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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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"Got.'ers (YMO LU6c The &ishtine" VoL VI, No. 19 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 14 May 1955


Villamar-Bargo Council Brownie, Girl Scouts PTA Summer Recreation Flnotinnq Tnmnrrnw Open Activity Hut Enrollement Starts Wed.


The Villamar-Bargo Council will hold its semi-annual election tomorrow as ballots will be distributed to all residences between noon and 3 P.M., listing the candidates for the specific wards.
Only changes from the last voting is that Wards 1, 2, and 3 have been combined into one district for election purposes. Out of these districts, residents will elect three council members. Also, a new district, Ward No. 8 has been added. Ward No. 8 is the Nob Hill housing area.
The elected Council will select one of its members to act as Mayor for the coming six months.
Nominated candidates and volunteer candidates for the Wards are as follows:
Ward No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3,
(Vote for 3 out of 4)
B.H. Carr
T. L. Tremble
M. Gordon
H. D. Childers
Ward No. 4
(Vote for one)
E. Antulov G. Liveakos
D.P. MeAnderws
Ward No. 5
(Vote for one)
P.E. Gibson
W.A. Schnarke
Ward No. 6
(Vote for one)
W.I. Hamm J. R. Ralston
Ward No. 7
(Vote for one)
George Beach
H. L. DeLeon
G. W. Twinning
J. W. Allen
Ward No. 8
(Vote for one)
Bob Marshall
H. Harrison


Red Cross Acknowledges

Naval Base Contributions
Last week, acknowledgement was received on the Naval Base from Mrs. Helen Bowler, American Red Cross Field Director for Guantanamo Bay, thanking the base for the contribution of $5,344.64 made by the Naval Base to the National drive of the Red Cross. The letter read of follows:
National and Area Headquarters join me in expressin gour sincere thanks for the generous contribution made by military personnel, civilina employees and dependents of the U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, for the 1955 Fund Drive for American National Red Cross. We thank the Chairman and Unit Coordinators for their time and effort in making this drive for new members so successful.


On Sunday, 8 April, the Girl Scouts and Brownie Scouts of the Naval Base culminated a year of work and planning when RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commnader Naval Base, officially opened their new hut on Victory Hill.
The original plan began over a year ago when membership of the girl scouts and brownie troops began to grow beyond the capacity of the hut on Marina Point. To solve the problem, it was suggested that vacated apartments on Vicotry Hill be converted and made into the new hut, being an ideal location for such an activity.
After the two apartments had been vacated, the entire building was re-worked, partitions removed, new fixtures installed, and a new floor laid, making it ready for the scouts to move in. However, all work is not complete. The major alterations have been completed, but volunteer help is still needed to complete painting, tables, etc.
In addition to the official opening Sunday, the Brownies and the Girl Scouts displayed their work for the past year. However, an even greater portion of their work was shown in the opening of the hut itself since the most of the efforts of thea girls were spent in various fund-raising campaigns to open up their hut.
(see pictures on page 3)


The Guantanamo Bay Parent Teachers Association has announced that its Summer Recreation Program, offering swimming lessons, horseback riding instructions, and an afternoon activities program, will begin next week with enrollment and the collection of fees. Mrs. D. E. McCoy ,treasurer for the Summer program, will enroll members in the various groups and collect the fees beginning Wednesday, 18 May, in the vicinity of the Commissary Store. Mrs. McCoy will enroll members up until noon on Wednesday, Thursday ,and Friday, 18, 19, and 20 May. All participants must sign up and pay their fees at this time if they intend to enter the Summer Recreation Program.
The swimming classes, like those held last year, will be held during the mornings at the three Special Services pools on the base. Classes will begin 30 May, and the charge will be $2.50 for the 12 lessons. Instead of an age limit, as used last year, this year any child who can stand up in the shallow end of the pool with water no higher than his chin may be enrolled. Also, if enough persons show interest, there will be an adult women's class held at the same price. The classes in horseback riding will be held at the Naval Station Coral each morning, beginning 30
(Continued on Page Three)


Base High School Graduates Nine Thursday


THE GRADUATING CLASS (minus one) of the Naval Base School for 1955. Girls: Nancy Jo Halentic, Patricia Wormwood, Doris Sigler, Irma Pina; Boys: John McGee, Edgar Heimer, David Shyver and Frank Vaughn. Not pictured: James Cavanaugh.
The commencement exercises will be held in the school assembly hall next Thursday night at 8 P.M. Col. Robert E. Foit, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks, will be the principal speaker.


IL_ ANMR, __l


9&


'Blithe Spirit' Set

For June 21st - 25th

Run at Little Theatre
"Blithe Spirit," an uproarious and slightly improbable farce in three acts by the brilliant playwright Noel Coward, has been selected as the next production for the Guantanamo Bay Little Theatre. Scheduled to run from the 21st through the 25th of June, "Blithe Spirit" promises to be one of the best productions yet.
Rehearsals have been underway for two weeks now, and according to director-producer Alan Wagner, the cast is one of the most promising and talented groups that he has worked with in his Little Theatre experience. Assisting Wagner will be Evelyn Perdue as Production Assistant, and Jim Bailey as Assistant Director.
Besides his position as director and producer, Alan Wagner will play the lead role of Charles, bedeviled man of letters. Playing opposite Wagner is Joy Graves, a very promising newcomer to the Little Theatre who will make her debut as Ruth, the second wife of Charles. Playing the part of Elvira, Charles' remarkably materialiZed first wife, will be Evelyn Leach, who is well remembered for her portrayal of Emily in "Our Town." Evelyn Perdue, a seasoned actor of the Little Theatre, is cast as Madame Arcati, a highly unlikely medium.
Supporting players in the cast include Ann Babine as Edith, the rapid house maid; Charlie Murphy as Violet Bradman, who flutters; and Jerry Murphy as Dr. Bradman, who doesn't believe.
Sets for "Blithe Spirit" are already under construction, under the supervision of veteran set designer Jim Cheeck. Bob Pope and Milton Merz will handle the lighting, and Joe Lewis will take care of the special effects. Others helping out include Jim Seay, Jim Sinclair, Fred Hollen, Chet Blakelock, Vi Merz, and many others.


MCB-1 Executive Officer

Takes Battalion Command
Tuesday at the ATTC Camp Area, LT R. J. Rowson, CEC, USN, assumed command of Mobile Construction Battalion ONE from CDR 0. J. Martyn, CEC, USN. Como mander Martyn has been ordered to the Naval Air Station, Denver, Colorado where he will assume the duties of Public Officer and Resident Officer in Charge of Construction.
Commander Martyn was commanding officer of the SeaBee battalion for 18 months, taking command during MCB-1's last deployment here in Cuba in November 1953. During his command of the
(Continued on Page Three)








Pawe Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 14 May 1955


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615
Saturday, 14 May 1955
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Gusntanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LTJG J. D. Byerley ------ Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC ----------------- Editor
H. L. Sisson, JO3 ------------------ News
F. L. Cannon, JOB --------- -Photographer
D. C. Roberts, JOSN ------------- Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-85, Revised Nov. 1944, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a members of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.



The Significance Of

The Poppy
Why do we have a poppy day?
First, we wear the poppy once a year to express the feeling of reverence that is always in our hearts for the men who died for America in the two World Wars. The poppy is their flower. It grew on the battle-fields in France and Belgium where so many of them' fought and died; it grew over their fresh graves-the one touch of beauty and life in all that region of destruction and death known at the front.
Second, we wear the poppy to help lighten the burden for those who are still undergoing suffering and hardships because of the wars, the disabled veterans and the families of the dead and disabled. Making poppies gives employment to hundreds of men otherwise who would be unable to earn anything toward the support of themselves and their families.
The funds derived from the poppy sale constitute the largest source of revenue for the Rehabilitation and Child Welfare work of the American Legion and the American Legion Auxiliary. The dimes, quarters and dollars dropped into the contribution boxes on Poppy Day enable the Legion Posts and Auxiliary Units to carry out a construction program of aid to the disabled and to the dependent families of veterans throughout the year. The wearing of the poppy has become recognized almost universally, not only as a means of paying tribute to the memory of the war dead, but also as a means of aiding those who are bearing war's afflictions.
When you buy your poppy Saturday, 28 May, think of the disabled veteran in a hospital or convalscent workshop who has fash-


The Toastmaster What's DO' Stateside


by Joe west
We spend dollar after dollar for medicines to cure our bodies. The thing that most of us cherish above all in life is health. In spite of this most men are killing themselves with their minds. Most of his sicknesses and suffering have their origin right within man himself. When a person concerns himself with the wrongdoings of his neighbor, when he criticises his neighbor, gossips about him or just hates his neighbor in general, that person is lost in a dilema which may take twenty years off of his life and possibly cause him to die from cancer, or some other horrible illness. The hatred that is felt within a person only tends to tie his own stomach in a knot and causes a negative reaction within his body which may break down his life cells. There isn't a thing gained by hating your neighbor. That's the funny part of it, you're killing yourself for nothing. Sidhartha Gautama the Buddha once declared, "hatred cannot be ended by hatred
-but by love." The greatest harmonizing key however, lies in the teachings of Jesus the Christ, when he taught us to love our neighbors as ourselves.
Love adjusts. There is no tangle so intricate, no misunderstanding so complicated, no inharmony so subtle, that it cannot be adjusted by love. You can prove this for yourself, if you have need of any adjustment in your life, either mental, moral, physical, spiritual, or financial. Love blesses man and lifts him out of all error. It helps him to overcome all things in all ways; it draws him gently to the richness of light and life, peace and harmony, joy and abundancehere and now.
Would you like to try to prove this? Then start right at this moment, bless your problem, bless the person who was your life most upset at this time. Then take up whatever task at hand that needs your attention and forget about the problem or the person. No matter ow simple or commonplace this task may appear, consciously put more spirit into it than you have ever put into a job before.
Love adjusts one's affairs in such a way that all concerned are satisfied. Wholeness and substance and peace and understanding are the portion of the individual who is willing to fill his daily life, in work, in play or socially with love.
Every person who thus allies himself with the power of love creates a bit of heaven on earth. He is exercising himself as a channel, through which the prayer of the Christ, "THY KINGDON COME," may be fulfilled.
Don't get this Toastmaster wrong now. I'm not infringing on the duties of the clergy. The point that I am trying to put over is that you can live a longer, healthier, happier life if you will adjust it, and that unfailingly love adjusts.

ioned the little blood-red flower. Think of the fatherless family whose struggles during the coming year will be lightened by the coin you drop into the poppy worker's box. Think of the brave American boys who lie beneath the waving poppies of France. Think of these things and you will understand the true significance of the poppy.


