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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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9&


CGove ITMO Like The Sunshixte" Vol. VI, No. 18 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 7 May 1955


Dislocation Pay In Effect Junior Workshop Gives Aoril 1 On POS Moves 'Once Upon A Clothesline'


--I-- .. . . .


Washington (AFPS)-For what is probably the first time in the history of the military services, the government will pay a dislocation allowance to married servicemen and officers who make a permanent change *of station. The regulation, which went into effect in April, provides that one month's quarters allowance be paid over and above the normal monthly allowances at the completion of the move from one station to another.
This is to compensate the serviceman for the expenses involved in moving his family from one place to another. Here are some of the provisions of the regulation:
1)-The allowance will be paid only at the completion of the dependents' move. In other words, it can't be drawn in advance.
2)-The only persons eligible for dislocation allowances are officers, warrant officers and non-commissioned officers in pay grades E-4 (with more than four years service) through E-7, who have dependents.
3)-Enlisted men in pay grades E-1 through E-4 (with four years or less service), even though married and drawing quarters allowances, are not eligible.
4)-The dislocation allowance will be paid only once during a fiscal year, except in certain cases where the move is necessary to the best interest of the services. These cases will be decided by the services involved.
5)-The allowance may be paid more than once during a fiscal year for movements on a permanent change of station to, from or between service schools. This has been decided to mean any military, civilian or foreign school.
6)-The dislocation allowance will not be paid upon entry to active duty from the home to the first permanent station and neither will it be paid when leaving the service upon separation, release from active duty or retirement.
7)-If the change of permanent stations is made within or adjacent to the same metropolitan area the allowance will not be paid--except in special cases.


On-Site Survey Board

Ends Inspection Today
The annual On-Site Survey Inspection of the Naval Base will close this morning at 0800 when the final write-up and departure conference will be held in the Naval Base Board Room. Headed by RADM T. C. Ragan, the On-Site Survey Board arrived here Monday morning and inspected all commands of the Naval Base, reviewing each command after the inspection.


, The final performance of the Junior Theatre Workshop, sponsored by the Little Theatre, will be presented to-night at 8:00 P.M. For all who are young in heart, whether six or sixty, "Once Upon A Clothesline" is well worth seeing. It is a fantasy written by Aurand Harris involving clothespins, ants, grasshoppers, birds, a butterfly, a cricket, a beetle, and a big black spider.
As in the production of "Many Moons" which had its very successful run last week, it must be remembered that this is a completely new experience for most of the children taking part. The polish and finesse of a Broadway show are somewhat lacking but eagerness and zeal are there in full measure. It is hoped that this project will continue through the years both for the fine experience it gives the children and the entertainment and enjoyment it affords the audience.
It must be noted also that none of this would have been possible without the full cooperation of the mothers of the cast who have been called upon to act as costumers, The fathers have had their share too, in acting as the House Staff for all performances. The sets were constructed by Little Theatre members.
The cast of "Once Upon A Clothesline" includes: Bob Zaborsky, Patsy Moseley, Ginger Shiver, Dan Douglas, Susan McElroy, Judy Harrison, Jim Page, Stephanie Stoll, Jeff Maddox, Peter Minard, Pat Minard, Pat Page, Walter Snow, and Eddie Kloske.


186 NayBase EMs Gel New Rates

Ten Promoted To Chief
On top of the recent pay raise, 99 men of the Naval Base will add even more to their income on 1 June when they receive their first paycheck in a new rate. These 99 men are the first increment of 186 Gtmo personnel to be advanced in three groups. The first group will be advanced 16 May while the second and third groups will receive their new rates on 16 July and 16 September.
Of the 186 men slated for promotions, ten will become chief
petty officers. Fleet Training Group
Forrestal Duty Offered boasts the most advancements from white hat to khaki cap as three
men will become chief at that comTo Reenlistees mand. Naval Air Station, Naval
Station, and VU-10 will each have
The Navy is now offering enlist- two new chiefs while Naval Suped men, with special emphasis on ply Depot will advance one man those about to reenlist, an oppor- to CPO. tunity to volunteeer for duty aboard The largest number of advance-' the new super aircraft carrier, ments will be at the Naval Station the USS FORRESTAL. where 82 men are due for promoFor personnel who desire to tions. However, this figure is only volunteer for duty on the FOR- a little over one third of the numRESTAL, they may submit a letter ber of men who took the examinaof request via official channels, pro- tions in February. For the entire vided they have the obligated serv- Naval Base, the percentage of men ice of fifteen months or will agree being advanced is on a par with to extend or re-enlist for the obli- Navy-wide advancements. gated time. A breakdown of the advancement
Re-enlistees who apply for At- by commands is as follows: lantic Fleet duty and list the FOR- NAVAL STATION RESTAL as their first choice stand 16 May: 12 First Class, 10 Seca good chance of being assigned ond Class, and 16 Third Class; to the 60,000-ton carrier 16 July: 1 First Class, 10 Second
tothe 60,000-t e . Class, and 10 Third Class; 16 Sep: The letter of request should be 2 First Class, 12 Second Class, and submitted in accordance with Bu- 9 Third Class. Pers Instruction 1306.25A. Other NAVAL AIR STATION qualifications necessary to apply 16 May: 5 First Class, 9 Second for FORRESTAL duty is a conduct Class, and 15 Third Class; 16 July: record of 4.0 for the past six 5 Second Class and 2 Third Class; months. 16 Sep: 2 Second Class and 7 Third
The requirements of filling the Class.


ship's billets preclude guarantee of
(Continued on Page Three)


John California, Flyer backstop, attempts to put the tag on an unidentified Bee, but drops the ball in the tangle. Bees won the first game of the 1955 season, 13 to 3.
(See Story, on Page Four)


VU-10
16 May: 1 First Class, 8 Second Class, and 5 Third Class; 16 July: 3 First Class, 1 Second Class, and 3 Third Class; 16 Sep: 1 First Class, 1 Second Class, and 2 Third Class.
FLEET TRAINING GROUP
16 May: 5 First Class, 2 Second Class, and 1 Third Class; 16 July:
1 Third Class.
NAVAL HOSPITAL
16 May: 5 Second Class and 3 Third Class; 16 May: 2 Second Class and 2 Third Class.
NAVAL SUPPLY DEPOT
16 May: 2 Third Class; 16 July:
1 Second Class.


Villamar Council Election
Election time is approaching again for the residents of the Villamar - Bargo area. The Council will be elected on Sunday, 15 May.
Ballots will be distributed to all residences between noon and 3 P.M. on the 15th. All adults in the area are urged to vote for their choice of alderman. The elected Council will select one of its members to act as Mayor for the coming six months.
More candidates for office are needed and all interested parties are requested to call Mayor Yost at 9501 before Thursday 12 May.


00123w_









P ITwoTHEIII ....Satrday....May.195


Te Inian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615
Saturday, 7 May 1955
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay,* Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers. USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LTJG J. D. Byerley --..... Officer-Advisor H. B. Davis, JOC -....-----.....Editor
H. L. Sisson, JOS ------ ---------- News
F. L. Cannon, JOS ---------- Photographer
D. C. Roberts, JOSN ---.....---- Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1944, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a members of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.



What's Doin' Stateside

(AFPS Weekly Feature)
The combined yearly income of America's 160 million people probably tops that of the 600 million inhabitants of Europe ,including Russia, and is far greater than the income received by more than one billion Asians, according to a report of a leading research organization ... The study, covering most phases of the U.S. economy, took five years to prepare . . . It predicts that, by 1960, the average American family will earn $6,000 a year or about $700 more than at present . . . At the same time, the average work week will decline to 37% hours . . . The study indicates that American productivity is rising so rapidly that, within a century, we'll be producing as much in a single seven-hour day as we now do in a 40-hour week.
* * *
One of the big controversies of the moment rages about subscription or pay-as-you-go television
The Federal Communications Commission which must decide whether to license the system says its mail on the subject from private citizens is generally favorable... Subscription video would provide current stage productions, first run movies, etc., for home viewers willing to pay a special "admission price" for each presentation.
* * *
Changing times... For the first time in 70 years, Montgomery Ward has dropped horses' work harnesses from its mail order catalog.

Waiter: "May I help you with that soup, sir?"
GI: "What do you mean, help me? I don't need any help.
Waiter: "Sorry, sir. From the sound I thought you might wish to be dragged ashore."


FTG Bulletin
by M. Vandesteen
LCDR Leonard R. Laughlin arrived at Roosevelt Roads, P.R. on 29 April to assume duties as Officer in Charge of the Gunfire Training Unit Culebra Island. He will relieve LCDR Chester T. Shablowski as Officer in Charge. Mr. Laughlin was formerly attached to the Fleet Air Defense Training Center, Dam Neck, Virginia Beach, Virginia.
LT Andrew K. Shreve reported to the Fleet Training Group for duty last Sunday. Mr. Shreve was formerly in the USS Melvin R. Norman (DE 416). He is assigned to the CIC department. His hometown is Washington, D.C.
Charles L. Runge, ET3 arrived Wednesday, 27 April on the Johnson for a tour of duty with the Fleet Training Center. Runge was formerly on duty at the Naval Air StationT, Oceana, Virginia. He hails from Frenchtown, New Jersey.
Francis H. Gallosky, FPC and wife departed Thursday on the Johnson. Chief Gallosky will report to the Receiving Station, Brooklyn, New York and await his transfer to the Fleet Reserve and release to inactive duty. He will retire from active duty after twenty years active service.
Henry R. Dowell, RD1 departed by FLAW Friday, 6 May. He was transferred to duty under instruction in a special forty-eight week course in the ET conversion program. The school convenes at Great Lakes, Illinois. As a result of last February's examinations for advancement to pay grade E-7, Dowell will don his chief's uniform on 16 July 1955.
Andrew Gagliano, EN1, one of the leading bowlers on the FTG bowling team and Secretary of the Enlisted Men's League, departed the Guantanamo Bay area Thursday enroute to Brooklyn, New York. Upon arrival he will report to the Commanding Officer, Brooklyn Receiving Station to await discharge from the Naval Service. Andy intends to make use of the GI Bill and enroll in college.
Mrs. John Ferrante arrived by FLAW Wednesday, 27 April. Mrs. Ferrante was accompanied by her three children, Jane Maire, Margaret Ann, and John Michael Jr.. Their journey began from Pearl Harbor, stopping for a few weeks visit in Niles, California before resuming their flight to Guantanamo Bay.
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Davis arrived Friday, 29 April for a visit with Mr. and Mrs. George Partridge. Mr. and Mrs. Davis traveled from Chicago via commercial airlines and departed Wednesday from Guantanamo City by Cubana Airlines.
The following personnel of the Fleet Training Group and Training Center received authorization for forthcoming promotions:


Lockwook, W. Carr, B. H. Mayes, C. H. Molloy, J. E. Nolan, L. R. Mathis, W. W. Dominicci, F. B. Daudelin, A. N. Rose, J. R. Vescovi, D. C. Carrignan, R. M. Flaherty, F. L. Engebretsen, J. C.


