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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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VGoevs TMO Li6e T ansii9ne" Vol. VI, No. 16 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday,.23 April 1955


Base School Commended

In Committee Report
CAPT G. M. Holley, Naval Base Chief of Staff, and head of the Naval Base School Board nas received the final report from the Committee of the Southern Association for Accrediting Secondary Schools and Colleges. The committee visited the Naval Base School early this year and observed extensively the activities, studies, methods and facilities of the Naval Base School from the pre-school group through the high school.
Although s o m e discrepencies were noted in the final report, the committee reported that the Naval Base School is a school "of which the parents, the faculty, and the officials can be justly proud," and that the community should be congratulated upon the fine association and keen interest in the activities of the school.
The recommendations of the committee were summarized in the report as follows:
1. A principal should be employed to share in the administrative and supervisory responsibilities of the superintendent.
2. A definite amount of not less than two dollars per pupil should be included in the budget yearly for developing and maintaining a good selection of library books.
3. A site of not less than ten acres should be selected for a new elementary school center and classrooms and other necessary facilities contructed.
4. A site should be selected on Leeward Point for the construction of a primary school.
5. The science and library facilities should be expanded and improved.
6. The number of series of readers available to the pupils in the elementary grades should be increased.
Also included in the recommendations was that liaison should be established with schools for dependents on otehr bases and also with other public schools to and from which pupils of the Naval Base School transfer.
The commendable points mentioned in the report were several, including the following points:
1. Pupils transferring into or out of the base school should have little trouble in adjusting satisfactorily to the new school.
2. The program leading to graduation from this school adequately meets the standards of the Southern Association for Accrediting Secondary Schools and colleges.
3. The school board has wisely adopted a policy of maintaining a lower pupil-teacher ratio than is usually recognized as desirable for public schools.
4. The Naval Base School is to be commended for the provisions which have been made for nursery school and kindergarten experiences for young children on the base.


' ouldn't Marry Five' Opens

At Marina Point Monday
"He Couldn't Marry Five" opens at the Community Auditorium Monday night for a 2-performance run. Starting at 8 P.M. the play is this year's selection of the Junior-Senior class of the Naval Base High School for the benefit of the yearbook fund.
The story concerns a young man who, running from one love affair, runs into another one with even more complications. He falls in love with five girls, all sisters, and to make it even more precarious, all five are in love with him. The ensuing situations bring forth some rich comedy sequences, and the young man's final choice will come as a surprise for the audience.
The play is directed by Mrs. Ruth Liveakos of the school and includes: Anita Sierra, Pat Wormwood, Nancy Halentic, Linda Thurston, Doris Sigler, Irma Pina, Dolores Roguz, Bobbie Johnson, James Dalton and Phil Keenan.


Navy Seeks EM

For Sub Training
Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has invited enlisted men in 15 ratings and qualified strikers to submit requests for submarine training.
Enlisted men in the MM, QM, GM, FT, RM, SO, EN, TM, ET, EM, IC, YN, CS and SD ratings in pay grades E-4, E-5 and E-6 and HM in E-5, E-6 and E-7 are eligible for the program. However, they must meet the necessary requirements. The Navy also asked SN, SA, FN, FA, TN and TA to submit applications for initial submarine training.
Eligibility requirements for the course, held at the U.S. Naval Submarine School, New London, Conn., are contained in BuPers Instruction 1540.2A.


Archbishop Serantes Administers
Confirmation, Ist Communion
Sixteen persons of the Naval Base will receive Confirmation on Sunday, 24 April from His Excellency Enrique Perez Serantes, Archbishop of Santiago. The Confirmation Mass will take place in the Naval Base Chapel at 1400.
Also, at 0900 Sunday morning, 33 persons will be administered First Holy Communion by Archbishop Serantes, assisted by Chapalin Jerome J. Sullivan.
Immediately following the Cinfirmation ceremony, there will be a reception for the Archbishop and his party in the patio of the school. Accompanying the Archbishop here is Monsignor Angel Hernandez Cabanius, Father Desiderio Lopez, Mr. and Mrs. Fernando Canto, Dr. and Mrs. Antonio Civit, and Brother Leo, FSC.