I


(AFPS Weekly Feature)
A pair of California research scientists have come up with an idea which, they say, will bring atomic engines a step closer for airplanes and locomotives... They have designed a lightweight atomic reactor, expected to produce twice as much power per pound as reactors now in use . . . It's hoped it will also simplify the constitution of atomic powered ships.

In another atomic development, New England has become the latest section of the nation expecting atomic generated electricity in the near future . . . A Massachusetts utility company has applied to the Atomic Energy Commission for permission to build a plant at Rowe, Mass., which,, the company says, can be operating within three years.

The reputation of Americans as being the "movingest" people on earth is still well supported by the facts . . . The Census Bureau reports some 29 million persons changed their homes during the 12 months prior to April 1954 . . . In the movement, the western and north-central states gained population while the south and northeast lost.

Woodpeckers are in the news � . . They're destroying power and telephone poles in the Middle Atlantic states almost faster than they can be replaced . . . Chemical repellents have failed to stop them ... When heavy mesh cloth was wrapped around the poles, the undismayed birds carefully unwrapped them, then pecked away . . . It seems that woodpeckers prefer clean-shaven poles to ordinary trees.



An Editorial,,,,



You Are The Master
Today's machines, invented and built by man, are the true marvels of our present day life.
But have you ever seen a machine that has courage? Or a machine that can provide inspiring leadership? Or one than can form a determination?
No, and the chances are you never will. Machines are man's servants, not his masters.
Some people have gone so far as to envision a time when wars, if they must occur, might be waged "untouched by human hands."
This thinking is dubious. The time when it could become a reality is still in the far unknown future and there is no real certainty it ever will happen.
So, lBr. Serviceman, here's where you come in. Your skill and courage still remain the vital ingredient of our military strength.
Whether you fight on land, sea or in the air, your mastery of the equipment you use can make the difference between victory and defeat.
So it boils down to this. The only absolute weapon is man, and in a war it's man against man. Are you ready for your opponent?

'4


Sunday, 15 May 1955
Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services
Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0930-Sunday School
0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Christian Science
Sunday: 1000-Station Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)



The Chaplain's Corner




AFTER MAN HAS DONE HIS WORST STILL THERE IS GOD
The recent death of Professor Einstein of Princeton University recalls the story that the late President Franklin D. Roosevelt liked to tell in the early days of nuclear power. On several occasions he called into his office the nuclear scientists to discuss the progress being made on the A bomb. As one scientist after another described for the President the tremendous potential of the new weapon, Einstein listened quietly. Finally Mr. Roosevelt asked for his opinion. Einstein walked to a window, pointed up to the sun and exclaimed, "only THAT the atomic bomb can't destroy."
What tremendous power man has at his disposal today. He can blow himself, his neighbors and his world to bits if he so desires. But, as Prof. Einstein has indicated, there remains one thing that he can not destroy. After man has done his worst, and has delivered his best and final blow, all is not destroyed.
Prof. Einstein referred to that which man cannot destroy as "the sun". THAT and the source behind the sun-GOD, Himself, man cannot destroy.
The Psalmist speaks of this in the 9th Psalm. Speaking of the wars in his own day, he declares that after man has destroyed all the cities and all that is, and when his destructions have come to an end, the "Lord shall still endure forever." He closes his Psalm with these words which are a warning to post atomic man as well as post exilic man:
"Put them in fear, 0 Lord:
that the nations may know
themselves to be BUT men."
Although we have power at our disposal, we must remember that we are but mortal men. It is GOD who still will have the last word after we have expended all of our power.
-Chaplain Roberts MCB-1


Pagte Two


I Im mml


Saturday, 14 May 1955


THE INDIAN





THP, INDIAN


Saturday. 14 May 1955


Base IRO Officer Lectures At Santiago University


Two Girl Scouts and two Brownies of the Naval Base raise the flag in front of the new Brownie and Girl Scout Hut on Victory Hill. Left to right: Sharon Pavlow, Mary Jean Vogel, Gale Saunders, and Susan Work.


RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, cuts the ribbon opening the new Brownie and Girl Scout Hut on Victory Hill. The opening of the Hut culminated a year of work and planning for the Brownies and Girl Scouts.


Foam Recommended For

Fighting Glass 'B' Fires
One of the most effective methods of methods of fighting class 'B" fires-flammable liquids such as oil, paints, etc., in open vats or similar containers-is the application of a heavy, smothering foam. Principle chemicals used in extinguishers of the foam type are: bicarbonate of soda and aluminum sulphate. When these chemicals are dissolved and mixed, the resulting extinguishing agent is a heavy foam, which blankets the surface \ of the flaming liquid, thus depriving the fire of oxygen necessary for continuous combustion. Don't give a fire a chance to start. Open vats of oil ,paints, and volatile liquids are always dangerous fire hazards.

Hubby: "Why did you hang that ghastly picture?" Wifey: "Because I couldn't find the artist."


Summer Recreation...
(Continued from Page One)
May. The charge will be $10.50 for 11 lessons. Children in grades one through 12 may be admitted to this activity.
The afternoon activity period will be held at the Naval Base School each afternoon for two hours for a period of four weeks, beginning on 6 June. Activities will include crafts, sports and games, music, nature study, camping, library, and story telling, etc. The charge will be $3.75 for all of these activities, conducted by professional teachers. Bus transportation will be provided to the school and back home.


H. P. MNeal, Base Industrial Relations Officer, is shown as he delivered a lecture on employee relations at the University of Oriente, Santiago de Cuba, recently. The invitation for the lecture was extended by the University through the American Embassy, Havana. Those pictured, left to right, are: Carlos P. Bru, Employee Relations Assistant, IRO; Mr. McNeal; Dr. Felipe Salcines, Rector of the University; Dr. Grillo Longoria of the University faculty; William E. Paterson, American ViceConsul; and Dr. White, also of the University Faculty.


MCB-1 Command...
(Continued from Page One)
battalion, MCB-1 has been deployed at Argentia, Newfoundland and in Guantanamo Bay.
Commander Marty began his Naval career in 1941 and has had varied and far reaching tours of duty from the Phillipines to Rome, Italy. Mrs. Martyn and the Martyn's two children, Sarah Lee and and Michael, are presently residing in New Haven, Conn.


Parent - Teachers Install '55 - '56 Officers


Burt Knight, newly elected president of the Guantanamo Bay ParentTeachers Association (fourth from left) receives congratulations from LT T. H. Cushman, retiring president of the PTA, upon Knight's taking over for the 1955-56 school year. New Officers, left to right are: CDR C. E. Lee, treasurer; Mrs. G. S. Reynolds, secretary; LCDR E. T. Fortenberry, vice president, and Burt Knight, president. Retiring officers: left to right; LT T. H. Cushman, president, Mrs. A. D. Nelson, vice president, Mr. Ralph Sierra, treasurer, and Mrs. Barbara Broughton, secretary.
4 $


Ladies Golf Shots

by Betty Lou Tipler
The results of this week's Wednesday tournament were as follows:
First Flight
Low Gross-Alma McCracken
Low Net-Bev Larson
Second Flight
Low Gross-Val Evans Low Net-Dottie Allen
Teresa Moseley
Audrey Page
Third Flight
1st-Cynthia Holley
2nd-Sara Brotherton
Theresa Moseley and Marie Aslin are leaving Guantanamo within the next few days and we hate to see them go. We all wish them Bon Voyage and good golfing in the States.
I am sorry to announce that there is still no definite date for the Ladles Championship Tournament. We hope to be able to announce the date in the near future, so keep practicing.

Reader: You make up these jokes yourself ?
Editor: Yes, indeed, out of my head.
Reader: You must be!

A kiss is a noun, though generally used as a conjunction. It is seldom declined, and is more common than proper. It is not very singular, and is generally used in the plural.

Teacher: "Yes, Johnny, what is it?"
Johnny: "I don't wanna scare you, but Pop said if I didn't get better grades someone is due for a licking."

Doctor: "Well, young lady, where do you feel, pain?"
Patient: "Oh, doctor, all over. I can hardle lift my arms over my head. And it's the same with my legs!"


m
Page Three








Page ~o~r TE IN IANSaturday. 14 Mav 1955


Marines Lead League With Perfect Record


As Baseball Season Enters Third week
by Hal Davis
The 1955 baseball season finally came around Thursday night and produced the makings of a ball game when the Marine Leathernecks, defending champions of 1954, brought out a 4-run 7th inning rally to come from behind and defeat the Naval Air Station Flyers, 12 to 9.


Before that game went into the record books some of the most fantastic, un-baseball-like scores had been chalked up that this writer has ever seen or heard of. The biggest pasting of them all came Wednesday night when the ill-fated Staff Corps club met the Naval Station Indians and came out on the very unglamorous end of a 32 to 4 debacle. The Indians took an 8-run lead right off the bat in the first inning, eased 11 more across in the second and went into a slump with 6 in the third. They used the rest of the-and we use the word with qualifications-game for batting, fielding and pitching practice. Even so, they got across 7 more runs with everyone on the bench getting a whack at four Staff hurlers and only three Braves going hitless. Twenty three hits and 12 Staff miscues accounted for the 32 Indian scores.
R H E
Indians 32 23 2 Staff 4 7 12
Another lopsided score was chalked up Sunday afternoon when VU-10 Mallard ace Madden shut out the Flyers 'with 4 scattered hits while his mates ganged up to knock out 13 runs. Madden helped his cause along with two doubles and two RBI's. Duke Snyder handled the mound duty for the Flyers and allowed 10 hits.


