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Indian

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Indian
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9~ e


V Go'evs NvMO e T6 Sayns1aine" Vol. VI, No. 20 U. S.Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 21 May 1955


Col. R. E. Fojt Speaks

At School Graduation
Nine students graduated from the Naval Base High School Thursday night, one of the largest graduating classes in years. Boys won out over girls with a one-edgemargin.
The Seniors graduating Thursday night were: Misses Nancy Jo Halentic, P a t r i c i a Wormwood, Doris Sigler and Irma Pina; James Cavanaugh, John McGee, Edgar Heimer, David Shyver and Frank Vaughn.
Colonel Robert E. Fojt, USMC, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks, was the principal speaker for the commencement exercises.
Col. Fojt said, "This is a special day for you of the graduating class, and we are all happy in our own different ways to share in this occasion with you . ..
Col. Fojt then went on to congratulate the high school graduates and the 8th grade graduates, stressing the importance of "more than a passing grade in the required subjects of study."
Bringing out the relationship betwen education and democracy, the colonel said, "Today we are convinced that democracy cannot exist without free education which is undergirded with sound moral principles . . . that a mere force will never replace justice in the adjustment of wrong." At this point, he emphasized that "the basic hope for real peace lies in the ability of our teachers to instill in every individual the desire to learn the truth and to broaden their understanding of the highest moral concepts, coupled with the willingness and diligence of the individual to be led in such growth . .
Climaxing, Col. Fojt offered a solution to the problems "of this world, or of your own life" in the form of some guiding principles, saying, "Mold them into your creed for living. Use them as guides in your struggle for the goals you set for your life . . . you must grow in knowledge, be of service to the world, maintain a positive mental attitude, have faith and early in life learn to recognize the real values of life, in order that you may contribute toward peace and security of this world, and have a happy life."




CAPT Roy E. Bishop, CHC,
USN, Chief of Chaplains, Commander, Service Forces, Atlantic Fleet, will conduct the 1100 Protestant Divine Worship Services at the Naval Base Chapel tomorrow.


Armed Forces Day 1955

PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE

My friends here at home and across the seas: We in America have constantly pledged that we will never commit aggresion but we must always be prepared to defeat it.
On May 21st ,the Armed Forces of the United States will hold open house to give our own and other peace loving peoples the best possible opportunity to see how ready we are in military terms for any threat to our security or to the peace of the free world. As Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of the United States, I earnestly hope that all who can will accept this invitation to become better acquainted with the armed components of our national power for peace.
Dwight D. Eisenhower
Prseident




Poppies to Honor

American War Dead
Next Saturday will be Poppy Day. That day will see many people wearing little red poppies in memory of those who have given their lives in our nation's defense. As they put on their poppies, they will contribute to the welfare of disabled war veterans and needy children of veterans.
The poppies, made of crepe paper in replica of the wild poppies of France and Flanders which bloomed "between the crosses, row on row," of the World War I battle cemeteries, have been received from the V. A. Hospital, Lake City, Florida, where they were made by disabled veterans. The members of the American Legion Auxiliary will offer them on the streets Saturday from early morning to late afternoon, and at the same time will receive contributions for American Legion and Auxiliary work for disabled veterans and needy children of veterans.
The custom of wearing poppies in honor of the war dead began at the close of World War I, when the picture of the little wild poppies growing in the bare earth around the battle graves was fresh in. the minds of the returning veterans. At its first national convention in 1921, the American Legion Auxiliary adopted the poppy as its memorial flower and ever since has conducted an annual distribution of poppies.

9


New Town Council Elects
J R. Ralston Mayor

Wednesday night, newly elected Villamar-Bargo Council held their first meeting with the retiring council for the purpose of electing a mayor. Mr. J. R. Ralston, representative for Precinct 6, was elected Mayor by a unanimous vote of the new council. Mr. Ralston will preside over council meetings and direct the Villamar-Bargo activities for the coming six months. Retiring Mayor is Mr. J. R. Yost, also of Precinct 6.
Other new council members are; B. H. Carr, T. L. Tremble, and M. Gordon, Precincts 1, 2, and 3; G. Liveakos, Precinct 4; W. A. Schnarke, Precinct 5; G.W. Twinning, Precinct 7. and Bob Marshall, Precinct 8.
Elections for the council were held last sunday as the retiring council, J. R. Yost, J. R. Nelson, C. E. Blakeman, J. E. Armstrong, and W. J. Sparks, distributed ballots for the election to residents of Villamar and Bargo.
In addition to the election of new members of the Town Council, residents were asked on the ballot to indicate their wishes as to whether or not they desire a swimming pool for the Bargo-Villamar residential areas. Results of the issue were: 671 voted in favor
30 stated no preference or
stated "no"


Supply Depot Strives

For New Safety Record
The Naval Supply Depot, Guantanamo Bay, is again setting new safety records for Naval Supply Depots outside Continental United States. Having won the SecNav Award for Achievement in Industrial Safety in 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954 the Depot appears to be on the road to winning another SecNav Award for 1955. The close of business 17 May 1955 recorded the 575th day without a lost-time accident. This is an outstanding record in that over one-half the Depot personnel are employed in the more accident-prone occupations, such as stevedoring, mechanics, fueling and materials handling. This is coupled with the definite consideration that must be given to the difficult problem encountered with a large number of non-English speaking personnel on board at NSD.
CDR E. W. Sutherling, SC, USN, commanding officer of the Supply Depot, states that a large measure of credit for the en-able record is due to the Supervisor's Safety Committee, the continuous program on safety practices, and the untiring efforts of each employee to maintain NSD-GTMO as one the safest places to work.

.9


BuPers Guarantees

Choice of Schools

To Reenlistees
The Bureau of Naval Personnel has recently provided, under certain conditions, guaranteed assignment ot service schools upon reenlistment.
The schools to be used in this program are as follows:
CLASS "B"
B o i I e r m a n, Commissaryman, Electrician's Mates, Electronics Technicians, Gunners Mates, IC Electricians, Music, Yoeman, Aviation Electricians Mates, Advanced Aviation Electronics Technicians, Tradevman, Advanced Photographer's Mates, Aerographer's Mates, Air Controlman, and Mine Warfare.
CLASS "C"
Teletype Maintenance, Cryptographers ,Torpedoman, Opticalman and Instrumentman, Welding, FT (GFCS Mk 56 or UWFC Mk 102), Ground Controlled Approach, Oxygen, Catapult and Arresting Gear and 12 week Maintenance Course at the Fleet Sonar School.
The conditions that are prerequisites for the guarantee of assignment to school training under this program are: a. Personnel must specifically request school training b. Personnel must reenlist on board their permanent duty station within 24 hours after discharge. c. Personnel must not have exercised any choice of duty assignment in accordance with BUPERS Instruction 1306. 25A d. The reenlistment must be the first reenlistment. e. Only personnel reenlisting in the Regular Navy are eligible f. Personnel must be eligible for the school in acordance
with the normal entrance requirements stipulated in the various current instructions. g. Personnel
must be in Pay Grade E-4 or above of a rating listed for the school h. Personnel must be considered suitable candidates for the school by their commanding officer.
Personnel will be ordered to the school of their choice within 6 months of their reenlistment unless the number of personnel requesting the same school under this program exceeds the capacity of the school during that time. In the latter case, personnel will be ordered to the school desired as soon after 6 months as possible and in all events during the current reenlistment period.


so


40






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Pasre Two


THE2 INDIAN


Saturday, 21 May 1955


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615
Saturday, 21 May 1955
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay. Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers. USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LTJG J. D. Byerley ------ Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC ------------------ Editor
H. L. Sisson, JO3 ------------------- News
D. C. Roberts, JOSN ------------- Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-85, Revised Nov. 1944. and financed with non-appropriated funds.
THE INDIAN is a members of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


An Editorial ....


