the riding instruction and 5 have enrolled in the sailboating class. The afternoon activities, which are to be held at the Naval Base School, commencing on June 6, has a total of 170 enrolled, in grades 1 through 12. The classes will be held in the afternoons, Monday through Friday, and offer instructions in such activities as music study, handi-craft, nature study and general sports. The classes will last approximately two hours each afternoon until they are discontinued on July 1. Command Hurricane Drill Scheduled For Today A Command Post Drill will be held this morning, Saturday, May 28, and Hurricane Condition TwoBaker wil be set a 9:00 A.M. The object of the drill is to test the adquacy and effectiveness of procedures and hurricane bills of individual activities, to insure that all personnel are familiar with their duties, to makes sure that required supplies and equipment are available and suitably located and to test the emergency (hurricane) communications circuit and procedure. There will be no evacuation to the hurricane shelters nor will action be required of forces afloat. The fire alarm will not be sounded during the drill for drill purposes. Five Base Commands in SecNay Safety Awards For Past Year The coveted Secretary of the Navy Safety Award for Achievement in Industrial Safety in 1954 has been won by the Naval Base, Naval Station, Naval Air Station, Naval Hospital, and Naval Supply Depot. __________________________ Naval Station, Naval Hospital, and Naval Supply Depot also won Ten Cent Boat Fare the Secretary of the Navy Award for Motor Vehicle Safety in 1954. Againin EfectThe awards were received this Again in Effect week from the Commandant, The long-time boat fare of ten TENTH Naval District, who recents per trip between Caimanera quested that the Base Commander, and the Base again became effective ro ta t v an the Coilast Monday after boats operated mandant, present the awards to for a week at fifteen cents per trip. the respective commands. Action was taken last Friday by Presentation will be made in apthe Cuban Minister of Transportapropriate ceremonies at each action to suspend the resolution autivity. RADM G. B. H. Hail, USN, Disthorizing the fare increase, after strict Commandant, expressed cona protest of the increase was presgratulations to the winning comented by Dr. Humberto S. Villalon, mands. His letter forwarding the Secretary General of the Union of awards said, in part: Base Workers and Employees. Ac"I note with considerable pleascording to Dr. Villalon, a further sre the consistently fine safety investigation to determine whether records of the Naval Supply Depot, or not a fare increase is justified the Naval Hospital, the Naval Stawill be conducted by the Minister tion, and the Naval Air Station. of Transportation. These Commands have earned Few employees rode the boats at either one or both of these coveted the increased fares. Most of them awards consecutively each year for came by train to Boqueron, thence a number of years. Their efforts by foot to the North boundary of are particularly commendable." the Base, and from that point by The Secretary of the Navy trucks and buses to the Industrial Award for Achievement Indusarea. Others drove private vehicles trial Safety is made annually to into the Base. Snomte traspottoeifiute bureaus, offices, and shore activities Some transportation difficulties fra mrvmn nteacdn were experienced last Monday frean improvet n te ace morning, but boat operations ref reeiy raedar turned to normal Monday afterths ofhepcdig alnr turnd t noral onda afer-year, or for the maintenance of a noon. previously established outstanding industrial safety record. The award consists of a letter of commxendaAnnual Memorial Services tion and a certificate, both signed by the Secretary of the Navy. To Be Held Monday The Secretary of the Navy Award for Motor Vehicle Safety Monday, 30 May 1955, Memorial is issued annually to bureaus, Day, the American Legion, the offices and shore activities which Fleet Reserve, the American Leghave motor vehicle accident, casualion Auxiliary and the Fleet Reserve ty, and damage cost rates that Auxiliary will honor the dead of are better than the continental two world wars and the dead of Navy-wide average. The award Guantanamo Bay when they will consists of a letter of commendahold their annual Memorial Services tion and a certificate, both signed at the Naval Base Cemetery at by the Secretary of the Navy. Cuczo Beach. Beginning at 1200 with the Bugler sounding assembly, and RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, and CAPT G. M. Holley, Chief of Staff, as guests of honor, the four organizations will hold their solemn services. All commanding officers of Naval Base command have been invited as well as anyone on the Naval Base who wishes to attend. The program for the services will include decorating of the graves with wreaths by the four organizations and a rifle salute by an honor (Continued on Page Five) Gold Buttons For EM's Now Up For Approval Washington (AFPS)Navy enlisted men may soon have 'brass" of their own to polish if a recent recommendation is approved by the Permanent Naval Uniform Board. The "brass" would be gold buttons for peacoats, a recommendation made by Vice Adm. James L. Holloway Jr., Chief of the Bureau (Continued on Page Two) GlIe

PAGE 2