R H 13 10 0 4


The same NAS team had sunk the Staff on Friday, the 6th, with a 13 to 6 win with Nixon on the mound going the whole route. Five Staff errors helped the Flyer cause.


R H 13 8 6 10


Monday night it looked for a few innings like the fans would get to see a ball game when the Marines met the MCB-1 outfit. The Bees scored first, getting 1 in the first inning, but the Leathernecks came back with 3 in the second .The Bees promptly added 3 in their half of the second, and there the score stayed at 4 to 3 until the 5th when the Marines gathered momentum and posted two more, then 5 in the sixth, 2 in the seventh and 4 more in the 8th. The Bees came alive again in the bottom of the eighth, but it was too late and their 4 runs only brought them to the halfway point in the final score, 16 to 8. Errors again highlighted the contest with the Marines taking the blame for five and the Bees getting seven.


R H 16 17 8 8


Unless the Bees and/or the Flyers start to show some power in their next couple games, the league is going to straighten out into a 3-club race for the flag.
Not necessarily batting power is needed - just general all - round baseball savvy is needed. The various exhibitions during the past week of how many ways to muff a play have made the stands look mighty barren along toward the middle of the game, and left many fans muttering that movies are better than ever.


League Standings


TEAM W
Marines 3 VU-10 2 NavSta 2 MCB-1 1 NAS 1 Staff 0
(Stanidngs include Thursday night.)


Bill Wood (1), the Marine Leatherneck slugging outfielder, is congratulated at the plate by his teammates after his home run ball in the Monday night game between the Marines and the Bees from MCB-1. Marines won, 16 to 8.


L PCT 0 1.000 0 1.000 1 .666 1 .500 3 .250 3 .000 game of


Baseball Schedule
Sun., 15 May-Staff vs Marines
Mon., 16 May-MCB-1 vs VU-10 Tues., 17 May-Open Wed., 18 MayNavSta vs Naval Air Thurs., 19 May-Staff vs MCB-1
Fri., 20 May-VU-10 vs Marines Sat., 21 May-Open
(Sunday games are played at Naval Station diamond No. 1 commencing at 1400. Week night games commence at 1900.)


Little League Schedule
Sat., 14 May-Bears vs Hawks Sun., 15 May-Tigers vs Colts Tues., 17 May-Colts vs eBars Thurs., 19 May-Hawks vs Tigers Sat., 21 May-Bears vs Tigers
(All games played at Little League diamond at Villamar. Weekday games commence at 1600. Week-end games start at 1400.)


Little League Standings


Bears Colts Hawks Tigers


Pat Sheehan of the Little League Colts hooks in and around Tiger third baseman Terry Trimble to come in safe during the Tiger-Colt game Saturday afternoon. The Tigers came out on the short end of a 13-4 score.


5 1
4 2 2 4 1 5


Little League Results
Saturday
Colts 13-Tigers 4 Sunday
Bears 7-Hawks 5 Tuesday
Colts 25-Hawks 2 Thursday
Bears 17-Tigers 8


0


Winners of the 1954 Naval Base Junior Handicap and Junior Consolation Golf Tourneys display their trophies. Left to right: Wright North, Jr., Consolation Winner; Michael Dote, Consolation Runner-up; Stanley Price, Handicap Runner-up, and Rnnie Mosley, Handicap Winner.
0


VU10O NAS


NAS Staff


Marines Bees


THE INDIAN








Saturday, 14 May 1955 THE INDIAN Page Five


NSD Supply Line

Mrs. J. P. McFadden, Mrs. H. D. Goolsby and Mrs. P. D. Larson arrived on the JOHNSON Thursday, in completion of a wonderful 8 day Caribbean cruise. Ports of call were San Juan and Port of Spain.
Miles W. White, DCCA, returned from the Hospital on 6th of May, after 5 days of hospitalization. LT and Mrs. Robert Whitman, Betty, Mary and Paul sailed aboard the JOHNSON for a visit at their homes in Boston before reporting to their new duty station in Athens, Georgia. LT Whitman will be an Instructor at the Navy Supply School. LT Whitman was the Administrative and Inventory Officer at NSD. He was relieved by ENS J. R. Pope.
Kline D. Sanders, SA, reported aboard NSD on 4 May from USS EPC-618. His home address is Needville, Texas.
William L. Davis, SKSN, is being transferred on 11 May to USS STRIBLING (DD-867) after having been on board NSD for the past 2 years.
CHPCLK Louis P. Colston reported Thursday to NSD from U.S. Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Florida. He will assume duties of Assistant Fuel Officer. Mr. Colston will reside at BOQ3, awaiting the arrival of his family.
Marion R. Tarrell, SK1, is being transferred on 11 May to Service S c h o o 1 Command, Brainbridge, Maryland, for a course of instruction and further transfer to recruiting duty at U.S. Naval Recruiting Station, Omaha, Nebraska.
LT and Mrs. Kenneth Woolard, cruised to Port au Prince, Haiti, aboard the USS NORTHHAMPTON and spent a leisurely and picturesque weekend as guests at the Hotel Riviera.
Gary E. Wakeman, SA, was advanced in rate on 1 May from-SA to SN.
Benjamin C. Jones, SA, reported on board 27 April from USS LST 880. His home town is Catlettburg, Ky.
Billy U. Walker, SN, reported on board 27 April from USS LST 880. His home town is Benton Harbor, Michigan.
Everyone at NSD wishes Mr. Bob Radcliffe a speedy recovery from his recent operation.


CDR E. W. Sutherling, Commanding Officer, U.S. Naval Supply Depot, presented the Good Conduct Medal to Robert H. Griffith, SK3 at a ceremony Monday morning. Griffith became eligible for the Good Conduct Medal after having completed three years of continuous active service, having had no courts-martial or non-judicial punishment of any kind and his average mark in proficiency in rate well exceeding the minimum average mark of 3.5.


FTG Bulletin
by Ron Federman
With LCDR Moseley, our Supply Officer, leaving FTG on Friday, 13 May, our new Supply Officer, Lieutenant Edward L. Noga, reported aboard on 4 May. Mr. Noga's hometown is New Castle, Pennsylvania. Mr. Noga completed a tour of duty at Special Weapons Depot, Norfolk, Va. before arriving at FTG.
Mr. Moseley, recently promoted to Lieutenant Commander, will report to the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts, Navy Department, Washington, D. C. Also departing FTG Headquarters yesterday was Donelson, TM1. Donelson was scheduled to travel via FLAW, and he was what you might say, "traveling in a crowd", what with a wife and six children accompanying him. Donelson will report to the Commanding Officer, Naval Schools, Mine Warfare, Yorktown, Va. for 25 weeks duty under instruction in Class "A" and "B" Mineman School. Subsequently, he hopes to change his rate to Mineman.
LCDR Shablowski, former Officer in Charge, Gunfire Support Training Unit, Culebra, Puerto Rico, after serving 28 months with the unit, left the Caribbean Area for duty with SubGroup One, at Bayonne, New Jersey.
It is anticipated that CHTORP Vaughn's relief, CHTORP Leimes, will arrive at Guantanamo Bay in the USNS THOMAS. Mr. Leimes served with the Naval Schools Command, at Newport, Rhode Island, before receiving his orders to Guantanamo Bay.
Athletic-wise, our FTG Golf Team defeated NAS in a rough and tough match a week ago today. The conclusion of the match found FTG on-top by a score of 13% to 101. Captain McElroy, Cohanski were top scorers for FTG, each taking 3 points.
Today FTG will attempt to upset the high-flying VU-10 team, which to date is undefeated. Tomorrow FTG will meet the USS DES MOINES Golf Team, who were previously defeated at the hands of our capable Golfers. The winners of the match will receive a trophy, thus the competition should be keen.
Harlan, YN1, seems to be quite a fisherman! Recently, he caught a Snapper weighing 361 pounds. Harlan was disappointed, however, after someone at the Air Station topped his catch with a 41% pounder.
Good things sometimes happen to people all at once. Such was the case with LCDR Shaw of the ASW Department. It was recently published that Mr. Shaw was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Commander, but that was only part of the story. It was not mentioned that right on the heels of his promotion, Mrs. Shaw gave birth to a baby girl, and on that very same day his mother-in-law, Mrs. Marie Smith, arrived at Guantanamo Bay to visit the Shaw Family. Quite an exciting day, and one worth remembering! Mrs. Smith left via commercial airlines for the States last Friday.
SHIPS ARRIVALS
HAMMERBERG (DE 1005)
(To arrive 16 May) CONE (DD 866)
(To arrive 20 May) STRIBLING (DD 867)


0


M 0osu es NAS Crosswinds


by Paul A. Hoffer, USMC
Rifle Range
This week the Marine Barracks riflemen have been firing for the qualification day on Saturday, May 14. 62 Men will fire for qualification on this detail.
Picnic
Saturday, May 7, a picnic was held at the Marine Barracks Movie Lyceum. Plenty of chow and beer were on hand. Events were held through out the day. Win a steak dinner
It's easy to win a steak dinner, here is all you have to do: Guess the score of the coming Marine baseball game, get a form from the Security Setcion office and fill it out with your name and the score of the coming game. All entries must be in the Special Services Officer by noon of the day of the game.
Baseball
The Marine Barracks baseball team got off to a flying start as they registered two wins in the Base League. Last Thursday night the Marines defeated the Naval Station Indians 14 to 13. The game was played on a wet and muddy field. Five runs in the bottom of the 7th proved to be the winning margin for the Marines. J. A. Dowd was the winning pitcher. Monday night the Leathernecks met the MCB-1 Bees at Naval Station and won 16 to 8 in a game of homeruns. Chuck Hunter paced the way with two. One in the 5th and the other in the 7th, each time with one man aboard. Bill Wood hit one in the 6th. Al Stork of the Bees hit one in the 3rd. Earl Castellow collected three hits as did Don Schreck who also was the winning pitcher. Schreck pitched 8 1/3 innings, John Dowd finishing the game. This Thursday the Marines face the Naval Air Station Flyers at Naval Station Diamond No. 1 at 1900. Meet Your Team
Earl G. Castellow, third baseman for the Marine baseball team played ball at Janesville in the Wisconsin State League, Class "D". So far this year he has five hits for nine trips to the plate. Castellow joined us from Marine Corps Training Center, Parris Island, S. C. His home town is in Windsor, North Carolina. He attended the University of North Carolina where he played baseball and football. Castellow is the property of the Chicago Cubs. He is at the present in Security Section.

