Citation
Indian

Material Information

Title:
Indian
Added title page title:
The Indian
Creator:
U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Publisher:
U.S. Naval Base
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright, The Indian. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Sunday Supplement
Related Item:
Gitmo Review
Related Item:
Gitmo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Bay Gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
















"Go, ers q TMO Like Te S nshine" Vol. VI, No. 16 U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 30 April 1955


Naval Station Tops Base Shady Auto Deals Entrap On Volunteer Blood Donors Many Service Personnel


RADM E. B. Taylor, Base Commander pins the Air Medal on LT Whitman's coat as CDR E. W. Sutherling, Supply Depot C. 0., looks on.

LT Whitman Awarded

Air Force Medal
Last week, on behalf of the Secretary of the Air Force, RADM Taylor decorated LT R. G. Whitman, NSD Administrative Officer, with the Air Medal.
During World War II, LT Whitman served with the 351th Heavy Bombardment Group of the Army Air Forces in the European Theatre. Captured when he was forced to parachute from a blazing B-17 over the anti-aircraft defenses at Calais while returning from a mission deep into enemy territory, LT Whitman spent the last year of the war in a P.O.W. camp in Northeastern Germany.


On-Site Survey Pary

Arrives Here Monday
The On-Site Survey Board, headed by RADM T. C. Ragan, will arrive on the Naval Base Monday at the Naval Air Station for the annual Survey Inspection of the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base.
Arriving at 1145, the Survey Board will begin their inspection with an Arrival Conference with Commander Naval Base, RADM E. B. Taylor, and all commanding officers of Naval Base activities. Following the arrival conference, the Board will begin the survey of the Naval Base.
Tuesday morning the Survey Inspection of the Naval Station and associated activities will be held, lasting all day. Wednesday the party is scheduled for survey of the Naval Air Station with a write-up following on Tuesday. Friday the Survey Board will separate into teams with teams inspecting Fleet Training Center, Naval Supply Depot, Naval Hospital, the Marine Barracks, and the Commissary Store.
The formal inspection will conclude Saturday with the final writeup and departure conference.


The Volunteer Blood Donor list at the Naval Hospital has reached an all-time high since the last stop of the Mobile Blood Donor Unit at the Naval Station Sick Bay on Bay Hill on Thursday, 21 April. At this last stop of the Mobile Unit, 103 men of the Naval Station showed up to be placed on the Volunteer Blood Donor list, bringing to 105 the total for Naval Station personnel.
This figure of 105 tops all commands both in percentage and in number. And besides the statistical outlook, the 105 donors from the Naval Station is over half of the total figure, 197, giving the Naval Station the right to claim " more volunteer donors than all other commands combined"
The breakdown for the Blood Donor List by Commands is as follows:
Naval Station 105 Naval Supply Depot 44 VU-10 and NAS 23 Marine Barracks 22 MCB-1 4 TOTAL 197
Breaking the Blood Donor List down according to types and RH factor, the list is as follows:
Type "0" 83 Type "A" 83 Type "B" 25 Type "AB" 6
Of the total 197 donors, 164 were Rh Positive, and 33 were Rh Negative.
On the basis of these figures, it is possible to supply the more common type of blood, Type "0" with the average maximum of 6 pints for 12 consecutive days. However, the rare type, Type "AB", a serious case of bleeding during an emergency would be hard to supply with blood since there are only six AB


by PFC. Norbert Olshefski, USA
(AFPS Staff Writer)
New York-Some servicemen returning to the United States from Europe are becoming victims of automobile racketeers, authorities at Ft. Hamilton warned recently.
The rackets are worked from both sides of the Atlantic, with the European end of the operations at Bremerhaven, the huge North German port of embarkation.
But the services are powerless to intervene in a private contract between two persons. The individual can receive legal assistance from his service. Then, if it is determined that a breach of the law occurred, he can take the case to a civilian court.
In one complaint, a sergeant said he was promised a 15 per cent discount on the list price of an automobile and so he signed a contract and made a deposit. He learned later that his contract did not call for a discount and was unable to get his money back.
One salesman told a soldier that he represented a certain firm and the soldier signed a contract and made a deposit. Later he found that the man represented another firm and was unable to get his deposit back. Another switch pulled on servicemen is the one in which a promise is made to deliver a certain model with extras, such as radio, heater, etc. When the soldier goes to pick up his car on arrival in the states, the dealer has a different model ready-without extras. The soldier either takes the switch or forfeits the deposit he laid down.
The best means of combating such tactics, according to the Army, is to check the contract, preferably with a lawyer or legal officer, and inquire about the reliability of the firm with which


present at the last inspection.


MOB-1 Sets Aim

At 55 Family Units

By Early August
Late last week, CDR 0. J. Martyn, Commanding Officer, MCB-1, announced that Commander Construction Battalions, Atlantic Fleet, has placed MCB-1 in the role of building contractor to complete 55 housing units. The pay-off for successful completion of the contract will be in the form of an early return to the battalion's home port at Davisville, Rhode Island.
Specially the agreement requires that after 15 April, MCB-1 complete 55 equivalent units on the ousing project and that 55 units be turned over to the Naval Base ready for occupancy.
The new concept in determining the length of the battalion's deployment in Guantanamo Bay does not in itself guarantee that the battalion will complete operations here any sooner. Rather, the contract affords the battalion an opportunity to earn an early return to their home port by increasing its output. Analysis of the construction rate thus far shows that unless means are found to speed up the work, the required 55 units cannot be completed before 20 August. However, it is estimated that the units may be complete by 5 August. This would require an average of 3.4 units per week from the contract date, 15 April. The average since MCB-1 took over the project has been 2.5 units per week.


2,427 Navy EM

Upped To CPO
Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has announced the promotion of 2,427 enlisted men and women to Chief Petty Officer as the result of Service-wide examinations held in February.
Promotions will be made in five increments between May 16, 1955, and Jan. 16, 1956.
Fifty-seven persons in 17 rates, for which no examination were held in February, will be advanced from the waiting list resulting from the 1954 tests. They will be advanced on May 16 in the first increment which has a total of 535 promotions.
In the second increment on July 16, 492 men will be advanced; 491 on Sept. 16; 479 on Nov. 16, and 487 on Jan. 16, 1956.

PTA Elects Officers Tuesday
The annual election of officers of the Parent-Teachers Association is scheduled to take place Tuesday nigmt, 3 May at 1930 in the High School open-air auditorium. In addition, a report from the Recreation Committee will be read. All members are urged to attend.


A
ow


J








Page Two


THE INDIAN


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Speciil Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9616
Saturday, 30 April 1955
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. s. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LTJG J. D. Byerley ------ Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC ------------------ Editor
H. L. Sisson, J03 ------------------- News
F. L. Cannon, JO3 --------- Photographer
D. C. Roberts, JOSN ------------- Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1944, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a members of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFFS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.



What's Doin' Stateside

(AFPS Weekly Feature)
St. Louis is on the way to becoming the telephone capital of the nation. . . . It has been made the center of a long distance phone network which eventually will make it possible to talk with virtually any city in the U.S. and Canada simply by operators dialing the number. . . . Already more than half of all stateside long distance calls are completed 4n this speedier fashion.

Supermarkets are going chic.
A new one on New York's Staten Island sells women's apparel as well as groceries. . . . A customer can help herself to a new handbag, dress and jar of pickles.

A machine has been developed at the Univesrity of Illinois to perform certain types of brain operations using extremely high pitched sound waves to eliminate tissue instead of conventional surgical instruments. . . . Tested extensively on animals, it's now believed ready for use on humans.
* * *$
The "do-it-yourself" trend in home repairs and construction is creating something of a safety menace, according to safety experts. . . . Six hundred thousand amateur carpenters and seftaught electricians become casualties yearly and the number is going up.

A survey conducted by the University of California unearthed this bit. . . . More money is spent each year in the U.S. on comic books than on all high school and grammar school texbooks put together.


I Won't Sell My Citizenship

(Permission to reprint this aritcle obtained from "American Weekly Magazine.")

by Sgt. Wilbur F. H. Radeline

At any time in the past 30 years I could have inherited a fortune if I had been willing to do one thing give up my American citizenship.
I would not do that and I did not speak about it to any but a few close friends. Recently, however, the story has received some publicity and several hundred Americans have written me to suggest what they think I should do. In writing this I want to thank them--and to explain why no amount of money is worth the price I would have to pay.
I was born in a county poorhouse in Pennsylvania. My mother was an immigrant servant girl. My father was Count De Brogna, a Sicilian, who died in Italy in 1923.
He left me an estate which has been estimated at $300,000 in citrus farms, cash, an ancestral mansion, and family jewels.
He left them, that is, on one condition, that I change my citizenship.
Yes-he was my father. But he would not give his name to the
girl he said he loved, nor to his son, because of the "vast" differences in their stations in life. For he was not an American.
But foster parents adopted me, gave me their name, and helped my mother-for they were Americans. They gave me love, a home and happiness.
I have tried to get the estate. I consulted outstanding Republican and Democratic members of Congress, and was even referred to Cordell Hull when he was Secretary of State.
The answer was the same in every case: the will is valid; I could
only inherit by complying with the terms my father set down.
That I will never do. I am a sick man. I have what is called osteoarthritis. My wife suffers from epilepsy and frequently-sometimes two or three times a week-tears her clothes. It is hard to replace them on a sergeant's pay. I need the inheritance money very much.
But no amount of need can tempt me to surrender my citizenship.
I have seen Americans work, live and die for my country, America, and for what it offers to all, not just a select few.
Where else in the world can an ailing man, over 50 years of age, and his sick wife look forward to security and peace of mind and soul in the eventide of life?
That is why I thank God I am an American, and pray that I will always be a good one. (AFPS)


THE TOASTMASTER

by Joe West


One of the most common words seen in the offices of both government and industry is the word "THINK", yet concentration is one of the lost, or nearly lost, mental powers of most Americans.
We have forgotten how to pay attention. We do not know how to listen and observe. Because we do not practice concentration, we forget names and faces and facts. We let our minds wander from the main point, and so we never catch that point.
Most of us do not understand about things because we do not pay attention. Our wits, such as they are, go wool-gathering even while we talk, and much more while others talk. Then we complain about our poor memories.
Think of the person you met a little while ago. You know him well, so well you could speak his name and exchange the usual greetings. But beyond that, what was said? Can you remember what kind of clothes he was wearing? Did he have a necktie or was he wearing a sport shirt? Did he wear a hat, or was he bareheaded?
How many friends have we lost? How many people have we unconsciously hurt because we spoke without thinking?
It is written somewhere that: "They never taste who always drink; They always talk who never think."
You positively can control your mind, but it takes effort and will


power to do it. Conditions around us conspire to distract attention and make concentration harder, but you can do it if you will.
The fact that most of us lack concentration power seems to be a reflection of the times in which we live. We are constantly assailed by so many noises and sights that we become confused calloused, and inattentive in self defense. But if we are going to produce results of any merit, we must exert our mental strength to rise above these distractions. We can shut out the noises when we become engrossed in some line of thought. We can ignore our surroundings as we listen to some speaker of worth. We can even improve our memories if we learn to concentrate.
Concentration and frequent reviews are the twin keys to better memory and better thinking. We can disregard unimportant things and fix attention on that which matters most. Then we can bring back in review the things we wish to retain. By that process we can remember names and faces, or speech outlines, or important engagements and errands.
It is not easy, but it is possible. You can control your thoughts, and you can build a dependable memory, but you can't do it by merely wishing for it. If it is worth your while, you will accomplish it by concentrated persistent effort. You must be a dictator, a dictator to your mind.