4-


DC1 to DCCA
RD1to RDCA
PN2 to PN1 RM2 to RM1 SK2 to SK1 S02 to SO RD2 to RD1 ET3 to ET2 RM3 to RM2 YN3 to YN2 YNSN to YN3 RMSN to RM3
SN to YNT3


The Toastmaster


by Joe West
Can you take criticism? I couldn't until I became a Toastmaster. One of the most important facets of toastmaster training is- learning to evaluate and learning to act on someone else's evaluation of you, without being hurt.
You will find the story in the Gospels (Mark 10:17-21, Luke 18:18 Matthew 19:16) and it will pay you to read it as an example of how to seek evaluation, and then fail to profit by it. The young man came to Jesus, saying, "Good Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?" The Master gave him a direct answer, but the man did not like it. Perhaps he, like many of us, asked for critiicsm, hoping to receive a compliment. Jesus went to the bottom of the matter and told him the truth. The man had asked a fair question, and he was entitled to an honest opinion.
He must have been a man of attractive personality, for Mark says, "Then Jesus, beholding him, loved him, and said unto him, 'One thing thou lackest; go thy way, sell whatever thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven; and come, take up the cross and follow me.'"
The Master saw possibilities in this man, and desired him for a follower but realized that such a man, carrying the burden of his great wealth, could never be a true deciple until he got rid of his hindrance. His criticism was searching and painful, but sincere. It the inquirer had followed the advice of his evaluator, he might have done great things. As it was, he dopped out of sight and was not heard from further.
He asked for criticism, but when he got it, he simply couldn't take it.
Criticism, whether given in friendship or malice, can be one of the most constructive elements in life for us. Its value depends altogether on how we use it. The worst way to receive it is to be angry about it. The next worst way is to ignore it. The one best way to receive it is to listen to it, study it, and then use it.
Like the young man in the story, most of us have favorite weaknesses to which we cling. Either we enjoy the objectionable characteristic, or we think it distinguishes us, or we are unwilling to admit the flaw in our personality. The alcoholic victim knows that strong drink is poison to him, but he does not make the effort to give it up. Many of us are like that. We feel it is easier to get along with our faults than to correct them. Gentlemen, I strongly recommend that during your two year tour of duty at Gtmo you become a member of our local Toastmasters Club 92. The dividends will be rich in self improvement.

SHIPS DEPARTURES
USS BORDELON (DDR 881)
(To depart 9 May)
USS HAVERFIELD (DER 893)
(To depart 9 May)
USS DES MOINES (CA 134)
(To depart 13 May)
USS CHOPPER (SS 342)
(To depart 11 May)


Sunday, 8 May 1955
Catholic Meu
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 09007-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Cbnfessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services
Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0930--Sunday School
0930--Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1980-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900--Choir Rehearsal Christian Science
Sunday: 1000-Station Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)


The Chaplain's Corner


T
NATIONAL FAMILY WEEK
This is National Family Week. It began last Sunday and fittingly ends tomorrow which is Mother's Day. In an age in which there is one divorce out or every four marriages, it is only proper that one week be set aside to call our attention to the importance of family life and the qualities that go into making marriages and homes stable, happy, and permanent.
Of the many qualities that contribute in making homes permanent, the most indispensible factor is character. In the last analysis, there can be no substitute for unselfishness, loyalty, faith, courage, pluck. It is the spirit that finally makes a marriage go or flop.
Where there is the willingness to cooperate, many difficulties can be transcended. When this spirit is absent, minor conflicts are magnified and the marriage becomes unstable. As the Bible says, "Out of the heart are the issues of life." Out of our inward quality of character comes the stuff that either triumphs over obstacles or succumbs to them.
Andre Maurois once wrote that he would like to have the marriage vow read: "I bind myself for lifefrom now on my aim in life will be not to search for someone who will please me, but to please someone I have chosen." This is character. This is mature personality. It is religous personality.
When we find God and he lives in us, we are ready to lose life for those we love. Home and wife and children are what we now serve under God. We are more ready to love than be loved-serve than be served-bless than be blessed. And marriage founded on this kind of. character cannot fail. The fruit of the spirit is love, joy, peace, good temper, kindliness, generosity, fidelity, gentleness, self control. Christian character will weather any and every storm. Marriage built on this kind of foundation and faith cannot fail.

Chaplain M. E. Roberts
MCB-1


THE INIbiAX


M


Saturday, 7 May 1955


so








Saturday, 7 May 1955 THE INDIAN Page Three


VA Eliminates Mortgages

For WWII Veterans
Washington (AFPS)-The Veterans Administration has announced that in the near future it plans to estimate home mortgages under the GI Bill which include closing fees in overall loans to purchasers.
The VA said this new policy would effect less than one and onehalf percent of loans now being made to veterans.
When put into effect, the ruling will mean that mortage companies can not include such items as hazard insurance and title search fees in loans to veterans.
The VA also says it has no intention of stopping loans in which no down payments are required as long as they do not contain closing fees provisions.



Base School Allotted


$1,200 For Library
The Library of the Naval School will add many new volumes to its shelves at the beginning of the next school year, in accordance with a recommendation of the Committee of the Southern Associaiton for Accrediting Secondary Schools and Colleges. The committee recommended that the library facilities should be expanded and improved, and the visiting representative of the Bureau of Naval Personnel took immediate action on the recommendation. Last week the appropriation for $1,200 was approved and several new volumes ordered for the library.



PTA Elects Officers


At Final Meeting
The Parent Teachers Association of Guantanamo Bay held its final meeting of the 1954-55 school year Tuesday night at the School openair auditorium on Chapel Hill. Officers were elected for the coming year, and a report was made by Mr. William McGill on the summer recreation program. Mr. Ralph Sierra made the annual treasurer's report.
Also, Mrs. William Mathews, of the American Legion Auxiliary, presented prizes to the Poppy Day Poster Contest winners. The winning posters from the Naval Base School will be sent to Miami to be judged with other national entries for the international contest.
The attendance prizes were awarded to Mrs. Usey's 2nd Grade class for first place, Mrs. McNeal's nursery class for second place, and Mrs. Burke's kindergarten for third place.
The Officer's for the coming year will be announced next week.


NavSta CO Commends Two Men For Performance Of Duty Gtmo Rifle, Pistol Club Joins National Association


CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, presents an accommodation for outstanding performance of duty to R.E. Beardsley, GM1, for duties performed while attached to Ship's Department. Loooking on is CHELEC J.W. Coxon, (Beardsley), Thomas J. Moser, SN, who was also commended for outstanding performance of duty as driver for Brigadier General J. P. Doyle on a visit to the base, and CHBOSN W. L. Arwood.


Holy Name Society Holds

Breakfast, Tomorrow
The newly formed Guantanamo Bay Chapter of the Holy Name Society will hold their second Communion Breakfast at the CPO Club tomorrow immediately after Holy Communion at the Naval Base Chapel at 0900, in addition to an official reception at 1800 in the open-air auditorium on Chapel Hill.
At the reception, the official charter of the organization will be issued, listing all charter members.
Anyone who wishes to join the local Holy Name Society, which fosters reverence to the person of Christ by assisting members to develop a sound spiritual life, will still be considered a charter member if they join the society either before Holy Communion, after Communion at the breakfast, or during the official reception at 1800.
Heading the Guantanamo Bay Chapter of the Holy Name Society is CDR V. J. Soballe, president; Mr. Norman Huddy, vice president; Mr. Robert Radcliffe, treasurer; R.P. Schuler, PN1, recording secretary; and Mr. Gordon Ward, corresponding secretary.


Inactive Duty Promotion

Possible For Navy EM
Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has announced that enlisted men who pass servicewide exams but are discharged before they can be promoted, will be advanced to the next highest pay grade while on inactive duty.
Promotions will be granted only if the individual enlists in the Naval Reserve within three months after discharge.


9


Services Fight Pay-Back

On Reenlistment Bonus
Military officials of the three services are going ahead, with SecDef's signature if possible, with an attempt to get the ComptrollerGeneral to reverse himself on his latest ruling concerning reenlistment bonuses.
The three services have joined forces in the concerted effort to avoid having servicemen pay back any of the reenlistment bonuses they may have received.
Officials agree that if they are unsuccessful in their attempt for a decision reversal, it will still be many, many months before any military man will have to pay back any money.
If the reversal attempt fails, the backers of the move plan to ask Congress for a "relief" law which would mean that anyone who received a re-up bonus before the ComptrollerGeneral's d e c i s i o n would not have to pay back money that has already been spent.
The decision which has caused all the flurry of activity in the Defense Department was the one in which the Comptroller ruled that all reenlistments after Oct. 1, 1949 'should be counted in computing the reenlistment bonus for future shipover contracts.

BuPers Notice 1430.7A CH-1 also states that this new policy will hold true for men who are discharged and then re-enlist in the regular Navy within 90 days.
4.


Sevently-eight people from the Naval Base proved their interest in the oldest national sportsmen's organization in America when the group met at the Community Hall at Marina Point and formed the Guantanamo Bay Rifle and Pistol Club in affiliation with the National Rifle Association of America. The rifle and pistol fans met on 18 and 22 April for the purpose of installing officer, the signing of charter members, and the general organization of the club.
LCDR R.K. Minard, key motivator in making this organization a reality, was elected president by acclamation. Other officers elected were, vice president, Mr. R. E. Zaiser, secretary ,Walters Semon, PN3, treasurer, Norman Walters, MRC, and chief instructor, T/Sgt. G. 0. Schuler.
Mr. 1. Ward was elected as Executive Officer in charge of the rnage and program, and Mrs. Fay Yarbro will serve as Publicity Chairman. The local chapter of the National Rifle Association has 78 charter members. Honorary members are RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, Col. Robert E. Fojt, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks.
A wide series of matches and a variety of qualification courses are being planned for both men and women with an opportunity for new members to win a NRA qualificaiton certificate. Watch for more information on the first Instructors 22 Pistol Match on 8 May, 1955.
A distinctive emblem for an arm patch is wanted for the Guantanamo Bay club, and an interesting prize will be given to the person whose design is selected. All entries should be submitted to Mr. R.L. Yarbro, Mr. A.M. Rose, or M/Sgt. J.H. Johnson on or before the next regular meeting to be held at 1900, 9 May in the Community Hall.
The National Rifle Association is a nonprofit organization supported entirely by the membership fees of public spirited citizens and clubs. Its seventy-one year old membership roster carries the names of three Presidents of the U.S., a Chief Justice, and many other outstanding American diplomats.


The Guantanamo Bay Rifle and Pistol Club
is sponsoring an
INSTRUCTORS PISTOL
MATCH
Sunday, 8 May 1955, at 1400 at the Marine Pistol Shoot
All members are invited
to attend




FORRESTAL..