Millionaire: "My boy, when I was your age, I carried water for a gang of bricklayers."
Son: "I'm mighty proud of you, Dad. If it hadn't been for your pluck and perseverance, I might have had to do something like that myself "

(To arrive 20 May) BROUGH (DE 148)
(To arrive 20 May) PILLSBURY (DER 133)
(To arrive 20 May)
SHIPS DEPARTURES
FURSE (DDR 882)
( To depart 17 May) FORT SNELLING (LSD 30)
(To depart 21 May) DYESS (DRR 880)
(To depart 20 May)


0


by Paul Snyder
Eleven men have qualified to be advanced to pay grade E-3 during the past week, according to LT A. C. Idoux, Training Officer. The men are T. D. Ambler ADAN, N. N. Campbell ACAN, J. A. Docter AMAN, D. L. Eggers AN, H. F. Kahler ADAN, D. Martinez ADEAN, K. 0. Notestine ACAN, C. A. Ramirez AN, R. D. Commander SN, H. S. Loper CSSN, and D. P. Watson TN. These men will be advanced Monday, 16 May, 1955.
Air Control Division met and vanquished the Aerology Division at Phillips Park last week-end in a rousing softball game. The score, 19-12, is indicative of the mighty batsmen on each squad. The artistry of Hug Kenyon on the mound led the AC's to victory while Gene "Rip" Sewell's powerful bat led their offense. Losing hurler was Roger Smtih, after he relieved Don Parker. Stung by one defeat, Aerology challenged again, but was losing 12-7 before the second game was "halted." All enjoyed the steak and beer, and all are looking forward to another picnic soon. (Aerology wishes to challenge again. They are convinced they will win the next contest.)
Two men on the Air Station have made Chief, it was announced last week. John D. Weaver AC1 will don the khaki of ACCA, 16 November 1955 and Robert E. Hewitt RM1 gets the hard-hat 16 July 1955. Weaver works in the Leeward Point Tower and Hewitt can be found in Communications.
DEPARTURES
Richard Lightfoot MM3 left aboard FLAW for Jacksonville and discharge last Wednesday. On Friday, Stan Kowalczyk AD1 headed for VW-4 (Eearly Warning) Squadron at NAS, Jacksonville. Kowalczyk plans on shipping for the last time this coming November when he signs for "6".
Tomorrow, Al McQuillen TE3 will board FLAW for Telegraphic and Cryptographic Repair School at Norfolk, Virginia. Nick Karinikas PH2 will be going to VX-6 at Patuxent Rivers soon. Nick hopes to join the photographic squadron and eventually head for the Antartic.
Several more men will be advanced to higher pay grades in the near future. Ron L. Ellis ADEAN will become an ADE3; Ron Price AD3 to AD2; and J. E. R. Short SN to GM3 Monday, 16 May. Also, on 16 September 1955, Fred D. Gunther AT3 will be advanced to AT2.


Newsbits

Orphans are becoming a rarity in America . . . This is one of the consequences of medical progress both in curbing maternal deaths in childbirth and prolonging the lives of adults . . . There are now fewer than 90,000 minors with neither parent... Thirty-five years ago, there were 800,000.

New Yorkers now can obtain blood "insurance" for their families . . . Under a plan devised by the Blood Bank Assn. of New York State, the head of a family who donates a pini of blood is gurantteed four free pints for himself and each member of his family for the following year.


40
Saturday, 14 M~ay 1955


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THE INDIAN









Page Sir THE INDIAN Saturday, 14 May 1955


MOVIES

Saturday, 14 May
THE LONG LONG TRAILER
Lucille Ball Desi Arnaz
A honeymoon on wheels turns out to be a nightmare when the groom finds his funds strained by the purchase of the super-streamlined trailer.
Sunday ,15 May
THREE SAILORS AND A GIRL Jane Powell Gordon MacRae
A Story about submarine sailors who support a Broadway production. Film studded with song and dance numbers.
Monday, 16 May
THE CITY IS DARK
Sterling Hayden Gene Nelson
A police sergeant is assigned to track down three escaped convicts. They have ensnared a parolee who is married and gone straight.

Tuesday, 17 May
THE CARNIVAL STORY
Ann Baxter Steve Cochran
Story of a poverty-stricken German girl who sought refuge with an American carnival and eventally became a star high diver. She has three marriages as a result.

Wednesday, 18 May
ABOUT MRS. LESLIE
Shirley Booth Robert Ryan
A woman reflects on her past life and a secret romance she had with a Washington big-wig.

Thursday, 19 May
WHITE FIRE
Scott Brady Mary Castle
A young man runs into trouble when he tries to solve the murder of a night club owner for which his young brother is accused.

Friday, 20 May
RAILS INTO LARAMIE
John Payne Marie Blanchard
Army sergeant sent to mend a situation in Laramie finds an old friend runs the whole town crookedly. He is forced to bring him to bring him to justice.

Girl (at her front gate with soldier): "I'd ask you in for a while, only mother's out and father is upstairs with rheumatism of the legs."
Soldier: "Both legs?"
Girl: "Yes."
Soldier: "Then I'll come in."

"My dear, what a lovely coat. It must have cost a fortune."
"No, it only cost a kiss."
"The one you gave your husband."
"Oh, no. One that he gave the maid."


Radio's 'Tops' of the Week

SATURDAY, 14 May .. . THEATRE ROYAL . . . 9:00 P.M. "The Overcoat", a tragic-comedy, with Michael Redgrave in the guest star role, is the story of a meek, pitiful little man who spends more than he can afford for a much needed overcoat, only to have it stolen by brigands. He dies as a result of exposure.
SUNDAY, 15 May ... HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE... 10:00 P.M.
Rosalind Russel and Robert Cummings become romantically involved in the leading roles of "What a Woman". Miss Russel is a literary agent in this story and Cummings, an author.
MONDAY, 16 May . .. BEST PLAYS . . . 9:00 P.M.
A day's grist of crime in the detective squad room of a New York precinct police station is performed in this evenings production of "Detective Story" with Wendell Corey as Detective McLeod.
TUESDAY, 17 May... THE CHASE . . . 9:00 P.M.
The chase begins in Brooklyn when a feline worth a considerable fortune left by an eccentric matron, is "catnapped" from its rightful gardians by the deceased lady's jealous niece.
WEDNESDAY, 18 May .. . ON STAGE . . . 9:00 P.M.
A very strange tale of a husband and wife who have lost their love for each other and find wheels are growing in their bodies. When the couple rediscover their love for one another, the wheels disappear.
THURSDAY, 19 May... FAMILY THEATRE . . . 9:00 P.M.
Robert Francis is stared in "Down Payment," as a young hardware employee who steals company funds to provide the down payment on a home. When another employee is arrested for the theft, he realizes his error.
FRIDAY, 20 May ... RADIO WORKSHOP... 10:00 P.M.
"The Monkey's Paw," by W. W. Jacobs, a terrifying tale of a mystic and horrible charm and its effects upon a family is given a modern New England setting in Navy Journalist Bud Sission's adaptation of the classic short story. The Monkey's Paw is an ordinary paw, dried to a mummy, with a spell put on it by an old fakir in India who wanted to show that those who interfered with fate do so to their own sorrow. This is a show you can't afford to miss.


A gal with glamor-and that ain't all. Piper Laurie will star for Universal-International in a comedy with music titled "Ain'. Misbehavin." Piper plays the part of a pretty chorine with chorine pals like Dany Crayne and Mamie Van Doren (Indian pinups for the last two issues). She even does a slapstick bit of upsetting San Francisco society with a pie throwing incident. She throws the pies at gobs in restaurants, so be careful.


by Francis L. Cannon, J03

THE DAY LINCOLN WAS SHOT
by Jan Bishop
This work is the result of 25 years of research on the events surrounding the assasination of Lincoln. The book covers a 24 hour period, from 7 A.M. April 14, 1865 to the next morning. The plan of those involved in the plot are out lined and the movements of Lincoln are traced throughout this period. It goes into great detail, but the pace of the story-telling isn't hurt, thanks to the skillful writing of the author.
THE PERFECTIONIST
by Lane Kauffman
A novel concerning one Martin Pryor who has led a very well ordered ilfe, so well ordered that it approached perfection. But there was one small flaw: he had murdered his wife and someone knew it. This person, cad that he was, undertook to blackmail poor Pryor. It disturbed the orderliness of his life, of course. The rest of this not particularly original story has Pryor romping around trying to find out who his blackmailer was. He narrowed down to five suspects and . . . oh well, it's in the library if you really care.
MY AMAZON ADVENTURE
by Sebastian Snow
This one presents a rather odd situation. The author set out on a journey alone, with no particular training, no plans, no equipment to speak of, a smattering of Spanish, a little money and some sort of a vague desire to trace the Amazon to its source. He didn't succeed, but he figured it was worth a book anyway since everybody seems to be writing books about the Amazon these days. His courage and fortitute cannot be disputed too much, but the manner in which he approached his task seems a bit addlebrained and thoroghly unscientific. His observations on the Amazon are doubtless accurate as he can make them, but the book is for idle reading, not solid information.
THE LAST OF THE BOHEMIANS
by Andre Beucher
Story is about Leon-Paul Fargue, The Poet of Paris", and a real, live bohemian in the best tradition of a Paris bohemian. The author's connection with him was a sort of Boswell - Johnson arragement; he toddled along with him to the several worlds of Paris and took notes on the great man's sayings and actions. Fargue died in 1947, leaving a legend in the artistic world of Paris. That world is admirably recreated here before Paris became war torn and was still gay.
Just in are a few works put out by the Viking Portable Library, "portables". Included are the writings of Rebelais, the great 16th century satirist; Voltaire's Candide and miscellaneous writings; the Greek Reader, translated by W. H. Auden; Dante's Divine Comedy and other works; Some of Mark Twain; 12 short stories and the Scarlet Letter by Hawthorne; some of the writing of D. H. Lawrence.