Sunday, I May 1955
Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1280-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 164--Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services
Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0930--Sunday School
0980--Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1980-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Christian Science
Sunday: 1000--Station Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)

The Chaplain's Comer
Some years ago I made the acquaintance of a great animal trainer. He had trained a large number of animal acts for circuses. One of his observations which he repeated often was this: The animals that I train work to their fullest capacity, but the men that I live with utilize only one fourth of their talents.
This is an observation that drives deep into the conscience of every one of us.
What I am trying to point out, shipmates, is this: There are unexplored riches and possibilities in the life of every one of us. Too often it remains for crises to arouse us to the realization of this fact. We miss so much by taking an easy road of contentment and satisfaction. We fail in our obligation to ourself, our fellow men, and our God when we do not live our lives to their fullest capacities.
The result of our failure to use to the utmost the God-given potentialities of our lives is the loss of those gifts. This is one of the inevitable laws of life. We lose the things that we do not use. Hoover Ru ert put it in a couplet.
A buried talent is never a buried
treasure;
Talents become treasures only
through use.
This is true in every realm of living. He that uses his money increases it. He who guards his health keeps it. He who uses his intellect increases his knowledge. He who worships increases love and knowledge of God.
Regardless of what our abilities may be we must use them, one or many, if we are to make life count for the most. Some of those who have lived most successfully are men and women who had to face the greatest of difficulties and handicaps. There is Helen Keller for instance. How much she has accomplished with so little. Abraham Lincoln, revered as one of our greatest presidents, faced disappointment and adversity so often but persisted in developing and using the gifts that he had. Beethoven wrote his greatest symphony after he lost his hearing.
The great challenge of life is to recognize your limitations and then to develop to the utmost the talents that God has given you. You must persist in the development of those talents regardless of the disappointments and adversities that assail you. Have faith in yourself; have faith in God; and great will be your discoveries and your accomplishments.
Karl G. Peterson


i


Saturday, 30 April 1955






ft


Saturday, 30 April 1955


THE INDIAN


Legion Auxiliary Announces

Spelling, Poster Winners
Last week, the American Legion Auxiliarly announced the winners of their annual Spelling Bee and also the Poppy Day Poster Contest. A first and second place prize was awarded to the Spelling Bee winners. Top award went to Wynn McGregor and Jim Minard proved to be the second best speller.
The Poppy Day Poster Contest was divided into three grade groups. Winners in the first group, grades four through six, were: 1st, Sallie Scarborough; 2nd Truman Scarborough; 3rd, Duncan Tebow; and Honorable Mention, Billy Jean Mathews.
In the second grade groupgrades seven through nine, Carl Heimer was awarded first'place, Kathleen Bertagna won second prize, and Emil Kloske won third place honors.
Tim Reffett was the winner and the only entry in the High School Group.


'Once Upon A Clothesline' Summer Recreation Program Next Junior Workshop Play Set For Base Children


CAPT Tilden I. Moe, Commanding Officer, Naval Uospital, congratulates LT S. L. Moschella (MC) USN, prior to presenting him his certificate for appointment to the rank of LCDR. Dr. Moschella's date of rank is March 1955. LT Moschella is the third doctor at the Hospital to receive word of his appointment to LCDR.


Pictured above, left to right, front row; Billy Jean Mathews, Sallie Scarborough, Kathleen Bertagna, Ducan Tebow, and Jim Minard. Rear row, left to right: Truman Scarborough, Carl Heimer, Tim Reffett, and Emil Kloske.


Following the successful production of "Many Moons" which opened last night for a 2-night performance at the Community Auditorium, the Junior Theatre Workshop plans a quick follow-up next week-end with the prsentation of "Once Upon A Clothesline."
An entirely new and different cast will perform in the "Clotheslines.'
The Junior Theatre Workshop is sponsored by the Guantanamo Bay Little Theatre and is considered the grass roots proving ground for the young people of the base. It was created to stimulate interest in Little Theatre activity and as an aid in training the future actors and actresses.
. As in the prevous production, "Once Upon A: Clothesline" is directed by Mrs. Lillian Armbruster, assisted by Miss Ann Saxe.
Included in the cast of "Clothesline" are: Bob Zaborsky, Ginger Shiver, Dan Douglas, Susan McElroy, Judy Harrison, Jim Page, Stephanie Stoll, Jeff Maddox, Peter Minard, Pat Page, Pat Minard, Walter Snow and Eddie Kloske.
Tickets may be obtained in front of the Naval Station Navy Exchange or from any member of the Junior Workshop for 250.



LTJG Doss Sinks

Hole-in-One
LTJG L. W. Doss from the Dental
Clinic joined the elite "Hole-inOne" Club a week ago when he one-stroked the sixth hole on the golf course. The first ace of his golfing experience, Doss used an 8-iron for the 122 yard hole.
Number 6 is the most popular hole for aces on the course. Eleven have been made since 1946. Doss makes it an even dozen and he thus becomes member number 26 of the "Gtmo Aces."


The Guantanamo Bay Parent Teachers Association is sponsoring a summer recreation program for children of the Naval Base that will include horseback riding, swiming, sailboating, handi-crafts, nature study, music study, and general sports beginning shortly after school is dismissed for summer vacation. Planed as a self-supporting enterprise, minium charges will be collected for each of the activities. but wholesome recreation for children will be insured.
The swiming program has been set for mornings and will last for five weeks or 12 lessons. The charge for the 12 lessons will be $2.50.
Riding instructions will also be held in the mornings. The charge for 11 lessons will be $10.00. Sailing lessons can be arranged for $.75 per lesson.
Then, beginning 6 June, to 1 July, there will be an afternoon activities session at the Naval Base School for children in grades 1 through 12. Each class will meet for two hours every afternoon Monday through Friday and will be directed in many different activities, such as handi-crafts, nature study, music, and general sports. Qualified instructors will be in charge of the classes, and bus transportation will be provided. The price of the afternoon activities program will be $3.75.
Mrs. D. E. McCoy has been appointed treasurer for the summer activities program. The time and place for the collection of fees will be announced later. Also, all parents are reminded that children must present a signed receipt to the instructor of any activity he intends to participate in before the instructor will enroll the child.


Interest Survey Made In

FSU Correspondence Courses

A survey is currently being made to determine whether or not there is sufficient interest at this base to support a University extension program from which students could receive resident college credits.
The program would be carried !out by Florida State University, which already sponsors such programs at military installations in various areas. Classes would be conducted by regular faculty members or other competent instructors.
Cost to students would be $12 per credit, or $36 for the average 3credit course.
Application forms listing avail- ..........
able courses may be obtained at the Industrial Relations Office or from Military division officers. No fees are being collected at this time, but applications will be used to determine whether sufficient lo- An unidentified young lady of the Naval Base kisses the ring of His cal interest exists to support the Excellency, Enrique Perez Serantes, Archbishop of Santiago, at a purposed program. reception held for him at the Naval Base School patio last Sunday.
If instituted, classes would pro- Archbishop Serantes administered First Holy Communion to 33 persons bably begin sometime after 1 July. here and gave Confirmation to 16 persons.

I


Top man at last week's Naval Station inspection was Arthur Bery, CS2 of Bay Hill galley. The honorman selection hails from San Francisco. He has been in the Navy four years and two months, 19 months of which have been spent here at Guantanamo. Prior to reporting here for duty he was on the USS Iowa (BB-61).

fat lady stepped on the scales, not knowing that they were out of order.
The indicator stopped at 75 pounds.
"Holy smoke," exclaimed a drunk who watched her, "She's hollow."


_. -page


Page












THE HUNTER and THE HUNTED, a day in a Sub...


we find ourselves in officer's country, which also embraces the ship's office. Once again, we find that space is at a premium. While in the forward torpedo room, the "word" is passed for All Hands not actually on watch to report to the compartment for a lecture on personal hygiene. Here, we listened attentively, while "Doc" Saur presented his lecture. A characteristic which is conspicuous among submariners, is their longing for self-improvement. Foreign to these men, is idleness.
Personnel not qualified in submarines strive to acquire the requisites which will enable them to pass the rigorous qualification test. To wear the Dolphin, which is the symbol of a qualified submariner, is the desire of every man. Each and everyone of these men know that the course prescribed for qualification will be demanding, but they feel that to wear this prized emblem is remu-


G. D. Wells, TM2 at torpedo firing key
of the MANTA, Officer of the Deck, helmsman, and quartermaster scurried into the conning tower as the


Diving Officer and planesman " Take her down".
by Charles M. Blake, YN3- Photographs by F. L. Cannon, J03
DIVE . . . At 8:39 A.M. the U.S.S. MANTA (AGSS-299) began to submerge. Precise teamwork coupled with assurance were the basic components of this metamorphasis. In less than a minute's time, the "boat" was below the waters' surface. Omnipresent was tension, too. Our vantage point for this drama of reality was the control room which crackled with brisk commands, audible over the infernal roar of the "boat" bleeding air to insure watertight integrity.
Seconds later, a deadening silence prevailed. Present in the we find four gigantic missiles of control room are the Diving Offi- death, inert, and housed in tubes. cer, planesmen, trim manifold oper- Also, and with a touch of irony, ator, hydraulic manifold operator, the after-escape hatch is shown each viewing the maze of lights, to us. some red, some green, with the At this point, we did a turnabout solemn aspect of a judge. The sub- and started forward. The stem of marine continues to plummet deep- the "boat" is our destination. er into the capriciousness of the While passing through the control deep. room, the Diving Officer gives the
At a predetermined depth, the command "bubble". McCary reachsubmarine levels off for its oper- es down and selects a lever among ation with two destroyers, which, the labyrinth that are present; a shortly, will pursue and simulate bubble of air is forced out of the the destruction of the "boat". The safety tank to indicate the "boats"
position to the operating forces
: afloat. The procedure was instantaneous. The relative distance of
the bubble on the surface and the
dye marker, cast over the side by
the destroyer, will indicate success
or failure of the simulated attack.
Passing through watertight doors,


neration enough. Following dinner, we were taken into the conning tower, where we saw LTJG Parker and Radioman Berce tracking two ships on sonar.
The intensity of the vibrations diminished during our visit and subsequently, evasive tactics were put into effect. At 3:35 P.M. LCDR V. R. Wanner, Commanding Officer


"boat" made preparations to surface. In a matter of minutes, the conning tower hatch was open and the MANTA was homeward bound. Within the hour, we were moored to the pier.


Tracking destroyers by sonar
exercise is more furtive than ever a game of chance.
Meanwhile, Robert McCary, Engineman First Class, has taken us in tow and our tour of the "boat begins. The first stop, after passing through the galley, is the after battery room. This, also, contains the living facilities for thirty-six men. We find their lockers to be miniature, compact and neat. From there, we pass through the motor room where an Interior Communications Electrician is keeping close surveilance on the console which indicates the amount of electricity the motors are receiving and also, the speed of the "boat". Thence, into the after torpedo room where


USS OLSEN (DE-765) spotted through periscope



I t


To the officers and men of the MANTA, our utmost appreciation is professed for the consideration and co-operation extended us in making this article possible.


PAR6 Pour


TH E INDIAN


Saturday, 30 April 1955






w


Saturday, 30 April 1995


THE INDIAN


Base '55 Baseball Opens Mon.



Flyers, SeaBees Clash In Opener

by Hal Davis
Monday night at 7 P.M. under the lights of diamond number one in the Fleet Recreation Area, the umpire will raise his arm, shout "Play Ball" and the 1955 Naval Base baseball season will be on its way.