Armed Forces Day
(Reprinted from "Armed Forces Talk"
Today is the sixth annual Armed Forces Day. Americans will be encouraged to look over their Armed Forces more carefully than on any other day of the year. In a way, we of the Armed Forces will be hosts at an "open house." But it's not an open house in the sense that a family home or an industrial plant might be opened to guests. Instead, on Armed Forces Day the American people are invited to take a closer look than usual at the defense team that is helping to keep them free and strong.
It's not so much the "we" are showing "them." It is rather a time for all Americans-both in an out of uniform--to join in a good look at the Armed Forces. Each post, base, and unit in the United States and in remote corners of the world, including the many units of the Reserves, will welcome visitors. We servicemen can be proud of this part of the national security that is in our keeping. What it represents is stated in the theme of this year's Armed Forces Day: "Power for Peace."
Armed Forces Day will be observed in many ways. It's both a celebration and a display. Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen will extend hospitality. There will be parades, demonstrations, e x h i b i t s, sports events, tours, and dedications. There will be air demonstrations, including the popular "flyover."
But there is more to it than that. We of the Armed Forces will have an opportunity to tell family members and friends how their defense team is working together, and how it is contributing to the defense of the free world. They look to us for the story of what is really going on in the Armed


The Toastmaster VU-10 Prop Blast


by Joe West
Friend, it is your national heritage to amount to something great so do not choose to be a common man. It is your right to be uncommon, if you can. Seek opportunity
-not security. Do not be a kept citizen, humbled and dulled by having the state look after you. Take the calculated risk; to dream and to build, to fail and to succeed. Prefer the challenges of life to the guaranteed existence; the thrill of fulfillment to the stale calm of Utopia. Do not trade freedom for beneficence nor dignity for a handout. Never cower before any master nor bend to any threat. It is your birthright to stand erect, proud and unafraid; to think and act for yourself, enjoy the benefit of your creations and to face the world boldly and say, "this I have done." All this is what it means to be an AMERICAN.
Yet there are those who do not believe that we have faith in our freedom. The gamble of the Soviet Communists is that the freedoms God has offered to man-freedom to choose, freedom to search and explore spiritual lows and realities, freedom to become God's children here and hereafter-are neither appreciated nor desired by most men.
The communist gambles that the average man in all countries has a slave mentality and that therefore his normal permanent role is to be the unquestioning tool of the gang that parades as The State.
All collectivists share belief in this gamble that the slave mentality is the fundamental and permanent base of human nature. If this gamble succeeded we would be headed straight for the horrors of mass destruction and the return to barbarism.
Fortunately, however, man's individuality is an inevitable consequence of his spiritual being. The individual free citizen, once aware of his heritage and destiny will permit no political conspiracy to enslave him-and this goes for all varieties of Collectivism. Socialist and Communist.


Naval Base Boy Scouts

Visit USS CORPORAL
The Boy Scouts of America, Troop 435, of the Naval Base will visit the USS CORPORAL (SS346) this morning at 1000. The CORPORAL is one of the vessels assigned here for duty with Fleet Training Group. This visit aboard the sub by the local Boy Scout Troop marks one of several visits the Scouts have made to various types of U.S. Navy ships.
It is anticipated that the Scouts will make many other visits to ships in this area during the summer months along with many outdoor scout activities that are being planned by the Scout Leaders.

Forces. They will look to us most of all on Armed Forces Day. Whether stationed at home or aboard, we can help create good will for the Armed Forces of the United States. We can explain the basic job of our Armed Forces, which is to be ready to combat aggression. To be such a representative, each of us must know the facts as to how we build and why we must continue to build Power for Peace.

9


Duing the past week, VU-10 has seen two more of its "old timer' pilots leave the squadron for new duty assignments. The two pilots leaving were: LT Weiland and LT Aslin. LT Weiland is headed for VX-6 and will be in for some of that cold cold Artic weather. LT Aslin is still stuck with this nice warm climate and will report to Point Mugu, California.
The KDC returned from an overnight trip to Santiago de Cuba last Sunday and everyone aboard enjoyed and eventfull weekend. The purpose of the trip was to attend the wedding of Emerson Price, A03, who was married Sunday afternoon. After the wedding, a party was held in his honor and the guys gave the bride and bridegroom a big send off.
Three of VU-10's men returned from Santiago via submarine this past weekend. It was a new experience for them, but turned out to be a very wet one. It seems a hatch in their compartment was left open and a large wave rolled in on the poor guys. After a short swimming period, the hatch was secured and the guys settled back and enjoyed the remainder of the trip.
Bill Madden, pitcher for the VU10 Mallards turned in the first no-hit performance of the season Monday night, and dusted off the MCB-I' team by the score of 20-2.
Donald Gunn has been seen with
a big smile lately. It must be because he became the proud father of a baby girl this week. We're still wondering where the cigars are though!


Navy Wives' Club

by Pat Aldridge
Pearl Pearcy, Activities Chairman, is back at the old stand in spite of a slowly mending fractured knee cap. Lorita Clark and Sarah Barco have been adding an eyeful to the pretty prize packages offered at the frequent bingo sessions held at the Villamar Lyceum on Thursday afternoons where maid service is always provided at a nominal fee:to keep the little darlings out of mamas' hair while the card is in her lap.
One planned activity was crossed off the calendar at the completion of the potluck luncheon held at the home of Doris Seagle last Thursday afternoon. All the members arrived bearing covered dishes and sat around ignoring that diet someone is always just going to start tomorrow while Jean 'Chaplain' Peterson, representing the Navy Relief Association, and Helen Bowler, familiar Red Cross figure, talked about their business and made things interesting. Members of the Navy Wives had met that long delayed transport on Wednesday so 1he-baby sitting and conducted fours of Guantanamo Bay were out of the way and everyone could relax.
Friday and Saturday . . . hey, that's today . . . the club sponsors a bake sale near the NOB Navy Exchange. None of this get-it-outof-a-box-and-add-water b u sine s s for our gals. When it comes to home cookin' the Navy Wives adhere strictly to a 'do it yourself' policy. Cake and, candy, really dandy. If you pick up the Indian in time, step into your warpaint and get about for a bite. The sale goes on from early until there ain't no mas.


Sunday, 22 May 1955 Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1280-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services
Sunday: 1100--Divine Worship
0930-Sunday School
0080-Adult Bible Class 1980-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1980--Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Christian Science
Sunday: 1000-Station Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J. J. Sullivan. CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)

The Chaplain's Corner

"It is like a straem. There are places so shallow that a child can wade in it. There are also places so deep that an elephant can swim in it." Thus a great scholar described the world's best seller, The Bible. It is truly descriptive of the book that contains truth that even a child can grasp, and at the same passages that challenge the best minds of the ages.
This is The Book which inspired the ideals that produced America. Those ideals were drawn and nurtured from the Scripture. The evident fact overlooked by many is that The Book of the founders of our country was the Bible. It was the source of our freedom. From the Mayflower Compact to the Declaration of Independence the ideals which produced America were inspired by The Bible. One writer referring to some of the great passages of Scripture, states it this way: "All these are America is a civilized society, these are America."
We would do well, therefore, as individuals and as a nation to pick up the old dust covered volume and it diligently that we may fill our minds with its great truths and principles. We shall find there not only the high ideals that are needed for complete and happy living today, but we shall find also the motivation and the power to live toward the realization of those great truths and ideals. The greatest men of the ages have relied on it. The greatest scholars have devoted their lives to the study of it. It has been the inspiration and the motivation of all that is best in our civilization. Can we then afford to neglect it? We may not find a blue print for the tasks before us as individuals or as a nation, but we shall find those basic and changeless values to which all of our planning must conform. Only thus shall our democracy be secure. Only thus shall there be peace and harmony within this great nation. For the Bible is that book which has demonstrated its power in the lives of millions to change the selfish life into a life of sacrificial service, the miser into one generous toward the needy, the fearful into courageous crusaders doubters into faithful believers, tyrants into servants of all mankind.
Karl G. Peterson Chaplain, U.S.N.