Saturday, 28 May 1955 $/g2'daii The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9616 Saturday, 21 May 1955 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Stat LTJG J. D. Byerley --------Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC-------------------Editor H. L. Sisson, JOB--------------------News D. C. Roberts. JOSN.----. Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-85, Revised Nov. 1944, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a members of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. What's Doin' Stateside People will be flying from the U. S. to Europe in half an hour, possibily within our lifetime .. They'll do it in atomic-powered airplanes_._._. That's the prediction of John Jay Hopkins, head of the company which built the nuclear submarine Nautalus for the Navy ...Hopkins says that atomic transportation is at about the same stage as diesel power was at the turn of the century. President Eisenhower wants to remodel the Capitol building to correct some architectural shortcomings which have existed since the dome was placed on the famed structure shortly before the Civil War ...The dome extends some 40 feet over the east central front of the building on which it rests ...The remodeling job would move forward this portion of the Capitol's front bringing it into line with the two wings which house the Senate and the House of Representives .The President has asked Congress for five million dollars to do the job. In which of America's five leading cities-those with more than two million population-do inhabitants breathe the purest air? The laurels go to Philadelphia, according to tests conducted by the U. S. Public Health Service ...Next in effectiveness of air pollution control is New York followed by Chicago and Los Angeles ...Detroiters inhale the dirtiest air. A new synthetic food-called lysine-is about to hit the market .It's one of the tissuebuilding acids considered essential to nutrition ...Meat, fish, eggs and milk are naturally rich in lysine. but wheat isn't ...Experts believe adding synthetic lysine to bread and cereals will increase their protein value 70 per cent. The Toastmaster Protestant Sunday School by Joe West To Make Changes Tomorrow ____________ In spite of our claims to independence of thought and action, most of us are confirmed conformists, which is a polite way of saying that we are "copycats." We do not want to be different. We want to be in style. We are unwilling to stand out from the crowd. Our regular test of any line of different action is likely to be, "Is it being done?" If a popular movie star comes out with a new type of hair-do, all the girls hurry to get their hair arranged in that style. If a hero of the athletic field appears in some special kind of sweater or slacks, the boys follow his lead. Someone devises a new style and announces, "This is what the well-dressed man -or woman-will wear," and we flock to the stores to make ourselves conform. The net result is that we are governed, in large measure, by slogans, the cliches, the mannerisms of popular persons. We are conformists at heart, in spite of our boasted individuality. We even talk like other people. We borrow the style and the pronunciations of the company we may be in. That is not a bad idea when we are in the company of intelligent and cultured people. It may lead us to improve ourselves. But if we permit ourselves to be influenced by those of lower intelligence and of poorer speech, it is not good for us. Speakers are subject to this handicap, for it really is a handicap to permit oneself to be an imitator, instead of seeking to develop one's own best style. Too many speakers try to imitate some popular talker, and in the imitation lose whatever they may have possessed of individual distinction. It is no great compliment to say of some speaker, "He is another Will Rogers." He will do better to be his own self and create his own style. In the Toastmasters Club, the constant insistance is on using your best style and developing and improving it. Sometimes an insistent or influential critic leads to overemphasis on some particular style of speech, to the detriment of all those who heed his remarks. Conformity is a good thing in its place. But conformity which causes us to submerge our personalities and our originality to become blind followers of leaders is a bad thing for all of us. The wise man dares to be different when he sees the crowd is taking a wrong path, or an inferior one. You need not be a conformist. You may have in yourself the qualities of leadership if you will permit them to be developed for use. Gold Buttons For EM's (Continued from Page One) of Navy Personnel, who said that they would improve the smartness of the enlisted uniform. The Bureau said notices have been sent to all fleet and shore commanders asking for recommendations and comments on the gold button proposal. The changeover will be considered by the Uniform Board after the recommendations have been made, the Bureau said. The present pricg of a set of eight standard gold buttons, which would fit peacoats, is $1.50. 