The Stingers from MCB-1 and the Flyers from the Naval Air Station have the honor this year of opening up the 60-game schedule for the six team league.
All games this season will be played at the Naval Station diamond number one. Make-up games will be played at the Marine Site diamond on week-ends. Week-day games at Naval Station will commence promptly at '7 P.M. Weekend games and the games at Marine Site will star at 2 P.M.
In the league this year are: The Naval Air Station Flyers, the Mobile Construction One Stingers, the Marine Leathernecks (defending champions), the Naval Station Indians, the VU-10 Mallards and a composite group made up of men from the Hospital, Dental Clinic, Fleet Training Group and the Naval Supply Depot. This last club, for purposes of brevity in the Indian, will be called the Staff Corps.
The Marine Leathernecks won the league championship last year, then went on to make a clean sweep by winning the post-season tournament. The MCR-8 team whiehl was in Gtmo at this time last year, took second place in the league, but the Naval Station Indians took the runner-up spot in the postseason play-off.
New Faces in Line-Ups
Many new faces dot the line-ups of all the clubs this season. The 1954 champion Marines have probably the strongest hold-overs from last year's first string with Chuck Mason, Don Schreck, Bill Wood, Ron Plante and Bob Holmes supplying the needed experience and championship strength. The Naval Station Indians have the experience of Jerry Morgan, Dale Buss, Pete Petinak, and Dave Wolgamuth to bolster their staff. The Flyers have only Pete Bielitz left over from last year's squad which finished in last place. The Stingers are new to Gtmo and the Staff Corps had no team last year.
Managers Predict Victory
A canvas of the managers of available clubs brought out almost the same predictions for the coming season. LT Jim Dempsey of the Indians went out on a limb with "the Indians to come in first, the Marines second and possibly VU-10 third." He added that, "We'll be out to get 'em this year."
Bill Downing of the Stingers said, "We'll be in there fighting in each game."
Lt. John Dowd of the Leathernecks said he has a good club and he expects "big things." He added, "If the pitching comes through as I expect, we'll be the top team."
O;te Major Rule Change
There is only one major rule change in this year's book. The catcher's box, instead of slanting back at an angle from the plate, comes directly back from the plate, 43-inches wide. The catcher cannot step outside the box until the ball


Local 'Game of Week'

To Be Aired On WGBY
Continuing a policy established last year, the Armed Forces Radio Service station, WGBY, will air play-by-play broadcasts of the base ball "Game of the Week" from daimond number 1 in the Fleet Recreation area.
Kicking off the baseball series will be the description of the opening game of the 1955 season Monday night between the MCB-1 team and the Flyers from Naval Station.
The "Game of the Week" will fall on various nights during the seasons schedule. Broadcast time will be 1900 until completion of the game.


Baseball Schedule

MONDAY 2 MAY
Naval Air Station vs MCB-1
TUESDAY 3 MAY - OPEN

WEDNESDAY 4 MAY
Staff vs VU-10

THURSDAY 5 MAY
Marines vs Naval Station


FRIDAY 6 MAY Naval Air Station vs


RADM E. B. Taylor, ComNavBase, officially opens the Little League Baseball season on the Naval Base with the traditional throw-out of the first ball as Larry Smith stands by to begin play.


Staff


SATURDAY 7 MAY
Open

SUNDAY 8 MAY
VU-10 vs Naval Air Station All games will be played at Naval Station diamond. Week-night games start at 1900. Games on Sunday start at 1400.

has left the pitcher's hand. To do so would cause a balk to be called and any runners would advance one base. This new rule practically does away with the intentional pass and should bring up some interesting situations.
All clubs have a month's practice and several exhibition games so far and have sharpened up considerably. At this stage of the game, it would be almost disastrous to make any predictions because injuries and tranfers can change the outlook at any time during the season. But in the exhibition games we've been able to get to, the Indians look to be the sharpest and the team to beat for the pennant. With Buss, Byerley and Wolgamuth making up the mound staff, and Mandy Mandis always interchangeable from the infield to the mound, and the steady clouting of Jerry Morgan, Pete Petinak, Mandis and Kennedy, the Indians could make it ve�y tough for the rest of the league.

U


Wright North (back to camera) lays the tag on Ronnie Moseley of the Bears as he slides toward the plate. North's Colt teammate, pitcher Dick Waters, moves in for the assist if necessary as the Bears and Colts opened the Little League season last week-end.


Pony League Drops 14-0
Game To Semi-Pros
The Naval Base Pony Leaguers ran into a weird set-up last weekend in their scheduled doubleheader with two Cuban Pony League clubs.
Through an inadvertant mistake, one of the clubs that made the trip to the Naval Base to play the local Ponies was a semi-pro outfit, composed of young men mostiy over 21. As a result the base Ponies were swamped, 14 to 0.



I


Little League Schedule
Sat., 30 April-Tigers vs Bears
Sun., 1 May-Colts vs Hawks Tues., 2 May-Bears vs Colts Thurs., 5 May-Tigers vs Hawks
Sat., 7 May-Colts vs Tigers
In the second game the Caimanera Colts capitalized on the Ponies, inaiblity to connect, plus many (6) errors and rapped out 15 runs as against 9 for the Ponies. Periquin pitched for the Colts, allowing 8 hits, and Richardson hurled for the Ponies, giving up 13 safeties.


Page Five





THE INDIAN


a


Saturday, 30 April 1955


Base Dancing Class Gives First Recital
On Wednesday, 20 April, the dance and ballet students of Mrs. W.D.F. Stgner presented their first annual recital at the Community Auditorium on: Marina Point. Under the direction of Mrs. Stagner, each class presented dance routines studied in their classes in the past months.


NavSta CO Commends Two Men For Performance Of Duty


The students of the first age group-ages five to eight-participated in three numbers, in costumes as Easter Bunnies, the Turkey in the Straw, and the Ballet of Hoops.
I Ballerinas in the first age group were, left to right: Linda Lou Beiland, Milinda Murphy, Donnita Crumbley, Sharyn Ferris, Margeret Larson, Suzy Aslin, Marion Edwards, Mary Ellen Tebow, Shirley Johnson, Janis Beiland, Elaine Usey, Kaarin Tervo, Martha Gordon, Valerie Hoppe, Patricia Bramlett, and Betty Whitman.


Students in the second age group-eight to ten-also participated in three numbers, as the Easter Bonnett Girls, the Tambarine Tap, and the Ballet of Hoops.
Left to right: Barbara Gosnell, Linda Spelce, Bonnie Perdue, Patricia
Minard, Jackie Ferris, Susan Richmond, Susan Tipler, Frances Ralston, Jackie Scott, Judy -McDonald, Joanna Franklin, Teddy Knox, Susan rady, Linda Garland, and Vicki Christie.


CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, congratulates Pete Petinak, SN, after presenting Petinak with a commendation for outstanding performance of duty in operating Phillips Park and the fine services rendered to the Fleet. At the same mast, Henry L. Whitman, BM3, was commended for outstanding performance of duty while temporarily attached at the New York Air Station, Floyd Bennet Field, Long Island, New York in connection with a noise characteristics test. Looking on are CHMACH Szarowich, far left, and LTJG J. D. Byerley, fourth from left.



CPO Club Features Julio Delgado At Friday Dance


Students in the third age group-ages 10 through 12-did three numbers, an Easter Basket dance, Tap Routine, and the Ballet of Hoops. :The ballerinas were, left to right: Judy Harrison, Edith Morales, Sharon Pomeroy, Peggy Lee Evans, Patricia McFadden, Kathy Sears, Sharon Sears, Maureen Keating, Joan Dibella, Kathleen Rangus, Betty McGowan, Stephanie Stoll, Susan McElroy, Bambi Caruthers, Nancy Cushing, and Roberta Hutcheraft.
Also, the adult class presented a dance routine. Participating in the
routine were Ruth Groeneveld, Eloise Grant, Fay Yarbor, Fay Bush, Lillian Armbruster, Barbara Broughton, Lontia McGill, and Sharon Pavlow.
Highlight of the evening were three solos by Miss Sharon Pavlow.


Ladies Golf Shots Pier Victor, Industrial Area

by Betty Lou Tipler No Ghildre Plaround The First and Second Flights N iIUIII Playgrund the Ladies Golf Association are It has been brought to the attenlying weekly now for low gross tion of the Base Provost Marshal d net while working their way that many children of the base are or down the ladder tourney, playing in the Industrial area, esThe results of last Wednesday's pecially around the new Pier Vict,tches: or. All parents are urged to keep 1st-low gross-Jane McElroy their children out of this area at
low net-Frances Grounds all times. Also, it is urged that 2nd-low gross- the play limits of children be set
Theresa Moseley at the top of the stairway leading
low net-Audrey Page down from Radio Point to the InThe Third and Fourth Flights dustrial Area.


played for:
3rd-ist-Catherine McGregor
2nd-Twylla Drace
4th-lst--Fran Posette and
Dotty Brandel 2nd-Mary McFadden


The qualifying rounds for the Ladies Championship Tournament have been postponed until May 11th, tentatively, pending the purchase of the trophies.



$


Julio Delgado-Cuba's popular orchestra which will be featured at the Chief Petty Officers', Club next Friday evening, 6 May. The occasion is the Mother's Day dance and dinner. Dinner, a complete steak or chicken menu for $1.00, will be served commencing at 1800. Dancing will follow from 2000 to 2400.



$s


Page Six


in pla
an up
ra'


m









Saturday, 30 April 1955 THE INDIAN Page Seven


Mtq 'a!& osIMs VU-1O Prop Blast NAS Crosswinds
by Richard D. Lackie .


by Paul A. Hoffer, USMC
DEPARTURES
SSgt Ottis D. Williams departed for stateside duty Wednesday night via FLAW. SSgt Williams will report to 2nd Marine Division, Camp LeJuene, N. C. for duty.
SKEET SHOOT
A popular event every Saturday morning at the Marine Barracks Skeet Range is a contest for the three top shooters of the day. Steak dinners are awarded to the top three. Last Saturday Pfc. Joseph Bland won 1st place with 12 out of a possible 16. Pfc. Michael J. Kovalich one of last weeks winners had 9 out of 16 and Cpl. Roger L. Willequer 3rd with 8 out of 16.
DANCE
Last Friday night Marine Barracks had their dance. Plenty of chow and beer were on hand. Hostesses were provided and everyone had a good time, if you don't think so just ask Cpl. Sanspree. Cpl. Tague was the M. C. and did a very good job. As Cpl. Tague would say "Oh the head is heavy".
BASEBALL
Last Sunday the Marines came from behind to defeat the SeaBees 11 to 8. Ron Plante started the game was relieved by Don Schreck in the sixth. Bob Holmes relieved Schreck in the eighth and turned in a good relief performance. The season officially opens May 5th against Naval Station.
MEET YOUR TEAM
Pfc. Robert E. Holmes a returning player from last years team will be one of Marine Barracks top pitchers. Holmes was bothered by arm trouble the beginning of this season but after a two week rest he seems to have gained some of his speed back. With the fine showing he made against the SeaBees Sunday in a relief role he should be one of the top pitchers of the league. Holmes is from Washington D. C. where he played high school baseball and basketball. Holmes was one of the high scorers in the Naval Base Basketball league this year.



Teenage Round-up

by Linda Thurston
On behalf of the cast and the Naval Base School, we would like to thank most sincerely the members of the Little Theatre and the Public Works Department for their cooperation in helping us with "He Couldn't Marry Five.'
Party Patter-Phil getting two of his "Five" mixed up on stage Tuesday night: "May I can you May, April ?" . . . Stanley roaring around in his new hot rod ... the whole cast relaxing at the party after the last performance... Maryalice and her diet. She's not going to eat for six weeks... All the gals getting new formals ready for last night's prom... And the boys sweating corsages ... . Neil's pain-in-the-neck ... "Etta" Wormwood, "Grany" Johnson and "Mom" Sigler scraping the cornstarch out of their tresses... Eunice's music . . . Seniors counting the days, but are they really happy ... Pat Burke's little gathering around the kitchen sink ... Paul hoisting chairs around. "It weren't nothin'." . . . Maryalice and her lucky star ... Famous last words: "We'll be right back."


LT J. B. Hawkins departed Gtmo last Monday to relieve LTJG Dixon as OinC of VU-10's "bachelor rest home" Key West, Fla. (VU10 Detachment ONE). LTJG Dixon will return to Gtmo temporarly to qualify in the JD type aircraft.
The last two TBM's assigned to VU-10 are now back at Key West. These will soon be retired from service and will be replaced by two JD's.
The Electronics Division presented Chief Reed all the accouterments of an Ensign Wednesday. Chief Reed departed the same day for OCS at Newport, R. I., after which he will report to the U.S.S. Cavalier (APA-37).
The Squadron wishes to welcome aboard LT Bouffard, LTJG "Charley" King and LTJG "Mort" Caraway. Lt Bouffard just completed a tour with Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron ONE and LTJG's King and Caraway came to us from VF-32.


Dehumidifiers Cause

Start of Home Fires
by Felix Lopez Melendez
Base Fire Inspector
Numerous fires with heavy loss in housing areas have been caused by clothing or other combustible material coming in contact with the heating element of dehumidifiers or light bulbs in closets.
In nearly every case the protective cover had been removed or broken off and not replaced.
The fire inspectors make a quarterly inspection of private housing for fire hazards, but it's the responsibility of the occupant to keep his home free from same. At any time conditions exist which constitutes fire hazards the occupant must contact the Fire Department at once. Check your closet lights and dehumidifiers for proper clearence from combustibles and protective covers.
Ensure your safety by keeping the standard wire guard fixed properly. Always remember - there is no place like home - for fire!