(Continued from Page One)

duty aboard to all applicants, however, assignment to the FORRESTAL is highly probable -for men re-enlisting in the near future, and providing that their rates are included in the ship's allowance.
The FORRESTAL will have a crew of about 466 officers and 3,400 enlisted men when it is commissioned this fall at Norfolk, Va.


Saturday, 7 May 1955


THE INDIA1N


I


Page Three








Page our HE IDIANSaturday. 7 May 1955


Marines, Bees, Mallards Lead



In First Week of '55 Season

by Hal Davis
What it was was baseball, although you might have had a hard time convincing any of the fans who saw the first two games as the 1955 season got off to a walloping start with the Naval Air Station Flyers and the Staff Corps on the wolloped end of a couple of very lopsided scores.


The MCB-1 Bees journeyed into town to raise the lid on the new season against the Flyers last Monday night on Diamond Number 1 in the Fleet Recreation Area. They not only raised the lid, they stuffed the Flyers in the box and slammed it shut with a 13 to 3 pasting that left the airmen unglued at every seam.
Al Stork, a 6-foot southpaw from Patterson, N. J., made his debut on the mound for the Bees and gave up 4 hits while fanning 14. He toured the distance easily as the Bees gave him a 2-run margin in the second inning, six more in the third, two more in the fifth and one apiece in the sixth, eighth and ninth. Batting fifth in the lineup, which is unusual for a pitcher, he collected a long double to chase one run across the plate.
Jack Keasey, 3rd baseman from Youngston, Ohio proved to be the big gun for thi Bees, getting a double and four RBI's. Bob Bennett, centerfielder, poled a triple into right center field. He scored on a balk by Howie Woren, second Flyer hurler.
Only five of the 13 Bee tallies was earned as the Flyers threw the ball all over the diamond-high over the diamond. But the Bees had trouble on their ball passing, too, committing six errors, mostly in throwing, while the Flyers only miscued five times, also mostly in throwing.
Wes Nixon started for the Flyers and lasted one out into the third inning, giving up 4 hits for 5 Bee runs. Howie Woren came in and stayed for 5 2/3 more innings allowing four more hits and 8 runs. Snyder came in from center field and took the mound for the last inning.
R H E
MCB-1 -------- 13 8 6
Naval Air ----- 3 4 5
VU-10 SHATTERS STAFF
Wednesday night the VU-10 Mallards made their first appearance of the season and unleashed a powerful 14-hit attack that had the Staff Corps reeling from the first inning when the Mallards poured eight across the plate. They hit for five more in the second, one in the third, three in the fourth and three more in the sixth to run the adding machine score up to 20 to 5.
Bill Madden, from Valley Stream, L.I., started for the Mallards and lasted four innings, allowing one hit for 2 runs. Gene Edgar, a Flat River, Mo. Mallard veteran, took over in the 5th and grave up another hit for another run. Chuck King went in for the 9th inning and allowed the final Staff hit for two more tallies.
Madden knocked out four hits for five RBI's when he wasn't on the mound.
The Mallards tagged Staff starter Toland for nine hits and 14 runs in the first three innings. Myerson


relieved in the fourth and got slapped for five more hits and 3 more runs.


VU-10 -------Staff


R H E
20 14 2 5 3 6


MARINES EDGE INDIANS
Thursday night the fans almost got to see a baseball game even though it was dampened for half an hour by rain. The Marine Leathernecks, defending champions in the league, staged a 7th inning scoring spree to edge the Naval Station Indians, 14 to 13.
The Indians jumped off to a 2 to 0 lead in the first inning and added two more in the second while Dale Buss was holding the Leathernecks to three scattered hits in the first three innings. The Indians crowded two more across in the fourth, but the Marines started to tag Buss and scored twice in the bottom of the frame. The Indians scored another in the top of the fifth, but the Marines came alive in the bottom and tagged Don Byerley for four, then three more in the sixth.
The Braves tied it all up in their half of the 7th at 9 all. The Marines broke loose and banged in five markers. The Indians rallied in the eighth for three and managed one more in the top of the top of the ninth, but the Leathernecks had the one-run margin necessary for the win.
R H
Naval Station ------ 13 14 Marines ------------14 15


League Standings
(Including Thursday's game)


TEAM
Marines MCB-1 VU-10 NavSta Naval Air -----Staff


W L PCT 1 0 1.000 1 0 1.000 1 0 1.000 0 1 .000 0 1 .000 0 1 .000


Baseball Schedule
Sun., 8 May-VU-10 vs NAS Mon., 9 May-MCB-1 vs Marines Tues., 10 May-Open Wed., 11 MayNaval Station vs Staff Thurs., 12 May-Marines vs NAS Fri., 13 MayVU-10 vs Naval Station


Little League Schedule
Sat., 7 May--?-Colts vs Tigers Sun., 8 May-Hawks vs Bears Tues., 10 May-Hawks vs Colts Thurs., 12 May-Bear vs Tigers


Tom Pillittiere, Bee rightfielder, lays on the ground surrounded by teammates after a collision with Flyer catcher California at the plate. Pillittiere had the wind knocked out of him and was back on his feet a few moments later.


Colt pitcher Babine tries to distract Hawk baserunner Fortenberry's attention from that plate by looking like two Colts, but it didn't work and Fortenberry scored.


Ladies Golf Shots Major Leagues Offer


by Betty Lou Tipler
The members of the Ladies Golf Association are still going strong on the Ladder Tournament. While this tournament is in progress, the first and second flights are playing for low gross and low net each Wednesday morning. The third and fourth fiigths alternate between playing for low putts and blind five tournaments. All ladies make their own matches for Wednesday morning. Results of this past Wednesday's matches were:
First Flight
Low Gross-Sue Scott Low Net-Marion Caruthers
Second Flight
Low Gross--Theresa Moseley and Val Evans
Low Net-Gladys Hamilton
Third Flight
1st Low Puts--Susanne Smith 2nd Low Puts-Cynthia Holley The Fourth Flight was rained
out last week.


p


Free Games To Servicemen
Going to New York this Summer? Hanker to see a big league ball game? The New York major league stadiums are continuing their policy of admitting servicemen in uniform free to the games. This privilege has been extended to service men and women for the past several years.
The Giants have a serviceman's entrance at the Polo Grounds at 159th Street and 8th Avenue. The Dodgers will admit servicemen to Ebbets Field through the press gate at McKeever Place. The Yankees have a servicemen's entrance gate at 157th Street and River
Avenue.
Armed Forces personnel must be in uniform to gain free admittance.

I's the fresh egg that gets slapped in the pan."
* * *
"When your girl friend said she'd dig me up a date, she wasn't
kidding."


Page Four


THE INDIAN


Saturday. 7 May 19. 5


4ft






wt


Saturday, 7 May 1955


THE INDIAN


Navy Wives' Club Mq(cc osins Hospital Notes Why Is A Fire?


The regular business meeting of the Guantanamo Navy Wive's Club was held last week and many plans and preparations were made for the month of May. Biggest event for May will be a cake and cookie sale in front of the Naval Station Navy Exchange on 21 May.
Other plans for the month of May include a luncheon, under the direction of Activities Chairman, Pearl Pearcy, at the Marine Family Restaurant at 1:00 P.M., Thursday afternoon, May 19. The menu promises to be one of the best yet.
If not a baker or a luncheon fan, other members and guests of the local chapter of the Navy Wives Club will surely enjoy the bingo game and many prizes offered at the Villamar Movie Lyceum on Thursday 12 May. Any Navy wife is urged to find the time to attend any or all of these functions.
Those who missed the. charades party, where the husbands of Navy Wives Club members were the best of fun, are still asking others for the details. Many, many such parties are held, and no one knows what real fun, happy laughs, and good times are to be had at the next charades parties.



Teenage Round-up

by Linda Thurston
Stumbling around this past week after the Junior-Senior Prom and Banquet we happened to run into Neil Hayes mumbling, "Itty bitty bird a-singin' Boobalack" ... Neil's rendition of "Boobalack" brought to mind among other things, suicide, but mainly the latest hot notes that are floating around . . . so we decided to take a platter poll.
When we asked Dolores R, she said, "I don't know anything by Joni James." So much for Dolores. Of course, everybody knows that Cavie's favorite is "Indian Love Call," but did you realize that the "World Symphony" runs a close second? "Cuddle Me" for Stan Price. Anita claims "Since I Fell for You." "Night Train" gets my votes, says Marylice. Bobbie Johnson thinks "It Might As Well Be Spring," but she really likes "Ballin' the Jack" by Danny Kaye. Doris flips over Bostic's "Jungle Drums". Nancy Halentic goes in for "Rocket 69." Pat Wormwood likes "My Babe." Becky Dobbins would spend a nickel anyday on the "Sand and the Sea" and so would Eunice. "Earth Angel" is still going strong and Frank gets all torn up over it. Anytime you hear "Wonderful Lips," you're sure to see Jere Warren flipping around. Betty Stone--"Sincerely." Judy Inman very definitely likes "Gettin' To Know You." From behind a pair of "shades" Penny reports that he thinks "La-La" is real cool. Just "La-La," no more. "Close Your Eyes" is all it takes to get Shar and Bob jumpin.' Doris has a title---"Ashes in My Eyeballs." Anyone have the words and music.


"Whadda you want?" snapped the Supply Chief I "Nothin' ".
"Did you bring anything to put it in?"
"No, I didn't know you had any left."


by Paul A. Hoffer, USMC
DEPARTURES
Last Tuesday, 3 May, Staff Sergeant Theodore R. Bushong departed for the states. SSGt. Bushong will attend Airology school at Lakehurst ,New Jersey.
ARRIVALS
From HqCo., Supply Bn. Camp Lejeune, N.C. came Cpl. Dee J. Williamson. Cpl. Williamson will be one of our new bakers. Welcome to Gtmo and hope you enjoy your stay.
PROMOTIONS
Last week seven men were promoted to the next higher rank. Promoted to Sergeant were Carl E. Craft and Calvin E. Powell. To Corporal were Robert E. Clark, Raymond J. Conley, Ronald E. Hoover, Johnny D. Miller and Walter F. Pawlus. Congratulations from all hands here at Marine Barracks.
BASEBALL
Monday night, 9 May the Marine Barracks Baseball team play their second game of the season against the MCB-1 Bees at the Naval Station Diamond No. 1. How about all hands who can make the game turn out and give the team all the support they can.
MEET YOUR TEAM
Charles G. Hunter a new comer to Marine Barracks, came to us from Marine Corps Training Center, Parris Island, S. C. Hunter played class D ball in the Mountain State League and belonged to the New York Giants. He hails from New Albany, Ind., where he played high school baseball, football and basketball. He will bie on firstbase for the Marines this year. In the past exhibition games he has proved himself a good hitter and fielder. Hunter stands 6'2" and weighs 185. At the present time he is in Security Section.