0 Guantanamo Bay has taken pride for some time in the fact that it has the largest Protestant Sunday School in the Navy. It is not resting on its laurels, but is continuing to grow-not only in numbers, but in improving its facilities, teaching, and organization. Growth in numbers inevitably requires more materials, equipment and teachers. It also requires other changes to meet these increased demands to provide the best possible Christian Education for the children on the Base. The contributions made by so many who have served and are serving in the Sunday School can not be fully evaluated, nor can we adequately express our gratitude for their faithful and devoted services. The growth of the Sunday School and the response on the part of the children is a living testimony to their consecration and their ability. The time has come for a number of changes which it is hoped will improve the Sunday School. First, it has become necessary to move the Pre-School age children (Nursery -Kindergarten Departments) from Chapel Hill to Victory Hill. This change will take place on Sunday 29 May 1955. The Nursery Department under the supervision of Mrs. Christie will meet in the School Nursery on Victory Hill. The Kindergarten Department under the supervision of Mrs. Byerley will meet in Room of the First Grade Buildings on Victory Hill. LCDR Douglas will be the Superintendent of these Departments. The I Grade Primary Department, Mrs. Yarboro Superintendent, will meet in Room 15 on Chapel Hill. The II and III Grades of the Primary Department will have their Worship Services in Room 17 on Chapel Hill. They will use classrooms number 1, 2, 3 and 19. Mrs. Nelson is the Superintendent of this Department. The Junior Department will meet in Room 8 on Chapel Hill for their Worship Service. Mr. Wilkinson will be the Superintendent of this Department. A new department composed of Jr-Sr High Shcool students has been formed with LCDR Fortenberry as Superintendent. This department will have their Worship Service in the Music Room on Chapel Hill. A new Pre-Nursery Department will be formed about 1 July under the leadership of Mrs. McNeal. This department will be composed of children two (2) years of age. New equipment for the department is being purchased by the Adult Bible Class. The Adult Bible Class will meet in the School Assembly. Commander Gardes is the President of the class. These changes have made it possible to divide some of the larger classes and by means of re-location has made possible better classroom facilities. In order to provide more adequate transportation for the many children and to encourage more people to use the bus facilities, a new bus schedule will go into effect also on 29 May. The regular school buses and drivers will be used and they will make the same stops in Housing Areas. In addition, cerSunday, 22 May 1955 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 000-Naval Base Chapel Sunday. 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0980-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1980-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1980-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Chair Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CH, USN (Catholic) LCODR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner T The other day I sent a 50-word night letter home to inform my folks as to when I would be detached from the battalion and about when they could expect me. It took me a great deal of time and effort to write this telegram. For one thing, I wanted to pick the words which would convey the most meaning. Secondly, I was careful not to go over the 50-word limit because I did'nt want to pay any more than I had to. (I'm Scotch, you know.) Then I began to wonder -if God were to send a night letter to me, what would He write? If He had to squeeze the essence of the whole Bible into the carefully counted confines of the 50-word night letter, what would it be? Paraphrasing John 3:16; Job 19 :25, 26, Phillipians 4:8 I belive that it woud read something like this: TELEGRAM NIGHT LETTER "I love you and the whole world so much that I gave my Son, that whosoever believeth on Him should not perish but have everlasting life Though your body be destroyed, yet shall you see me, because you know that I, your Redeemer, liveth ...Meanwhile, whatsoever things are true, lovely, of good report, think on these things. Chaplain M. E. Roberts MCB-1 tain of the buses, as indicated on the schedule published in the papoose, will make trips by the Wharf Area and the Marine Barracks. Members of the Adult Bible Class will serve as conductors on the Trailer Buses. Pre School children riding the buses will be tagged with colored tags as they board the buses in order to assist the teachers in putting them on the correct buses for the return trips. This increased and more rapid bus service will be in effect for the 0900 Roman Catholic Mass, the 0930 Protestant Sunday School, and the 1100 Service of Divine Worship. Page Two m m THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 28 May i95~ rage Three Base Cub Scouts Have OutingWith Cuban Troop The Cub Souts of Guantanamo Bay had an outing Saturday, 14 May with Cub Souts of Guantanamo City and Caimanera. Over 40 Cubs from the Naval Base joined with 40 Cubs of Cuba in a full day of events with cokes, candy, gum, games, and contests between the three Cub groups. Prior to leaving Cuba, the Cubs from the Base, Guantanamo City, and from Caimanera went to Guantanamo City where a representive of each group placed a wreath of flowers at the monument of Jose Marti in the City square. The ride over, in Cuban buses, was especially enjoyed by the Cubs, but in the running contests, knot tying contests and others, the Cuban Cubs bested the Naval Base Cubs in every contest. Cub Pack Leader W. A. Johnson, Den Mothers, Den Fathers, and parents accompanied the scouts to Cuba. RADM E. B. Taylor Presented First Poppy Mrs. Peggy Way of the American Legion Auxiliary pins the first poppy on RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander Naval Base. The American Legion Auxiliary will distribute Poppy's throughout the entire Naval Base today and will accept contributions for the aid and benefit of war-veterans. Nurse Corps Celebrates Birthday Pictured above is CDR E. W. Sutherling, Commanding Officer, Naval Supply Depot, extending congratulations to James E. Harris, SK3, on his recent advancement in rating. Harris