Pa& Two


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IPage Three


Leathernecks Hold One-Game Edge in League,


Indians, Mallards in Tight 2nd Place Race

by Hal Davis
As of Thursday night the defending champion Marine Leathernecks maintained their slim hold on the top seat of the league with a one-game lead over the closes rivals, Naval Station and VU-10, both tied for second slot. A disappointing MCB-1 club was hanging precariously to their 4th rung by a very slim half-game edge over the Naval Air Station Flyers and the Staff team who both have a 1 and 4 record.
Staff came alive Thursday night
against the Bees to break a 10-10 edged the Flyers, 6 to 5. Wolgamuth tie and pull ahead with a 2-run opened for the Indians but was sent rally in the eight inning. The Bees, to the dugout in the third and with two out in the ninth squeezed Ambroski took the mound. Old relione run across, but couldn't manage able Mandis was called in again in another and went under, 12 to 11, the ninth to prevent a possible to give the Staff-men their first Flyer uprising. Ambroski gets win of the young season. Toland credit for the win and Flyer ace started for Staff but was lifted in Nixon took the loss allowing only the fourth for Rogina who shackled three hits after he relieved Pearson the Bee bats with two scattered hits in the second stanza. for the rest of the game. Rogina R H E took credit for the win, while De Naval Station 6 6 3 Barios, who went the route for the Naval Air 5 7 3 Bees and gave up 14 Staff hits, Wednesday night, 25 May, could was the loser, well turn out to be the "Game of


R H E
Staff 12 14 2 MCB-1 11 7 4
The league was closed out last week with WGBY's "Game of the Week" when the Naval Station Indians met and nosed out the VU10 Mallards in a thriller, 9 to 8. Dale Buss started for the Braves and Edgar took the mound for the Mallards. Both hurlers needed relief and Mandy Mandis took over in the sixth for Buss, while Madden took the chores in the ninth for Edgar. The Indians had a 2 to 0 lead by the third inning, but the Mallards exploded in the fourth for three and again in the sixth for three more before the Indians could gather themselves together. But the Braves came back for 2 in the seventh, 2 in the eighth and 3 in the ninth. In the bottom of the ninth the Mallards, with one out, threatened when Edgar singled. A fast throw by Yogi Ianeiro from behind the plate nipped Edgar in an attempted steal, and Mandy stuck out Madden to wrap it up.
R H E
Naval Station 9 9 3 VU-10 8 7 3
The Marines and Staff clashed Sunday and the Staff Corps showed symptoms of being alive when they took a 3 to 1 lead in the second inning and made it 5 to 3 in the fourth. But the Leathernecks, never ones to stay behind for long, started banging away in the sixth for 4 runs and kept adding more until they had 18 to the Staff 7. Schreck started for the Marines but was taken out in the second in favor of Dowd who went through the fifth. Patton came in for the sixth and took credit for the win. Bailey was the loser.
R H E
Marines 18 18 3 Staff 7 9 7
The worst drubbing of the week was administered to the MCB-1 nine by the Mallards. In the process Bill Madden pitched the first no-hitter of the season as his teammates swamped three Bee hurlers with 13 hits and crossed the plate 20 times. The Bees final total was 2, the result of a wild pitch that hit Morehead and Cabral's interference that gave Desjarlais a free pass to first. With none out the two stole the rest of the way home for the two lone runs.
R H E
VU-10 20 13 2 Bees -2 0 12
Naval Station and the Naval Air Station Flyers got together in another traditional rivalry contest on Wednesday night and the Indians


the Week" in the fourth week of the season. The Naval Station Indians meet the Marines Leathernecks, and there's usually never a dull moment when these two get together. WGBY will broadcast the game play-by-play starting at
7 P.M.


League Standings


(Including Thursday's TEAM W


Marines NavSta VU-10 MCB-1 NAS
Staff


4
3
3
1
1
1


Baseball Sched
Sunday, 22 May-MCB-1 v Mon, 23 May-VU-10 vs S Tues, 24 May-Open Wed, 25 May-NavSta vs Thurs, 26 May-MCB-1

Fri, 27 May-Staff vs Na Sat, 28 May-Open


Little League Sch
Sat, 21 May-Bears vs T Sun, 22 May-Hawks vs Tues, 24 May-Hawks vs Thurs, 26 May-Colts vs Sat, 28 May-Bears vs C


Little League Stan


Colts
Bears
Hawks
Tigers

Little League Res
Saturday
Hawks 6 - Bears
Sunday
Colts 10 - Tigers
Tuesday
Colts 12 - Bears
Thursday
Hawks 9 - Tigers
0


Ladies Bowling

The Ladies Summer Bowling League, rolling their games at the NAS EM Club Alleys, is well underway. Team No. 6, captained by Ann Forester, is leading the pack with eight wins and no losses.
Two newcomers to the league, Marie Rahling and Maureen Bertagna are presently the most promising bowlers. Marie is averaging 126, and Maureen is averaging 127. High series at this point in league play goes to J. King with 535, E. Griffin with 506, and F. Grounds with 506.
High Games
F. Grounds 203 J. King 186 E. Griffin 170 E. Sounders 168 S. Wenderlich 168 M. Bertagna 162
High Average
J. King 166 E. Griffin 159 F. Grounds 155 C. Godbout 146
E. Sounders 143 S. Wnederlich 139 V. Schmidt 138 P. Way 137 M. Pugh 136 C. Cohonski 13i6


Teenage Round-up
by Linda Thurston


game) Comes again that time of year
when all our buddies begin truckin' L PCT back to the States. Good ol' Doris
Sigler-girl senior-left for Moo 1.000 bile and points west yesterday. 1 .750 We'll all miss her sunny smile, 1 .750 southern accent and "ding, ding,
3 .250 ding."
4 .200 Next on the list of dear departed
. is Johnny McGee (sometimes bet4 .200 ter -known as McGoo) who will
always be remembered for his beard, loud shirts, pipe and his A ~crazy cars.
The remaining members of the rs NavSta graduating class of '55 will leave taff at various time during the Summer. Wormie will be college bound for D.C., where she wants to study s Marines modeling or psychoanalysis or televs vision or journalism or just settle Naval Air down and get married. Dave will vSta putter around the base this Summer with a job and go to college next Fall to study aeronautical engineering.
Nancy Jo is waiting for Ju'ie IdUle 3rd. And Irma wants to work a
while, then go to Art School. Edgar 'igers will go to Florida to college to Jolts become a doctor and Cavy will Bears shag to Annapolis.
All the kids will be missed, that's Tigers for sure. Most of them have been olts around this place for a long time,
but, as sage Burke says, "No matter where you go, you almost aldings ways end up in Gtmo again. Look
at me-I'll probably be here for W L the next 25 years."
Did Ya' See ... Chief-French6 2 Fry-in-The-Face Hays .. . Linda 5 3 Stinson's crazy orange peddle push4 4 ers that kept the GAA awake all
7 night . .. Penny, Frank, Bob and 1 7 gang slumming it on Friday, the
13th ... Wormie's clever jokes ... UltS Becky sleeping through it all.
Nita's delicicous pizza . . . Sharon
K and Peggy walking in the rain 5. . . All the kids, and teachers, too,
beginning to show up with some real sharp tans. The Sunday school 2 picnic and Sophomores' beach party
really cooked the kids, but they had 2 a ball ... Everybody being overjoyed 'cause school's out after all
7 these months.
I


Saturday, 21 May 1959


Pa e 'l ree


NAS Petty Officer

Makes Perfect Score

On Second Class Test

On Monday, 16 May, Irving A. Roeder and 98 other men of the Naval Base were advanced in pay grade. For the Examining Center, there was no question as to whether Roeder should be advanced, for he achieved the near-to-impossible perfect score on the advancement in rating test last February to earn his new rate of AE2.
Roeder, who took the examination at his last duty station in Dahlgren, Virginia, has been in the Navy for two years and seven months and is presently assigned to the Naval Air Staiton Electric Shop. Roeder has been in Guantanamo Bay for two months. Buffalo, New York is Roeder's home.