VU- 10 Prop Blast

A large part of VU-10 departed last Sunday in the form of Leading Chief, Jim Mauldin, who was probably completing his last full tour prior to finishing thirty years of service. Chief Mauldin's interests and activities on the squadron's behalf will be sorely missed. A rabid sports enthusiast, Mauldin supported all of VU-10's athletic teams and was one of the mainstays of our champinship golf team for the last two years. At last Saturday's personnel inspection, Chief Mauldin was presented with a large trophy for winning the consolation flight in the 1954 handicap golf championship.
VU-10's Mallards got off to a good start in last week's baseball game. Though it was just a practice game, it looks like we may have a hot team this year and, at any rate, well worth supporting, so lets see a few more of the squadron's personnel out there at the ball park.
The fathers and sons of the squadron and of base personnel will have a chance today to enjoy the off-shore sights of the GTMO area from the deck of VU-10's ocean liner (THE KDC) and all concerned are looking forward to it with much anticipation.
0


HEIRPORT NEWS
Congratulations to HM2 and Mrs. Doris Cuddy on the arrival of their third child, a girl, Robin Maire. Five other newcomers were presented by the stork; they are: Elizabeth Jewel to PR2 and Mrs. Mildred Doulin; Brady Alan to AKI and Mrs. Shirley Withers; Douglas Leathbridge to QMC and Mrs. Marilyn Dunn; Elaina Abril Vickers to AD3 and Mrs. Joan Vickers; Patrick Adam to PH3 and Mrs. Joan Moore.
ARRIVALS
Welcome aboard to the most recent arrivals from USNH Chelsea, Mass. They are: HN R. A. Frederick, HN W. L. Harding, HN S. Rose; and HN J. R. McCullough from USNH Corpus Christi, Texas.
MEET THE STAFF
A comparatively newcomer to USNH is HM3 Bob Dunn with 5 months in Gtmo. Bob attended Corps School at Bainbridge, Md, and then duty at USNH Annapolis. The majority of his time as a corpsman has been in EENT, in line with his future career as an ophthalmoolgist. Music and sailing are amoung his many interests, with photography being his favorite hobby. Bob plans on entering Pasadena C. C. and then UCLA.
SIDELIGHTS
HN Joe Rivas has taken the expression "Go fly a kite" literally. Certain obstacles however, seem to be hampering a promising career; radar masts in particular.... Many smiling faces these days as the notification of advancement in rate were released. In reviewing the results the new HM2 Thomas W. Price took top honors .... Ens and Mrs. Long and Dr. and Mrs. Imburg returned from a tourists' view of San Juan and Trinidad.


Mech: When anything g o e s wrong around the house, I always flix it.
Wife: Oh, yeah? Since you fixed the clock, the cuckoo backs out and asks "What time is it?".
* * *
She: That was a lovely proposal dearling, I've taken it all down in shorthand; now if you'll just sign it, I'll file it away for future reference.
bD


by rat Alridge h" n W .


by Felix Lopez, Base Fire Inspector
Consider fire as being represented by a simple triangle. Each of the three sides represents an element necessary to combustion.
Three essentials needed for fire: HEAT-Fuels do not actually burn in their solid or liquid forms. Heat causes liquids to give off vapors, and solids to give off combustible gases. The degree of heat required to convert different fuels to gas or vapor varies. Gasoline vaporizes at low temperatures, while wood or coal requires more heat. By using heat, almost any fuel can be converted. OXYGEN-As a human needs oxygen to live, so does fire. Normally, a fifteen percent concentration of oxygen is necessary for fire, and the greater the concentration, the greater the blaze. FUEL-Almost any material can serve as fuel, although we think of wood, paper, gasoline, oil, grease, etc. . . . as the most common.
So there it is-the "Fire Traingle"--composed of heat, oxygen, and fuel. All three are necessary. Take any one away and fire cannot exist.
Consider a fire extinguisher as your best friend for all incipient fires.


From A Navy Wife
Here on this Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, we have one of the greatest pleasures in life-time to enjoy ourselves. In the hustle and bustle of living in cities where the Navy goes, and the cost of living there, there is little extra time away from house keeping duites and "taxi" duties, driving the children to and from school, driving husbands to and from work. Not much opportunity, with no help, to enjoy the golf course, swimming pool, bowling, coffee together in friends back or front yards. When we think about this it doesn't seem much to give a few hours of your time and yourself, when you are asked to volunteer to work with some project on the base. You'll find you will feel a lot better "inside" if you do it. The next time you are called to give a little, a few hours of your time, maybe every other month to help with meeting the transports, working in the Trading Post, selling tickets or anything that gives a little of yourself, please say "yes"! You'll feel happier and it makes a happier base. Working together and helping others is a wonderful thing. Let's do it!
A Navy Wife


USS Nautilus Joins

Atlantic Fleet
Norfolk, Va. (AFPS)-The atomic-powered USS Nautilus is now an active component of the Navy's Atlantic Fleet.
The world's first nuclear submarine has completed necessary performance tests and is now undergoing routine repairs at Groton, Conn.

Daisy: "My boy friend is one of the big guns in the insurance business."
Maisie: "Yeah, I know. That's why he gets fired so often."


ow


Page Five








Page Six THE INDIAN Saturday, 7 May 1955


MOVIES

Saturday, 7 May
APPOINTMENT IN HONDURAS
Glenn Ford Ann Sheridan
Ford makes his way to Honduras to give an ousted president money to conquer his enemies. He wins a girl into the bargain.
Sunday, 8 May
ON THE WATERFRONT
Marlon Brando Eva Marie Saint
Brando is caught between fear and loyalty to the mob when a friend is pushed off a roof to keep him from talking. After a series of incidents he is beaten up by the mob's leader but recovers.
Monday, 9 May
ANDROCOLES AND THE LION
Alan Young Robert Newton
Based on the G. B. Shaw satire on the Roman Empire in the days of Ceasar and the persecution of Christians. Androcoles is a little Greek tailor whose tenderness wins the love of a ferocious lion who is supposed to kill him.
Tuesday, 10 May
SAILOR OF THE KING
Jeffrey Hunter Michael Rennie
A Royal Navy man and his son, unaware of each other, are heros in the same battle during WWII.
Wednesday, 11 May
VEILS OF BAGDAD
Victor Mature Marie Blanchard
Story takes place in the Middle East. An Arab is sent to spy in a neighboring country's Palace by his king. He goes, makes love to the other king's wife and learns of a plot to march on his country.
Thursday, 12 May
HELL BELOW ZERO
Alan Ladd Joan Tetzel
Man and woman fly to Antarctic to investigate death of her father, partner in a whaling enterprise. He was murdered by her exfiance.
Friday, 13 May
ESCAPE FROM FORT BRAVO
William Holden Eleanor Parker
Western action drama concerning Unionists and Confederate escapees with a fight against the Indians thrown in for novelty.

Mrs. Henpeck: What would you do if I were to die? The Poor Guy: It would drive me crazy, dear.
Mrs. Henpeck: Would you marry agian?
The P. G.: I don't think I'd be that crazy.


Radio's 'Tops' of the Week

SATURDAY, 7 May ... THEATRE ROYAL . . . 9:00 P.M.
Sir Lawrence Olivier returns to Theatre Royal this evening to be your host when he presents Orson Welles in the story of Alexander Pushkin's "The Queen of Spades."

SUNDAY, 8 May... HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE . .. 10:00 P.M.
A chance encounter with a marriage broker changes the entire life of a beautiful model, portrayed by Jeanne Crain and co-starring Thelma Ritter in "The Model and the Marriage Broker."

MONDAY, 9 May... BEST PLAYS . .. 9:00 P.M.
Murder is in store in this presentation of a Broadway smash hit in which an English housekeeper slays her employer, a retired actress, in this week's production of "Ladies in Retirement." Troubles commence when the actress wants to terminate the stay of her light-headed sister, who refuses to leave her country home in the Thames marshes. TUESDAY, 10 May... THE CHASE . . . 9:00 P.M.
It was an accident! She fell from a minaret in Istanbul, purely an accident but her husband could have prevented her death; and now his conscience tortures him, bringing him to a just sentence.

WEDNESDAY, 11 May... ON STAGE ... 9:00 P.M.
"The Man of Independent Mind" stars Cathy and Elliot Lewis in the story of Wally, an average guy who wants recognition. He almost succeeds when he becomes the strongest man in town, but circumstances seem to find him preferring to be Mr. Average Man after all.

THURSDAY, 12 May... FAMILY THEATRE . . . 9:00 P.M.
The role of a Korean veteran who, as a victim of battle fatigue had turned and run from the enemy in combat, is portrayed by Paul Picerni as Ricardo Montalban acts as host on Family Theatre. To complicate matters for the harassed veteran, word is received by his friends at home of the story, making his homecoming a difficult one.

FRIDAY, 13 May ... RADIO WORKSHOP ... 10:00 P.M. This evening Radio Workshop presents "The Little One" starring members of our own local community in a story about an unusual love affair. Who is this "Little One" and what strange mystic spell does he over Helen Wilder? This is a story you do not dare to miss.


Ain't Misbehavin'


Lovely Dani Crayne spends her spare time sliding In her regular workaday routine she makes motion versal-International. Her latest, with Piper Laurie Doren, is called "Ain't Misbehavin' "
J 0


by Francis L. Cannon, J03
THE WASHINGTON PAPERS
Edited by Saul K. Padover
This one volume contains most of the important writings of of George Washington. It also provides a logically arranged sourcebook on the personal and political philosophy of the first president. This tends to humanize him as a man and honor him as a thinker. He emerges not as a frosty hero but rather as a man of great character and charm with strong emotions curbed by severe self-discipline. Contained here are letters, diaries, various short works and his "Rules of Civility", which he wrote in his youth as a sort of guide for life.
ATOMS FOR PEACE
by Daniel 0. Woodbury
The author, with a good background in science and reporting, set out to gather all the released information on atomic power, then co-ordinate it and analyze its possibilities. He talked to hundreds of scientists, researchers, visited many labs and nuclear fission plants. He considers many of the potentialities, such as in transportation, power for industry medical applications, etc. The book is of necessity limited because of informational restrictions on the atom.
A CROSSBOWMAN'S STORY by George Millar
An historical novel reconstructing the adventures of the first expedition of white men to descend the Amazon and accomplish a journey from the Pacific to the Atlantic across South America. This actually happened in 1541. Story is told through the eyes of Isasaga, a crossbowman and the scrivener of the expedition. He tells of steaming jungles, mountain passes where men perished in the bitter cold, and battles with the Indians. If the cover can be believed the book is fairly accurate historically, if you want historical accuracy in a novel.

CAPTAIN BASHFUL by Donald Barr Chidsey
This novel concerns one "Captain Bashful", who was neither a captain nor bashful. Which is really quite consistent because this isn't much of a novel novel. It would appear that this person ran around the English countryside in Elizabethan times crossing swords with every man he met and seducing every fair lady who crossed his path. In back of it all was some sort of misty intent to regain his lost home and lands taken by an unjust somebody-or-other.