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THE INDIAN


Saturday, 14 May 1955




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m "Govers gTMO Like The Sunshine" Vol. VI, No. 19 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 14 May 1955 Villamar-Bargo Council Brownie, Girl Scouts PTA Summer Recreation Flection Tnmnrrnw Open Activity Hut Enrollement Starts Wed. The Villamar-Bargo Council will hold its semi-annual election tomorrow as ballots will be distributed to all residences between noon and 3 P.M., listing the candidates for the specific wards. Only changes from the last voting is that Wards 1, 2, and 3 have been combined into one district for election purposes. Out of these districts, residents will elect three council members. Also, a new district, Ward No. 8 has been added. Ward No. 8 is the Nob Hill housing area. The elected Council will select one of its members to act as Mayor for the coming six months. Nominated candidates and volunteer candidates for the Wards are as follows: Ward No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3 (Vote for 3 out of 4) B. H. Carr T. L. Tremble M. Gordon H. D. Childers Ward No. 4 (Vote for one) E. Antulov G. Liveakos D. P. McAnderws Ward No. 5 (Vote for one) P. E. Gibson W. A. Schnarke Ward No. 6 (Vote for one) W. I. Hamm J. R. Ralston Ward No. 7 (Vote for one) George Beach H. L. DeLeon G. W. Twinning J. W. Allen Ward No. 8 (Vote for one) Bob Marshall H. Harrison Red Cross Acknowledges Naval Base Contributions Last week, acknowledgement was received on the Naval Base from Mrs. Helen Bowler, American Red Cross Field Director for Guantanamo Bay, thanking the base for the contribution of $5,344.64 made by the Naval Base to the National drive of the Red Cross. The letter read of follows: National and Area Headquarters join me in expressing gour sincere thanks for the generous contribution made by military personnel, civilina employees and dependents of the U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, for the 1955 Fund Drive for American National Red Cross. We thank the Chairman and Unit Coordinators for their time and effort in making this drive for new members so successful. On Sunday, 8 April, the Girl Scouts and Brownie Scouts of the Naval Base culminated a year of work and planning when RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commnader Naval Base, officially opened their new hut on Victory Hill. The original plan began over a year ago when membership of the girl scouts and brownie troops began to grow beyond the capacity of the but on Marina Point. To solve the problem, it was suggested that vacated apartments on Vicotry Hill be converted and made into the new hut, being an ideal location for such an activity. After the two apartments had been vacated, the entire building was re-worked, partitions removed, new fixtures installed, and a new floor laid, making it ready for the scouts to move in. However, all work is not complete. The major alterations have been completed, but volunteer help is still needed to complete painting, tables, etc. In addition to the official opening Sunday, the Brownies and the Girl Scouts displayed their work for the past year. However, an even greater portion of their work was shown in the opening of the hut itself since the most of the efforts of the girls were spent in various fund-raising campaigns to open up their hut. (see pictures on page 3) The Guantanamo Bay Parent Teachers Association has announced that its Summer Recreation Program, offering swimming lessons, horseback riding instructions, and an afternoon activities program, will begin next week with enrollment and the collection of fees. Mrs. D. E. McCoy ,treasurer for the Summer program, will enroll members in the various groups and collect the fees beginning Wednesday, 18 May, in the vicinity of the Commissary Store. Mrs. McCoy will enroll members up until noon on Wednesday, Thursday ,and Friday, 18, 19, and 20 May. All participants must sign up and pay their fees at this time if they intend to enter the Summer Recreation Program. The swimming classes, like those held last year, will be held during the mornings at the three Special Services pools on the base. Classes will begin 30 May, and the charge will be $2.50 for the 12 lessons. Instead of an age limit, as used last year, this year any child who can stand up in the shallow end of the pool with water no higher than his chin may be enrolled. Also, if enough persons show interest, there will be an adult women's class held at the same price. The classes in horseback riding will be held at the Naval Station Coral each morning, beginning 30 (Continued on Page Three) Base High School Graduates Nine Thursday THE GRADUATING CLASS (minus one) of the Naval Base School for 1955. Girls: Nancy Jo Halentic, Patricia Wormwood, Doris Sigler, Irma Pina; Boys: John McGee, Edgar Heimer, David Shyver and Frank Vaughn. Not pictured: James Cavanaugh. The commencement exercises will be held in the school assembly hall next Thursday night at 8 P.M. Col. Robert E. Fojt, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks, will be the principal speaker. 'Blithe Spirit' Set For June 21st -25th Run at little Theatre "Blithe Spirit," an uproarious and slightly improbable farce in three acts by the brilliant playwright Noel Coward, has been selected as the next production for the Guantanamo Bay Little Theatre. Scheduled to run from the 21st through the 25th of June, "Blithe Spirit" promises to be one of the best productions yet. Rehearsals have been underway for two weeks now, and according to director-producer Alan Wagner, the cast is one of the most promising and talented groups that he has worked with in his Little Theatre experience. Assisting Wagner will be Evelyn Perdue as Production Assistant, and Jim Bailey as Assistant Director. Besides his position as director and producer, Alan Wagner will play the lead role of Charles, bedeviled man of letters. Playing opposite Wagner is Joy Graves, a very promising newcomer to the Little Theatre who will make her debut as Ruth, the second wife of Charles. Playing the part of Elvira, Charles' remarkably materialized first wife, will be Evelyn Leach, who is well remembered for her portrayal of Emily in "Our Town." Evelyn Perdue, a seasoned actor of the Little Theatre, is cast as Madame Arcati, a highly unlikely medium. Supporting players in the cast include Ann Babine as Edith, the rapid house maid; Charlie Murphy as Violet Bradman, who flutters; and Jerry Murphy as Dr. Bradman, who doesn't believe. Sets for "Blithe Spirit" are already under construction, under the supervision of veteran set designer Jim Cheeck. Bob Pope and Milton Merz will handle the lighting, and Joe Lewis will take care of the special effects. Others helping out include Jim Seay, Jim Sinclair, Fred Hollen, Chet Blakelock, Vi Merz, and many others. MCB-1 Executive Officer Takes Battalion Command Tuesday at the ATTC Camp Area, LT R. J. Rowson, CEC, USN, assumed command of Mobile Construction Battalion ONE from CDR O. J. Martyn, CEC, USN. Com wander Martyn has been ordered to the Naval Air Station, Denver, Colorado where he will assume the duties of Public Officer and Resident Officer in Charge of Construction. Commander Martyn was commanding officer of the SeaBee battalion for 18 months, taking command during MCB-1's last deployment here in Cuba in November 1953. During his command of the (Continued on Page Three)