is presently attached to the Issue Control Branch at the Naval Supply Depot. H. P. McNeal Completes Reserve Training Tour Mr. H. P. McNeal, Naval Base Industrial Relations Officer, recently completed his annual tour of reserve training here on the Naval Base. Mr. McNeal, a lieutenant commander in the reserves, was attached to the Naval Base Legal Office during his reserve duty. Mr. Ralph Sierra, Assistant Industrial Relations Officer, assumed the duties of Industrial Realtions Officer during Mr. McNeal's training period. Pictured above is CDR E. W. Sutherling, Commanding Officer, Naval Supply Depot, extending congratulations to James E. Harris, SK3, on his recent advancement in rating. Harris is presently attached to the Issue Control Branch at the Naval Supply Depot. The officers of the Nurse Corps, U. S. Navy, celebrated the 47th Birthday of Nurse Corps at quarters "H" at the Naval Hospital on Friday 20 May. Left to right: LTJG Barbara Courtright; LTJG 11ary Nielubowict; Capt. Tilden I. Moe, MC USN; Commanding Officer USNH; LTJG Arlene Coffin; LTJG Florence Meyer; and LT Dee Lawson is shown cutting the Birthday cake. Ladies Golf Shots This week we are finally qualifying for the Base Ladies Championship Tournament. Last week's (May 18th) scores were: First Flight Low Gross-tie-Polly Herring, Jane McElory. Low NetSue Scott Second Flight Low Gross-Billie Nelson Low Net-Katherine McGregor Third and fourth flights played a blind five tournament. Third Flight First-Sara Brothers Second-Cynthia Holleq Fourth Flight First-Dottie Brandel Second-Chris Guyer Our tournament starts next week. he Wednesday players have qualify. ied and we want to remind all weekend players to be sure to qualify today or tomorrow. Betty Dalton to Present Solo Music Recital Sunday The solo recital debut of Miss Lynn Dalton will be presented Sunday, May 29, at 8:00 P. M. at the Community Auditorium on Marina Point. Betty, who was 15 years old this March, was born in San Francisco, California and is the daughter of LT and Mrs. Lionel Dalton. Guest performers in the recital will be Jim Dalton and Kathy Dalton. Jim's a trumpet student now in the 11th grade at the Naval Base School. Kathy is a piano class of Mrs. H. P. McNeal. Betty has studied piaino four years and marimba four years. Her program will consist of four groups of piano classic favorites, including the complete Beethoven Moonlight Sonata. Betty will also present one group of marimba numbers. The recital is open to the public and everyone is cordially invited to attend. CB Reserve Personnel Here for Training Duty The Polit Group of Reserve CEC and CB personnel from the First Naval District arrived aboard the Naval Base on May 14 from South Weymouth, Massachusetts to begin a two weeks course of training duty aboard an overseas installation. CDR R. G. Witherell, former Commanding Officer of MCB-8 and now Reserve CB Program Officer of the First Naval District, expressed his appreciation of the cordial welcome given the Reserves by the officres and men of MCB-1. The group consist of most all of the eight rates and these men have been intergated with men of the battalion and ar enow getting "on the job" training in order to develop the CB "Know How". The success of this group will determine teh extent that the Bureal of Personnel will develop this reserve project in the future. The height of bad luck-seasickness with lockjaw? Saturday, 28 1May 1915 THE INDIAN Page Three

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Saturday. 28 May 1955 Naval Station Indians In First Place Position As First Round of League Play Is Completed by Hal Davis As the six teams in the Naval Base League completed the first round of play in the 1955 season, the field narrowed down to what looks like a three club race for the championship between the Naval Station Indians, currently holding down the top-dog position, the VU-10 Mallards, only a half a game behind, and the faltering Marine Leathernecks, a game and a half behind the leaders. The second division could possibly turn out to be a tighter race than the senior section with the pitches and hit three Staff-men. Naval Air Station Flyers holding Edgar allowed only two more hits a one game lead over both the and no runs for the rest of the way. MCB-1 Bees and the Staff corps. During the week, the Naval StaR H E tion Indians, backing up the 6-hit Mallards 17 18 7 hurling of Mandy Mandis with Staff 6 5 8 eight safeties of their own, wreakSo at this stage of the game it's ed a little sweet havoc and revenge anybody's guess at who will on the Marine Leathernecks with emerge at the end of the season a 13 to 4 win. The Braves clouted holding the championship trophy. four Marine hurlers from the The Indians are currently on a mound by taking a 7-run lead in rampage of six straight wins, and the bottom of the first inning, all Manager Dempsey said they would off Patton, and all unearned. Astake the rest of them. The Malsistant Manager Johnny Dowd took lards, very strong this year, are the mound from Patton and held not to he counted out the least bit. it for five more innings before the In their first encounter of the seaIndians' attack finally routed him son the Mallards went down at the in favor of ITolmes after Dowd had hands of Naval Station, 9 to 8. given up five hits for five more At that time, Dempsey admitted runs. Holmes let another unearned the Mallards were his only worry. run in before Schreck took over And the VU-10 men have beaten in the last inning to put out the all other covers by very lopsided fire. Seven Marine errors made the scores. The closest game they've game a loose one and helped