NavSta EM Club

Begins Bingo Games
Bingo games have been inaugurated at the White Hat Club in the Fleet Recreation Area. Scheduled for every Friday night at 1930, the first game was held last night.
It is planned to hold the bingo session every Friday night if enough interest is shown by base and Fleet enlisted men. Dependents and civilian guests are excluded from the sessions.

Every United States Savings Bond owner tends to become a better citizen. He takes more interest in his govrnment and how it is run because he owns a share of it. Ideologies or isms don't flourish on sound econnmic soil. They grow only in surroundings of poverty and suffering. Thrifty people avoid poverty and suffering and gain in personal dignity, self-reliance and understanding of their rights and privileges. They oppose having their rights trampled and destroyed by Communism.



I


by raul Snyuer
Personnel changes up on the Air Station have slowed considerably the past week or so. The new men are still getting acquainted while those completing their tours are awaiting orders for parts unknown. During the past week, Kenneth Creekmore RMSN reported for duty from Naval Station, San Juan, Puerto Rico. Several days later, Albert T. Casantini SN from Naval Mine Countermeasures Station, Panama City, Fla.; Edward R. Farley AN from NATTC, Norman Okla., and J. D. Haggard SN from NAS Jacksonville reported aboard. Creekmore has been assigned to Communications while Casantini reported to the Boatshed. Farley caught a Leeward boat for duty and Haggard will exercise with the FLAW crew.
On Monday night aboard FLAW, Stanley Rodowicz YN1 left for "B" School at Bainbridge, Md. Frank Kynast AD3, John Woolbert ADAN, and George Redrup AN left on the same aircraft for discharge. Stan Colarusso TD1 and Marion Keefe TD2 headed for NATTC, Memphis and "B" School Tuesday night aboard another FLAW hop. A contingent for FasRon 5 included Louis M. Greer AA, James A. Adams AN, Donald L. Earl AN, Julius M. Lessard AA, Andrew J. Davis AN and Anthony F. Esposito AA, all headed for NAS, Oceana, Va., for further assignment. Willard L. Foresman AA accompanied this group on FLAW, but will continue on to NAS Quonset Point, R. I.
George B. Powers ADC, former Leading Chief at Leeward Point Field, has received orders to VW4, NAS, Jacksonville, Fla. Chief and Mrs. Powers will leave Gtmo. Sunday morning on FLAW. Hasta luego, Chief.
CHGUN J. B. Sentz has received his orders for Pacific Fleet Air Gunnery Unit at NAAS, El Centro, Calif.
LT Jack M. Hamilton will soon be leaving for his new duty station at NAS, Key West, Fla. LT Hamilton will be attached to Heliocopter Squadron-1
CHIEF YARBER TO RECEIVE COMMISSION
James Yarber ADC/AP will receive a temporary commission to the rank of Ensign in July 1955. Chief Yarber was among 321 enlisted aviation pilots chosen by a Navy selection board to receive commissions this summer. At the present time, Chief Yarber is rolling up flight'hours in the various station aircraft, particularly the HUP-2, the "Angel of the Air Station."
AV-50 IN NEW GARB
AV-50, the Enlisted Men's barracks, is receiving a face-lifting. Last year's maroon and cream is being replaced by pea-green and haze-grey. The painting will soon be completed, ending the shuffling and reshuffling of personnel from one wing to another. With the recent addition of new metal lockers, the barracks is a much improved "home" for the men on the Air Station.
ATTENTION BASEBALL FANS
All NAS Flyers baseball fans are reminded of the season opener at Fleet Recreation diamond #1 Monday night at 1900. After opening game ceremonies by officials, the Flyers will meet the MBC-1 squad in the 1955 lidlifter. Last year's fans will watch an improved ball


FTG Bulletin
by M. Vandesteen
Rear Admiral R. L. Campbell, Commander Amphibious Group FOUR, and staff visited the Fleet Training Group and Fleet Training Center, Monday, 25 April. During the tour they were given a brief ing as to the functions and training facilities of the Training Group Center.
Commander Julian Getzewich was promoted to the rank of Commander, Monday, 25 April. Effective date of rank is 1 January 1955.
Lieutenant Commander Francis W. Mosely received his appointment to Lieutenant Commander, Saturday, 23 April. Effective date of rank is I January 1955.
Mr. and Mrs. George Trimmer from New York City arrived in Guantanamo Bay, Tuesday, 19 April for a visit with Mr. and Mrs Daniel Gnad. Mr. and Mrs. Trimmer boarded commercial airlines in Guantanamo City yesterday for their return trip home.
The Fleet Training Group, Dental, Hospital and Supply combination baseball team will make their first appearance on the Naval Station Diamond #1 at 1900, Wednesday, 4 May. Their opponent will be Utility Squadron TEN. Let's start them off in the season with a large showing of fans in the bleachers.
SHIPS ARRIVALS
USS A. M. SUMNER (DD-692) (To arrive 2 May)
USS MOALE (DD-693(To arrive 2 May) USS HAMMERBERG (DE-1005) (To arive 6 May)
USS INGRAHAM (DD-694) (To arive 2 May)
SHIPS DEPARTURES
USS E. K. OLSEN (DE-T65) (To depart 6 May) :
USS GWIN (DW 33) (To depart 6 May)



HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED.-Men with experience in radio, newspaper, public ralations, script writing, technical direction, photography, re-write and public information. Must be willing to sacrifice spare time and normal activities on Naval Base for opportunities in Fourth and Fifth Estates. Applicants must have rugged constitution, ability to reason with the unreasonable, explain the unexplainable, expedite the sluggish and calm the irritated. Additional helpful qualifications include the ability to be in three places at the same time; must be able to hold an intelligent telephone conversation type a news story and drink balck coffee all in one motion; should be impervious to headaches, colds and the sudden invasion of the Friday materiel inspector; also helpful are nerves of steel, one deaf ear and a spare head. The pay is low, but money can be saved because there is no time to spend it. No references required; if your pulse beat is anywhere close to 72, you are eligible. No phone calls, please. Come in person to The Indian office for full information.


club which hopes to end much higher than last's years cellar spot. You are urged to give your team all the support possible, helping them to make this season a huge success.


Saturday, 30 April 1955


Page Seven


THE INDIAN









NnV-flPPO-iOND-GtMo.-0951 THE INDIANSaudy30Arl15


MOVIES

Saturday, 30 April
SEA OF LOST SHIPS
John Derek Wanda Hendrix
Story of two boys brought up together as brothers. They enter the Coast Guard Academy together, both fall in love with same girl. Rather than hurt the other's feelings one breaks off with the girl, gets drunk and wrecks a car, is expelled from Academy.

Sunday, 1 May
KANSAS CITY CONFIDENTIAL
John Payne Coleen Gray
A bank robbery planned by a retired police captain fails. A florist with a police record is involved indirectly but fights to clear himself.

Monday, 2 May
CRY VENGEANCE
Mark Stevens Martha Hyer
Former detective is released from San Quentin after serving a long term on a framed charge. He sets out for Alaska to find the man who framed him and to clear his own name.

Tuesday, 3 May UNCHAINED
Chester Morris Elroy Hirsch
Depicts efforts of warden to prove that a new penal system whereby prisoners are on honor is worthwhile. He has trouble with rancher in for attempted murder.

Wednesday, 4 May
SIX BRIDGES TO CROSS
Tony Curtis Julia Adams
Shows how depression in the 30's produced some of our top public enemies. Leader of one group, when saved from a tough rap by a cop becomes a stool pigeon. They become friends and former gang leader attempts to lead straight life.

Thursday, 5 May
THE COUNTRY GIRL
Bing Crosby Grace Kelly
A great Broadway singer who has taken to drink gets a big chance for comeback, but lacks confidence necessary to fill part. Through his wife he finds strength and abandons doubts that have led to his intemperence.

Friday, 6 May
ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET
THE KEYSTONE KOPS
But Abbot Lou Costello
Takes place in New York in 1912. The boys are cheated out of $5,000 by a sharpie and they track down the man, via all kinds of wierd happenings.


Radio's 'Tops' of the Week

SATURDAY, 30 April ... THEATRE ROYAL . . . 9:00 P.M.
Margaret Lockwood is guest star for this week. Misi Lockwood gives an entertaining performance as Becky Sharpe ir, sequences from Thackerey's "Vanity Fair".
SUNDAY, 1 May ... HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE... 10:00 P.M.
An intense drama of a schoolteacher and her ambiti us dreams for one of her students will be the subject of "The Corn I Green" Claudette Colbert and Cameron Mitchell will co-star.
MONDAY, 2 May . . . BEST PLAYS . .. 9:E0 P.M.
Another of Broadway's best finds it's way to the Best Plays stage this week as Elliot Nugent re-creates his role of the college proffessor who almost loses his wife to a homecoming football hero in "The Male Animal".
TUESDAY, 3 May .. . THE CHASE .. . 9:00 P.M.
Look for the surprise climax when a wealthy young man loses all his riches, his girl, and his will to live, and hires a gunman to kill him when he changes his mind and decides to run, the Chase is on.
WEDNESDAY, 4 May... ON STAGE ... 9:00 P.M.
Cathy and Elliot Lewis star in "Current Up A Side Street" as a killer and his girl who try to elude the law, but find they cannot elude their mistrust of one another.
THURSDAY, 5 May ... FAMILY THEATRE ... 9:00 P.M.
"Tennessee's Partner" is the story of an old prospector who continually stands by a no-good friend even though he knows he's being exploited. Walter Brenman is the star and your hostess will be Joan Evans.
FRIDAY, 6 May . . . RADIO WORKSHOP ... 10:00 P.M.
In the world of 2500 A.D. many strange and worderful changes may have occurred in the society of man, that is, unless man, overpowered by his own accomplishments, allows himself to become the servant of the very things he himself has creaed. Listen and wonder as the Radio Workshop players present, "The Doom Machine".


JUST MAMIE


Hold onto your hats! It's Mamie Van Doren, current rage in Hollywood.


$ $


by Francis L. Cannon
AMERICAN IN RUSSIA by Harrison E. Salisbury
The author of this fascinating narrative spent five years (194954) in Russia as correspondent for the New York Times. It is the story of his experiences in dealing with the Russian people, officials, and men-in-the street. He tells how they live, what many of them who dared to express an opinion thought about. The book is based to a great extent on his famous series in the Times, "Russia Re-Viewed."
SCOTLAND YARD by Sir Harold Scott
The full story of the workings of fabled old Scotland Yard. It is not ,as many believe, a sort of detective agency. It is the headquarters of London's Metropolitan Police Force and from it all branches of the force are directed. The author was Commissioner of Police from, 1945 to 1953. He covers the whole gamut of operations from problems of recruitment and training to protection of the Royal Family. He recalls many famous cases, including the theft of the Stone of Scone by a group of fervent Scottish Nationals.
COROMANDEL
by John Masters
A novel concerning the exploits of Jason Savage, Wiltshire farm boy turned adventurer. In 1627 he obtained a blood-stained map of India with the name "Coromandel" emblazoned thereon. It engendered a vision which drove him from the farm to the streets of London, then by ship to India, where he hoped to find Coromandel and Mount Meru. Just why he went to all this trouble I really don't know. Possibly he hoped to find cheap farm labor.
FISHER OF MEN by Kurt Frieburger
A biblical novel of the life of St. Peter. The story starts in Bethsaida, where he was born and where he first heard the word of Christ. He accompanies Christ on His journeys and is struck with wonder at His preachings. After Christ's cruel trial and betrayal Peter goes to Rome to begin the mission Christ has entrusted to him. The book also gives an insight into the cultural history of the times and life in the imperial city.
ADMIRAL KIMMEL'S STORY USN (Ret.)
by RADM Husband E., Kimmel
"How it feels to be left holding, the bag" would be a more apt title for this one. It is the personal story of the man in command at Pearl Harbor at the time of the December 7 attack. His purpose is more than to vindicate himself in the eyes of history, he wants the facts set down so that a repetition of the same thing can never happen again. He states that Washington had information of the impending attack well before it happened and that this was withheld from the commanders at Pearl Harbor. He was denied materials which he needed badly. He couldn't send the fleet out because there was no way to refuel the whole fleet at sea. He makes no out-and-out accusations but if you read closely. you can get. the idea.