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Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 14 May 1955 The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 14 May 1955 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LTJG J. D. Byerley --------Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOG----------Editor H. L. Sisson, JOB--------------------News F. L. Cannon, JOs----------Photographer D. C. Roberts. JOSN---------Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1944, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a members of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. The Significance Of The Poppy Why do we have a poppy day? First, we wear the poppy once a year to express the feeling of reverence that is always in our hearts for the men who died for America in the two World Wars. The poppy is their flower. It grew on the battle-fields in France and Belgium where so many of themfought and died; it grew over their fresh graves-the one touch of beauty and life in all that region of destruction and death known at the front. Second, we wear the poppy to help lighten the burden for those who are still undergoing suffering and hardships because of the wars, the disabled veterans and the families of the dead and disabled. Making poppies gives employment to hundreds of men otherwise who would be unable to earn anything toward the support of themselves and their families. The funds derived from the poppy sale constitute the largest source of revenue for the Rehabilitation and Child Welfare work of the American Legion and the American Legion Auxiliary. The dimes, quarters and dollars dropped into the contribution boxes on Poppy Day enable the Legion Posts and Auxiliary Units to carry out a construction program of aid to the disabled and to the dependent families of veterans throughout the year. The wearing of the poppy has become recognized almost universally, not only as a means of paying tribute to the memory of the war dead, but also as a means of aiding those who are bearing war's afflictions. When you buy your poppy Saturday, 28 May, think of the disabled veteran in a hospital or convalscent workshop who has fashThe Toastmaster What's Doin' Stateside by Joe West (AFPS Weekly Feature) 1 M We spend dollar after dollar for medicines to cure our bodies. The thing that most of us cherish above all in life is health. In spite of this most men are killing themselves with their minds. Most of his sicknesses and suffering have their origin right within man himself. When a person concerns himself with the wrongdoings of his neighbor, when he criticises his neighbor, gossips about him or just hates his neighbor in general, that person is lost in a dilema which may take twenty years off of his life and possibly cause him to die from cancer, or some other horrible illness. The hatred that is felt within a person only tends to tie his own stomach in a knot and causes a negative reaction within his body which may break down his life cells. There isn't a thing gained by hating your neighbor. That's the funny part of it, you're killing yourself for nothing. Sidhartha Gautama the Buddha once declared, "hatred cannot be ended by hatred -but by love." The greatest harmonizing key however, lies in the teachings of Jesus the Christ, when he taught us to love our neighbors as ourselves. Love adjusts. There is no tangle so intricate, no misunderstanding so complicated, no inharmony so subtle, that it cannot be adjusted by love. You can prove this for yourself, if you have need of any adjustment in your life, either mental, moral, physical, spiritual, or financial. Love blesses man and lifts him out of all error. It helps him to overcome all things in all ways; it draws him gently to the richness of light and life, peace and harmony, joy and abundancehere and now. Would you like to try to prove this? Then start right at this moment, bless your problem, bless the person who was your life most upset at this time. Then take up whatever task at hand that needs your attention and forget about the problem or the person. No matter how simple or commonplace this task may appear, consciously put more spirit into it than you have ever put into a job before. Love adjusts one's affairs in such a way that all concerned are satisfied. Wholeness and substance and peace and understanding are the portion of the individual who is willing to fill his daily life, in work, in play or socially with love. Every person who thus allies himself with the power of love creates a bit of heaven on earth. He is exercising himself as a channel, through which the prayer of the Christ, "THY KINGDON COME," may be fulfilled. Don't get this Toastmaster wrong now. I'm not infringing on the duties of the clergy. The point that I am trying to put over is that you can live a longer, healthier, happier life if you will adjust it, and that unfailingly love adjusts. ioned the little blood-red flower. Think of the fatherless family whose struggles during the coming year will be lightened by the coin you drop into the poppy worker's box. Think of the brave American boys who lie beneath the waving poppies of France. Think of these things and you will understand the true significance of the poppy. A pair of California research scientists have come up with an idea which, they say, will bring atomic engines a step closer for airplanes and locomotives. They have designed a lightweight atomic reactor, expected to produce twice as much power per pound as reactors now in use ...It's hoped it will also simplify the constitution of atomic powered ships. In another atomic development, New England has become the latest section of the nation expecting atomic generated electricity in the near future ...A Massachusetts utility company has applied to the Atomic Energy Commission for permission to build a plant at Rowe, Mass., which, the company says, can be operating within three years. The reputation of Americans as being the "movingest" people on earth is still well supported by the facts ...The Census Bureau reports some 29 million persons changed their homes during the 12 months prior to April 1954 In the movement, the western and north-central states gained population while the south and northeast lost. Woodpeckers are in the news They're destroying power and telephone poles in the Middle Atlantic states almost faster than they can be replaced ...Chemical repellents have failed to stop them .When heavy mesh cloth was wrapped around the poles, the undismayed birds carefully unwrapped them, then pecked away .. It seems that woodpeckers prefer clean-shaven poles to ordinary trees. An Editorial .. You Are The Master Today's machines, invented and built by man, are the true marvels of our present day life. But have you ever seen a machine that has courage? Or a machine that can provide inspiring leadership? Or one than can form a determination? No, and the chances are you never will. Machines are man's servants, not his masters. Some people have gone so far as to envision a time when wars, if they must occur, might be waged "untouched by human hands." This thinking is dubious. The time when it could become a reality is still in the far unknown future and there is no real certainty it ever will happen. So, Mr. Serviceman, here's where you come in. Your skill and courage still remain the vital ingredient of our military strength. Whether you fight on land, sea or in the air, your mastery of the equipment you use can make the difference between victory and defeat. So it boils down to this. The only absolute weapon is man, and in a war it's man against man. Are you ready for your opponent? Sunday 15 May 19 5 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930-Sunday School 090-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner T AFTER MAN HAS DONE HIS WORST STILL THERE IS GOD The recent death of Professor Einstein of Princeton University recalls the story that the late President Franklin D. Roosevelt liked to tell in the early days of nuclear power. On several occasions he called into his office the nuclear scientists to discuss the progress being made on the A bomb. As one scientist after another described for the President the tremendous potential of the new weapon, Einstein listened quietly. Finally Mr. Roosevelt asked for his opinion. Einstein walked to a window, pointed up to the sun and exclaimed, "only THAT the atomic bomb can't destroy." What tremendous power man has at his disposal today. He can blow himself, his neighbors and his world to bits if he so desires. But, as Prof. Einstein has indicated, there remains one thing that he can not destroy. After man has done his worst, and has delivered his best and final blow, all is not destroyed. Prof. Einstein referred to that which man cannot destroy as "the sun". THAT and the source behind the sun-GOD, Himself, man cannot destroy. The Psalmist speaks of this in the 9th Psalm. Speaking of the wars in his own day, he declares that after man has destroyed all the cities and all that is, and when his destructions have come to an end, the "Lord shall still endure forever." He closes his Psalm with these words which are a warning to post atomic man as well as post exilic man: "Put them in fear, 0 Lord: that the nations may know themselves to be BUT men." Although we have power at our disposal, we must remember that we are but mortal men. It is GOD who still will have the last word after we have expended all of our power. -Chaplain Roberts MCB-1

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Base IRO Officer Lectures At Santiago University Two Girl Scouts and two Brownies of the Naval Base raise the flag in front of the new Brownie and Girl Scout Hut on Victory Hill. Left to right: Sharon Pavlow, Mary Jean Vogel, Gale Saunders, and Susan Work. RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, cuts the ribbon opening the new Brownie and Girl Scout Hut on Victory Hill. The opening of the Hut culminated a year of work and planning for the Brownies and Girl Scouts. Foam Recommended For Fighting Class 'B' Fires One of the most effective methods of methods of fighting class "B" fires-flammable liquids such as oil, paints, etc., in open vats or similar containers-is the application of a heavy, smothering foam. Principle chemicals used in extinguishers of the foam type are: bicarbonate of soda and aluminum sulphate. When these chemicals are dissolved and mixed, the resulting extinguishing agent is a heavy foam, which blankets the surface of the flaming liquid, thus depriving the fire of oxygen necessary for continuous combustion. Don't give a fire a chance to start. Open vats of oil ,paints, and volatile liquids are always dangerous fire hazards. Hubby: "Why did you hang that ghastly picture?" Wifey: "Because I couldn't find the artist." Summer Recreation. (Continued from Page One) May. The charge will be $10.50 for 11 lessons. Children in grades one through 12 may be admitted to this activity. The afternoon activity period will be held at the Naval Base School each afternoon for two hours for a period of four weeks, beginning on 6 June. Activities will include crafts, sports and games, music, nature study, camping, library, and story telling, etc. The charge will be $3.75 for all of these activities, conducted by professional teachers. Bus transportation will be provided to the school and back home. H. P. MNeal, Base Industrial Relations Officer, is shown as he delivered a lecture on employee relations at the University of Oriente, Santiago de Cuba, recently. The invitation for the lecture was extended by the University through the American Embassy, Havana. Those pictured, left to right, are: Carlos P. Bru, Employee Relations Assistant, IRO; Mr. McNeal; Dr. Felipe Salcines, Rector of the University; Dr. Grillo Longoria of the University faculty; William E. Paterson, American ViceConsul; and Dr. White, also of the University Faculty. MCB-1 Command. (Continued from Page One) battalion, MCB-1 has been deployed at Argentia, Newfoundland and in Guantanamo Bay. Commander Marty began his Naval career in 1941 and has had varied and far reaching tours of duty from the Phillipines to Rome, Italy. Mrs. Martyn and the Martyn's two children, Sarah Lee and and Michael, are presently residing in New Haven, Conn. Parent -Teachers Install '55 -'56 Officers Burt Knight, newly elected president of the Guantanamo Bay ParentTeachers Association (fourth from left) receives congratulations from LT T. H. Cushman, retiring president of the PTA, upon Knight's taking over for the 1955-56 school year. New Officers, left to right are: CDR C. E. Lee, treasurer; Mrs. G. S. Reynolds, secretary; LCDR E. T. Fortenberry, vice president, and Burt Knight, president. Retiring officers: left to right; LT T. H. Cushman, president, Mrs. A. D. Nelson, vice president, Mr. Ralph Sierra, treasurer, and Mrs. Barbara Broughton, secretary. 1* 0 Ladies Golf Shots by Betty Lou Tipler The results of this week's Wednesday tournament were as follows: First Flight Low Gross-Alma McCracken Low Net-Bev Larson Second Flight Low Gross-Val Evans Low Net--Dottie Allen Teresa Moseley Audrey Page Third Flight 1st-Cynthia Holley 2nd-Sara Brotherton Theresa Moseley and Marie Aslin are leaving Guantanamo within the next few days and we hate to see them go. We all wish them Bon Voyage and good golfing in the States. I am sorry to announce that there is still no definite date for the Ladies Championship Tournament. We hope to be able to announce the date in the near future, so keep practicing. Reader: You make up these jokes yourself? Editor: Yes, indeed, out of my head. Reader: You must be! A kiss is a noun, though generally used as a conjunction. It is seldom declined, and is more common than proper. It is not very singular, and is generally used in the plural. Teacher: "Yes, Johnny, what is it?" Johnny: "I don't wanna scare you, but Pop said if I didn't get better grades someone is due for a licking." Doctor: "Well, young lady, where do you feel, pain?" Patient: "Oh, doctor, all over. I can hardle lift my arms over my head. And it's the same with my legs!" THE INDIAN Page Three Saturday, 14 May 1958