the had was with the Leathernecks, and Braves to their 5th straight victhey won with a 5-run margin. tory. The Marines, currently in a R H E Indians 13 8 0 Marines 4 6 7 The Marines also fell victim to the rampaging Mallards to close out last week's schedule, 10 to 5. Edgar and Madden teamed up on the mound to give the Leathernecks their three hits for their five runs. All the Marine base knocks came off Edgar. Madden not only held the Marines hitless for 4 1/3 innings, but also rapped a homer to aid the Mallard cause. The Marines started the game with Ron Plante on the mound. He lasted 2 1/3 frames and reliefer Dowd came in after Plante had allowed four hits for 8 runs. Dowd gave up five more hits and the other two runs for the Mallards over the rest of the distance. RH E Mallards 10 10 4 Marines 5 3 4 Dale Buss blanked the MCB-1 Bees on Sunday's day game to give the Indians a 10 to 0 win over their country rivals. The Bees, starting the season with a win over the Flyers, haven't been able to break into the victory column since. Keasey gave up eight hits and went the route for the Bees. Buss lasted the entire way for the Indians and gave up 4 scattered hits to shut out the Bees. R H E Indians 10 8 2 Bees 0 4 8 Monday night the VU-10 Mallards smothered a Staff uprising to emerge on the lopsided end of a 17 to 6 score. Staff fought neck and neck with the Mallards up until the sixth inning with a tied score at 6-all. Bailey was doing the mound chores for Staff when the Mallards reached him in the bottom of the 6th for 4 runs. Rogina went in to handle the relief duty and Mallards rapped him for eight more hits and seven more runs in the 7th and 8th frames. King started for the Mallards but gave way to Gene Edgar in the 4th inning. King had allowed only three hits, but had chalked up three wild slump, have never given up without a struggle .Even with the Indian victory of 13 to 4, it was still a good game with plenty of action. Marine pitching is their big weakness this season, but they can make up for it, in part, with their slugging power. The Indians have the best of the pitching deal in the league with Mandis, Buss, Wolgamuth, and Byerley. Combine their hurling with the devastating effect of their powerful hitters-Mandis, Morgan, McGowan, Guillemette, Mawhinney and Petinak-and the Indians have the decided edge on the rest of the clubs. So, if the nod of Lady Luck and the smile of Dame Fortune were to be bestowed at this particular time, they would undoubtedly have to go to the Indians. And that's all they'd need. League Standings (Including Friday TEAM W Naval Station 6 VU-10 5 Marines 4 Naval Air 2 MCB-1 1 Staff 1 night's game.) L GB PCT 1 -.857 1 % .833 2 1% .666 4 3% .333 5 41/2 .166 5 41/2 .166 Baseball Schedule Sun., 29 May-Marines vs VU-10 Mon., 30 May-Naval Air vs Naval Station Tues., 31 May-OPEN Wed., 1 June-Marines vs MCB-1 Thurs., 2 June-Naval Air vs VU-10 Fri., 3 June-Marines vs Staff Sat., 4 June-OPEN Little League Schedule LITTLE LEAGUE SCHEDULE: Sat., 28 May Bears vs Colts Sun., 29 May-Tigers vs Hawks Tues., 31 May-Tigers vs Bears Thurs., 2 June-Colts vs Hawks Sat., 4 June-Hawks vs Tigers The Naval Station Indians of 1955-Rear, left to right: Dempsey (manager), Hemman, Cordice, Haley, Ambroski, Kennedy, Blakelock, laniero, Guillemette Petinak Morgan. Front row, left to right: Dempsey (batboy), Mancuso, Shaffer, Wolgamuth, Byerley, Mandis, McGowan, Kelley and Mawhinney. Rifle-Pistol Club, NRA To Have Busy Schedule The Guantanamo Bay Rifle-Pistol Club, now affiliated with the Nationnal Rifle Association, is preparing for a heavy summer of events as a busy schedule is planned for the next meeting on 6 June, at the 'Community Hall on Marina Point at 1900. At this meeting it is planned to discuss and arrange details on three important events. First of all, the Rifle-Pistol Club will further plans for a tentative match with shooters of ComTEN. A dispatch has already been forwarded to San Juan inviting ComTEN shooters to compete against Gtmo shooters. Also, at this meeting, preliminary arrangements and plans will begin for the National Rifle Association's Inter-Service regional and national championship matches. Arrangements to be made include a possible elimination qualification match for military personnel of Guantanamo Bay. The Regional Match will be held in Jacksonville this year on 29, 30, and 31 July. The Guantanamo Bay Rifle-Pistol Club plans to enter a team, but membership on the team is not limited to club members only, which is the purpose of planning an elimination qualification match. The National Contest will be held at Camp Perry, Ohio, beginning 20 August and closing 6 September. Further details for interested persons-who should attend the meeting on 6 June-about the National Championships are as follows. Eligibility All officers and enlisted personnel ordered to active duty for a period of 90 days or more are eligible to participate. Reserve and ROTC competitive classes are also provided. Marine Corps policy is that no Marine Corps personnel will participate in a firing capacity with Navy teams in these matches. Suggested qualifications for participation are as follows: Be capable of equaling the following scores: Pistol: .45 automatic, service ammunition, National Match Course, S TOP TEN BATTERS (Based on 15 or more times at bat) Player Team Madden Ianeiro Clark Morgan Mandis Hunter Kraft Snyder Bland Postal AB H AVG. VU-10 Naval Station VU-10 Naval Station Naval Station Marines Staff N.A.S. Marines VU-10 31 16 21 10 19 9 24 11 19 8 27 11 16 6 21 8 22 8 31 10 .516 .476 .473 .458 .421 .407 .400 .380 .363 .322 LITTLE LEAGUE STANDINGS