Mrs. Helen Bowler, American Red Cross Field Director for Guantanamo Bay, accepts a contribution for the Red Cross from RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, in the form of a check for $5,344.64. $344.64 of the Naval Base contribution was collected during the base drive, and $5,000 was alloted from the Base Community Fund.

'55 Navy Gtmo Carnival Nets $53,3271

Red Cross, 'Dimes' Get First Contributions


Reenlistment Bonus Date

Set At 1 Oct, 1949
The Assistant Comptroller General of the United States has handed down a ruling regarding the payment of the new reelistment bonus. The ruling was spurred by the confusion that had arisen regarding the method of computing reenlistment times.
The new ruling states that all reenlistments or extensions entered into after 1 Oct. 1949 shall be computed for payment of the reenlistment bonus.
The new bonus bill allows a bonus of 30 days pay for each year the man reenlists if it is his first reenlistment since 1 Oct. 1949; 20 days pay for each year of reenlistment if it is his second re-up; and ten days pay for each year of reenlistment on his third shipping over agreement.
For example-if a man reenlisted in 1950 for six years, his next re-up will be his second and he will be entitled to 20 days pay for each year he reenlists. However, if a man enlisted, or reenlisted before October 1949 for six years, his next reenlistment will be his first and he will be entitled to 30 days pay for each year of new re-up.
It is possible that the new ruling will force a rebate to the government by some personnel who were given erroneous bonus payments, but there are further instructions pending on that phase of the ruling.


The 1955 Guantanamo Bay Carnival, held on the Naval Base 19, 20, 21, and 22 February, netted $53,327.90, topping the records of all previous years by over $10,000. Staged each year for National Charities, the Guantanamo Bay Community Fund, and other charities, the four-day carnival was a record-breaker in every respect.
The check for the final increment of the net proceeds was presented to RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander Naval Base, at the final meeting of the 1955 Charity Carnival Committee by CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, Carnival Chairman.
Out of the net proceeds from the Carnival, over $17,000 will go to National Charities, including the Navy Relief Society, the American Red Cross, the Cancer Society, the Heart Fund, the Salvation Army, the Tuberculosis Society, and the Foundation for Infantile Paralysis.
Already the American Red Cross has received a check for $5,344.64, presented to the Guantanamo Bay Field Director, Mrs. Helen Bowler by RADM E. B. Taylor. Of this amount, $5,000 was drawn from the net proceeds of the carnival, and the remainder collected in a drive for the Red Cross on the Naval Base.
Also, a check for $1,769.50 was forwarded to the March of Dimes. $269.50 was collected on the Naval Base, and an additional $1,500 was drawn from the Community Fund.
Besides the national and local charities, part of the proceeds will
(Continued on Page Three)


9&








Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 23 April 1955


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615
Saturday, 23 April 1955
u. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LTJG J. D. Byerley ------ Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC ---------------- Editor
H. L. Sisson, JO3 ----------------- News
F. L. Cannon, JO3 ---------- Photographer
D. C. Roberts, JOSN ------------Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1944, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
THE INDIAN is a members of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


An Editorial ....


Will It Go Or Grow

An opportunity has just been handed to most of you to prepare fer that rainy day without revising your present budget at all. Here's a chance to go on living as you have been on the same old payonly now you can spend it all and save some money at the same time. How? It's this simple: Instead of taking home the new pay raise make out an allotment for U.S. Savings Bonds. You won't miss it. So before you start spending all your raise stop a moment to realize that the lasting good you get from more pay depends entirely on what you do with it.
By putting aside a little money each pay day in Savings Bonds it automatically accumulates into big money to buy worthwhile things, such as a new car, new home, college education for your children or a nice bundle waiting for you when you retire or leave the service.
It is your decision whether your pay raise goes or grows. Make out that allotment now. If you wait and the pay raise works its way into your weekly spending you'll be right back in the same old rut. After all, you've been getting along without it up till now, haven't you? (AFPS)


What's Doin' Stateside NSD Truck Driver


(AFPS Weekly Feature)
One of American industry's leading atomic experts predicts that, by 1980, 65 percent of all new U.S. electric generating plants will be fed by nuclear fission . .. Atomic powered plants will go far toward meeting the spiraling U.S. demand for electricity-expected to triple during the next two decades.