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THSaturday 14 May 1 Marines Lead League With Perfect Record As Baseball Season Enters Third week by Hal Davis The 1955 baseball season finally came around Thursday night and produced the makings of a ball game when the Marine Leathernecks, defending champions of 1954, brought out a 4-run 7th inning rally to come from behind and defeat the Naval Air Station Flyers, 12 to 9. Before that game went into the record books some of the most fantastic, un-baseball-like scores had been chalked up that this writer has ever seen or heard of. The biggest pasting of them all came Wednesday night when the ill-fated Staff Corps club met the Naval Station Indians and came out on the very unglamorous end of a 32 to 4 debacle. The Indians took an 8-run lead right off the bat in the first inning, eased 11 more across in the second and went into a slump with 6 in the third. They used the rest of the-and we use the word with qualifications-game for batting, fielding and pitching practice. Even so, they got across 7 more runs with everyone on the bench getting a whack at four Staff hurlers and only three Braves going hitless. Twenty three hits and 12 Staff miscues accounted for the 32 Indian scores. R H E Indians 32 23 2 Staff 4 7 12 Another lopsided score was chalked up Sunday afternoon when VU-10 Mallard ace Madden shut out the Flyers with 4 scattered hits while his mates ganged up to knock out 13 runs. Madden helped his cause along with two doubles and two RBI's. Duke Snyder handled the mound duty for the Flyers and allowed 10 hits. R 13 0 H 10 4 E 0 4 The same NAS team had sunk the Staff on Friday, the 6th, with a 13 to 6 win with Nixon on the mound going the whole route. Five Staff errors helped the Flyer cause. R H E NAS 13 8 2 Staff 6 10 5 Monday night it looked for a few innings like the fans would get to see a ball game when the Marines met the MCB-1 outfit. The Bees scored first, getting 1 in the first inning, but the Leathernecks came back with 3 in the second .The Bees promptly added 3 in their half of the second, and there the score stayed at 4 to 3 until the 5th when the Marines gathered momentum and posted two more, then 5 in the sixth, 2 in the seventh and 4 more in the 8th. The Bees came alive again in the bottom of the eighth, but it was too late and their 4 runs only brought them to the halfway point in the final score, 16 to 8. Errors again highlighted the contest with the Marines taking the blame for five and the Bees getting seven. R H E Marines 16 17 5 Bees 8 8 7 Unless the Bees and/or the Flyers start to show some power in their next couple games, the league is going to straighten out into a 3-club race for the flag. Not necessarily batting power is needed -just general all -round baseball savvy is needed. The various exhibitions during the past week of how many ways to muff a play have made the stands look mighty barren along toward the middle of the game, and left many fans muttering that movies are better than ever. League Standings TEAM Marines VU-10 NavSta MCB-1 NAS Staff (Stanidngs in Thursday night.) W 3 2 2 1 1 0 clude Bill Wood (1), the Marine Leatherneck slugging outfielder, is congratulated at the plate by his teammates after his home run ball in the Monday night game between the Marines and the Bees from MCB-1. Marines won, 16 to 8. L PCT 0 1.000 0 1.000 1 .666 1 .500 3 .250 3 .000 game of Baseball Schedule Sun., 15 May-Staff vs Marines Mon., 16 May-MCB-1 vs VU-10 Tues., 17 May-Open Wed., 18 MayNavSta vs Naval Air Thurs., 19 May-Staff vs MCB-1 Fri., 20 May-VU-10 vs Marines Sat., 21 May-Open (Sunday games are played at Naval Station diamond No. 1 commencing at 1400. Week night games commence at 1900.) Little League Schedule Sat., 14 May-Bears vs Hawks Sun., 15 May-Tigers vs Colts Tues., 17 May-Colts vs eBars Thurs., 19 May-Hawks vs Tigers Sat., 21 May-Bears vs Tigers (All games played at Little League diamond at Villamar. Weekday games commence at 1600. Week-end games start at 1400.) Little League Standings Bears 5 Colts 4 Hawks 2 Tigers 1 Little League Results Saturday Colts 13-Tigers 4 Sunday Bears 7-Hawks 5 Tuesday Colts 25-Hawks 2 Thursday Bears 17-Tigers 8 9 Pat Sheehan of the Little League Colts hooks in and around Tiger third baseman Terry Trimble to come in safe during the Tiger-Colt game Saturday afternoon. The Tigers came out on the short end of a 13-4 score. 1 2 4 5 Winners of the 1954 Naval Base Junior Handicap and Junior Consolation Golf Tourneys display their trophies. Left to right: Wright North, Jr., Consolation Winner; Michael Dote, Consolation Runner-up; Stanley Price, Handicap Runner-up, and Rnnie Mosley, Handicap Winner. VU-10 NAS Page Your THE INDIAN Saturday 14 May 19 5

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Page Five Saturday, 14 May 1955 THE INDIAN NSD Supply Line Mrs. J. P. McFadden, Mrs. H. D. Goolsby and Mrs. P. D. Larson arrived on the JOHNSON Thursday, in completion of a wonderful 8 day Caribbean cruise. Ports of call were San Juan and Port of Spain. Miles W. White, DCCA, returned from the Hospital on 6th of May, after 5 days of hospitalization. LT and Mrs. Robert Whitman, Betty, Mary and Paul sailed aboard the JOHNSON for a visit at their homes in Boston before reporting to their new duty station in Athens, Georgia. LT Whitman will be an Instructor at the Navy Supply School. LT Whitman was the Administrative and Inventory Officer at NSD. He was relieved by ENS J. R. Pope. Kline D. Sanders, SA, reported aboard NSD on 4 May from USS EPC-618. His home address is Needville, Texas. William L. Davis, SKSN, is being transferred on 11 May to USS STRIBLING (DD-867) after having been on board NSD for the past 2 years. CHPCLK Louis P. Colston reported Thursday to NSD from U.S. Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Florida. He will assume duties of Assistant Fuel Officer. Mr. Colston will reside at BOQ3, awaiting the arrival of his family. Marion R. Tarrell, SK1, is being transferred on 11 May to Service S c h o o 1 Command, Brainbridge, Maryland, for a course of instruction and further transfer to recruiting duty at U.S. Naval Recruiting Station, Omaha, Nebraska. LT and Mrs. Kenneth Woolard, cruised to Port au Prince, Haiti, aboard the USS NORTHHAMPTON and spent a leisurely and picturesque weekend as guests at the Hotel Riviera. Gary E. Wakeman, SA, was advanced in rate on 1 May from SA to SN. Benjamin C. Jones, SA, reported on board 27 April from USS LST 880. His home town is Catlettburg, Ky. Billy U. Walker, SN, reported on board 27 April from USS LST 880. His home town is Benton Harbor, Michigan. Everyone at NSD wishes Mr. Bob Radcliffe a speedy recovery from his recent operation. CDR E. W. Sutherling, Commanding Officer, U.S. Naval Supply Depot, presented the Good Conduct Medal to Robert H. Griffith, SK3 at a ceremony Monday morning. Griffith became eligible for the Good Conduct Medal after having completed three years of continuous active service, having had no courts-martial or non-judicial punishment of any kind and his average mark in proficiency in rate well exceeding the minimum average mark of 3.5. FTG Bulletin by Ron Federman With LCDR Moseley, our Supply Officer, leaving FTG on Friday, 13 May, our new Supply Officer, Lieutenant Edward L. Noga, reported aboard on 4 May. Mr. Noga's hometown is New Castle, Pennsylvania. Mr. Noga completed a tour of duty at Special Weapons Depot, Norfolk, Va. before arriving at FTG. Mr. Moseley, recently promoted to Lieutenant Commander, will report to the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts, Navy Department, Washington, D. C. Also departing FTG Headquarters yesterday was Donelson, TM1. Donelson was scheduled to travel via FLAW, and he was what you might say, "traveling in a crowd", what with a wife and six children accompanying him. Donelson will report to the Commanding Officer, Naval Schools, Mine Warfare, Yorktown, Va. for 25 weeks duty under instruction in Class "A" and "B" Mineman School. Subsequently, he hopes to change his rate to Mineman. LCDR Shablowski, former Officer in Charge, Gunfire Support Training Unit, Culebra, Puerto Rico, after serving 28 months with the unit, left the Caribbean Area for duty with SubGroup One, at Bayonne, New Jersey. It is anticipated that CHTORP Vaughn's relief, CHTORP Leimes, will arrive at Guantanamo Bay in the USNS THOMAS. Mr. Leimes served with the Naval Schools Command, at Newport, Rhode Island, before receiving his orders to Guantanamo Bay. Athletic-wise, our FTG Golf Team defeated NAS in a rough and tough match a week ago today. The conclusion of the match found FTG on top by a score of 13/2 to 10/s. Captain McElroy, Cohanski were top scorers for FTG, each taking 3 points. Today FTG will attempt to upset the high-flying VU-10 team, which to date is undefeated. Tomorrow FTG will meet the USS DES MOINES Golf Team, who were previously defeated at the hands of our capable Golfers. The winners of the match will receive a trophy, thus the competition should be keen. Harlan, YN1, seems to be quite a fisherman! Recently, he caught a Snapper weighing 36 pounds. Harlan was disappointed, however, after someone at the Air Station topped his catch with a 41 pounder. Good things sometimes happen to people all at once. Such was the case with LCDR Shaw of the ASW Department. It was recently published that Mr. Shaw was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Commander, but that was only part of the story. It was not mentioned that right on the heels of his promotion, Mrs. Shaw gave birth to a baby girl, and on that very same day his mother-in-law, Mrs. Marie Smith, arrived at Guantanamo Bay to visit the Shaw Family. Quite an exciting day, and one worth remembering! Mrs. Smith left via commercial airlines for the States last Friday. SHIPS ARRIVALS HAMMERBERG (DE 1005) (To arrive 16 May) CONE (DD 866) (To arrive 20 May) STRIBLING (DD 867) oosues M NAS Crosswinds by Paul A. Hoffer, USMC Rifle Range This week the Marine Barracks riflemen have been firing for the qualification day on Saturday, May 14. 62 Men will fire for qualification on this detail. Picnic Saturday, May 7, a picnic was held at the Marine Barracks Movie Lyceum. Plenty of chow and beer were on hand. Events were held through out the day. Win a steak dinner It's easy to win a steak dinner, here is all you have to do: Guess the score of the coming Marine baseball game, get a form from the Security Setcion office and fill it out with your name and the score of the coining game. All entries must be in the Special Services Officer by noon of the day of the game. Baseball The Marine Barracks baseball team got off to a flying start as they registered two wins in the Base League. Last Thursday night the Marines defeated the Naval Station Indians 14 to 13. The game was played on a wet and muddy field. Five runs in the bottom of the 7th proved to be the winning margin for the Marines. J. A. Dowd was the winning pitcher. Monday night the Leathernecks met the MCB-1 Bees at Naval Station and won 16 to 8 in a game of homeruns. Chuck Hunter paced the way with two. One in the 5th and the other in the 7th, each time with one man aboard. Bill Wood hit one in the 6th. Al Stork of the Bees hit one in the 3rd. Earl Castellow collected three hits as did Don Schreek who also was the winning pitcher. Schreck pitched 8 1/3 innings, John Dowd finishing the game. This Thursday the Marines face the Naval Air Station Flyers at Naval Station Diamond No. 1 at 1900. Meet Your Team Earl G. Castellow, third baseman for the Marine baseball team played ball at Janesville in the Wisconsin State League, Class "D". So far this year he has five hits for nine trips to the plate. Castellow joined us from Marine Corps Training Center, Parris Island, S. C. His home town is in Windsor, North Carolina. He attended the University of North Carolina where he played baseball and football. Castellow is the property of the Chicago Cubs. He is at the present in Security Section. Millionaire: "My boy, when I was your age, I carried water for a gang of bricklayers." Son: "I'm mighty proud of you, Dad. If it hadn't been for your pluck and perseverance, I might have had to do something like that myself (To arrive 20 May) BROUGH (DE 148) (To arrive 20 May) PILLSBURY (DER 133) (To arrive 20 May) SHIPS DEPARTURES FURSE (DDR 882) ( To depart 17 May) FORT SNELLING (LSD 30) (To depart 21 May) DYESS (DRR 880) (To depart 20 May) by Paul Snyder Eleven men have qualified to be advanced to pay grade E-3 during the past week, according to LT A. C. Idoux, Training Officer. The men are T. D. Ambler ADAN, N. N. Campbell ACAN, J. A. Doctor AMAN, D. L. Eggers AN, H. F. Kahler ADAN, D. Martinez ADEAN, K. 0. Notestine ACAN, C. A. Ramirez AN, R. D. Commander SN, H. S. Loper CSSN, and D. P. Watson TN. These men will be advanced Monday, 16 May, 1955. Air Control Division met and vanquished the Aerology Division at Phillips Park last week-end in a rousing softball game. The score, 19-12, is indicative of the mighty batsmen on each squad. The artistry of Hug Kenyon on the mound led the AC's to victory while Gene "Rip" Sewell's powerful bat led their offense. Losing hurler was Roger Smtih, after he relieved Don Parker. Stung by one defeat, Aerology challenged again, but was losing 12-7 before the second game was "halted." All enjoyed the steak and beer, and all are looking forward to another picnic soon. (Aerology wishes to challenge again. They are convinced they will win the next contest.) Two men on the Air Station have made Chief, it was announced last week. John D. Weaver AC1 will don the khaki of ACCA, 16 November 1955 and Robert E. Hewitt RM1 gets the hard-hat 16 July 1955. Weaver works in the Leeward Point Tower and Hewitt can be found in Communications. DEPARTURES Richard Lightfoot MM3 left aboard FLAW for Jacksonville and discharge last Wednesday. On Friday, Stan Kowalczyk AD1 headed for VW-4 (Eearly Warning) Squadron at NAS, Jacksonville. Kowalczyk plans on shipping for the last time this coining November when he signs for "6". Tomorrow, Al McQuillen TE3 will board FLAW for Telegraphic and Cryptographic Repair School at Norfolk, Virginia. Nick Karinikas PH2 will be going to VX-6 at Patuxent Rivers soon. Nick hopes to join the photographic squadron and eventually head for the Antartic. Several more men will be advanced to higher pay grades in the near future. Ron L. Ellis ADEAN will become an ADE3; Ron Price AD3 to AD2; and J. E. R. Short SN to GM3 Monday, 16 May. Also, on 16 September 1955, Fred D. Gunther AT3 will be advanced to AT2. Newsbits Orphans are becoming a rarity in America ...This is one of the consequences of medical progress both in curbing maternal deaths in childbirth and prolonging the lives of adults ...There are now fewer than 90,000 minors with neither parent .Thirty-five years ago, there were 800,000. New Yorkers now can obtain blood "insurance" for their families ...Under a plan devised by the Blood Bank Assn. of New York State, the head of a family who donates a pint of blood is gurantteed four free pints for himself and each member of his family for the following year.