by Paul A. Hoffer, USMC DEPARTURES
Last week seven men departed for stateside duty. Most of them going to Camp Lejeune, N.C. To Camp Lejeune were Pfc. Harry W. Daniels, Pfc. Charles W. Mason, Pfc. Harold W. Rowley Jr., Pfc. Robert C. Santosuosso and Cpl. Howard A. Youngfleisch. Reporting to Marine Corps Schools, Quantico, Va. were Cpl. Robert J. Gatti and Roger L. Willequer. PROMOTIONS
This past week twelve men were promoted to the next higher rank. To Sergeant were Clarence Frederick Jr, Edward F. Novack and Russell L. Spencer. Promoted to Corporal were John W. Breeden, Edward J. Collins, Joseph J. Griffin Jr., Paul A. Hoffer, Richard M. McIver, Charles R. Shontz, John R. Wertz, Jay K. Wolcott, and Ralph A. Young Jr. Congratulations from all hands here at Marine Barracks.
RIFLE RANGE
Last Saturday, May 14th, 62 men fired the M1 Rifle for qualification. The four top shooters were Cpl. "D.. "C" Foley-221, Pfc. Thomas H. Marsh-219, SSgt Gerald A. McNemar and Pfc. John P. Gallant-217.
BASEBALL
The Marine Baseball team now boast a 4-0 record. The past week the Marine defeated Naval Air Station 12 to 9 and the Staff Corps 18 to 7. This week two important games will be played. Friday, May 20th, the Marines meet the high flying VU-10 Mallards and Naval Station Indians, wins over these two teams could put the Marines in a pretty good position in the league.


THE INDIAN





m


Pane pour THE INDIAN Saturday, 21 May 1955


MOVIES

Saturday, 31 May
DRAGONFLY SQUADRON
John Hodiak Barbara Britton
A major is sent to Korea to step-up the training program of a squadron. He meets the woman he loves, their romance broken because of her supposedly dead husbands return.
Sunday, 22 May
SABRINA
Humphrey Bogart Audrey Hepburn
Two very rich brothers, living in their fabulous mansion, pay little attention to their chauffeurs daughter until she returns from Paris, where she attended beauty school.
Monday, 23 May DESERT LEGION
Alan Ladd Arlene Dahl
This story takes place in 1855 when a captain in the Foreign Legion leaves with a scouting party to search in the Algerian Desert for the trail of a notorious bandit raider. The captain eventually falls into enemy hands and is helped by the beautiful daughter of the Emir.
Tuesday, 24 May
MEN OF THE FIGHTING LADY Dewey Martin Van Johnson
Author, Louis Calhern, visits a Naval carrier to get its Christmas story from Commander Walter Pidgeon. A flash back tells the story of three flights of the Navy pilots against a railroad in Korea.
Wednesday, 25 May
THE BIG LEAGUER
Edward G. Robinson Vera Ellen
This film depicits two weeks at the training camp of the New York Giants, in Florida, where lads from all over come to try out for possible careers with the team.
Thursday, 26 May
RAIDERS OF THE SEVEN SEAS John Payne Donna Reed
A pirate captures a group of Spanish prisoners and makes them his crew. During his raids he takes as a prize a Spanish Countess who turns out to be a very spirited girl and tries to ruin his piratical adventures.
Friday, 27 May


Radio's 'Tops' of the Week

SATURDAY, 21 May ... THEATRE ROYAL . .. 9:00 P.M.
"The Happy Hypocrite" with John Geilgud playing the lead is the story of an evil man, who, because of his ways is spurned by his true love. He wears a mask to mirror his evil countenance and the lady is fooled. His happiness is eventually threatened when he is betrayed by a jealous ex-mistress.
Bob Hope returns to the airways with the band of Les Brown and Margaret Whiting as his guest, replacing "The Great Gildersleeve."
SUNDAY, 22 May ... HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE 10:00 ... P.M.
This week's outstanding radio adaptation of Hollywood's best in movies is the "Naked Jungle" with Donna Reed and Charlton Heston. The story concerns an invasion of ants upon a jungle plantation owner and his mail-order bride.
MONDAY, 23 May ... BEST PLAYS.. . 9:00 p.M.
Tonight we find Napoleon, portrayed by Dennis King, back on the island of St. Helena in this stirring historical drama of the last day of Napoleon.
TUESDAY, 24 May... THE CHASE .. . 9:00 P.M.
Three escaped convicts hide away in the home of two old maids who rally to the occasion and their pursuit of evil becomes psychological rather than physical.
WEDNESDAY, 25 May . . . ON STAGE... 9:00 P.M.
When a woman loses her man to another woman she sometimes becomes bitter. When she loses him for the second time, her vengeance can cause endless grief, as will be heard in "A Woman with Vengeance."
THURSDAY, 26 May... FAMILY THEATRE .. . 9:00 P.M.
"U.F.O." "Unidentified flying object" for the uninitiated into the realm of the space enthusiast as the story is related of the professor of astro-physics who devises a crude method of communication between earthling and the men in the "flying saucers."
FRIDAY, 27 May . . RADIO WORKSHOP ... 10:00 P.M.
Some things are just Well worth waiting for, and it's true with the story of "The Monkey's Paw" by W. W. Jacobs. Due to technical difficulties this was not produced last week. It's a terrifying tale of a mystic and horrible charm and its effects upon a family, given a modern New England setting in Navy Jounralist Bud Sisson's adaptation of the classic short story. The Monkey's Paw is an ordinary paw, dried tO a mummy, with a spell put on it by an old fakir in India who wanted to show that those who interfered with fate do so to their own sorrow. This is a show you can't afford to miss.


THE STRANGER WORE A GUN SOl
Randolph Scott Claire Trevo
When a former Quatrell spy discovers that the notorious guerrilla leader is murdering and plundering for his own gain, he jbins the Confederate Army and fights the rest When Eddie Fisher made the recording hit of "Never Before" could of - the Civil War in Orthodox this lovely lass be the reason behind it all. If you haven't guessed it by fashion. now this curvavious lovely is MGM's actress Debbie Reynolds.
9


FTG Bulletin
by Ron Federman
After utilizing practically every means of transportation conceivable, Mr. and Mrs. James O'Reilly, arrived at Guantanamo Bay for a visit with the Gmeiner Family. CHELEC Gmeiner is with the FTG Engineering Department. The guests are Mrs. Gmeiner's mother and father who are residents of Harrington, New Jersey. In journeying to Guantanamo Bay the couple drove from New Jersey to Miami by car, and then used various modes of transportation in Cuba, including buses, trains, and airplanes, finally arriving at the Naval Base on Tuesday, 10 May.
Recently, the Bloodmobile stopped at Crane Hill in anticipation of receiving voluntary blood donations. They did just that, as all Fleet Training Center personnel, officer and enlisted alike, contributed to the blood bank in a worthwhile endeavor. Hats off to members of the Fleet Training Center for their 100% participation in a worthy cause.
CDR McIntosh, who has been spending 21 days convalescent leave with his family, departed Guantanamo Bay on Tuesday, 17 May, for the Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Portsmouth, Va., where he will be examined for possible further treatment. We look for his early return!
LT Williams of the Gunnery Department, and CDR Getzewich, Engineering Officer, departed the area last Sunday on TAD Orders to Special Weapons Orientation School, Norfolk, Va., for a period of about 4 days. LT Williams will also attend Guided Missiles Orientation School while at Norfolk. Just as I was about to conclude this week's column, it was learned that another baby was born; Mrs. Williams presented her husband, Onal Williams, YN1, of the Administration Department, with a 6 lb. baby girl at 1140, 17 May. The new addition to the Williams' Household has been named Joan Theresa.
SHIPS ARRIVALS
USS BROUGH (DE 148)
(To arrive 20 May) USS PILLSBURY (DER 133)
(To arrive 14 May) USS BENNINGTON (CVA 20)
(To arrive 18 May) USS MACON (CA 132)
(To arrive 15 May) USS ROSS (DD 563)
(To arrive 27 May) USS BEARSS (DD 564)
(To arrive 27 May)


Base Library Closes

For Annual Inventory

The Naval Station Library will be closed from May 31 to June 3 due to annual inventory. No books will be issued after May 24 and books now in circulation must be returned to the library on or before May 30. The library will be open from 1:00 P.M. to 5:00 P.M. and 6:00 P.M. to 9:30 P.M. on May 30.
It is hoped that all personnel will throughly check their quarters, lockers, desks, closets and return all -books found to the library. No fines will be charged. The library will open on June 4 at 1:00 P.M.