Saturday, 30 April 1955


Navv :DPPO 10ND--Gtmo.-0951


Ift


4%


THE INDIAN




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EM3U21V2A_OHNZXR INGEST_TIME 2015-10-27T21:47:46Z PACKAGE AA00031277_00323
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

g2 "Govevs qTMO Like The Sunshine" Vol. VI, No. 16 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 30 April 1955 Naval Station Tops Base Shady Auto Deals Entrap On Volunteer Blood Donors Many Service Personnel RADM E. B. Taylor, Base Commander pins the Air Medal on LT Whitman's coat as CDR E. W. Sutherling, Supply Depot C. 0., looks on. LT Whitman Awarded Air Force Medal Last week, on behalf of the Secretary of the Air Force, RADM Taylor decorated LT R. G. Whitman, NSD Administrative Officer, with the Air Medal. During World War II, LT Whitman served with the 351th Heavy Bombardment Group of the Army Air Forces in the European Theatre. Captured when he was forced to parachute from a blazing B-17 over the anti-aircraft defenses at Calais while returning from a mission deep into enemy territory, LT Whitman spent the last year of the war in a P.O.W. camp in Northeastern Germany. On-Site Survey Party Arrives Here Monday The On-Site Survey Board, headed by RADM T. C. Ragan, will arrive on the Naval Base Monday at the Naval Air Station for the annual Survey Inspection of the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base. Arriving at 1145, the Survey Board will begin their inspection with an Arrival Conference with Commander Naval Base, RADM E. B. Taylor, and all commanding officers of Naval Base activities. Following the arrival conference, the Board will begin the survey of the Naval Base. Tuesday morning the Survey Inspection of the Naval Station and associated activities will be held, lasting all day. Wednesday the party is scheduled for survey of the Naval Air Station with a write-up following on Tuesday. Friday the Survey Board will separate into teams with teams inspecting Fleet Training Center, Naval Supply Depot, Naval Hospital, the Marine Barracks, and the Commissary Store. The formal inspection will conclude Saturday with the final writeup and departure conference. The Volunteer Blood Donor list at the Naval Hospital has reached an all-time high since the last stop of the Mobile Blood Donor Unit at the Naval Station Sick Bay on Bay Hill on Thursday, 21 April. At this last stop of the Mobile Unit, 103 men of the Naval Station showed up to be placed on the Volunteer Blood Donor list, bringing to 105 the total for Naval Station personnel. This figure of 105 tops all commands both in percentage and in number. And besides the statistical outlook, the 105 donors from the Naval Station is over half of the total figure, 197, giving the Naval Station the right to claim more volunteer donors than all other commands combined" The breakdown for the Blood Donor List by Commands is as follows: Naval Station 105 Naval Supply Depot 44 VU-10 and NAS 23 Marine Barracks 22 MCB-1 4 TOTAL 197 Breaking the Blood Donor List down according to types and RH factor, the list is as follows: Type "0" 83 Type "A" 83 Type "B" 25 Type "AB" 6 Of the total 197 donors, 164 were Rh Positive, and 33 were Rh Negative. On the basis of these figures, it is possible to supply the more common type of blood, Type "0" with the average maximum of 6 pints for 12 consecutive days. However, the rare type, Type "AB", a serious case of bleeding during an emergency would be hard to supply with blood since there are only six AB donors on the base. As a result, the Blood Donor List can not be called adequate in every respect, but it is far better than ever before. by PFC. Norbert Olshefski, USA (AFPS Staff Writer) New York-Some servicemen returning to the United States from Europe are becoming victims of automobile racketeers, authorities at Ft. Hamilton warned recently. The rackets are worked from both sides of the Atlantic, with the European end of the operations at Bremerhaven, the huge North German port of embarkation. But the services are powerless to intervene in a private contract between two persons. The individual can receive legal assistance from his service. Then, if it is determined that a breach of the law occurred, he can take the case to a civilian court. In one complaint, a sergeant said he was promised a 15 per cent discount on the list price of an automobile and so he signed a contract and made a deposit. He learned later that his contract did not call for a discount and was unable to get his money back. One salesman told a soldier that he represented a certain firm and the soldier signed a contract and made a deposit. Later he found that the man represented another firm and was unable to get his deposit back. Another switch pulled on servicemen is the one in which a promise is made to deliver a certain model with extras, such as radio, heater, etc. When the soldier goes to pick up his car on arrival in the states, the dealer has a different model ready-without extras. The soldier either takes the switch or forfeits the deposit he laid down. The best means of combating such tactics, according to the Army, is to check the contract, preferably with a lawyer or legal officer, and inquire about the reliability of the firm with which you are dealing. Volunteer blood donors present at the last Naval Station personnel inspection were congratulated for their part by CDR V. J. Soballe for CAPT W. R. Caruthers. Over 100 men from the Naval Station volunteered to be placed on the Blood Donor list, giving the Naval Station the honor of having "more than all other commands combined." Pictured here are the donors present at the last inspection. I MCB-1 Sets Aim At 55 Family Units By Early August Late last week, CDR 0. J. Martyn, Commanding Officer, MCB-1, announced that Commander Construction Battalions, Atlantic Fleet, has placed MCB-1 in the role of building contractor to complete 55 housing units. The pay-off for successful completion of the contract will be in the form of an early return to the battalion's home port at Davisville, Rhode Island. Specially the agreement requires that after 15 April, MCB-1 complete 55 equivalent units on the housing project and that 55 units be turned over to the Naval Base ready for occupancy. The new concept in determining the length of the battalion's deployment in Guantanamo Bay does not in itself guarantee that the battalion will complete operations here any sooner. Rather, the contract affords the battalion an opportunity to earn an early return to their home port by increasing its output. Analysis of the construction rate thus far shows that unless means are found to speed up the work, the required 55 units cannot be completed before 20 August. However, it is estimated that the units may be complete by 5 August. This would require an average of 3.4 units per week from the contract date, 15 April. The average since MCB-1 took over the project has been 2.5 units per week. 2,427 Navy EM Upped To CPO Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has announced the promotion of 2,427 enlisted men and women to Chief Petty Officer as the result of Service-wide examinations held in February. Promotions will be made in five increments between May 16, 1955, and Jan. 16, 1956. Fifty-seven persons in 17 rates, for which no examination were held in February, will be advanced from the waiting list resulting from the 1954 tests. They will be advanced on May 16 in the first increment which has a total of 535 promotions. In the second increment on July 16, 492 men will be advanced; 491 on Sept. 16; 479 on Nov. 16, and 487 on Jan. 16, 1956. PTA Elects Officers Tuesday The annual election of officers of the Parent-Teachers Association is scheduled to take place Tuesday nigmt, 3 May at 1930 in the High School open-air auditorium. In addition, a report from the Recreation Committee will be read. All members are urged to attend. I 9/m

PAGE 2

Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 30 April 1955 The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 30 April 1955 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LTJG J. D. Byerley --------Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOG------------------Editor H. L. Sisson, J03--------------------News F. L. Cannon, J 3--------Photographer D. C. Roberts, JOSN-------------Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1944, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a members of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. What's Doin' Stateside (AFPS Weekly Feature) St. Louis is on the way to becoming the telephone capital of the nation. ...It has been made the center of a long distance phone network which eventually will make it possible to talk with virtually any city in the U.S. and Canada simply by operators dialing the number. ...Already more than half of all stateside long distance calls are completed in this speedier fashion. Supermarkets are going chic. A new one on New York's Staten Island sells women's apparel as well as groceries. ...A customer can help herself to a new handbag, dress and jar of pickles. A machine has been developed at the Univesrity of Illinois to perform certain types of brain operations using extremely high pitched sound waves to eliminate tissue instead of conventional surgical instruments. ...Tested extensively on animals, it's now believed ready for use on humans. The "do-it-yourself" trend in home repairs and construction is creating something of a safety menace, according to safety experts. ...Six hundred thousand amateur carpenters and selftaught electricians become casualties yearly and the number is going up. A survey conducted by the University of California unearthed this bit. ...More money is spent each year in the U.S. on comic books than on all high school and grammar school textbooks put together. I Won't Sell My Citizenship (Permission to reprint this aritcle obtained from "American Weekly Magazine.") by Sgt. Wilbur F. H. Radeline At any time in the past 30 years I could have inherited a fortune if I had been willing to do one thing give up my American citizenship. I would not do that and I did not speak about it to any but a few close friends. Recently, however, the story has received some publicity and several hundred Americans have written me to suggest what they think I should do. In writing this I want to thank them-and to explain why no amount of money is worth the price I would have to pay. I was born in a county poorhouse in Pennsylvania. My mother was an immigrant servant girl. My father was Count De Brogna, a Sicilian, who died in Italy in 1923. He left me an estate which has been estimated at $300,000 in citrus farms, cash, an ancestral mansion, and family jewels. He left them, that is, on one condition, that I change my citizenship. Yes-he was my father. But he would not give his name to the girl he said he loved, nor to his son, because of the "vast" differences in their stations in life. For he was not an American. But foster parents adopted me, gave me their name, and helped my mother-for they were Americans. They gave me love, a home and happiness. I have tried to get the estate. I consulted outstanding Republican and Democratic members of Congress, and was even referred to Cordell Hull when he was Secretary of State. The answer was the same in every case: the will is valid; I could only inherit by complying with the terms my father set down. That I will never do. I am a sick man. I have what is called osteoarthritis. My wife suffers from epilepsy and frequently-sometimes two or three times a week-tears her clothes. It is hard to replace them on a sergeant's pay. I need the inheritance money very much. But no amount of need can tempt me to surrender my citizenship. I have seen Americans work, live and die for my country, America, and for what it offers to all, not just a select few. Where else in the world can an ailing man, over 50 years of age, and his sick wife look forward to security and peace of mind and soul in the eventide of life? That is why I thank God I am an American, and pray that I will always be a good one. (AFPS) THE TOASTMASTER by Joe West One of the most common words seen in the offices of both government and industry is the word "THINK", yet concentration is one of the lost, or nearly lost, mental powers of most Americans. We have forgotten how to pay attention. We do not know how to listen and observe. Because we do not practice concentration, we forget names and faces and facts. We let our minds wander from the main point, and so we never catch that point. Most of us do not understand about things because we do not pay attention. Our wits, such as they are, go wool-gathering even while we talk, and much more while others talk. Then we complain about our poor memories. Think of the person you met a little while ago. You know him well, so well you could speak his name and exchange the usual greetings. But beyond that, what was said? Can you remember what kind of clothes he was wearing? Did he have a necktie or was he wearing a sport shirt? Did he wear a hat, or was he bareheaded? How many friends have we lost? How many people have we unconsciously hurt because we spoke without thinking? It is written somewhere that: "They never taste who always drink; They always talk who never think." You positively can control your mind, but it takes effort and will S power to do it. Conditions around us conspire to distract attention and make concentration harder, but you can do it if you will. The fact that most of us lack concentration power seems to be a reflection of the times in which we live. We are constantly assailed by so many noises and sights that we become confused calloused, and inattentive in self defense. But if we are going to produce results of any merit, we must exert our mental strength to rise above these distractions. We can shut out the noises when we become engrossed in some line of thought. We can ignore our surroundings as we listen to some speaker of worth. We can even improve our memories if we learn to concentrate. Concentration and frequent reviews are the twin keys to better memory and better thinking. We can disregard unimportant things and fix attention on that which matters most. Then we can bring back in review the things we wish to retain. By that process we can remember names and faces, or speech outlines, or important engagements and errands. It is not easy, but it is possible. You can control your thoughts, and you can build a dependable memory, but you can't do it by merely wishing for it. If it is worth your while, you will accomplish it by concentrated persistent effort. You must be a dictator, a dictator to your mind. 5S Sunday, 1 May 1955 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0000-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHO, USN (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner Some years ago I made the acquaintance of a great animal trainer. He had trained a large number of animal acts for circuses. One of his observations which he repeated often was this: The animals that I train work to their fullest capacity, but the men that I live with utilize only one fourth of their talents. This is an observation that drives deep into the conscience of every one of us. What I am trying to point out, shipmates, is this: There are unexplored riches and possibilities in the life of every one of us. Too often it remains for crises to arouse us to the realization of this fact. We miss so much by taking an easy road of contentment and satisfaction. We fail in our obligation to ourself, our fellow men, and our God when we do not live our lives to their fullest capacities. The result of our failure to use to the utmost the God-given potentialities of our lives is the loss of those gifts. This is one of the inevitable laws of life. We lose the things that we do not use. Hoover Rupert put it in a couplet. A buried talent is never a buried treasure; Talents become treasures only through use. This is true in every realm of living. He that uses his money increases it. He who guards his health keeps it. He who uses his intellect increases his knowledge. He who worships increases love and knowledge of God. Regardless of what our abilities may be we must use them, one or many, if we are to make life count for the most. Some of those who have lived most successfully are men and women who had to face the greatest of difficulties and handicaps. There is Helen Keller for instance. How much she has accomplished with so little. Abraham Lincoln, revered as one of our greatest presidents, faced disappointment and adversity so often but persisted in developing and using the gifts that he had. Beethoven wrote his greatest symphony after he lost his hearing. The great challenge of life is to recognize your limitations and then to develop to the utmost the talents that God has given you. You must persist in the development of those talents regardless of the disappointments and adversities that assail you. Have faith in yourself; have faith in God; and great will be your discoveries and your accomplishments. Karl G. Peterson Page TWO THE INDIAN Saturday, 30 April 1955