Colts Bears Hawks Tigers W L 7 3 6 4 6 4 1 9 LITTLE LEAGUE RESULTS Saturday Bears 12-Tigers Sunday Hawks 13-Colts Tuesday Hawks 7-Bears Thursday Colts 4-Tigers 4 4 1 1 245, or Navy Expert Course E, 350. Small-Bore Rifle: Metallic sights, Dewar Course, 370. High-Power Rifle: Service, National Trophy Rifle Course, 220, or Navy Expert Course B, 320. Expenses Individual expenses for the National Championship matches are allowable from command or unit recreation funds. Match registration and entry fees will total per individual approximately the following: High-Power Rifle -$51.0 Pistol -$47.00 Small-Bore Rifle -$63.00 Quarters Enlisted participants will be quartered and. messed with the Marine Battalion at no cost to the individual. Officer participants, upon application to the Marine Battalion Commander, will be quartered and messed with the Marine Corps Officers at an individual cost of $1.60 per day. Page Four THE INDIAN Saturday 28 May 19 5

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Page Five THE INDIAN NSD Supply Line Hospital Notes Dorothy Jones, wife of Benjamin C. Jones ,SA, is a welcomed newcomer to the Gtmo area. Mrs. Jones flew down to Guantanamo City -an experience of a life time in itself-from her home in Ashland, Ky. The couple has established residence in Caimanera. Mr. Robert Radcliffe is back at NSD feeling good as new, after a 12 day stay in the hospital. Bob is glad to be back, but we bet there is some regret in living the awfully nice scenery the nurses create. John N. Wright will bid farewell to Guantanamo on 27 May and journey on the Johnson to the Receiving Station for separation. Wright, too has fallen prey to the propagandist and has decided to go to California. CDR and Mrs. C. E. Lee and their daughter Linda had a very pleasant journey on the Johnson "RoundRobin". They visited San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Port of Spain. Trinidad. Although the trip was a very scenic and exiting one for the Lees, they all expressed their happiness to be back again at their present home away from home at Gtmo. Robert W. Baily, DK3 is one of the Disbursing Office's happier DKs since the arrival of Clea, his wife, and their children, Joan and Robert. Guantanamo should prove a pleasant change in temperature for the Bailey family, which hails from Washington, Pa. Roscoe H. Gabbert, BM3, will depart May 27 on the Johnson for the Receiving Station, Brooklyn for separation. His plans are to re-enlist and spend his leave with his wife and son in Hugteston, W. Virginia. Gabbert spent a very active tour here at Gtmo and has won a place in the hearts of everyone at NSD and many of the local populace. The boat trips to Caimanera won't be the same without Gabbert's smiling face. The Control Division Officer and the Fiscal Officer are no longer bashingg it" at BOQ 3. Mrs. Cecil Allen and daughter Susan, who had been recently residing in Hartsville, S. C. with Mrs. Allen's mother, arrived on the same Johnson trip with Mrs. John Bayer and children Ben and Susan. The Bayer's home is in Camp Hill, Pa. LCDR John P. McFadden ,the Fuel Division Officer at NSD left Sunday via FLAW. He will be in Washington D. C. and Norfolk ,Virginia for sevveral days discussing fuel matters. by D. W. Degon HEIRPORT NEWS Belated congratulations to HMC and Mrs. Redick on their new arrival, a son, John Garland. Also presented by the stork the past two weeks were: John Anthony to AM3 and Mrs. Florence Willis; William Ora Young VII to DC2 and Mrs. Irene Young; Paula Gail to AD2 and Mrs. Grace Kebble; Gerald Edward to FN and Mrs. Martha Paulton; Katherine Sue to RM3 and Mrs. Phyllis Saforek; Vicki Lynn to AM1 and Mrs. Nancy Berry; Corlis Ann to MEC and Mrs. Phyllis Dellafiora; David Albert to RD1 and Mrs. Raquel Dominicci; Joan Theresa to YN1 and Mrs. Theresa Williams; Earnest Everett to AGC and Mrs. Blanch Whittemore; Lynn Marie to TE3 and Mrs. Joananne Thomas. ARRIVALS Welcome aboard to: LT (MSC) C. H. Johnson, arriving from USNH Philadelphia; LT (MC) D. J. Doohen from NNMC Bethesda; HMC L. B. Whited reporting from the USS Kleinsmith; HMC R. W. Lacy from the USS Putman; and HM3 J. F. Betrone from NAS Pensacola, Florida. DEPARTURES Bon Voyage is extended to many of the "olde timers" of Gtmo. Transferred to Jacksonville, Florida for separation were: LCDR (MC) E. D. Grady; HM1 C. A. Barnes and HN R. A. Moran. Also departing were: HM2 R. Miller for duty at Naval Shipyard, Brooklyn, and HM3 Carl J. Fickes to Naval Supply Depot, Crane, Ind. MEET THE STAFF HM3 Mario "Nick", Greco, a compartively newcomer to USNH with 5 months longevity in Gtmo. Nick attended Corps School at Portsmouth, Va. and has been stationed at Pensacola, Florida and Parris Island, S.C. The major part of his duties have been with Optical Dispensing Units, currently he was acquiring experience in office procedures to coincide with his future plans of attending Seaton Hall, West Orange, N.J. and majoring in Business Administration. He is now attached to the Food Service Department (Continued from Page One) MEMORIAL SERVICES guard from the Marine Barracks. After the salute, taps will echo across the cemetary in honor of the dead, and the ceremony will conclude with the playing of the Naional Anthem by the Naval Base Band. Teenage Round-up by Linda Thurston Now that the Summer vacation is really upon us, the kids are sitting around wondering what to do with all the spare time on their hands. There are no jobs available for the teenagers right now and the prospects don't look so good over the summer, so the big question is where to spend the vacation. It's a long, long walk to the beaches, and the Teenage