Saturday, 21 May 1955


THE INDIAN




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m "Vo .es NavMa LiB e Te Satnsa 2e" Vol. VI, No. 20 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 21 May 1955 Col. R. E. Fojt Speaks At School Graduation Nine students graduated from the Naval Base High School Thursday night, one of the largest graduating classes in years. Boys won out over girls with a one-edgemargin. The Seniors graduating Thursday night were: Misses Nancy Jo Halentic, Patricia Wormwood, Doris Sigler and Irma Pina; James Cavanaugh, John McGee, Edgar Heimer, David Shyver and Frank Vaughn. Colonel Robert E. Fojt, USMC, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks, was the principal speaker for the commencement exercises. Col. Fojt said, "This is a special day for you of the graduating class, and we are all happy in our own different ways to share in this occasion with you ." Col. Fojt then went on to congratulate the high school graduates and the 8th grade graduates, stressing the importance of "more than a passing grade in the required subjects of study." Bringing out the relationship betwen education and democracy, the colonel said, "Today we are convinced that democracy cannot exist without free education which is undergirded with sound moral principles ...that a mere force will never replace justice in the adjustment of wrong." At this point, he emphasized that "the basic hope for real peace lies in the ability of our teachers to instill in every individual the desire to learn the truth and to broaden their understanding of the highest moral concepts, coupled with the willingness and diligence of the individual to be led in such growth ." Climaxing, Col. Fojt offered a solution to the problems "of this world, or of your own life" in the form of some guiding principles, saying, "Mold them into your creed for living. Use them as guides in your struggle for the goals you set for your life ...you must grow in knowledge, be of service to the world, maintain a positive mental attitude, have faith and early in life learn to recognize the real values of life, in order that you may contribute toward peace and security of this world, and have a happy life." CAPT Roy E. Bishop, CHC, USN, Chief of Chaplains, Commander, Service Forces, Atlantic Fleet, will conduct the 1100 Protestant Divine Worship Services at the Naval Base Chapel tomorrow. Armed Forces Day 1955 PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE My friends here at home and across the seas: We in America have constantly pledged that we will never commit aggresion but we must always be prepared to defeat it. On May 21st ,the Armed Forces of the United States will hold open house to give our own and other peace loving peoples the best possible opportunity to see how ready we are in military terms for any threat to our security or to the peace of the free world. As Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of the United States, I earnestly hope that all who can will accept this invitation to become better acquainted with the armed components of our national power for peace. Dwight D. Eisenhower Prseident Poppies to Honor American War Dead Next Saturday will be Poppy Day. That day will see many people wearing little red poppies in memory of those who have given their lives in our nation's defense. As they put on their poppies, they will contribute to the welfare of disabled war veterans and needy children of veterans. The poppies, made of crepe paper in replica of the wild poppies of France and Flanders which bloomed "between the crosses, row on row," of the World War I battle cemeteries, have been received from the V. A. Hospital, Lake City, Florida, where they were made by disabled veterans. The members of the American Legion Auxiliary will offer them on the streets Saturday from early morning to late afternoon, and at the same time will receive contributions for American Legion and Auxiliary work for disabled veterans and needy children of veterans. The custom of wearing poppies in honor of the war dead began at the close of World War I, when the picture of the little wild poppies growing in the bare earth around the battle graves was fresh in the minds of the returning veterans. At its first national convention in 1921, the American Legion Auxiliary adopted the poppy as its memorial flower and ever since has conducted an annual distribution of poppies. New Town Council Elects J. R. Ralston Mayor Wednesday night, newly elected Villamar-Bargo Council held their first meeting with the retiring council for the purpose of electing a mayor. Mr. J. R. Ralston, representative for Precinct 6, was elected Mayor by a unanimous vote of the new council. Mr. Ralston will preside over council meetings and direct the Villamar-Bargo activities for the coming six months. Retiring Mayor is Mr. J. R. Yost, also of Precinct 6. Other new council members are; B. H. Carr, T. L. Tremble, and M. Gordon, Precincts 1, 2, and 3; G. Liveakos, Precinct 4; W. A. Schnarke, Precinct 5; G. W. Twinning, Precinct 7. and Bob Marshall, Precinct 8. Elections for the council were held last sunday as the retiring council, J. R. Yost, J. R. Nelson, C. E. Blakeman, J. E. Armstrong, and W. J. Sparks, distributed ballots for the election to residents of Villamar and Bargo. In addition to the election of new members of the Town Council, residents were asked on the ballot to indicate their wishes as to whether or not they desire a swimming pool for the Bargo-Villamar residential areas. Results of the issue were: 671 voted in favor 30 stated no preference or stated "no" Supply Depot Strives For New Safety Record The Naval Supply Depot, Guantanamo Bay, is again setting new safety records for Naval Supply Depots outside Continental United States. Having won the SecNav Award for Achievement in Industrial Safety in 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954 the Depot appears to be on the road to winning another SecNav Award for 1955. The close of business 17 May 1955 recorded the 575th day without a lost-time accident. This is an outstanding record in that over one-half the Depot personnel are employed in the more accident-prone occupations, such as stevedoring, mechanics, fueling and materials handling. This is coupled with the definite consideration that must be given to the difficult problem encountered with a large number of non-English speaking personnel on board at NSD. CDR E. W. Sutherling, SC, USN, commanding officer of the Supply Depot, states that a large measure of credit for the en-able record is due to the Supervisor's Safety Committee, the continuous program on safety practices, and the untiring efforts of each employee to maintain NSD-GTMO as one the safest places to work. BuPers Guarantees Choice of Schools To Reenlistees The Bureau of Naval Personnel has recently provided, under certain conditions, guaranteed assignment ot service schools upon reenlistment. The schools to be used in this program are as follows: CLASS "B" B o ii e r i a n, Commissaryman, Electrician's Mates, Electronics Technicians, Gunners Mates, IC Electricians, Music, Yoeman, Aviation Electricians Mates, Advanced Aviation Electronics Technicians, Tradevman, Advanced Photographer's Mates, Aerographer's Mates, Air Controlman, and Mine Warfare. CLASS "C" Teletype Maintenance, Cryptographers ,Torpedoman, Opticalman and Instrumentman, Welding, FT (GFCS Mk 56 or UWFC Mk 102), Ground Controlled Approach, Oxygen, Catapult and Arresting Gear and 12 week Maintenance Course at the Fleet Sonar School. The conditions that are prerequisites for the guarantee of assignment to school training under this program are: a. Personnel must specifically request school training b. Personnel must reenlist on board their permanent duty station within 24 hours after discharge. c. Personnel must not have exercised any choice of duty assignment in accordance with BUPERS Instruction 1306. 25A d. The reenlistment must be the first reenlistment. e. Only personnel reenlisting in the Regular Navy are eligible f. Personnel must be eligible for the school in acordance with the normal entrance requirements stipulated in the various current instructions. g. Personnel must be in Pay Grade E-4 or above of a rating listed for the school h. Personnel must be considered suitable candidates for the school by their commanding officer. Personnel will be ordered to the school of their choice within 6 months of their reenlistment unless the number of personnel requesting the same school under this program exceeds the capacity of the school during that time. In the latter case, personnel will be ordered to the school desired as soon after 6 months as possible and in all events during the current reenlistment period.