PAGE 3

Saturday, 30 April 1955 Legion Auxiliary Announces Spelling, Poster Winners Last week, the American Legion Auxiliarly announced the winners of their annual Spelling Bee and also the Poppy Day Poster Contest. A first and second place prize was awarded to the Spelling Bee winners. Top award went to Wynn McGregor and Jim Minard proved to be the second best speller. The Poppy Day Poster Contest was divided into three grade groups. Winners in the first group, grades four through six, were: 1st, Sallie Scarborough; 2nd Truman Scarborough; 3rd, Duncan Tebow; and Honorable Mention, Billy Jean Mathews. In the second grade groupgrades seven through nine, Carl Heimer was awarded first place, Kathleen Bertagna won second prize, and Emil Kloske won third place honors. Tim Reffett was the winner and the only entry in the High School Group. 'Once Upon A Clothesline' Summer Recreation Program Next Junior Workshop Play Set For Base Children CAPT Tilden I. Moe, Commanding Officer, Naval "Hospital, congratulates LT S. L. Moschella (MC) USN, prior to presenting him his certificate for appointment to the rank of LCDR. Dr. Moschella's date of rank is March 1955. LT Moschella is the third doctor at the Hospital to receive word of his appointment to LCDR. Pictured above, left to right, front row; Billy Jean Mathews, Sallie Scarborough, Kathleen Bertagna, Ducan Tebow, and Jim Minard. Rear row, left to right: Truman Scarborough, Carl Heimer, Tim Reffett, and Emil Kioske. Following the successful production of "Many Moons" which opened last night for a 2-night performance at the Community Auditorium, the Junior Theatre Workshop plans a quick follow-up next week-end with the prsentation of "Once Upon A Clothesline." An entirely new and different cast will perform in the "Clotheslines." The Junior Theatre Workshop is sponsored by the Guantanamo Bay Little Theatre and is considered the grass roots proving ground for the young people of the base. It was created to stimulate interest in Little Theatre activity and as an aid in training the future actors and actresses. As in the prevous production, "Once Upon A Clothesline" is directed by Mrs. Lillian Armbruster, assisted by Miss Ann Saxe. Included in the cast of "Clothesline" are: Bob Zaborsky, Ginger Shiver, Dan Douglas, Susan McElroy, Judy Harrison, Jim Page, Stephanie Stoll, Jeff Maddox, Peter Minard, Pat Page, Pat Minard, Walter Snow and Eddie Kloske. Tickets may be obtained in front of the Naval Station Navy Exchange or from any member of the Junior Workshop for 25 LTJG Doss Sinks Hole-in-One LTJG L. W. Doss from the Dental Clinic joined the elite "Hole-inOne" Club a week ago when he one-stroked the sixth hole on the golf course. The first ace of his golfing experience, Doss used an 8-iron for the 122 yard hole. Number 6 is the most popular hole for aces on the course. Eleven have been made since 1946. Doss makes it an even dozen and he thus becomes member number 26 of the "Gtmo Aces." The Guantanamo Bay Parent Teachers Association is sponsoring a summer recreation program for children of the Naval Base that will include horseback riding, swiming, sailboating, handi-crafts, nature study, music study, and general sports beginning shortly after school is dismissed for summer vacation. Planed as a self-supporting enterprise, minium charges will be collected for each of the activities. but wholesome recreation for children will be insured. The swiming program has been set for mornings and will last for five weeks or 12 lessons. The charge for the 12 lessons will be $2.50. Riding instructions will also be held in the mornings. The charge for 11 lessons will be $10.00. Sailing lessons can be arranged for $.75 per lesson. Then, beginning 6 June, to 1 July, there will be an afternoon activities session at the Naval Base School for children in grades 1 through 12. Each class will meet for two hours every afternoon Monday through Friday and will be directed in many different activities, such as handi-crafts, nature study, music, and general sports. Qualified instructors will be in charge of the classes, and bus transportation will be provided. The price of the afternoon activities program will be $3.75. Mrs. D. E. McCoy has been appointed treasurer for the summer activities program. The time and place for the collection of fees will be announced later. Also, all parents are reminded that children must present a signed receipt to the instructor of any activity he intends to participate in before the instructor will enroll the child. HONOR MAN Interest Survey Made In FSU Correspondence Courses A survey is currently being made to determine whether or not there is sufficient interest at this base to support a University extension program from which students could receive resident college credits. The program would be carried out by Florida State University, which already sponsors such programs at military installations in various areas. Classes would be conducted by regular faculty memhers or other competent instructors. Cost to students would be $12 per credit, or $36 for the average 3credit course. Application forms listing available courses may be obtained at the Industrial Relations Office or from Military division officers. No fees are being collected at this time, but applications will be used to determine whether sufficient local interest exists to support the purposed program. If instituted, classes would probably begin sometime after 1 July. An unidentified young lady of the Naval Base kisses the ring of His Excellency, Enrique Perez Serantes, Archbishop of Santiago, at a reception held for him at the Naval Base School patio last Sunday. Archbishop Serantes administered First Holy Communion to 33 persons here and gave Confirmation to 16 persons. U Top man at last week's Naval Station inspection was Arthur Bery, CS2 of Bay Hill galley. The honorman selection hails from San Francisco. He has been in the Navy four years and two months, 19 months of which have been spent here at Guantanamo. Prior to reporting here for duty he was on the USS Iowa (BB-61). fat lady stepped on the scales, not knowing that they were out of order. The indicator stopped at 75 pounds. "Holy smoke," exclaimed a drunk who watched her, "She's hollow." i m THE INDIAN Page Three

PAGE 4

Pag Four THE HUNTER and THE HUNTED, a day in a Sub. we find ourselves in officer's country, which also embraces the ship's office. Once again, we find that space is at a premium. While in the forward torpedo room, the "word" is passed for All Hands not actually on watch to report to the compartment for a lecture on personal hygiene. Here, we listened attentively, while "Doc" Saur presented his lecture. A characteristic which is conspicuous among submariners, is their longing for self-improvement. Foreign to these men, is idleness. Personnel not qualified in sulmarines strive to acquire the requisites which will enable them to pass the rigorous qualification test. To wear the Dolphin, which is the symbol of a qualified submariner, is the desire of every man. Each and everyone of these men know that the course prescribed for qualification will be demanding, but they feel that to wear this prized emblem is remuDiving Officer and planesman Take her down". by Charles M. Bslake, YN3 -Photographs by F. L. Cannon, J03 DIVE ...At 8:39 A.M. the U.S.S. MANTA (AGSS-299) began to submerge. Precise teamwork coupled with assurance were the basic components of this metamorphasis. In less than a minute's time, the "boat" was below the waters' surface. Omnipresent was tension, too. Our vantage point for this drama of reality was the control room which crackled with brisk commands, audible over the infernal roar of the "boat" bleeding air to insure watertight integrity. Seconds later, a deadening silence prevailed. Present in the we find four gigantic missiles of control room are the Diving Offideath, inert, and housed in tubes. cer, planesmen, trim manifold operAlso, and with a touch of irony, ator, hydraulic manifold operator, the after-escape hatch is shown each viewing the maze of lights, to us. some red, some green, with the At this point, we did a turnabout solemn aspect of a judge. The suband started forward. The stem of marine continues to plummet deepthe "boat" is our destination. er into the capriciousness of the While passing through the control deep. room the Diving Officer gives the At a predetermined depth, the command "bubble". McCary reachsubmarine levels off for its operes down and selects a lever among ation with two destroyers, which, the labyrinth that are present; a shortly, will pursue and simulate bubble of air is forced out of the aeration enough. Following dinner, the destruction of the "boat" The safety tank to indicate the "boats" we were taken into the conning position to the operating forces tower, where we saw LTJG Parker afloat. The procedure was instanand Radioman Berce tracking two taneous. The relative distance of ships on sonar. the bubble on the surface and the The intensity of the vibration dye marker, cast over the side by diminished during our visit and s; t ?v the destroyer, will indicate success subsequently, evasive tactics were lIv or failure of the simulated attack, put into effect. At 3:35 P.M. LCDR Passing through watertight doors, V. R. Wanner, Commanding Officer G. D. Wells, TM2 at torpedo firing key of the MANTA, Officer of the Deck, helmsman, and quartermaster scurried into the conning tower as the "boat" made preparations to surface. In a matter of minutes, the conning tower hatch was open and the MANTA was homeward bound. Within the hour, we were moored to the pier. Tracking destroyers by sonar exercise is more furtive than ever a game of chance. Meanwhile, Robert McCary, Engineman First Class, has taken us in tow and our tour of the "boat begins. The first stop, after passing through the galley, is the after battery room. This, also, contains the living facilities for thirty-six men. We find their lockers to be miniature, compact and neat. From there, we pass through the motor room where an Interior Communications Electrician is keeping close surveilance on the console which indicates the amount of electricity the motors are receiving and also, the speed of the "boat". Thence, into the after torpedo room where USS OLSEN (DE-765) spotted through periscope I S To the officers and men of the MANTA, our utmost appreciation is professed for the consideration and co-operation extended us in making this article possible. Saturday, 30 April 1955 ft THE INDIAN