There seems to be an argument shaping up about the mental and emotional state of present-day American women . . . One group of educators, the Commission on Education for Women, claims they're becoming increasingly unhappy and emotionally upset... Why? . . . Because they're trying to fulfill too many assignments simultaneously- as mother and housewife, career woman and glamour girl . . . But a recent survey conducted among college coeds indicates that most girls desire marriage and children above all else and regard careers as strictly secondary.

Young men graduating from U.S. engineering colleges this spring can write their own ticket, according to most reports . . . The need for engineers is so acute that graduates of some institutions have received as many as five job offers each.

Alcatraz may close down... The world-famous prison and setting for innumerable movies may be replaced by a new "maximum security" institution within three or four years, Federal prison officials say.

The uranium hunt is really at a fever pitch . . . A southwestern air line whose route crosses prospecting areas of Colorado and Texas has begun a new service


Awarded for Driving


Perdrin P. Pruna, Truck Driver, was presented with a Safe Driving Award on 11 April. The certificate and lapel emblem which he received were in recognition of his performing 36 consecutive months of accident-free driving. The presentation was made by LT P. D. Larson, NSD Safety Officer.
NSD has a very active safety program, which is paying daily dividends in human welfare. The NSD Safety Scoreboard on wharf "Baker" now shows that the whole Depot has worked over 550 days without a lost time accident. This is believed to be a record for major Supply Corps activities.


for its passengers . . . During the flight, a stewardess demonstrates how to operate a geiger counter, using a real hunk of uranium ore.


The Toastmaster
hv _lnj W~et


If I could bestow upon my little boy one gift that would be most likely to insure his success and happiness, I would choose to endow him with the ability to use flattery, with grace and intelligence.
I always believed that flattery was an evil thing, with a demoralizing effect on the characters of both the flatterer and the flattered. As I have watched people and things for the past two and a half decades, I have come to reverse this belief, and to regard flattery as a most effective lubricant of men and affairs.
It has long been the custom to condemn flattery. Poets and writers have vied in attacking it, but those who censured it most severely have been most avid in seeking it under the guise of "appreciation." It has been said that a flatterer's throat is an open sepulcher; that no man can be both friend and flatterer; also that flattery is the food of fools. The last is probably true, for the scriptures and the philosophers agree that all men are fools, and cetrainly all men love flattery. Nobody loves it more than I do.
The tolernace for flattery varies widely among individuals. Some accept it graciously and it becomes them like the morning dew on a rose, leaving them smiling and glowing with gratitude. On others it acts like a poison, making them puff up and swell like the skunk cabbage; but all of them love it. Remember that there is no soap like soft soap and a good soft soap is 90 percent lye.
Of course flattery is not always successful. There was the case of the man who said to another; "Tis a fine lad you have there, a noble head and the manners of a gentleman. Will you lend me ten dollars?" And the other replied; "That I will not. 'Tis my wife's boy by a former husband." In spite of cases like this however, flattery has a large percentage of success.
Flattery is the food of love, the vital part in every affair of the heart. What man among you, being in love, does not lie awake nights thinking up honeyed words to say about his sweetheart's beautiful face and figure, or her lovely disposition. Flattery is equally the cement that holds marriages together. Every husband knows the importance of the daily exchange of flattering words and gestures to still the troubled waters of matrimony.
Do not think of flattery as merly a matter of words, for the subtlest flattery of all is expressed by a respectful attitude and a deferential manner. Neither should you despise flattery. Learn to use it as a handle which will fit many of the tools that will help you to carve out a successful career.


Payroll savings is the ideal method for building a long-range savings plan for the "sunny day" of your future-the time you can retire with added income, when you buy a home or a business of your own, when you send your children to college, when you have the means and leisure for travelwhenever you get any of the good things of life which you are sure to get if you save systematically for them.