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raeno F-auie TwoTH IDASaudy21My15 The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 21 May 1955 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Statl U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LTJG J. D. Byerley --------Offier-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC------------------Editor H. L. Sisson, 30------------News D. C. Roberta. JOSN------Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1944, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a members of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. An Editorial .., Armed Forces Day (Reprinted from "Armed Forces Talk" Today is the sixth annual Armed Forces Day. Americans will be encouraged to look over their Armed Forces more carefully than on any other day of the year. In a way, we of the Armed Forces will be hosts at an "open house." But it's not an open house in the sense that a family home or an industrial plant might be opened to guests. Instead, on Armed Forces Day the American people are invited to take a closer look than usual at the defense team that is helping to keep them free and strong It's not so much the "we" are showing "them." It is rather a time for all Americans-both in an out of uniform--to join in a good look at the Armed Forces. Each post, base, and unit in the United States and in remote corners of the world, including the many units of the Reserves, will welcome visitors. We servicemen can be proud of this part of the national security that is in our keeping. What it represents is stated in the theme of this year's Armed Forces Day: "Power for Peace." Armed Forces Day will be observed in many ways. It's both a celebration and a display. Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen will extend hospitality. There will be parades, demonstrations, ex hibit s, sports events, tours, and dedications. There will be air demonstrations, including the popular "flyover." But there is more to it than that. We of the Armed Forces will have an opportunity to tell family members and friends how their defense team is working together, aind how it is contributing to the defense of the free world. They look to us for the story of what is really going on in the Armed The Toastmaster VU-10 Prop Blast by Joe West Friend, it is your national heritage to amount to something great so do not choose to be a common man. It is your right to be uncommon, if you can. Seek opportunity -not security. Do not be a kept citizen, humbled and dulled by having the state look after you. Take the calculated risk; to dream and to build, to fail and to succeed. Prefer the challenges of life to the guaranteed existence; the thrill of fulfillment to the stale calm of Utopia. Do not trade freedom for beneficence nor dignity for a handout. Never cower before any master nor bend to any threat. It is your birthright to stand erect, proud and unafraid; to think and act for yourself, enjoy the benefit of your creations and to face the world boldly and say, "this I have done." All this is what it means to be an AMERICAN. Yet there are those who do not believe that we have faith in our freedom. The gamble of the Soviet Communists is that the freedoms God has offered to man-freedom to choose, freedom to search and explore spiritual lows and realities, freedom to become God's children here and hereafter-are neither appreciated nor desired by most mr en. The communist gambles that the average man in all countries has a slave mentality and that therefore his normal permanent role is to be the unquestioning tool of the gang that parades as The State. All collectivists share belief in this gamble that the slave mentality is the fundamental and permanent base of human nature. If this gamble succeeded we would be headed straight for the horrors of mass destruction and the return to barbarism. Fortunately, however, man's individuality is an inevitable consequence of his spiritual being. The individual free citizen, once aware of his heritage and destiny will permit no political conspiracy to enslave him-and this goes for all varieties of Collectivism. Socialist and Communist. Naval Base Boy Scouts Visit USS CORPORAL The Boy Scouts of America, Troop 435, of the Naval Base will visit the USS CORPORAL (SS346) this morning at 1000. The CORPORAL is one of the vessels assigned here for duty with Fleet Training Group. This visit aboard the sub by the local Boy Scout Troop marks one of several visits the Scouts have made to various types of U.S. Navy ships. It is anticipated that the Scouts will make many other visits to ships in this area during the summer months along with many outdoor scout activities that are being planned by the Scout Leaders. Forces. They will look to us most of all on Armed Forces Day. Whether stationed at home or aboard, we can help create good will for the Armed Forces of the United States. We can explain the basic job of our Armed Forces, which is to be ready to combat aggression. To be such a representative, each of us must know the facts as to how we build and why we must continue to build Power for Peace. Duing the past week, VU-10 has seen two more of its "old timer" pilots leave the squadron for new duty assignments. The two pilots leaving were: LT Weiland and LT Aslin. LT Weiland is headed for VX-6 and will be in for some of that cold cold Artic weather. LT Aslin is still stuck with this nice warm climate and will report to Point Mugu, California. The KDC returned from an overnight trip to Santiago de Cuba last Sunday and everyone aboard enjoyed and eventfull weekend. The purpose of the trip was to attend the wedding of Emerson Price, A03, who was married Sunday afternoon. After the wedding, a party was held in his honor and the guys gave the bride and bridegroom a big send off. Three of VU-10's men returned from Santiago via submarine this past weekend. It was a new experience for them, but turned out to be a very wet one. It seems a hatch in their compartment was left open and a large wave rolled in on the poor guys. After a short swimming period, the hatch was secured and the guys settled back and enjoyed the remainder of the trip. Bill Madden, pitcher for the VU10 Mallards turned in the first no-hit performance of the season Monday night, and dusted off the MCB-1 team by the score of 20-2. Donald Gunn has been seen with a big smile lately. It must be because he became the proud father of a baby girl this week. We're still wondering where the cigars are though! Navy Wives' Club by Pat Aldridge Pearl Pearcy, Activities Chairman, is back at the old stand in spite of a slowly mending fractured knee cap. Lorita Clark and Sarah Barco have been adding an eyeful to the pretty prize packages offered at the frequent bingo sessions held at the Villamar Lyceum on Thursday afternoons where maid service is always provided at a nominal fee to keep the little darlings out of mamas' hair while the card is in her lap. One planned activity was crossed off the calendar at the completion of the potluck luncheon held at the home of Doris Seagle last Thursday afternoon. All the members arrived bearing covered dishes and sat around ignoring that diet someone is always just going to start tomorrow while Jean 'Chaplain' Peterson, representing the Navy Relief Association, and Helen Bowler, familiar Red Cross figure, talked about their business and made things interesting. Members of the Navy Wives had met that long delayed transport on Wednesday so the baby sitting and conducted fours of Guantanamo Bay were out of the way and everyone could relax. Friday and Saturday ...hey, that's today ...the club sponsors a bake sale near the NOB Navy Exchange. None of this get-it-outof-a-box-and-add-water business for our gals. When it comes to home cookin' the Navy Wives adhere strictly to a 'do it yourself' policy. Cake and candy, really dandy. If you pick up the Indian in time, step into your warpaint and get about for a bite. The sale goes on from early until there ain't no mas. Sunday, 22 May 1955 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1910-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner "It is like a straem. There are places so shallow that a child can wade in it. There are also places so deep that an elephant can swim in it." Thus a great scholar described the world's best seller, The Bible. It is truly descriptive of the book that contains truth that even a child can grasp, and at the same passages that challenge the best minds of the ages. This is The Book which inspired the ideals that produced America. Those ideals were drawn and nurtured from the Scripture. The evident fact overlooked by many is that The Book of the founders of our country was the Bible. It was the source of our freedom. From the Mayflower Compact to the Declaration of Independence the ideals which produced America were inspired by The Bible. One writer referring to some of the great passages of Scripture, states it this way: "All these are America is a civilized society, these are America." We would do well, therefore, as individuals and as a nation to pick up the old dust covered volume and it diligently that we may fill our minds with its great truths and principles. We shall find there not only the high ideals that are needed for complete and happy living today, but we shall find also the motivation and the power to live toward the realization of those great truths and ideals. The greatest men of the ages have relied on it. The greatest scholars have devoted their lives to the study of it. It has been the inspiration and the motivation of all that is best in our civilization. Can we then afford to neglect it? We may not find a blue print for the tasks before us as individuals or as a nation, but we shall find those basic and changeless values to which all of our planning must conform. Only thus shall our democracy be secure. Only thus shall there be peace and harmony within this great nation. For the Bible is that book which has demonstrated its power in the lives of millions to change the selfish life into a life of sacrificial service, the miser into one generous toward the needy, the fearful into courageous crusaders doubters into faithful believers, tyrants into servants of all mankind. Karl G. Peterson Chaplain, U.S.N. 4ft THE INDIAN Saturday, 21 May 1955