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4e Saturday, 14 May 1955 MOVIES Saturday, 14 May THE LONG LONG TRAILER Lucille Ball Desi Arnaz A honeymoon on wheels turns out to be a nightmare when the groom finds his funds strained by the purchase of the super-streamlined trailer. Sunday ,15 May THREE SAILORS AND A GIRL Jane Powell Gordon MacRae A Story about submarine sailors who support a Broadway production. Film studded with song and dance numbers. Monday, 16 May THE CITY IS DARK Sterling Hayden Gene Nelson A police sergeant is assigned to track down three escaped convicts. They have ensnared a parolee who is married and gone straight. Tuesday, 17 May THE CARNIVAL STORY Ann Baxter Steve Cochran Story of a poverty-stricken German girl who sought refuge with an American carnival and eventally became a star high diver. She has three marriages as a result. Wednesday, 18 May ABOUT MRS. LESLIE Shirley Booth Robert Ryan A woman reflects on her past life and a secret romance she had with a Washington big-wig. Thursday, 19 May WHITE FIRE Scott Brady Mary Castle A young man runs into trouble when he tries to solve the murder of a night club owner for which his young brother is accused. Friday, 20 May RAILS INTO LARAMIE John Payne Marie Blanchard Army sergeant sent to mend a situation in Laramie finds an old friend runs the whole town crookedly. He is forced to bring him to bring him to justice. Girl (at her front gate with soldier): "I'd ask you in for a while, only mother's out and father is upstairs with rheumatism of the legs." Soldier: "Both legs?" Girl: "Yes." Soldier: "Then I'll come in." "My dear, what a lovely coat. It must have cost a fortune." "No, it only cost a kiss." "The one you gave your husband." "Oh, no. One that he gave the maid." Radio's 'Tops' of the Week SATURDAY, 14 May. .THEATRE ROYAL ..9:00 P.M. "The Overcoat", a tragic-comedy, with Michael Redgrave in the guest star role, is the story of a meek, pitiful little man who spends more than he can afford for a much needed overcoat, only to have it stolen by brigands. He dies as a result of exposure. SUNDAY, 15 May .HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE .10:00 P.M. Rosalind Russel and Robert Cummings become romantically involved in the leading roles of "What a Woman". Miss Russel is a literary agent in this story and Cummings, an author. MONDAY, 16 May ..BEST PLAYS .9:00 P.M. A day's grist of crime in the detective squad room of a New York precinct police station is performed in this evenings production of "Detective Story" with Wendell Corey as Detective McLeod. TUESDAY, 17 May ..THE CHASE .9:00 P.M. The chase begins in Brooklyn when a feline worth a considerable fortune left by an eccentric matron, is "catnapped" from its rightful gardians by the deceased lady's jealous niece. WEDNESDAY, 18 May ..ON STAGE ..9:00 P.M. A very strange tale of a husband and wife who have lost their love for each other and find wheels are growing in their bodies. When the couple rediscover their love for one another, the wheels disappear. THURSDAY, 19 May ..FAMILY THEATRE .9:00 P.M. Robert Francis is stared in "Down Payment," as a young hardware employee who steals company funds to provide the down payment on a home. When another employee is arrested for the theft, he realizes his error. FRIDAY, 20 May .RADIO WORKSHOP .10:00 P.M. "The Monkey's Paw," by W. W. Jacobs, a terrifying tale of a mystic and horrible charm and its effects upon a family is given a modern New England setting in Navy Journalist Bud Sission's adaptation of the classic short story. The Monkey's Paw is an ordinary paw, dried to a mummy, with a spell put on it by an old fakir in India who wanted to show that those who interfered with fate do so to their own sorrow. This is a show you can't afford to miss. A gal with glamor-and that ain't all. Piper Laurie will star for Universal-International in a comedy with music titled "Ain', Misbehavin." Piper plays the part of a pretty chorine with chorine pals like Dany Crayne and Mamie Van Doren (Indian pinups for the last two issues). She even does a slapstick bit of upsetting San Francisco society with a pie throwing incident. She throws the pies at gobs in restaurants, so be careful. 0 *So I NOOK by Francis L. Cannon, J03 THE DAY LINCOLN WAS SHOT by Jan Bishop This work is the result of 25 years of research on the events surrounding the assasination of Lincoln. The book covers a 24 hour period, from 7 A.M. April 14, 1865 to the next morning. The plan of those involved in the plot are out lined and the movements of Lincoln are traced throughout this period. It goes into great detail, but the pace of the story-telling isn't hurt, thanks to the skillful writing of the author. THE PERFECTIONIST by Lane Kauffman A novel concerning one Martin Pryor who has led a very well ordered ilfe, so well ordered that it approached perfection. But there was one small flaw: he had murdered his wife and someone knew it. This person, cad that he was, undertook to blackmail poor Pryor. It disturbed the orderliness of his life, of course. The rest of this not particularly original story has Pryor romping around trying to find out who his blackmailer was. He narrowed down to five suspects and ...oh well, it's in the library if you really care. MY AMAZON ADVENTURE by Sebastian Snow This one presents a rather odd situation. The author set out on a journey alone, with no particular training, no plans, no equipment to speak of, a smattering of Spanish, a little money and some sort of a vague desire to trace the Amazon to its source. He didn't succeed, but he figured it was worth a book anyway since everybody seems to be writing books about the Amazon these days. His courage and fortitute cannot be disputed too much, but the manner in which he approached his task seems a bit addlebrained and thoroghly unscientific. His observations on the Amazon are doubtless accurate as he can make them, but the book is for idle reading, not solid information. THE LAST OF THE BOHEMIANS by Andre Beucher Story is about Leon-Paul Fargue, The Poet of Paris", and a real, live bohemian in the best tradition of a Paris bohemian. The author's connection with him was a sort of Boswell -Johnson arragement; he toddled along with him to the several worlds of Paris and took notes on the great man's sayings and actions. Fargue died in 1947, leaving a legend in the artistic world of Paris. That world is admirably recreated here before Paris became war torn and was still gay. Just in are a few works put out by the Viking Portable Library, "portables". Included are the writings of Rebelais, the great 16th century satirist; Voltaire's Candide and miscellaneous writings; the Greek Reader, translated by W. H. Auden; Dante's Divine Comedy and other works; Some of Mark Twain; 12 short stories and the Scarlet Letter by Hawthorne; some of the writing of D. H. Lawrence. 4 Page Six THE INDIAN