PAGE 5

Base '55 Baseball Opens Mon. Flyers, SeaBees Clash In Opener by Hal Davis Monday night at 7 P.M. under the lights of diamond number one in the Fleet Recreation Area, the umpire will raise his arm, shout "Play Ball" and the 1955 Naval Base baseball season will be on its way. The Stingers from MCB-1 and the Flyers from the Naval Air Station have the honor this year of opening up the 60-game schedule for the six team league. All games this season will be played at the Naval Station diamond number one. Make-up games will be played at the Marine Site diamond on week-ends. Week-day games at Naval Station will commence promptly at 7 P.M. Weekend games and the games at Marine Site will star at 2 P.M. In the league this year are: The Naval Air Station Flyers, the Mobile Construction One Stingers, the Marine Leathernecks (defending champions), the Naval Station Indians, the VU-10 Mallards and a composite group made up of men from the Hospital, Dental Clinic, Fleet Training Group and the Naval Supply Depot. This last club, for purposes of brevity in the Indian, will be called the Staff Corps. The Marine Leathernecks won the league championship last year, then went on to make a clean sweep by winning the post-season tournament. The MCB-8 team whieh was in Gtmo at this time last year, took second place in the league, but the Naval Station Indians took the runner-up spot in the postseason play-off. New Faces in Line-Ups Many new faces dot the line-ups of all the clubs this season. The 1954 champion Marines have probably the strongest hold-overs from last year's first string with Chuck Mason, Don Schreck, Bill Wood, Ron Plante and Bob Holmes supplying the needed experience and championship strength. The Naval Station Indians have the experience of Jerry Morgan, Dale Buss, Pete Petinak, and Dave Wolgamuth to bolster their staff. The Flyers have only Pete Bielitz left over from last year's squad which finished in last place. The Stingers are new to Gtmo and the Staff Corps had no team last year. Managers Predict Victory A canvas of the managers of available clubs brought out almost the same predictions for the coming season. LT Jim Dempsey of the Indians went out on a limb with "the Indians to come in first, the Marines second and possibly VU-10 third." He added that, "We'll be out to get 'em this year." Bill Downing of the Stingers said, "We'll be in there fighting in each game." Lt. John Dowd of the Leathernecks said he has a good club and he expects "big things." He added, "If the pitching comes through as I expect, we'll be the top team." One Major Rule Change There is only one major rule change in this year's book. The catcher's box, instead of slanting back at an angle from the plate, comes directly back from the plate, 43-inches wide. The catcher cannot step outside the box until the ball Local 'Game of Week' To Be Aired On WGBY Continuing a policy established last year, the Armed Forces Radio Service station, WGBY, will air play-by-play broadcasts of the base ball "Game of the Week" from daimond number 1 in the Fleet Recreation area. Kicking off the baseball series will be the description of the opening game of the 1955 season Monday night between the MCB-1 team and the Flyers from Naval Station. The "Game of the Week" will fall on various nights during the seasons schedule. Broadcast time will be 1900 until completion of the game. Baseball Schedule MONDAY 2 MAY Naval Air Station vs MCB-1 TUESDAY 3 MAY -OPEN WEDNESDAY 4 MAY Staff vs VU-10 THURSDAY 5 MAY Marines vs Naval Station FRIDAY 6 MAY Naval Air Station vs RADM E. B. Taylor, ComNavBase, officially opens the Little League Baseball season on the Naval Base with the traditional throw-out of the first ball as Larry Smith stands by to begin play. Staff SATURDAY 7 MAY Open SUNDAY 8 MAY VU-10 vs Naval Air Station All games will be played at Naval Station diamond. Week-night games start at 1900. Games on Sunday start at 1400. has left the pitcher's hand. To do so would cause a balk to be called and any runners would advance one base. This new rule practically does away with the intentional pass and should bring up some interesting situations. All clubs have a month's practice and several exhibition games so far and have sharpened up considerably. At this stage of the game, it would be almost disastrous to make any predictions because injuries and transfers can change the outlook at any time during the season. But in the exhibition games we've been able to get to, the Indians look to be the sharpest and the team to beat for the pennant. With Buss, Byerley and Wolgamuth making up the mound staff, and Mandy Mandis always interchangeable from the infield to the mound, and the steady clouting of Jerry Morgan, Pete Petinak, Mandis and Kennedy, the Indians could make it very tough for the rest of the league. U Wright North (back to camera) lays the tag on Ronnie Moseley of the Bears as he slides toward the plate. North's Colt teammate, pitcher Dick Waters, moves in for the assist if necessary as the Bears and Colts opened the Little League season last week-end. Pony League Drops 14-0 Game To Semi-Pros The Naval Base Pony Leaguers ran into a weird set-up last weekend in their scheduled doubleheader with two Cuban Pony League clubs. Through an inadvertant mistake, one of the clubs that made the trip to the Naval Base to play the local Ponies was a semi-pro outfit, composed of young men mostly over 21. As a result the base Ponies were swamped, 14 to 0. I Little League Schedule Sat., 30 April-Tigers vs Bears Sun., 1 May-Colts vs Hawks Tues., 2 May-Bears vs Colts Thurs., 5 May-Tigers vs Hawks Sat., 7 May-Colts vs Tigers In the second game the Caimanera Colts capitalized on the Ponies, inaiblity to connect, plus many (6) errors and rapped out 15 runs as against 9 for the Ponies. Periquin pitched for the Colts, allowing 8 hits, and Richardson hurled for the Ponies, giving up 13 safeties. Saturday, 30 April 1956 Page Five THE INDIAN

PAGE 6

Saturday, 30 April 1955 Base Dancing Class Gives First Recital On Wednesday, 20 April, the dance and ballet students of Mrs. W.D.F. Stagner presented their first annual recital at the Community Auditorium on Marina Point. Under the direction of Mrs. Stagner, each class presented dance routines studied in their classes in the past months. NavSta C 0 Commends Two Men For Performance Of Duty The students of the first age group-ages five to eight-participated in three numbers, in costumes as Easter Bunnies, the Turkey in the Straw, and the Ballet of Hoops. Ballerinas in the first age group were, left to right: Linda Lou Beiland, Milinda Murphy, Donnita Crumbley, Sharyn Ferris, Margeret Larson, Suzy Aslin, Marion Edwards, Mary Ellen Tebow, Shirley Johnson, Janis Beiland, Elaine Usey, Kaarin Tervo, Martha Gordon, Valerie Hoppe, Patricia Bramlett, and Betty Whitman. Students in the second age group-eight to ten-also participated in three numbers, as the Easter Bonnett Girls, the Tambarine Tap, and the Ballet of Hoops. Left to right: Barbara Gosnell, Linda Spelce, Bonnie Perdue, Patricia Minard, Jackie Ferris, Susan Richmond, Susan Tipler, Frances Ralston, Jackie Scott, Judy McDonald, Joanna Franklin, Teddy Knox, Susan Grady, Linda Garland, and Vicki Christie. CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, congratulates Pete Petinak, SN, after presenting Petinak with a commendation for outstanding performance of duty in operating Phillips Park and the fine services rendered to the Fleet. At the same mast, Henry L. Whitman, BM3, was commended for outstanding performance of duty while temporarily attached at the New York Air Station, Floyd Bonnet Field, Long Island, New York in connection with a noise characteristics test. Looking on are CHMACH Szarowich, far left, and LTJG J. D. Byerley, fourth from left. CPO Club Features Julio Delgado At Friday Dance Students in the third age group-ages 10 through 12-did three numbers, an Easter Basket dance, Tap Routine, and the Ballet of Hoops. The ballerinas were, left to right: Judy Harrison, Edith Morales, Sharon Pomeroy, Peggy Lee Evans, Patricia McFadden, Kathy Sears, Sharon Sears, Maureen Keating, Joan Dibella, Kathleen Rangus, Betty McGowan, Stephanie Stoll, Susan McElroy, Bambi Caruthers, Nancy Cushing, and Roberta Hutcheraft. Also, the adult class presented a dance routine. Participating in the routine were Ruth Groeneveld, Eloise Grant, Fay Yarbor, Fay Bush, Lillian Armbruster, Barbara Broughton, Lontia McGill, and Sharon Pavlow. Highlight of the evening were three solos by Miss Sharon Pav1ow. Ladies Golf Shots Pier Victor, Industrial Area by Betty Lou Tipler No Childr Playground The First and Second Flights the Ladies Golf Association are It has been brought to the attenying weekly now for low gross tion of the Base Provost Marshal d net while working their way that many children of the base are or down the ladder tourney. playing in the Industrial area, esThe results of last Wednesday's specially around the new Pier Victtches: or. All parents are urged to keep 1st-low gross-Jane McElroy their children out of this area at low net-Frances Grounds all times. Also, it is urged that 2nd-low grossthe play limits of children be set Theresa Moseley at the top of the stairway leading low net-Audrey Page down from Radio Point to the Inphe Third and Fourth Flights dustrial Area. played for: 3rd-1st-Catherine McGregor 2nd-Twylla Drace 4th-1st-Fran Posette and Dotty Brandel 2nd-Mary McFadden The qualifying rounds for the Ladies Championship Tournament have been postponed until May 11th, tentatively, pending the purchase of the trophies. Julio Delgado-Cuba's popular orchestra which will be featured at the Chief Petty Officers' Club next Friday evening, 6 May. The occasion is the Mother's Day dance and dinner. Dinner, a complete steak or chicken menu for $1.00, will be served commencing at 1800. Dancing will follow from 2000 to 2400. Page Six m THE INDIAN in pla an up ma