FROM LEXINGTON TO LIBERTY
by Bruce Lancaster
This is an attempt to cut through the simplified myths surrounding the origins of the Revolutionary War. Revealed are many odd and unknown facts, for example that the famine at Valley Forge was broken by an unusually early run of shad up the Schuylkill. The author states that the incidents thought by many to bring on the war was merely an outward symptom of inner unrest because of fundamental differences in the ideals of the people involved. What it amounts to is history tempered with human interest and littleknown facts.


Page Six


Saturday, 7 May 195


THE INDIAN




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PAGE 1

"Govers qTMO Like The Snshine" Vol. VI, No. 18 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 7 May 1955 Dislocation Pay In Effect Junior Workshop Gives, April 1 On PCS Moves Once Upon A Clothesline Washington (AFPS)-For what is probably the first time in the history of the military services, the government will pay a dislocation allowance to married servicemen and officers who make a permanent change of station. The regulation, which went into effect in April, provides that one month's quarters allowance be paid over and above the normal monthly allowances at the completion of the move from one station to another. This is to compensate the serviceman for the expenses involved in moving his family from one place to another. Here are some of the provisions of the regulation: 1)-The allowance will be paid only at the completion of the dependents' move. In other words, it can't be drawn in advance. 2)-The only persons eligible for dislocation allowances are officers, warrant officers and non-commissioned officers in pay grades E-4 (with more than four years service) through E-7, who have dependents. 3)-Enlisted men in pay grades E-1 through E-4 (with four years or less service), even though married and drawing quarters allowances, are not eligible. 4)-The dislocation allowance will be paid only once during a fiscal year, except in certain cases where the move is necessary to the best interest of the services. These cases will be decided by the services involved. 5)-The allowance may be paid more than once during a fiscal year for movements on a permanent change of station to, from or between service schools. This has been decided to mean any military, civilian or foreign school. 6)-The dislocation allowance will not be paid upon entry to active duty from the home to the first permanent station and neither will it be paid when leaving the service upon separation, release from active duty or retirement. 7)--If the change of permanent stations is made within or adjacent to the same metropolitan area the allowance will not be paid-except in special cases. On-Site Survey Board Ends Inspection Today The annual On-Site Survey Inspection of the Naval Base will close this morning at 0800 when the final write-up and departure conference will be held in the Naval Base Board Room. Headed by RADM T. C. Ragan, the On-Site Survey Board arrived here Monday morning and inspected all commands of the Naval Base, reviewing each command after the inspection. The final performance of the Junior Theatre Workshop, sponsored by the Little Theatre, will be presented to-night at 8:00 P.M. For all who are young in heart, whether six or sixty, "Once Upon A Clothesline" is well worth seeing. It is a fantasy written by Aurand Harris involving clothespins, ants, grasshoppers, birds, a butterfly, a cricket, a beetle, and a big black spider. As in the production of "Many Moons" which had its very successful run last week, it must be remembered that this is a completely new experience for most of the children taking part. The polish and finesse of a Broadway show are somewhat lacking but eagerness and zeal are there in full measure. It is hoped that this project will continue through the years both for the fine experience it gives the children and the entertainment and enjoyment it affords the audience. It must be noted also that none of this would have been possible without the full cooperation of the mothers of the cast who have been called upon to act as costumers, The fathers have had their share too, in acting as the House Staff for all performances. The sets were constructed by Little Theatre members. The cast of "Once Upon A Clothesline" includes: Bob Zaborsky, Patsy Moseley, Ginger Shiver, Dan Douglas, Susan McElroy, Judy Harrison, Jim Page, Stephanie Stoll, Jeff Maddox, Peter Minard, Pat Minard, Pat Page, Walter Snow, and Eddie Kloske. John California, Flyer backstop, unidentified Bee, but drops the ball game of the 1955 season, 13 to 3. (See Story on 001, 8 Ada5 E N Noh 18 NayBse E ms Cet 'New Rales Ten Promoted To Chief On top of the recent pay raise, 99 men of the Naval Base will add even more to their income on 1 June when they receive their first paycheck in a new rate. These 99 men are the first increment of 186 Gtmo personnel to be advanced in three groups. The first group will be advanced 16 May while the second and third groups will receive their new rates on 16 July and 16 September. __________________________ Of the 186 men slated for promotions, ten will become chief ForrstalDut Offred petty officers. Fleet Training Group Forrestalboasts the most advancements from white hat to khaki cap as three To Denliteesmen will become chief at that comTo Reenlistees mand. Naval Air Station, Naval Station, and VU-10 will each have The Navy is now offering enlisttwo new chiefs while Naval Suped men, with special emphasis on ply Depot will advance one man those about to reenlist, an opporto CPO. tunity to volunteer for duty aboard The largest number of advancethe new super aircraft carrier, ments will be at the Naval Station the USS FORRESTAL. where 82 men are due for promoFor personnel who desire to tons. However, this figure is only volunteer for duty on the FORa little over one third of the numRESTAL, they may submit a letter her of men who took the examinaof request via official channels, protons in February. For the entire vided they have the obligated servNaval Base, the percentage of man ice of fifteen months or will agree being advanced is on a par with to extend or re-enlist for the obliNavy-wide advancements. gated time. A breakdown of the advancement Re-enlistees who apply for Atby commands is as follows: lantic Fleet duty and list the FORNAVAL STATION RESTAL as their first choice stand 16 May: 12 First Class, 10 Seca good chance of being assigned ond Class, and 16 Third Class; to the 60,000-ton carrier. 16 July: 1 First Class, 10 Second The letter of request should be Class, and 10 Third Class; 16 Sap: submitted in accordance with Bu2 First Class, 12 Second Class, and Pers Instruction 1306.25A. Other 9 Third Class. qualifications necessary to apply 16 May STA9ON for FORRESTAL duty is a conduct Cs and 5 Tird Class; 1 July: record of 4.0 for the past six ClSecond Ca and 2 Ti Cls months.16 Sp: 2 Second Class and 7 Third The requirements of filling the Class. ship's billets preclude guarantee of VU-10 16 May: 1 First Class, S Second oClass, and 5 Third Class; 16 July: 3 First Class, 1 Second Class, and 3 Third Class; 16 Sap: 1 First Class, 1 Second Class, and 2 Third Class. FLEET TRAINING GROUP 16 May: 5 First Class, 2 Second Class, and 1 Third Class; 16 July: 1 Third Class. NAVAL HOSPITAL 16 May: 5 Second Class and 3 Third Class; 16 May: 2 Second Class and 2 Third Class. NAVAL SUPPLY DEPOT 16 May: 2 Third Class; 16 July: 1 Second Class. Villamar Council Election Election time is approaching again for the residents of the Vi tmar -Bargo area. The Council will be elected on Sunday, 15 May. s:>::': <:, .4Ballots will be distributed to all residences between noon and 3 P.M. on the 15th. All adults in the area are urged to vote for their choice of alderman. The elected Council will select one of its members to act as Mayor for the coming six months. attempts to put the tag on an More candidates for office are in the tangle. Bees won the first needed and all interested parties are requested to call Mayor Yost Page Four) at 9501 before Thursday 12 May.