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Saturday, 21 May 1955 THE INL3IAN Pare Three Leathernecks Hold One-Game Edge in League; Indians, Mallards in Tight 2nd Place Race by Hal Davis As of Thursday night the defending champion Marine Leathernecks maintained their slim hold on the top seat of the league with a one-game lead over the closes rivals, Naval Station and VU-10, both tied for second slot. A disappointing MCB-1 club was hanging precariously to their 4th rung by a very slim half-game edge over the Naval Air Station Flyers and the Staff team who both have a 1 and 4 record. Staff came alive Thursday night against the Bees to break a 10-10 edged the Flyers, 6 to 5. Wolgamuth tie and pull ahead with a 2-run opened for the Indians but was sent rally in the eight inning. The Bees, to the dugout in the third and with two out in the ninth squeezed Ambroski took the mound. Old relione run across, but couldn't manage able Mandis was called in again in another and went under, 12 to 11, the ninth to prevent a possible to give the Staff-men their first Flyer uprising. Ambroski gets win of the young season. Toland credit for the win and Flyer ace started for Staff but was lifted in Nixon took the loss allowing only the fourth for Rogina who shackled three hits after he relieved Pearson the Bee bats with two scattered hits in the second stanza. for the rest of the game. Rogina R H E took credit for the win, while De Naval Station 6 6 3 Barits, who went the route for the Naval Air 5 7 3 Bees and gave up 14 Staff hits, Wednesday night, 25 May, could was the loser, well turn out to be the "Game of R H E Staff 12 14 2 MCB-1 11 7 4 The league was closed out last week with WGBY's "Game of the Week" when the Naval Station Indians met and nosed out the VU10 Mallards in a thriller, 9 to 8. Dale Buss started for the Braves and Edgar took the mound for the Mallards. Both hurlers needed relief and Mandy Mandis took over in the sixth for Buss, while Madden took the chores in the ninth for Edgar. The Indians had a 2 to 0 lead by the third inning, but the Mallards exploded in the fourth for three and again in the sixth for three more before the Indians could gather themselves together. But the Braves came back for 2 in the seventh, 2 in the eighth and 3 in the ninth. In the bottom of the ninth the Mallards, with one out, threatened when Edgar singled. A fast throw by Yogi lanelro from behind the plate nipped Edgar in an attempted steal, and Mandy struck out Madden to wrap it up. RH E Naval Station 9 9 3 VU-10 8 7 3 The Marines and Staff clashed Sunday and the Staff Corps showed symptoms of being alive when they took a 3 to 1 lead in the second inning and made it 5 to 3 in the fourth. But the Leathernecks, never ones to stay behind for long, started banging away in the sixth for 4 runs and kept adding more until they had 18 to the Staff 7. Schreck started for the Marines but was taken out in the second in favor of Dowd who went through the fifth. Patton came in for the sixth and took credit for the win. Bailey was the loser. RH E Marines 18 18 3 Staff 7 9 7 The worst drubbing of the week was administered to the MCB-1 nine by the Mallards. In the process Bill Madden pitched the first no-hitter of the season as his teammates swamped three Bee hurlers with 13 hits and crossed the plate 20 times. The Bees final total was 2, the result of a wild pitch that hit Morehead and Cabral's interference that gave Desjarlais a free pass to first. With none out the two stole the rest of the way home for the two lone runs. RH E VU-10 20 13 2 Bees 2 0 12 Naval Station and the Naval Air Station Flyers got together in another traditional rivalry contest on Wednesday night and the Indians the Week" in the fourth week of the season. The Naval Station Indians meet the Marines Leathernecks, and there's usually never a dull moment when these two get together. WGBY will broadcast the game play-by-play starting at 7 P.M. League Standings (Including Thur TEAM Marines NavSta VU-10 MCB-1 NAS Staff Baseball S Sunday, 22 May-M Mon, 23 May-VUTues, 24 May-Ope Wed, 25 May-Na Thurs, 26 May-M Fri, 27 May-Staff Sat, 28 May-Open Little League Sat, 21 May-Bear Sun, 22 May-Haw Tues, 24 May-Haw Thurs, 26 May-Co Sat, 28 May-Bear little League Colts Bears Hawks Tigers Little Leagu Saturd Hawks 6 Sund Colts 10 Tuesd Colts 12 Thursd Hawks 9 Ladies Bowling The Ladies Summer Bowling League, rolling their games at the NAS EM Club Alleys, is well underway. Team No. 6, captained by Ann Forester, is leading the pack with eight wins and no losses. Two newcomers to the league, Marie Rahling and Maureen Bertagna are presently the most promising bowlers. Marie is averaging 126, and Maureen is averaging 127. High series at this point in league play goes to J. King with 535, E. Griffin with 506, and F. Grounds with 506. High Games F. Grounds 203 J. King 186 E. Griffin 170 E. Sounders 168 S. Wenderlich 168 M. Bertagna 162 High Average J. King E. Griffin F. Grounds C. Godbout E. Sounders S. Wnederlich V. Schmidt P. Way M. Pugh C. Cohonski 166 159 155 146 143 139 138 137 136 1.9l Teenage Round-up by Linda Thurston sday's game) Comes again that time of year when all our buddies begin truckin' W L PCT hack to the States. Good of Doris 4 0 Sigler-gir senior-left for Mou 1VU bile and points west yesterday. 3 1 .750 We'll all miss her sunny smile, 3 1 .750 southern accent a 1 3 .250 ding." 1 4 .200 Next on the list of dear departed 1 4 200 is Johnny McGee (sometimes bet1 4 tr known as McGoo) who will always be remembered for his hchedule beard, loud shirts, pipe and his schedule cars. The remaining members of the [CB-1 vs NavSta graduating class of '55 will leave 10 vs Staff at various time during the Sumn mer. Wormie will be college hound m for D.C., where she wants to study vSta vs Marines modeling or psychoanalysis or teleMCB-1 vs vision or journalism or just settle Naval Air down and get married. Dave will vs NavSta putter around the base this Summer with a job and go to college next Fall to study aeronautical engineering. Schedule Jo is waiting for Ju e Scedul 3rd AndIrma wants to work a while, then go to Art School. Edgar s vs Tigers will go to Florida to college to ks vs Colts become a doctor and Cavy will wks vs Bears shag to Annapolis. lts vs Tigers All the kids will be missed, that's 'its for sure. Most of them have been s vs Colts around this place for a long time, but, as sage Burke says, "No matStandings ter where you go, you almost al5tanio~s ways end up in Gtmo again. Look b at me-I'll probably be here for W L the next 25 years." Did Ya' See ..Chief-French6 2 Fry-in-The-Face Hays .Linda 5 3 Stinson's crazy orange peddle push4 era that kept the GAA awake all 1 7 night .Penny, Frank, Bob and gang slumming it on Friday, the Results 13th .Wormie's clever jokes e Results Becky sleeping through it all Nita's delicicous pizza .Sharon lay K and Peggy walking in the rain Bears 5 ..All the kids, and teachers, too, a beginning to show up with some Y real sharp tans. The Sunday school Tigers 2 picnic and Sophomores' beach party ay really cooked the kids, but they had Bears 2 a ball .Everybody being overlay joyed 'cause school's out after all SgTigers 7 these months. 9 NAS Petty Officer Makes Perfect Score On Second Class Test On Monday, 16 May, Irving A. Roeder and 98 other men of the Naval Base were advanced in pay grade. For the Examining Center, there was no question as to whether Roeder should be advanced, for he achieved the near-to-impossible perfect score on the advancement in rating test last February to earn his new rate of AE2. Roeder, who took the examination at his last duty station in Dahlgren, Virginia, has been in the Navy for two years and seven months and is presently assigned to the Naval Air Staiton Electric Shop. Roeder has been in Guantanamo Bay for two months. Buffalo, New York is Roeder's home. MAQ(Nc Mosu'es by Paul A. Hoffer, USMC DEPARTURES Last week seven men departed for stateside duty. Most of them going to Camp Lejeune, N. C. To Camp Lejeune were Pfc. Harry W. Daniels, Pfc. Charles W. Mason, Pfc. Harold W. Rowley Jr., Pfc. Robert C. Santosuosso and Cpl. Howard A. Youngfleisch. Reporting to Marine Corps Schools, Quantico, Va. were Cpl. Robert J. Gatti and Roger L. Willequer. PROMOTIONS This past week twelve men were promoted to the next higher rank. To Sergeant were Clarence Frederick Jr, Edward F. Novack and Russell L. Spencer. Promoted to Corporal were John W. Breeden, Edward J. Collins, Joseph J. Griffin Jr., Paul A. Hoffer, Richard M. Melver, Charles R. Shontz, John R. Wertz, Jay K. Wolcott, and Ralph A. Young Jr. Congratulations from all hands here at Marine Barracks. RIFLE RANGE Last Saturday, May 14th, 62 men fired the M1 Rifle for qualification. The four top shooters were Cpl. "D" "C" Foley-221, Pfc. Thomas H. Marsh-219, SSgt Gerald A. McNemar and Pfc. John P. Gallant-217. BASEBALL The Marine Baseball team now boast a 4-0 record. The past week the Marine defeated Naval Air Station 12 to 9 and the Staff Corps 18 to 7. This week two important games will be played. Friday, May 20th, the Marines meet the high flying VU-10 Mallards and Naval Station Indians, wins over these two teams could put the Marines in a pretty good position in the league. Saturday, 21 May 1955 Page 'Three THE INDIAN 9