Club is fine at night, but in the daytime you feel like a roast beef inside and a grilled pork chop outside. The newly organized Parents Advisory Council to the Teenage Club, headed by Mr. Sierra, may come up an answer and we sincerely hope so. Did Ya' See ...All the kids having a ball at John McGee's going-away party ...Frank and Penny counting the days until they leave ...Neil's strenuous job at the pool ...Cavie's graduation cap that doesn't fit anymore Wormie's crazy sun tan ...Howie bidding Pistole a fond farewell at the plane ...Pat Kennedy leaving yesterday for the grand tour of "los Estados" ...Frances Linder trying to rush home in ten minutes time ...Judy B's original bathing suit ...Bobby and Edwin doing the "Cha-Cha-Cha" in Gtmo Judy Inman's cute pigtails Navy H getting her back scratched by an unknown admirer ...Phil leaving his enormous tip to a gratewaiter ...Maryalice going sailing with a cute ensign ...Becky's trials and tribulations ...Kids wondering if Eunice is still with us. We haven't seen her since school closed IN FLANDERS FIELD by Colonel John McCrae In Flander's fields the poppies blow, Between the crosses, row on row, That mark our places: and in the sky, The larks still bravely singing fly, Scarce heard amidst the guns below. We are the dead. Short days ago we lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, Loved and were loved and now we lie In Flanders' Field Take up our quarrel with the foe, To you from failing hands we throw The Torch be yours to hold it high: If ye break faith with us who die We shall not sleep, though poppies grow In Flanders' Field .OPERATION BLONDE EVJE;YT1ME I TAKC -Y0W ouLpTL; ANE ANYPLACE WE END LIP SURFROUNDED--THIs TIME I'V 6T T 'EA/ 1/ '. NAS Crosswinds by Paul Snyder LCDR J. L. Stowe reported aboard the Air Station last week from NAAS Saufley Field, Pen sacola, Fla. LCDR Stowe is the prospective Officer-in-Charge of Leeward Point Field. Leaving last week were CHGUN J. D. Sentz and family aboard FLAW to Norfolk where they will begin a cross-country drive to NAAS El Centro, Cal. for duty with Fleet Air Gunnery Unit Pacific. The Sentz family were known in Gtmo for their interest in Cub scouting. CHGUN Sentz was a Cub Master, top bowler on NAS Team No. 2 and an ardent rifle and pistol team supporter while heading the Ordnance Division. Mrs. Sents served as a Den Mother with the local Cub scouting group. William J. Hart, AC1, left Gtmo via FLAW for NAMC, Naval Base, Philadelphia last Tuesday. Also on that flight was Nathan Williams, SD3, enroute to VA-16 via FasRon 5, Ocean. Destined for Receiving Station, Brooklyn and discharge on MSTS are John T. Page AC2, Pete H. Bielitz RMSN, William L. Nicoll TE3, Henry R. Triebeneck SN, Sheldon Connor SN, Francis J. Ewing SN and Samuel A. Laxton Jr. AT2. Warren D. Nelson, CS2 is also sailing to Brooklyn and eventual duty aboard the USS ROANOKE. Richard F. Richter ADC left on FLAW yesterday for PhotoRon 62 at NAS Sanford, Fla. Leaving Gtmo this week will be Clayton T. Hopkins AK1 for ComFairShipWing One, Naval Air Facility, Weeksville, North Carolina; Richard G. Chappell AK1 for NAS, Memphis and David L. Bohn AE3 for NAS, Pensacola, Fla. The friends of Mrs. Nancy Greenfeld wish her a speedy recovery and return from her twoweek stay at the Base Hospital. It has been learned that CAPT Frank Bruner, ex-Commanding Officer of N.A.S. has been assigned to the University of Minnesota as Professor of Naval Science. L. P. Andrade, YNC, has been assigned to Central Office on McCalla Hill. Chief Andrade recently reported here from the Naval Proving Grounds at Dahlgren, Va. ATTENTION EM AND WIVES Chief Tom Douglass, Manager of the N.A.S. EM Club, announced that Monday nights will be "Brown Bagger" night at the EM Club beginning June 6. Mondays were closed nights in the past but will now be open reservedly for couples. Arrangements are being made for a combo for your listening and dancing pleasure. All other facilities will be open with an extra-attraction of pizza-pie to be served on these nights. Also, Douglass would like to announce a "Happy Hour" at the club starting this Tuesday from 1700-1830 when all drinks will be sold for 10. TWO MEN ADVANCED Robert E. Stromwall has been advanced to AT3 effective May 16. Jerome Rizzo was also advanced and will don his AB3 crow July 16. Congratulations men. "Pilot to control tower Pilot to control tower: I'm coming in, please give landing instructions." "Control tower to pilot Control tower to pilot! Why are you yelling so loud?" "Pilot to control tower! I don't have a radio!" a ur ay, y8 M195TEIDA S t d 28 Ma 1955 I I

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Page Six THE INDIAN Ssturdsy, 28 May 1955 MOVIES Saturday, 28 May THE SILVER LODE Dan Duyrea Lizabeth Scott John Payne's wedding is interrupted when self-styled U. S. Marshall Dan Duyrea and three deputies arrive and charge him with murdering Duyrea's brother by shooting him in the back. Sunday, 29 May KINGS ROW Ann Sheridan Robert Cummings Since he was a kid he was in love with this girl. She finally dies and he is still in love with her. He goes away to medical school and while there falls in love again. Monday, 30 May Radio's 'Tops' of the Week SATURDAY, 28 May ..BOB HOPE ..7:00 P.M. It's a laugh a minute time as Bob Hope and his mirth mate, Jack Kirkwood, go slumming on skid row, wind up in the jailhouse, and their only visitor is Margaret Whiting. SUNDAY, 29 May .HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE. 10:00 P.M. James M. Cain's story, "Mildred Pierce" is featured tonight as Claire Trevor and Zachary Scott co-star in a story of a marriage