PAGE 2

Saturday, 7 May 1955 The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9616 Saturday, 7 May 1955 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LTJG J. D. Byerley -------Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC-----------------Editor H. L. Sisson, JOB---------News F. L. Cannon, 303-------Photographer D. C. Roberts, JOSN-------------Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1944, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a members of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Los news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. B. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. What's Doin' Stateside (AFPS Weekly Feature) The combined yearly income of America's 160 million people probably tops that of the 600 million inhabitants of Europe ,including Russia, and is far greater than the income received by more than one billion Asians, according to a report of a leading research organization .The study, covering most phases of the U.S. economy, took five years to prepare ..It predicts that, by 1960, the average American family will earn $6,000 a year or about $700 more than at present ...At the same time, the average work week will decline to 37% hours ..The study indicates that American productivity is rising so rapidly that, within a century, we'll be producing as much in a single seven-hour day as we now do in a 40-hour week. One of the big controversies of the moment rages about subscription or pay-as-you-go television The Federal Communications Commission which must decide whether to license the system says its mail on the subject from private citizens is generally favorable. Subscription video would provide current stage productions, first run movies, etc., for home viewers willing to pay a special "admission price" for each presentation. * Changing times .For the first time in 70 years, Montgomery Ward has dropped horses' work harnesses from its mail order catalog. Waiter: "May I help you with that soup, sir?" GI: "What do you mean, help me? I don't need any help. Waiter: "Sorry, sir. From the sound I thought you might wish to be dragged ashore." FTG Bulletin by M. Vandesteen LCDR Leonard R. Laughlin arrived at Roosevelt Roads, P.R. on 29 April to assume duties as Officer in Charge of the Gunfire Training Unit Culebra Island. He will relieve LCDR Chester T. Shablowski as Officer in Charge. Mr. Laughlin was formerly attached to the Fleet Air Defense Training Center, Dam Neck, Virginia Beach, Virginia. LT Andrew K. Shreve reported to the Fleet Training Group for duty last Sunday. Mr. Shreve was formerly in the USS Melvin R. Norman (DE 416). He is assigned to the CIC department. His hometown is Washington, D.C. Charles L. Runge, ET3 arrived Wednesday, 27 April on the Jobsson for a tour of duty with the Fleet Training Center. Runge was formerly on duty at the Naval Air Station, Oceana, Virginia. He hails from Frenchtown, New Jersey. Francis H. Gallosky, FPC and wife departed Thursday on the Johnson. Chief Gallosky will report to the Receiving Station, Brooklyn, New York and await his transfer to the Fleet Reserve and release to inactive duty. He will retire from active duty after twenty years active service. Henry R. Dowell, RD1 departed by FLAW Friday, 6 May. He was transferred to duty under instruction in a special forty-eight week course in the ET conversion program. The school convenes at Great Lakes, Illinois. As a result of last February's examinations for advancement to pay grade E-7, Dowell will don his chief's uniform on 16 July 1955. Andrew Gagliano, EN1, one of the leading bowlers on the FTG bowling team and Secretary of the Enlisted Men's League, departed the Guantanamo Bay area Thursday enroute to Brooklyn, New York. Upon arrival he will report to the Commanding Officer, Brooklyn Receiving Station to await discharge from the Naval Service. Andy intends to make use of the GI Bill and enroll in college. Mrs. John Ferrante arrived by FLAW Wednesday, 27 April. Mrs. Ferrante was accompanied by her three children, Jane Maire, Margaret Ann, and John Michael Jr. Their journey began from Pearl Harbor, stopping for a few weeks visit in Niles, California before resuming their flight to Guantanamo Bay. Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Davis arrived Friday, 29 April for a visit with Mr. and Mrs. George Partridge. Mr. and Mrs. Davis traveled from Chicago via commercial airlines and departed Wednesday from Guantanamo City by Cubana Airlines. The following personnel of the Fleet Training Group and Training Center received authorization for forthcoming promotions: Lockwook, W. Carr, B. H. Mayes, C. H. Molloy, J. E. Nolan, L. R. Mathis, W. W. Dominicci, F. B. Daudelin, A. N. Rose, J. R. Vescovi, D. C. Carrignan, R. M. Flaherty, F. L. Engebretsen, J. C. 4 DC1 to DCCA RD1 to RDCA PN2 to PN1 RM2 to RM1 SK2 to SK1 S02 to SO1 RD2 to RD1 ET3 to ET2 RM3 to RM2 YN3 to YN2 YNSN to YN3 RMSNtoRM3 SN to YNT3 The Toastmaster by Joe West Can you take criticism? I couldn't until I became a Toastmaster. One of the most important facets of toastmaster training is learning to evaluate and learning to act on someone else's evaluation of you, without being hurt. You will find the story in the Gospels (Mark 10:17-21, Luke 18:18 Matthew 19:16) and it will pay you to read it as an example of how to seek evaluation, and then fail to profit by it. The young man came to Jesus, saying, "Good Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?" The Master gave him a direct answer, but the man did not like it. Perhaps he, like many of us, asked for criticism, hoping to receive a compliment. Jesus went to the bottom of the matter and told him the truth. The man had asked a fair question, and he was entitled to an honest opinion. He must have been a man of attractive personality, for Mark says, "Then Jesus, beholding him, loved him, and said unto him, 'One thing thou lackest; go thy way, sell whatever thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven; and come, take up the cross and follow me.'" The Master saw possibilities in this man, and desired him for a follower but realized that such a man, carrying the burden of his great wealth, could never be a true deciple until he got rid of his hindrance. His criticism was searching and painful, but sincere. It the inquirer had followed the advice of his evaluator, he might have done great things. As it was, he dopped out of sight and was not heard from further. He asked for criticism, but when he got it, he simply couldn't take it. Criticism, whether given in friendship or malice, can be one of the most constructive elements in life for us. Its value depends altogether on how we use it. The worst way to receive it is to be angry about it. The next worst way is to ignore it. The one best way to receive it is to listen to it, study it, and then use it. Like the young man in the story, most of us have favorite weaknesses to which we cling. Either we enjoy the objectionable characteristic, or we think it distinguishes us, or we are unwilling to admit the flaw in our personality. The alcoholic victim knows that strong drink is poison to him, but he does not make the effort to give it up. Many of us are like that. We feel it is easier to get along with our faults than to correct them. Gentlemen, I strongly recommend that during your two year tour of duty at Gtmo you become a member of our local Toastmasters Club 92. The dividends will be rich in self improvement. SHIPS DEPARTURES USS BORDELON (DDR 881) (To depart 9 May) USS HAVERFIELD (DER 393) (To depart 9 May) USS DES MOINES (CA 134) (To depart 13 May) USS CHOPPER (SS 342) (To depart 11 May) 0 Sunday, 8 May 1955 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC. USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner NATIONAL FAMILY WEEK This is National Family Week. It began last Sunday and fittingly ends tomorrow which is Mother's Day. In an age in which there is one divorce out or every four marriages, it is only proper that one week be set aside to call our attention to the importance of family life and the qualities that go into making marriages and homes stable, happy, and permanent. Of the many qualities that contribute in making homes permanent, the most indispensible factor is character. In the last analysis, there can be no substitute for unselfishness, loyalty, faith, courage, pluck. It is the spirit that finally makes a marriage go or flop. Where there is the willingness to cooperate, many difficulties can be transcended. When this spirit is absent, minor conflicts are magnified and the marriage becomes unstable. As the Bible says, "Out of the heart are the issues of life." Out of our inward quality of character comes the stuff that either triumphs over obstacles or succumbs to them. Andre Maurois once wrote that he would like to have the marriage vow read: "I bind myself for lifefrom now on my aim in life will be not to search for someone who will please me, but to please someone I have chosen." This is character. This is mature personality. It is religous personality. When we find God and he lives in us, we are ready to lose life for those we love. Home and wife and children are what we now serve under God. We are more ready to love than be loved-serve than be served-bless than be blessed. And marriage founded on this kind of character cannot fail. The fruit of the spirit is love, joy, peace, good temper, kindliness, generosity, fidelity, gentleness, self control. Christian character will weather any and every storm. Marriage built on this kind of foundation and faith cannot fail. Chaplain M. E. Roberts MCB-1 Page Two FU THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 7 May 1955 THE INDIAN Page Three VA Eliminates Mortgages For WWII Veterans Washington (AFPS)-The Veterans Administration has announced that in the near future it plans to estimate home mortgages under the GI Bill which include closing fees in overall loans to purchasers. The VA said this new policy would effect less than one and onehalf percent of loans now being made to veterans. When put into effect, the ruling will mean that montage companies can not include such items as hazard insurance and title search fees in loans to veterans. The VA also says it has no intention of stopping loans in which no down payments are required as long as they do not contain closing fees provisions. Base School Allotted $1,200 For Library The Library of the Naval School will add many new volumes to its shelves at the beginning of the next school year, in accordance with a recommendation of the Committee of the Southern Associaiton for Accrediting Secondary Schools and Colleges. The committee recommended that the library facilities should be expanded and improved, and the visiting representative of the Bureau of Naval Personnel took immediate action on the recommendation. Last week the appropriation for $1,200 was approved and several new volumes ordered for the library. PTA Elects Officers At Final Meeting The Parent Teachers Association of Guantanamo Bay held its final meeting of the 1954-55 school year Tuesday night at the School openair auditorium on Chapel Hill. Officers were elected for the coming year, and a report was made by Mr. William McGill on the summer recreation program. Mr. Ralph Sierra made the annual treasurer's report. Also, Mrs. William Mathews, of the American Legion Auxiliary, presented prizes to the Poppy Day Poster Contest winners. The winning posters from the Naval Base School will be sent to Miami to be judged with other national entries for the international contest. The attendance prizes were awarded to Mrs. Usey's 2nd Grade class for first place, Mrs. McNeal's nursery class for second place, and Mrs. Burke's kindergarten for third place. The Officer's for the coming year will be announced next week. NavSta CO Commends Two Men For Performance Of Duty Gtmo Rifle, Pistol Club Joins National Association CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, presents an accommodation for outstanding performance of duty to R.E. Beardsley, GM1, for duties performed while attached to Ship's Department. Loooking on is CHELEC J. W. Coxon, (Beardsley), Thomas J. Moser, SN, who was also commended for outstanding performance of duty as driver for Brigadier General J. P. Doyle on a visit to the base, and CHBOSN W. L. Arwood. Holy Name Society Holds Breakfast, Tomorrow The newly formed Guantanamo Bay Chapter of the Holy Name Society will hold their second Communion Breakfast at the CPO Club tomorrow immediately after Holy Communion at the Naval Base Chapel at 0900, in addition to an official reception at 1800 in the open-air auditorium on Chapel Hill. At the reception, the official charter of the organization will be issued, listing all charter members. Anyone who wishes to join the local Holy Name Society, which fosters reverence to the person of Christ by assisting members to develop a sound spiritual life, will still be considered a charter member if they join the society either before Holy Communion, after Communion at the breakfast, or during the official reception at 1800. Heading the Guantanamo Bay Chapter of the Holy Name Society is CDR V. J. Soballe, president; Mr. Norman Huddy, vice president; Mr. Robert Radcliffe, treasurer; R.P. Schuler, PN1, recording secretary; and Mr. Gordon Ward, corresponding secretary. Inactive Duty Promotion Possible For Navy EM Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has announced that enlisted men who pass servicewide exams but are discharged before they can be promoted, will be advanced to the next highest pay grade while on inactive duty. Promotions will be granted only if the individual enlists in the Naval Reserve within three months after discharge. 9 Services Fight Pay-Back On Reenlistment Bonus Military officials of the three services are going ahead, with SecDef's signature if possible, with an attempt to get the ComptrollerGeneral to reverse himself on his latest ruling concerning reenlistment bonuses. The three services have joined forces in the concerted effort to avoid having servicemen pay back any of the reenlistment bonuses they may have received. Officials agree that if they are unsuccessful in their attempt for a decision reversal, it will still be many, many months before any military man will have to pay back any money. If the reversal attempt fails, the backers of the move plan to ask Congress for a "relief" law which would mean that anyone who receivell a re-up bonus before the ComptrollerGeneral's d e c i a i o n would not have to pay back money that has already been spent. The decision which has caused all the flurry of activity in the Defense Department was the one in which the Comptroller ruled that all reenlistments after Oct. 1, 1949 should be counted in computing the reenlistment bonus for future shipover contracts. BuPers Notice 1430.7A CH-1 also states that this new policy will hold true for men who are discharged and then re-enlist in the regular Navy within 90 days. Sevently-eight people from the Naval Base proved their interest in the oldest national sportsmen's organization in America when the group met at the Community Hall at Marina Point and formed the Guantanamo Bay Rifle and Pistol Club in affiliation with the National Rifle Association of America. The rifle and pistol fans met on 18 and 22 April for the purpose of installing officer, the signing of charter members, and the general organization of the club. LCDR R. K. Minard, key motivator in making this organization a reality, was elected president by acclamation. Other officers elected were, vice president, Mr. R. E. Zaiser, secretary ,Walters Semon, PN3, treasurer, Norman Walters, MRC, and chief instructor, T/Sgt. G. O. Schuler. Mr. G. Ward was elected as Executive Officer in charge of the rnage and program, and Mrs. Fay Yarbro will serve as Publicity Chairman. The local chapter of the National Rifle Association has 78 charter members. Honorary members are RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, Col. Robert E. Fojt, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks. A wide series of matches and a variety of qualification courses are being planned for both men and women with an opportunity for new members to win a NRA qualificaiton certificate. Watch for more information on the first Instructors 22 Pistol Match on 8 May, 1955. A distinctive emblem for an arm patch is wanted for the Guantanamo Bay club, and an interesting prize will be given to the person whose design is selected. All entries should be submitted to Mr. R. L. Yarbro, Mr. A. M. Rose, or M/Sgt. J. H. Johnson on or before the next regular meeting to be held at 1900, 9 May in the Community Hall. The National Rifle Association is a nonprofit organization supported entirely by the membership fees of public spirited citizens and clubs. Its seventy-one year old membership roster carries the names of three Presidents of the U.S., a Chief Justice, and many other outstanding American diplomats. The Guantanamo Bay I Rifle and Pistol Club is sponsoring an INSTRUCTORS PISTOL MATCH| Sunday, 8 May 1955, at 1400 at the Marine Pistol Shoot All members are invited to attend FORRESTAL .. (Continued from Page One) duty aboard to all applicants, however, assignment to the FORRESTAL is highly probable for men re-enlisting in the near future, and providing that their rates are included in the ship's allowance. The FORRESTAL will have a crew of about 466 officers and 3,400 enlisted men when it is commissioned this fall at Norfolk, Va. Saturday, 7 May 1955 THE INDIAN Page Three