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Page Pour PaIN Four THE INDIAN Saturday, 21 May 1955 MOVIES Saturday, 31 May DRAGONFLY SQUADRON John Hodiak Barbara Britton A major is sent to Korea to step-up the training program of a squadron. He meets the woman he loves, their romance broken because of her supposedly dead husbands return. Sunday, 22 May SABRINA Humphrey Bogart Audrey Hepburn Two very rich brothers, living in their fabulous mansion, pay little attention to their chauffeurs daughter until she returns from Paris, where she attended beauty school. Monday, 23 May DESERT LEGION Alan Ladd Arlene Dahl This story takes place in 1855 when a captain in the Foreign Legion leaves with a scouting party to search in the Algerian Desert for the trail of a notorious bandit raider. The captain eventually falls into enemy hands and is helped by the beautiful daughter of the Emir. Tuesday, 24 May MEN OF THE FIGHTING LADY Dewey Martin Van Johnson Author, Louis Calhern, visits a Naval carrier to get its Christmas story from Commander Walter Pidgeon. A flash back tells the story of three flights of the Navy pilots against a railroad in Korea. Wednesday, 25 May THE BIG LEAGUER Edward G. Robinson Vera Ellen This film depicits two weeks at the training camp of the New York Giants, in Florida, where lads from all over come to try out for possible careers with the team. Thursday, 26 May RAIDERS OF THE SEVEN SEAS John Payne Donna Reed A pirate captures a group of Spanish prisoners and makes them his crew. During his raids he takes as a prize a Spanish Countess who turns out to be a very spirited girl and tries to ruin his piratical adventures. Friday, 27 May THE STRANGER WORE A GUN Randolph Scott Claire Trevor When a former Quatrell spy discovers that the notorious guerrilla leader is murdering and plundering for his own gain, he joins the Confederate Army and fights the rest of the Civil War in Orthodox fashion. Radio's 'Tops' of the Week SATURDAY, 21 May ...THEATRE ROYAL .9:00 P.M. "The Happy Hypocrite" with John Geilgud playing the lead is the story of an evil man, who, because of his ways is spurned by his true love. He wears a mask to mirror his evil countenance and the lady is fooled. His happiness is eventually threatened when he is betrayed by a jealous ex-mistress. Bob Hope returns to the airways with the band of Les Brown and Margaret Whiting as his guest, replacing "The Great Gildersleeve." SUNDAY, 22 May .HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE 10:00. P.M. This week's outstanding radio adaptation of Hollywood's best in movies is the "Naked Jungle" with Donna Reed and Charlton Heston. The story concerns an invasion of ants upon a jungle plantation owner and his mail-order bride. MONDAY, 23 May .BEST PLAYS ...9:00 P.M. Tonight we find Napoleon, portrayed by Dennis King, back on the island of St. Helena in this stirring historical drama of the last day of Napoleon. TUESDAY, 24 May .THE CHASE .9:00 P.M. Three escaped convicts hide away in the home of two old maids who rally to the occasion and their pursuit of evil becomes psychological rather than physical. WEDNESDAY, 25 May .ON STAGE ...9:00 P.M. When a woman loses her man to another woman she sometimes becomes bitter. When she loses him for the second time, her vengeance can cause endless grief, as will be heard in "A Woman with Vengeance." THURSDAY, 26 May .FAMILY THEATRE ...9:00 P.M. "U.F.O." "Unidentified flying object" for the uninitiated into the realm of the space enthusiast as the story is related of the professor of astro-physics who devises a crude method of communication between earthling and the men in the "flying saucers." FRIDAY, 27 May .RADIO WORKSHOP ...10:00 P.M. Some things are just well worth waiting for, and it's true with the story of "The Monkey's Paw" by W. W. Jacobs. Due to technical difficulties this was not produced last week. It's a terrifying tale of a mystic and horrible charm and its effects upon a family, given a modern New England setting in Navy Jounralist Bud Sisson's adaptation of the classic short story. The Monkey's Paw is an ordinary paw, dried to a mummy, with a spell put on it by an old fakir in India who wanted to show that those who interfered with fate do so to their own sorrow. This is a show you can't afford to miss. FTG Bulletin by Ron Federman After utilizing practically every means of transportation conceivable, Mr. and Mrs. James O'Reilly, arrived at Guantanamo Bay for a visit with the Gmeiner Family. CHELEC Gmeiner is with the FTG Engineering Departmen t. The guests are Mrs. Gmeiner's mother and father who are residents of Harrington, New Jersey. In journeying to Guantanamo Bay the couple drove from New Jersey to Miami by car, and then used various modes of transportation in Cuba, including buses, trains, and airplanes, finally arriving at the Naval Base on Tuesday, 10 May. Recently, the Bloodmobile stopped at Crane Hill in anticipation of receiving voluntary blood donations. They did just that, as all Fleet Training Center personnel, officer and enlisted alike, contributed to the blood bank in a worthwhile endeavor. Hats off to members of the Fleet Training Center for their 100% participation in a worthy cause. CDR McIntosh, who has been spending 21 days convalescent leave with his family, departed Guantanamo Bay on Tuesday, 17 May, for the Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Portsmouth, Va., where he will be examined for possible further treatment. We look for his early return! LT Williams of the Gunnery Department, and CDR Getzewich, Engineering Officer, departed the area last Sunday on TAD Orders to Special Weapons Orientation School, Norfolk, Va., for a period of about 4 days. LT Williams will also attend Guided Missiles Orientation School while at Norfolk. Just as I was about to conclude this week's column, it was learned that another baby was born; Mrs. Williams presented her husband, Onal Williams, YN1, of the Administration Department, with a 6 lb. baby girl at 1140, 17 May. The new addition to the Williams' Household has been named Joan Theresa. SHIPS ARRIVALS USS USS USS USS USS USS When Eddie Fisher made the recording hit of "Never Before" could this lovely lass be the reason behind it all. If you haven't guessed it by now this curvavious lovely is MGM's actress Debbie Reynolds. BROUGH (DE 148) (To arrive 20 May) PILLSBURY (DER 133) (To arrive 14 May) BENNINGTON (CVA 20) (To arrive 18 May) MACON (CA 132) (To arrive 15 May) ROSS (DD 563) (To arrive 27 May) BEARSS (DD 564) (To arrive 27 May) Base Library Closes For Annual Inventory The Naval Station Library will be closed from May 31 to June 3 due to annual inventory. No books will be issued after May 24 and books now in circulation must be returned to the library on or before May 30. The library will be open from 1:00 P.M. to 5:00 P.M. and 6:00 P.M. to 9:30 P.M. on May 30. It is hoped that all personnel will throughly check their quarters, lockers, desks, closets and return all books found to the library. No fines will be charged. The library will open on June 4 at 1:00 P.M. S1 THE INDIAN Saturday, 21 May 1955