Sunday, 24 April 1955
Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0930-Sunday School
0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Christian Science
Sunday: 1000-Station Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)



The Chaplain's Corner


t


"Did You Get The Word"
We in the Navy are well acquained with the expression, "The Word." "Did you get the word on liberty?" or "What's the word on leave?" are typical of the questions that we hear.
One has only to be in the Navy a short time to understand what is meant by "the word." It means "This is it. This is the straight scoop, This is the truth". And when someone questions us as to how we know that our information is the straight scoop, we answer that it is the truth because it has come down from higher authority.
The author of the Gospel according to St. John also uses this very same expression, "The Word", and in much the same way as we do in the Navy.

"In the beginning was the
word and the word was with God and the word was God.
And the word became flesh and dwelt among us and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the father full
of grace and truth."
John 1:1&14.

Now what is John saying here? He is using the term, "Word" for Jesus and is saying that the two are synonomous. Why does he do this? Just as you and I use the expression in the Navy to describe a truth that has come down from higher authority, so John uses the "Word" meaning the truth about God which has come down from the highest authority of all.
John refers to Jesus as the Word of God, for by this Word and the life of this Word, we have a true expression of Almighty God, the One who uttered it.
In this day when words are so cheap, .let us be thankful that we still have the "Word" of words.


el


at

Page Two


Saturday, 23 April 1955


THE INDIAN





m


Saturday, 23 April 1655


THE INDIAN


Junior Music Makers Give Annual Recital


On Friday, 16 April, the piano students of Mrs. H. P. McNeal, the Junior Music Makers Club, presented their annual recital on the lawn of Mrs. McNeal's home. The Music Makers presented 24 selections followed by a presentation of awards for the year by Mr. H. P. McNeal.
Participating in the recital were: front row, left to right: Jackie Miles, Paula Knight, Peggy Echols, Carol Echols, Sallie Scarborough, Nancy Cushing, Billie Jean Matthews, Kathy Murphy, and Kathy Dalton.
Rear row; left to right: Ralph Sierra, Margaret Matthews, Judy Yost, Dolores Sierra, Lucille Mahaffey, Sherry Pavlow, Frances Linder, Taft Albright, and Harold Ganus.


Radio, Teleman Commended For Performance of Duty


Phillips Park Swimming

Ruled Out For Minors
According to the Naval Station Special Services Officer, LTJG J. D. Byerley, there will be "no swimming" for minors under the age of sixteen at Phillips Park Recreation and Swimming Area.
This ruling, however, is not new. As outlined in a Naval Base Instruction, Phillips Park gives first priority to the forces afloat. Naval Base commands and other groups may tentatively reserve the parkif not already reserved by Forces Afloat. Base reservations may be confirmed forty-eight hours in advance.
After Naval Base commands, divisions and other organized parties may make reservations. Then, if no others have reservations, Individuals and family groups may make reservations.
However, the "No swimming ruling for minors under 16 years of age" will be enforced at all times, and no exceptions will be made to the ruling.


Naval Station Begins

Disaster Plan Training
This week, the Naval Station began a training schedule in connection with the base Disaster Operation Plan. The overall training program is primarily for the damage control teams, but will include practically all Naval Station Personnel. Set up in order to provide maximum readiness for any type of disaster, the training program will be climaxed by a battle problem on 23 June. The first training began Thursday afternoon when the damage control team officers met with LTJG H. L. Olsen and reviewed the revisions to the Disaster Operation Plan. Next week, training will begin for the 18 damage control teams as they will review the disaster plan. Then, beginning the 1st of May, the administrative teams will be briefed in their duties during the disaster operation.
The importance of the training program is that the ability of the Naval Station to rapidly recover from disaster damage and restore services to the fleet and other ac-


Junior Workshop Presents

First Production 30 April
Teh Junior Theatre Workshop, sponsored by the Little Theatre of Guantanamo Bay, is ready to present its first production at the Community Theatre on Friday and Saturday, 29 and 30 April. "Many Moons" was selected as the first play for the junior affiliate of the Little Theatre. Mrs. Lillian Armbruster is the director of the fairy tale depicting the ambition of a king to grant his daughter every wish she makes. Miss Anne Saxe -is co-director.
Include in the cast of "Many Moons" are Nancy Lea Nelson, Betty McGowan, Ronny Moseley, Edward Deegan, Susan Tipler, Tommy Mallia, Mickey Douglass, Margaret Larson, James Minard and Shirley Krouse.
The Junior Theatre Workshop was organized under the sponsorship of the Little Theatre to stimulate interest of the younger people of the base in theatrical activities and to aid in the training of the future actors.
Future plans call for presentation of "Once Upon A Clothesline" on 6 and 7 May as the second production of the junior group.
Rehearsals for this second play are already in progress as the finishing touches are being put on "Many Moons."
Tickets, costing 250, may be obtained in fornt of the Naval Station Navy Exchange or from any member of the cast or the Junior Workshop.