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Saturday 7 May 1955 THE INDIAN Marines, Bees, Mallards Lead In First Week of '55 Season by Hal Davis What it was was baseball, although you might have had a hard time convincing any of the fans who saw the first two games as the 1955 season got off to a walloping start with the Naval Air Station Flyers and the Staff Corps on the wolloped end of a couple of very lopsided scores. The MCB-1 Bees journeyed into town to raise the lid on the new season against the Flyers last Monday night on Diamond Number 1 in the Fleet Recreation Area. They not only raised the lid, they stuffed the Flyers in the box and slammed it shut with a 13 to 3 pasting that left the airmen unglued at every seam. Al Stork, a 6-foot southpaw from Patterson, N. J., made his debut on the mound for the Bees and gave up 4 hits while fanning 14. He toured the distance easily as the Bees gave him a 2-run margin in the second inning, six more in the third, two more in the fifth and one apiece in the sixth, eighth and ninth. Batting fifth in the lineup, which is unusual for a pitcher, he collected a long double to chase one run across the plate. Jack Keasey, 3rd baseman from Youngston, Ohio, proved to be the big gun for the Bees, getting a double and four RBI's. Bob Bennett, centerfielder, poled a triple into right center field. He scored on a balk by Howie Woren, second Flyer hurler. Only five of the 13 Bee tallies was earned as the Flyers threw the ball all over the diamond-high over the diamond. But the Bees had trouble on their ball passing, too, committing six errors, mostly in throwing, while the Flyers only miscued five times, also mostly in throwing. Wes Nixon started for the Flyers and lasted one out into the third inning, giving up 4 hits for 5 Bee runs. Howie Woren came in and stayed for 5 2/3 more innings allowing four more hits and 8 runs. Snyder came in from center field and took the mound for the last inning. R MCB-1 --------13 Naval Air -3 H 8 4 E 6 5 VU-10 SHATTERS STAFF Wednesday night the VU-10 Mallards made their first appearance of the season and unleashed a powerful 14-hit attack that had the Staff Corps reeling from the first inning when the Mallards poured eight across the plate. They hit for five more in the second, one in the third, three in the fourth and three more in the sixth to run the adding machine score up to 20 to 5. Bill Madden, from Valley Stream, L.I., started for the Mallards and lasted four innings, allowing one hit for 2 runs. Gene Edgar, a Flat River, Mo. Mallard veteran, took over in the 5th and grave up another hit for another run. Chuck King went in for the 9th inning and allowed the final Staff hit for two more tallies. Madden knocked out four hits for five RBI's when he wasn't on the mound. The Mallards tagged Staff starter Toland for nine hits and 14 runs in the first three innings. Myerson relieved in the fourth and got slapped for five more hits and 3 more runs. R H E VU-10 --------20 14 2 Staff -----------5 3 6 MARINES EDGE INDIANS Thursday night the fans almost got to see a baseball game even though it was dampened for half an hour by rain. The Marine Leathernecks, defending champions in the league, staged a 7th inning scoring spree to edge the Naval Station Indians, 14 to 13. The Indians jumped off to a 2 to 0 lead in the first inning and added two more in the second while Dale Briss was holding the Leathernecks to three scattered hits in the first three innings. The Indians crowded two more across in the fourth, but the Marines started to tag Buss and scored twice in the bottom of the frame. The Indians scored another in the top of the fifth, but the Marines came alive in the bottom and tagged Don Byerley for four, then three more in the sixth. The Braves tied it all up in their half of the 7th at 9 all. The Marines broke loose and banged in five markers. The Indians rallied in the eighth for three and managed one more in the top of the top of the ninth, but the Leathernecks had the one-run margin necessary for the win. R H Naval Station ----13 Marines -----------14 14 15 League Standings (Including Thursday's game) TEAM W L PCT Marines -------1 0 1.000 MCB-1 ---------1 0 1.000 VU-10 ---------1 0 1.000 NavSta ---------0 1 .000 Naval Air --0 1 .000 Staff ----------0 1 .000 Baseball Schedule Sun., 8 May-VU-10 vs NAS Mon., 9 May-MCB-1 vs Marines Tues., 10 May-Open Wed., 11 MayNaval Station vs Staff Thurs., 12 May-Marines vs NAS Fri., 13 MayVU-10 vs Naval Station Little League Schedule Sat., 7 May-Colts vs Tigers Sun., 8 May-Hawks vs Bears Tues., 10 May-Hawks vs Colts Thurs., 12 May-Bear vs Tigers Tom Pillittiere, Bee rightfielder, lays on the ground surrounded by teammates after a collision with Flyer catcher California at the plate. Pillittiere had the wind knocked out of him and was back on his feet a few moments later. Colt pitcher Babine tries to distract Hawk baserunner Fortenberry's attention from that plate by looking like two Colts, but it didn't work and Fortenberry scored. Ladies Golf Shots Major Leagues Offer by Betty Lou Tipler The members of the Ladies Golf Association are still going strong on the Ladder Tournament. While this tournament is in progress, the first and second flights are playing for low gross and low net each Wednesday morning. The third and fourth fligths alternate between playing for low putts and blind five tournaments. All ladies make their own matches for Wednesday morning. Results of this past Wednesday's matches were: First Flight Low Gross-Sue Scott Low Net-Marion Caruthers Second Flight Low Gross-Theresa Moseley and Val Evans Low Net-Gladys Hamilton Third Flight 1st Low Puts-Susanne Smith 2nd Low Puts-Cynthia Holley The Fourth Flight was rained out last week. 9 Free Games To Servicemen Going to New York this Summer? Hanker to see a big league ball game? The New York major league stadiums are continuing their policy of admitting servicemen in uniform free to the games. This privilege has been extended to service men and women for the past several years. The Giants have a serviceman's entrance at the Polo Grounds at 159th Street and 8th Avenue. The Dodgers will admit servicemen to Ebbets Field through the press gate at McKeever Place. The Yankees have a servicemen's entrance gate at 157th Street and River Avenue. Armed Forces personnel must be in uniform to gain free admittance. I's the fresh egg that gets slapped in the pan." ** "When your girl friend said she'd dig me up a date, she wasn't kidding." Page Four