PAGE 7

Saturday, 30 April 1955 THE INDIAN Page Seven MA c osloes VU-10 Prop Blast NAS Crosswinds by Richard D. Lackie by Paul A. Hoffer, USMC DEPARTURES SSgt Ottis D. Williams departed for stateside duty Wednesday night via FLAW. SSgt Williams will report to 2nd Marine Division, Camp LeJuene, N. C. for duty. SKEET SHOOT A popular event every Saturday morning at the Marine Barracks Skeet Range is a contest for the three top shooters of the day. Steak dinners are awarded to the top three. Last Saturday Pfc. Joseph Bland won 1st place with 12 out of a possible 16. Pfc. Michael J. Kovalich one of last weeks winners had 9 out of 16 and Cpl. Roger L. Willequer 3rd with 8 out of 16. DANCE Last Friday night Marine Barracks had their dance. Plenty of chow and beer were on hand. Hostesses were provided and everyone had a good time, if you don't think so just ask Cpl. Sanspree. Cpl. Tague was the M. C. and did a very good job. As Cpl. Tague would say "Oh the head is heavy". BASEBALL Last Sunday the Marines came from behind to defeat the SeaBees 11 to 8. Ron Plante started the game was relieved by Don Schreck in the sixth. Bob Holmes relieved Schreck in the eighth and turned in a good relief performance. The season officially opens May 5th against Naval Station. MEET YOUR TEAM Pfc. Robert E. Holmes a returning player from last years team will be one of Marine Barracks top pitchers. Holmes was bothered by arm trouble the beginning of this season but after a two week rest he seems to have gained some of his speed back. With the fine showing he made against the SeaBees Sunday in a relief role he should be one of the top pitchers of the league. Holmes is from Washington D. C. where he played high school baseball and basketball. Holmes was one of the high scorers in the Naval Base Basketball league this year. Teenage Round-up by Linda Thurston On behalf of the cast and the Naval Base School, we would like to thank most sincerely the members of the Little Theatre and the Public Works Department for their cooperation in helping us with "He Couldn't Marry Five." Party Patter-Phil getting two of his "Five" mixed up on stage Tuesday night: "May I can you May, April?" ...Stanley roaring around in his new hot rod .. the whole cast relaxing at the party after the last performance .. Maryalice and her diet. She's not going to eat for six weeks ... All the gals getting new formals ready for last night's prom ... And the boys sweating corsages Neil's pain-in-the-neck .. "Etta" Wormwood, "Grany" Johnson and "Mom" Sigler scraping the cornstarch out of their tresses. Eunice's music ...Seniors counting the days, but are they really happy -..Pat Burke's little gathering around the kitchen sink .. Paul hoisting chairs around. "It weren't nothin'." ...Maryalice and her lucky star ...Famous last words: "We'll be right back." LT J. B. Hawkins departed Gtmo last Monday to relieve LTJG Dixon as OinC of VU-10's "bachelor rest home" Key West, Fla. (VU10 Detachment ONE). LTJG Dixon will return to Gtmo temporarly to qualify in the JD type aircraft. The last two TBM's assigned to VU-10 are now back at Key West. These will soon be retired from service and will be replaced by two JD's. The Electronics Division presented Chief Reed all the accouterments of an Ensign Wednesday. Chief Reed departed the same day for OCS at Newport, R. I., after which he will report to the U.S.S. Cavalier (APA-37). The Squadron wishes to welcome aboard LT Bouffard, LTJG "Charley" King and LTJG "Mort" Caraway. Lt Bouffard just completed a tour with Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron ONE and LTJG's King and Caraway came to us from VF-32. Dehumidifiers Cause Start of Home Fires by Felix Lopez Melendez Base Fire Inspector Numerous fires with heavy loss in housing areas have been caused by clothing or other combustible material coming in contact with the heating element of dehumidifiers or light bulbs in closets. In nearly every case the protective cover had been removed or broken off and not replaced. The fire inspectors make a quarterly inspection of private housing for fire hazards, but it's the responsibility of the occupant to keep his home free from same. At any time conditions exist which constitutes fire hazards the occupant must contact the Fire Department at once. Check your closet lights and dehumidifiers for proper clearence from combustibles and protective covers. Ensure your safety by keeping the standard wire guard fixed properly. Always remember -there is no place like home -for fire! NaYSta EM Club Begins Bingo Games Bingo games have been inaugurated at the White Hat Club in the Fleet Recreation Area. Scheduled for every Friday night at 1930, the first game was held last night. It is planned to hold the bingo session every Friday night if enough interest is shown by base and Fleet enlisted men. Dependents and civilian guests are excluded from the sessions. Every United States Savings Bond owner tends to become a better citizen. He takes more interest in his govrnment and how it is run because he owns a share of it. Ideologies or isms don't flourish on sound econnmic soil. They grow only in surroundings of poverty and suffering. Thrifty people avoid poverty and suffering and gain in personal dignity, self-reliance and understanding of their rights and privileges. They oppose having their rights trampled and destroyed by Communism. 8 by Paul Snyder Personnel changes up on the Air Station have slowed considerably the past week or so. The new men are still getting acquainted while those completing their tours are awaiting orders for parts unknown. During the past week, Kenneth Creekmore RMSN reported for duty from Naval Station, San Juan, Puerto Rico. Several days later, Albert T. Casantini SN from Naval Mine Countermeasures Station, Panama City, Fla.; Edward R. Farley AN from NATTC, Norman Okla., and J. D. Haggard SN from NAS Jacksonville reported aboard. Creekmore has been assigned to Communications while Casantini reported to the Boatshed. Farley caught a Leeward boat for duty and Haggard will exercise with the FLAW crew. On Monday night aboard FLAW, Stanley Rodowicz YN1 left for "B" School at Bainbridge, Md. Frank Kynast AD3, John Woolbert ADAN, and George Redrup AN left on the same aircraft for discharge. Stan Colarusso TD1 and Marion Keefe TD2 headed for NATTC, Memphis and "B" School Tuesday night aboard another FLAW hop. A contingent for FasRon 5 included Louis M. Greer AA, James A. Adams AN, Donald L. Earl AN, Julius M. Lessard AA, Andrew J. Davis AN and Anthony F. Esposito AA, all headed for NAS, Oceana, Va., for further assignment. Willard L. Foresman AA accompanied this group on FLAW, but will continue on to NAS Quonset Point, R. I. George B. Powers ADC, former Leading Chief at Leeward Point Field, has received orders to VW4, NAS, Jacksonville, Fla. Chief and Mrs. Powers will leave Gtmo. Sunday morning on FLAW. Hasta luego, Chief. CHGUN J. B. Sentz has received his orders for Pacific Fleet Air Gunnery Unit at NAAS, El Centro, Calif. LT Jack M. Hamilton will soon be leaving for his new duty station at NAS, Key West, Fla. LT Hamilton will be attached to Heliocopter Squadron-1 CHIEF YARBER TO RECEIVE COMMISSION James Yarber ADC/AP will receive a temporary commission to the rank of Ensign in July 1955. Chief Yarber was among 321 enlisted aviation pilots chosen by a Navy selection board to receive commissions this summer. At the present time, Chief Yarber is rolling up flight hours in the various station aircraft, particularly the HUP-2, the "Angel of the Air Station." AV-50 IN NEW GARB AV-50, the Enlisted Men's barracks, is receiving a face-lifting. Last year's maroon and cream is being replaced by pea-green and haze-grey. The painting will soon be completed, ending the shuffling and reshuffling of personnel from one wing to another. With the recent addition of new metal lockers, the barracks is a much improved "home" for the men on the Air Station. ATTENTION BASEBALL FANS All NAS Flyers baseball fans are reminded of the season opener at Fleet Recreation diamond #1 Monday night at 1900. After opening game ceremonies by officials, the Flyers will meet the MBC-1 squad in the 1955 lidlifter. Last year's fans will watch an improved ball FTG Bulletin by M. Vandesteen Rear Admiral R. L. Campbell, Commander Amphibious Group FOUR, and staff visited the Fleet Training Group and Fleet Training Center, Monday, 25 April. During the tour they were given a brief ing as to the functions and training facilities of the Training Group Center. Commander Julian Getzewich was promoted to the rank of Commander, Monday, 25 April. Effective date of rank is 1 January 1955. Lieutenant Commander Francis W. Mosely received his appointment to Lieutenant Commander, Saturday, 23 April. Effective date of rank is 1 January 1955. Mr. and Mrs. George Trimmer from New York City arrived in Guantanamo Bay, Tuesday, 19 April for a visit with Mr. and Mrs Daniel Gnad. Mr. and Mrs. Trimmer boarded commercial airlines in Guantanamo City yesterday for their return trip home. The Fleet Training Group, Dental, Hospital and Supply combination baseball team will make their first appearance on the Naval Station Diamond #1 at 1900, Wednesday, 4 May. Their opponent will be Utility Squadron TEN. Let's start them off in the season with a large showing of fans in the bleachers. SHIPS ARRIVALS USS A. M. SUMNER (DD-692) (To arrive 2 May) USS MOALE (DD-693(To arrive 2 May) USS HAMMERBERG (DE-1005) (To arive 6 May) USS INGRAHAM (DD-694) (To arive 2 May) SHIPS DEPARTURES USS E. K. OLSEN (DE-765) (To depart 6 May) USS GWIN (DW 33) (To depart 6 May) HELP WANTED HELP WANTED.-Men with experience in radio, newspaper, public ralations, script writing, technical direction, photography, re-write and public information. Must be willing to sacrifice spare time and normal activities on Naval Base for opportunities in Fourth and Fifth Estates. Applicants must have rugged constitution, ability to reason with the unreasonable, explain the unexplainable, expedite the sluggish and calm the irritated. Additional helpful qualifications include the ability to be in three places at the same time; must be able to hold an intelligent telephone conversation type a news story and drink back coffee all in one motion; should be impervious to headaches, colds and the sudden invasion of the Friday materiel inspector; also helpful are nerves of steel, one deaf ear and a spare head. The pay is low, but money can be saved because there is no time to spend it. No references required; if your pulse beat is anywhere close to 72, you are eligible. No phone calls, please. Come in person to The Indian office for full information. club which hopes to end much higher than last's years cellar spot. You are urged to give your team all the support possible, helping them to make this season a huge success. Saturday, 30 April 1955 THE INDIAN Page Seven

PAGE 8

0 Saturday, 30 April 1955 MOVIES Saturday, 30 April SEA OF LOST SHIPS John Derek Wanda Hendrix Story of two boys brought up together as brothers. They enter the Coast Guard Academy together, both fall in love with same girl. Rather than hurt the other's feelings one breaks off with the girl, gets drunk and wrecks a car, is expelled from Academy. Sunday, 1 May KANSAS CITY CONFIDENTIAL John Payne Coleen Gray A bank robbery planned by a retired police captain fails. A florist with a police record is involved indirectly but fights to clear himself. Monday, 2 May CRY VENGEANCE Mark Stevens Martha Hyer Former detective is released from San Quentin after serving a long term on a framed charge. He sets out for Alaska to find the man who framed him and to clear his own name. Tuesday, 3 May UNCHAINED Chester Morris Elroy Hirsch Depicts efforts of warden to prove that a new penal system whereby prisoners are on honor is worthwhile. He has trouble with rancher in for attempted murder. Wednesday, 4 May SIX BRIDGES TO CROSS Tony Curtis Julia Adams Shows how depression in the 30's produced some of our top public enemies. Leader of one group, when saved from a tough rap by a cop becomes a stool pigeon. They become friends and former gang leader attempts to lead straight life. Thursday, 5 May THE COUNTRY GIRL Bing Crosby Grace Kelly A great Broadway singer who has taken to drink gets a big chance for comeback, but lacks confidence necessary to fill part. Through his wife he finds strength and abandons doubts that have led to his intemperence. Friday, 6 May ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET THE KEYSTONE KOPS But Abbot Lou Costello Takes place in New York in 1912. The boys are cheated out of $5,000 by a sharpie and they track down the man, via all kinds of wierd happenings. Radio's 'Tops' of the Week SATURDAY, 30 April ..THEATRE ROYAL ..9:00 P.M. Margaret Lockwood is guest star for this week. Miss Lockwood gives an entertaining performance as Becky Sharpe in sequences from Thackerey's "Vanity Fair". SUNDAY, 1 May .HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE. 10:00 P.M. An intense drama of a schoolteacher and her ambi ti >us dreams for one of her students will be the subject of "The Corn 1, Green" Claudette Colbert and Cameron Mitchell will co-star. MONDAY, 2 May ...BEST PLAYS ...9:C0 P.M. Another of Broadway's best finds it's way to the Best Plays stage this week as Elliot Nugent re-creates his role of the college professor who almost loses his wife to a homecoming football hero in "The Male Animal". TUESDAY, 3 May ...THE CHASE ..9:00 P.M. Look for the surprise climax when a wealthy young man loses all his riches, his girl, and his will to live, and hires a gunman to kill him when he changes his mind and decides to run, the Chase is on. WEDNESDAY, 4 May. .ON STAGE ...9:00 P.M. Cathy and Elliot Lewis star in "Current Up A Side Street" as a killer and his girl who try to elude the law, but find they cannot elude their mistrust of one another. THURSDAY, 5 May .FAMILY THEATRE .9:00 P.M. "Tennessee's Partner" is the story of an old prospector who continually stands by a no-good friend even though he knows he's being exploited. Walter Brenman is the star and your hostess will be Joan Evans. FRIDAY, 6 May ...RADIO WORKSHOP ..10:00 P.M. In the world of 2500 A.D. many strange and worderful changes may have occurred in the society of man, that is, unless man, overpowered by his own accomplishments, allows himself to become the servant of the very things he himself has creaed. Listen and wonder as the Radio Workshop players present, "The Doom Machine". JUST MAMIE Hold onto your hats! It's Mamie Van Doren, current rage in Hollywood. $ $ *Be0K*NOIO by Francis L. Cannon AMERICAN IN RUSSIA by Harrison E. Salisbury The author of this fascinating narrative spent five years (194954) in Russia as correspondent for the New York Times. It is the story of his experiences in dealing with the Russian people, officials, and men-in-the street. He tells how they live, what many of them who dared to express an opinion thought about. The book is based to a great extent on his famous series in the Times, "Russia Re-Viewed." SCOTLAND YARD by Sir Harold Scott The full story of the workings of fabled old Scotland Yard. It is not ,as many believe, a sort of detective agency. It is the headquarters of London's Metropolitan Police Force and from it all branches of the force are directed. The author was Commissioner of Police from 1945 to 1953. He covers the whole gamut of operations from problems of recruitment and training to protection of the Royal Family. He recalls many famous cases, including the theft of the Stone of Scone by a group of fervent Scottish Nationals. COROMANDEL by John Masters A novel concerning the exploits of Jason Savage, Wiltshire farm boy turned adventurer. In 1627 he obtained a blood-stained map of India with the name "Coromandel" emblazoned thereon. It engendered a vision which drove him from the farm to the streets of London, then by ship to India, where he hoped to find Coromandel and Mount Meru. Just why he went to all this trouble I really don't know. Possibly he hoped to find cheap farm labor. FISHER OF MEN by Kurt Frieburger A biblical novel of the life of St. Peter. The story starts in Bethsaida, where he was born and where he first heard the word of Christ. He accompanies Christ on His journeys and is struck with wonder at His preachings. After Christ's cruel trial and betrayal Peter goes to Rome to begin the mission Christ has entrusted to him. The book also gives an insight into the cultural history of the times and life in the imperial city. ADMIRAL KIMMEL'S STORY USN (Ret.) by RADM Husband E. Kimmel "How it feels to be left holding the bag" would be a more apt title for this one. It is the personal story of the man in command at Pearl Harbor at the time of the December 7 attack. His purpose is more than to vindicate himself in the eyes of history, he wants the facts set down so that a repetition of the same thing can never happen again. He states that Washington had information of the impending attack well before it happened and that this was withheld from the commanders at Pearl Harbor. He was denied materials which he needed badly. He couldn't send the fleet out because there was no way to refuel the whole fleet at sea. He makes no out-and-out accusations but if you read closely you can get the idea. THE INDIAN Navy-bPP0-10ND-Gtmo: 0951 Navy-brPo-10ND-atmo.-o951