Community Fund..
(Continued from Page One)
be used by the Naval Base Community Fund for community betterment. Last year, the Community Fund financed projects for the Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Little League, Teen-age Club, Civilian and other base organizations; and provided funds for equipping several playgrounds on the base.

tivities is dependent directly upon the adequate training of its personnel. The entire program will be under the direction of CDR V.J. Soballe, Executive Officer, Naval Station.


CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, congrat. ulates C. N. Alcordo, TN, for outstanding performance of duty while George H. Kraus, RM2, stands by to receive a commendation for outstanding performance of radio operation during Hurricane Hazel. Alcordo and Kraus were awarded commendations during a meritorious mast on 6 April.


FSU Begins Courses

For On-Campus Credit

An educational program to be sponsored by the Florida State University, which will consist of courses that carry resident credit from the University, is being planed.
These courses are conducted by regular faculty members or other competent instructors. Tentative planning indicates that courses of-


fered will consist of all subjects contained in the standard curricula of the Colleges of Arts and Sciences or Humanies.
The cost of these courses to the student is $12.00 per credit, which totals $36.00 for the average three
(3) hour credit course.
Information relative to this program is being published by all commands and includes copies of the courses that are planned which are to be filled out by anyone desiring to register for any of the future courses.


9


Mrs. Douglas L. Bell and Colonel Robert E. Fojt, CO, MarBks., pin 1st Lieutenant bars on Lieutenant Douglas L. Bell. Lt. Bell's date of rank is 23 Nov 54.
9


Page Thtee






4%


Page Four


SaurdI.23AriI15


NavSta Indians Down Cuban All-Stars In Pre-Season Exhibition Game


Minard, Cuban center-fielder, hits the dirt at third as Ray Mawhinney attempts the tag in the Indian - Cuban All-Star game last Sunday. Indians blanked the All-Stars, 5 to 0 behind Dale Buss' scattered hit hurling.


Jerry Morgan of the Indians hooks into third base during the Cuban All-Star game last Sunday, but Cabeza gets the tag on time. Morgan has been shifting from second to short during the pre-season training games of the Braves, swapping with Mandy Mandis.


J. L. Neill, Jr., P. T* Ahlberg, H. L. Broughton, and E. H. Cavanaugh, the Public Works expedition team recently returned from an adventure on "La Gran Sabana," review their trip on a map. The team spent a forty day vacation in the little-explored area in Venezuela.


9


Little League Begins

48 Game Season Today
The "Grape-Nut Circuit" starts its 1955 season today at 3 P. M. when the Little League Colts tangle with the Bears in the opening game of the schedule at the Little League diamond at Villamar.
Opening ceremonies will be held just prior to game time.
The Little League has a 48-game schedule for the 1955 season. Divided into two parts, the winner of the first half will play the winner of the second half at the end of the schedule for the base championship.
With the exception of the first two games on the schedule, all games on week-ends will commence at 2 P. M. Games played on Tuesdays and Thursdays will start at
4 P. M.
Tomorrw's game between the Hawks and the Tigers will begin at 1 P. M.
The schedule for the week:
Tues. 26 April - Tigers vs Colts Thurs. 28 April - Bears vs Hawks Sat. 30 April Tigers vs Bears Sun. 1 May Colts vs Hawks



Naval Base 'Pony League'

Downs Caimanera Colts
The Pony League, a newly formed baseball organization for boys over the age limit for Little League
play, got off to a local start last weekend when the Naval Base squad journeyed to Caimanera and beat the Caimanera Colts, 3 to 2.
The Pony League is an international baseball organization made up on much the same basis as the Little League. Boys 13 to 15 are eligible to play.
At present there are two teams in Cuba, one in Caimanera and the other in Guantanamo City, and one team from the Naval Base. J. F. Meredith, BMC, heads the team from the Naval Base.
The game played last week-end was the first of a series planned for the new league. Sunday, April, 24, both Cuban teams will be on the base for a double-header with the local club.
Richardson pitched for the base team, allowing eight hits while his mates committed two errors while knocking out three hits. The Cuban team chalked up three miscues.