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Navy Wives' Club M en Mosies Hospital Notes Why Is A Fire? The regular business meeting of the Guantanamo Navy Wive's Club was held last week and many plans and preparations were made for the month of May. Biggest event for May will be a cake and cookie sale in front of the Naval Station Navy Exchange on 21 May. Other plans for the month of May include a luncheon, under the direction of Activities Chairman, Pearl Pearcy, at the Marine Family Restaurant at 1:00 P.M., Thursday afternoon, May 19. The menu promises to be one of the best yet. If not a baker or a luncheon fan, other members and guests of the local chapter of the Navy Wives Club will surely enjoy the bingo game and many prizes offered at the Villamar Movie Lyceum on Thursday 12 May. Any Navy wife is urged to find the time to attend any or all of these functions. Those who missed the charades party, where the husbands of Navy Wives Club members were the best of fun, are still asking others for the details. Many, many such parties are held, and no one knows what real fun, happy laughs, and good times are to be had at the next charades parties. Teenage Round-up by Linda Thurston Stumbling around this past week after the Junior-Senior Prom and Banquet we happened to run into Neil Hayes mumbling, "Itty bitty bird a-singin' Boobalack". Neil's rendition of "Boobalack" brought to mind among other things, suicide, but mainly the latest hot notes that are floating around so we decided to take a platter poll. When we asked Dolores R, she said, "I don't know anything by Joni James." So much for Dolores. Of course, everybody knows that Cavie's favorite is "Indian Love Call," but did you realize that the "World Symphony" runs a close second? "Cuddle Me" for Stan Price. Anita claims "Since I Fell for You." "Night Train" gets my votes, says Marylice. Bobbie Johnson thinks "It Might As Well Be Spring," but she really likes "Ballin' the Jack" by Danny Kaye. Doris flips over Bostic's "Jungle Drums". Nancy Halentic goes in for "Rocket 69." Pat Wormwood likes "My Babe." Becky Dobbins would spend a nickel anyday on the "Sand and the Sea" and so would Eunice. "Earth Angel" is still going strong and Frank gets all torn up over it. Anytime you hear "Wonderful Lips," you're sure to see Jere Warren flipping around. Betty Stone-"Sincerely." Judy Inman very definitely likes "Gettin' To Know You." From behind a pair of "shades" Penny reports that he thinks "La-La" is real cool. Just "La-La," no more. "Close Your Eyes" is all it takes to get Shar and Bob jumpin.' Doris has a title-"Ashes in My Eyeballs." Anyone have the words and music. "Whadda you want?" snapped the Supply Chief! "Nothin' "Did you bring anything to put it in?" "No, I didn't know you had any left." by Paul A. Hoffer, USMC DEPARTURES Last Tuesday, 3 May, Staff Sergeant Theodore R. Bushong departed for the states. SSGt. Bushong will attend Airology school at Lakehurst ,New Jersey. ARRIVALS From HqCo., Supply Bn. Camp Lejeune, N. C. came Cpl. Dee J. Williamson. Cpl. Williamson will be one of our new bakers. Welcome to Gtmo and hope you enjoy your stay. PROMOTIONS Last week seven men were promoted to the next higher rank. Promoted to Sergeant were Carl E. Craft and Calvin E. Powell. To Corporal were Robert E. Clark, Raymond J. Conley, Ronald E. Hoover, Johnny D. Miller and Walter F. Pawlus. Congratulations from all hands here at Marine Barracks. BASEBALL Monday night, 9 May the Marine Barracks Baseball team play their second game of the season against the MCB-1 Bees at the Naval Station Diamond No. 1. How about all hands who can make the game turn out and give the team all the support they can. MEET YOUR TEAM Charles G. Hunter a new comer to Marine Barracks, came to us from Marine Corps Training Center, Parris Island, S. C. Hunter played class D ball in the Mountain State League and belonged to the New York Giants. He hails from New Albany, Ind., where he played high school baseball, football and basketball. He will be on firstbase for the Marines this year. In the past exhibition games he has proved himself a good hitter and fielder. Hunter stands 6'2" and weighs 185. At the present time he is in Security Section. VU-10 Prop Blast A large part of VU-10 departed last Sunday in the form of Leading Chief, Jim Mauldin, who was probably completing his last full tour prior to finishing thirty years of service. Chief Mauldin's interests and activities on the squadron's behalf will be sorely missed. A rabid sports enthusiast, Mauldin supported all of VU-10's athletic teams and was one of the mainstays of our champinship golf team for the last two years. At last Saturday's personnel inspection, Chief Mauldin was presented with a large trophy for winning the consolation flight in the 1954 handicap golf championship. VU-10's Mallards got off to a good start in last week's baseball game. Though it was just a practice game, it looks like we may have a hot team this year and, at any rate, well worth supporting, so lets see a few more of the squadron's personnel out there at the ball park. The fathers and sons of the squadron and of base personnel will have a chance today to enjoy the off-shore sights of the GTMO area from the deck of VU-10's ocean liner (THE KDC) and all concerned are looking forward to it with much anticipation. y ..g HEIRPORT NEWS Congratulations to HM2 and Mrs. Doris Cuddy on the arrival of their third child, a girl, Robin Maire. Five other newcomers were presented by the stork; they are: Elizabeth Jewel to PR2 and Mrs. Mildred Doulin; Brady Alan to AK1 and Mrs. Shirley Withers; Douglas Leathbridge to QMC and Mrs. Marilyn Dunn; Elaina Abril Vickers to AD3 and Mrs. Joan Vickers; Patrick Adam to PH3 and Mrs. Joan Moore. ARRIVALS Welcome aboard to the most recent arrivals from USNH Chelsea, Mass. They are: HN R. A. Frederick, HN W. L. Harding, HN S. Rose; and HN J. R. McCullough from USNH Corpus Christi, Texas. MEET THE STAFF A comparatively newcomer to USNH is HM3 Bob Dunn with 5 months in Gtmo. Bob attended Corps School at Bainbridge, Md, and then duty at USNH Annapolis. The majority of his time as a corpsman has been in EENT, in line with his future career as an ophthalmoolgist. Music and sailing are amoung his many interests, with photography being his favorite hobby. Bob plans on entering Pasadena C. C. and then UCLA. SIDELIGHTS HN Joe Rivas has taken the expression "Go fly a kite" literally. Certain obstacles however, seem to be hampering a promising career; radar masts in particular. Many smiling faces these days as the notification of advancement in rate were released. In reviewing the results the new HM2 Thomas W. Price took top honors. ...Ens and Mrs. Long and Dr. and Mrs. Imburg returned from a tourists' view of San Juan and Trinidad. Mech: When anything g o es wrong around the house, I always flix it. Wife: Oh, yeah? Since you fixed the clock, the cuckoo backs out and asks "What time is it?". She: That was a lovely proposal dearling, I've taken it all down in shorthand; now if you'll just sign it, I'll file it away for future reference. by Pat Aldridge b D W D n by Felix Lopez, Base Fire Inspector Consider fire as being represented by a simple triangle. Each of the three sides represents an element necessary to combustion. Three essentials needed for fire: HEAT-Fuels do not actually burn in their solid or liquid forms. Heat causes liquids to give off vapors, and solids to give off combustible gases. The degree of heat required to convert different fuels to gas or vapor varies. Gasoline vaporizes at low temperatures, while wood or coal requires more heat. By using heat, almost any fuel can be converted. OXYGEN-As a human needs oxygen to live, so does fire. Normally, a fifteen percent concentration of oxygen is necessary for fire, and the greater the concentration, the greater the blaze. FUEL-Almost any material can serve as fuel, although we think of wood, paper, gasoline, oil, grease, etc. ...as the most common. So there it is-the "Fire Traingle"-composed of heat, oxygen, and fuel. All three are necessary. Take any one away and fire cannot exist. Consider a fire extinguisher as your best friend for all incipient fires. From A Navy Wife Here on this Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, we have one of the greatest pleasures in life-time to enjoy ourselves. In the hustle and bustle of living in cities where the Navy goes, and the cost of living there, there is little extra time away from house keeping duites and "taxi" duties, driving the children to and from school, driving husbands to and from work. Not much opportunity, with no help, to enjoy the golf course, swimming pool, bowling, coffee together in friends back or front yards. When we think about this it doesn't seem much to give a few hours of your time and yourself, when you are asked to volunteer to work with some project on the base. You'll find you will feel a lot better "inside" if you do it. The next time you are called to give a little, a few hours of your time, maybe every other month to help with meeting the transports, working in the Trading Post, selling tickets or anything that gives a little of yourself, please say "yes"! You'll feel happier and it makes a happier base. Working together and helping others is a wonderful thing. Let's do it! A Navy Wife USS Nautilus Joins Atlantic Fleet Norfolk, Va. (AFPS)-The atomic-powered USS Nautilus is now an active component of the Navy's Atlantic Fleet. The world's first nuclear submarine has completed necessary performance tests and is now undergoing routine repairs at Groton, Conn. Daisy: "My boy friend is one of the big guns in the insurance business." Maisie: "Yeah, I know. That's why he gets fired so often." Saturday, 7 May 1055 THE INDIAN Page Five

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m MOVIES Saturday, 7 May APPOINTMENT IN HONDURAS Glenn Ford Ann Sheridan Ford makes his way to Honduras to give an ousted president money to conquer his enemies. He wins a girl into the bargain. Sunday, 8 May ON THE WATERFRONT Marlon Brando Eva Marie Saint Brando is caught between fear and loyalty to the mob when a friend is pushed off a roof to keep him from talking. After a series of incidents he is beaten up by the mob's leader but recovers. Monday, 9 May ANDROCOLES AND THE LION Alan Young Robert Newton Based on the G. B. Shaw satire on the Roman Empire in the days of Ceasar and the persecution of Christians. Androcoles is a little Greek tailor whose tenderness wins the love of a ferocious lion who is supposed to kill him. Tuesday, 10 May SAILOR OF THE KING Jeffrey Hunter Michael Rennie A Royal Navy man and his son, unaware of each other, are heros in the same battle during WWII. Wednesday, 11 May VEILS OF BAGDAD Victor Mature Marie Blanchard Story takes place in the Middle East. An Arab is sent to spy in a neighboring country's Palace by his king. He goes, makes love to the other king's wife and learns of a plot to march on his country. Thursday, 12 May HELL BELOW ZERO Alan Ladd Joan Tetzel Man and woman fly to Antarctic to investigate death of her father, partner in a whaling enterprise. He was murdered by her exfiance. Friday, 13 May ESCAPE FROM FORT BRAVO William Holden Eleanor Parker Western action drama concerning Unionists and Confederate escapees with a fight against the Indians thrown in for novelty. Mrs. Henpeck: What would you do if I were to die ? The Poor Guy: It would drive me crazy, dear. Mrs. Henpeck: Would you marry agian ? The P. G.: I don't think I'd be that crazy. Radio's 'Tops' of the Week SATURDAY, 7 May ..THEATRE ROYAL ..9:00 P.M. Sir Lawrence Olivier returns to Theatre Royal this evening to be your host when he presents Orson Welles in the story of Alexander Pushkin's "The Queen of Spades." SUNDAY, 8 May ..HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE ..10:00 P.M. A chance encounter with a marriage broker changes the entire life of a beautiful model, portrayed by Jeanne Crain and co-starring Thelma Ritter in "The Model and the Marriage Broker." MONDAY, 9 May .BEST PLAYS .9:00 P.M. Murder is in store in this presentation of a Broadway smash hit in which an English housekeeper slays her employer, a retired actress, in this week's production of "Ladies in Retirement." Troubles commence when the actress wants to terminate the stay of her light-headed sister, who refuses to leave her country home in the Thames marshes. TUESDAY, 10 May .THE CHASE ..9:00 P.M. It was an accident! She fell from a minaret in Istanbul, purely an accident but her husband could have prevented her death; and now his conscience tortures him, bringing him to a just sentence. WEDNESDAY, 11 May ..ON STAGE ...9:00 P.M. "The Man of Independent Mind" stars Cathy and Elliot Lewis in the story of Wally, an average guy who wants recognition. He almost succeeds when he becomes the strongest man in town, but circumstances seem to find him preferring to be Mr. Average Man after all. THURSDAY, 12 May .FAMILY THEATRE .9:00 P.M. The role of a Korean veteran who, as a victim of battle fatigue had turned and run from the enemy in combat, is portrayed by Paul Picerni as Ricardo Montalban acts as host on Family Theatre. To complicate matters for the harassed veteran, word is received by his friends at home of the story, making his homecoming a difficult one. FRIDAY, 13 May .RADIO WORKSHOP ...10:00 P.M. This evening Radio Workshop presents "The Little One" starring members of our own local community in a story about an unusual love affair. Who is this "Little One" and what strange mystic spell does he over Helen Wilder? This is a story you do not dare to miss. Ain't Misbehavin' Lovely Dani Crayne spends her spare time sliding down bannisters. In her regular workaday routine she makes motion pictures for Universal-International. Her latest, with Piper Laurie and Mamie Van Doren, is called "Ain't Misbehavin' ". 4 0 *B OK* NOOI by Francis L. Cannon, J03 THE WASHINGTON PAPERS Edited by Saul K. Padover This one volume contains most of the important writings of of George Washington. It also provides a logically arranged sourcebook on the personal and political philosophy of the first president. This tends to humanize him as a man and honor him as a thinker. He emerges not as a frosty hero but rather as a man of great character and charm with strong emotions curbed by severe self-discipline. Contained here are letters, diaries, various short works and his "Rules of Civility", which he wrote in his youth as a sort of guide for life. ATOMS FOR PEACE by Daniel 0. Woodbury The author, with a good background in science and reporting, set out to gather all the released information on atomic power, then co-ordinate it and analyze its possibilities. He talked to hundreds of scientists, researchers, visited many labs and nuclear fission plants. He considers many of the potentialities, such as in transportation, power for industry medical applications, etc. The book is of necessity limited because of informational restrictions on the atom. A CROSSBOWMAN'S STORY by George Millar An historical novel reconstructing the adventures of the first expedition of white men to descend the Amazon and accomplish a journey from the Pacific to the Atlantic across South America. This actually happened in 1541. Story is told through the eyes of Isasaga, a crossbowman and the scrivener of the expedition. He tells of steaming jungles, mountain passes where men perished in the bitter cold, and battles with the Indians. If the cover can be believed the book is fairly accurate historically, if you want historical accuracy in a novel. CAPTAIN BASHFUL by Donald Barr Chidsey This novel concerns one "Captain Bashful", who was neither a captain nor bashful. Which is really quite consistent because this isn't much of a novel novel. It would appear that this person ran around the English countryside in Elizabethan times crossing swords with every man he met and seducing every fair lady who crossed his path. In back of it all was some sort of misty intent to regain his lost home and lands taken by an unjust somebody-or-other. FROM LEXINGTON TO LIBERTY by Bruce Lancaster This is an attempt to cut through the simplified myths surrounding the origins of the Revolutionary War. Revealed are many odd and unknown facts, for example that the famine at Valley Forge was broken by an unusually early run of shad up the Schuylkill. The author states that the incidents thought by many to bring on the war was merely an outward symptom of inner unrest because of fundamental differences in the ideals of the people involved. What it amounts to is history tempered with human interest and littleknown facts. Page Six Saturday, 7 May 1955 THE INDIAN