which turned into a scandal. Jazz International at 8:30 P.M. this evening replaces Gary Crosby, as Stan Kenton acts as your disc jockey offering music for jazz enthusiasts. MONDAY, 30 May ...BEST PLAYS .9:00 P.M. "Iron Curtain Express", an exciting drama of Communist intrigue that leads up to a thrilling chase. A top Communist diplomat commits suicide aboard a European train, the body is found by a foreign correspondent. Communist aides, anxious to hush up the suicide, first try to prove the reporter mudered him, then try to eliminate the correspondent as "The Chase" begins. WEDNESDAY, 1 June .ON STAGE .9:00 P.M. Living out on the hot, burning Mojave Desert with an invalid wife because of her illness, wells up a lot of emotion in a man. Then the man falls in love with a girl from the city and they leave to get married. Fate, in the form of an accident, steps in and they are both killed. An old Veterans Insurance Policy provides the invalid widow with the neat sum of ten thousand dollars as she starts on "The Fling". THURSDAY, 2 June .FAMILY THEATRE .9:00 P.M. Family Theatre presents Cameron Mitchell in "Stay Up for the Sunrise". Mitchell, playing the part with intense emotion, tells the story of you love. He portrays an immature romantic who dreamed too long -and too late. .THE SWORD AND THE ROSE FRIDAY, 3 June .RADIO WORKSHOP .10:00 P.M. Richard Todd Glynis Johns This is based on Charles Majors novel "When Knighthood was in Flower" It is a story of the love affair between Mary Tudor of Britain and a member of the palace guard. Tuesday, 31 May BAD FOR EACH OTHER Charlton Heston Lizabeth Scott A Medical Colonel home from Korea meets and becomes engaged to a wealthy divorcee. He resigns his comission and becomes a "society doctor. It takes an explosion and deaths in his small hometown to make him realize he wants to be a real doctor. Wednesday, 1 June FORBIDDEN Tony Curtis Joanne Dru No information available. Thursday, 2 June FOREVER FEMALE Wililam Holden Ginger Rogers Casting a Broadway play producer gets mixed up with a 19 year old girl and her domineering mother, His ex-wife also wants the part. Both women fall in love with the youthful playwright. Friday, 3 June BLACK HORSE CANYON Joel McCrea Mari Blanchard A lady rancher gets two cowpokes to help her capture her beautare handicaped by a neighboring iful black stallion. Their efforts are handicapped by a neighboring rancher who also entertains plans for capturing the horse. Mrs. Brown (with newspaper) -"John, it refers here to some gunmen taking a man for a ride. What kind of ride?" "A slay ride, my dear," replied Mr. Brown. Another highlight of the week comes along as members of our own community appear in The Radio Workshop's production of "The Assignment". This is the story of a cynical newspaper reporter who goes out on "The Assignment" and ends up falling in love. Actually you don't need a caption to describe the lovely features of Launa Lee --you need a book! FTG Bulletin by M. Vandesteen Chief Torpedoman Henry C. Leimes arrived via the Johnson on 18 May. He was formerly attached to the Naval Schools Command, Newport, Rhode Island. He will relieve Chief Torpedoman F. J. Vaughn, who is to depart Guantanamo Bay in the near future. Mr. Leimas claims Houston, Texas as his hometown. CDR G. A. Gardes departed the area last Sunday on TAD orders to report to the Staff of Commander, Trinidad Command, U.S. Atlantic Fleet pertaining to Training matters. CDR Gardes is expected to return on this evening's incoming FLAW flight. J. L. Atwood, MMC was transferred yesterday. He will report to Commanding Officer, U. S. Naval Receiving Station, Brooklyn, New York for transfer to the Fleet Reserve and release to inactive duty. Chief Atwood will retire after having completed 20 years and 9 months of active service. Mrs. Atwood and three children boarded the Johnson enroute to New York with her husband. On Friday, 20 May, Bill Carson, YN2 departed GTMO via FLAW accompanied by his wife and daughter. Bill was ordered to report to the Commanding Officer, U.S. Naval Communications Stations, New Orleans, Louisiana for duty. The Carson family planned to spend a few days leave in Hialeah, Florida before resuming their trip to New Orleans. They will travel by car from Florida to Louisiana. LT Williams of the Gunnery Department and CDR Getzewich, Engineering Officer, will return on this evening's FLAW flight having completed a 4 day course at the Special W e a p o n s Orientation School, Norfolk, Virginia. LCDR Stafford returned to duty after having spent a brief period of time in the Naval Hospital here in Guantanamo Bay. J. H. Beach, YNCA arrived in Guantanamo Bay on 19 May via FLAW for duty with the Fleet Training Group. Chief Beach was formerly on duty with the Flag Allowance, Commander, Training Command, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. He hails, from Henderson County, Kentucky. On Friday, 3 June the Staff Team comprised of FTG, Hospital, Dental and Supply Depot will meet the Marines on Diamond No. 1, Naval Station at 1900. This will be their second meeting with the Marines this season. Having lost five and won one the Staff Team will be out for another victory in hopes to even their wins and losses. With our support the team will have a better chance of upsetting the confident Marines. Lets have a good showing of FTG fans in the bleachers Friday night. SHIPS DEPARTURES USS WILHOITE (DER 397) (To depart 1 June) USS MITSCHER (DL 2) (To depart 1 June) USS CORPORAL (SS 346) (To depart 2 June) It's easy to control your temper when the other fellow is bigger than you. Page Six THE INDIAN Saturday, 28 May 1955