NSD Leads Second Half

Inter-Command Golf Tourney

The Intra-Command Golf Tournament swung into the second half of play weekend with the NSD squad taking a 15 to 9 victory over the Hospital-Dental combine to give NSD the lead in the close contest. Following in a tight race is the strong Naval Station team which banged out a win over FTG, 14 to 9 .
VU-10's squeaker over NAS, 13 to 10 , puts them in third place. MCB-1 drew a bye.
Matches scheduled for this weekend: Saturday at 1300 the HospDent group meets FTG, and the leaders, NSD, tangle with the second place Naval Station squad: on Sunday at 0815 MCB-1 goes against VU-10.



9I


SPORTS ROUND-UP
by Joe Celentano, JO1, USN
It wasn't too long ago that Willie Mays was a private in the Army. After his discharge he became one of Leo Durocher's major assets and now the Gaint slugger is a honorary lieutenant colonel in the Alabama State Militia. (Oppossing pitchers consider him a general-general nuisance, that is) � . . Prediction: Wes Santee will be the first American to run the fourminute mile-and the Kansas cowboy will do it this year.
Here's a tip on the Kentucky Derby' the Belmont Stakes and Preakness. Don't bet! . . . Welterweight champ Tony DeMarco bids farewell to his throne on June 10, it says here. He won't last 10 rounds with challenger Carmen Basilio . . . Bill Grieve, veteran American League umpire, recently completed a seven-day umpire's clinic at the Norfolk NAS, Va. ... It's only proper that the boxing trainer at Ft. Lee, Va., is named Sgt. James Battle.
Re m em b e r Lyn "Schoolboy" Rowe? He's now a Detroit Tiger coach . . . Lefty Warren Spahn of the Milwaukee Braves has been a 20-game winner in six of his nine years in the major leagues... Look for 6-foot, 205-lb. Vince Monto to start at fullback for Navy next grid season.
Righthander John Kucks, just out of the Army, has a good chance of sticking with the New York Yankees. He had an 11-3 record at Ft. Dix. N. J., and a 14-2 record in Germany... The Detroit Tigers have been strengthened in the outfield by the return of J. W. Porter from the Army. Last year Porter was player-manager of Ft. Ord, Calif., All-Army and Interservice champs.
Harry Wismer, one of the country's top sportscasters, was recently-presented with the Amvets of America sports award for 1955 for his work in the promotion of sports as a deterrent to juvenile delinquency . . . The newest addition to the American League umpiring staff is John Rice, a WWII Marine Corps veteran of the South Pacific.
Pfc. Ben Harrison of the Fleet Marine Force in Pearl Harbor, T. H., is in serious training for the National AAU swimming meet in Los Angeles, July 16-30.


Lady Keglers Plan

Summer Bowling League
A summer base-wide Ladies Bowling League is being formed and will be played at the Naval Air Station Bowling Alleys. All interested lady keglers may enter the league by contacting Mrs. McGowan at 8791 or Mrs. Munson at 9352, by 30 April. Plans call for a three month league to end by August.


1 e 0 a -


Don't Miss . . .
'He Couldn't Marry Five'.
Monday and Tuesday
at Marina Point.


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 23 April 1955


m







w


Saturday, 23 April 1955


THE INDIAN


Hospital Notes i~i(C OUS1es


Dy D. W. Degon
HEIRPORT NEWS
Congratulations to HM2 James C. and Mrs. Ruth Schuttle on the arrival of their second child, a boy, Jay "C". YN2 Bob and Mrs. Joann Heil welcomed their first child, a boy, Robert Michael. Bob, a former member of the hospital staff, is now attached to F.T.C. Also presented by the stork this past week are: Barbara Jean to ETI and Mrs. Elaine Martin; Kathleen Laurdes to LCDR and Mrs. Marie Shaw; Barbara Elizabeth to AKAN and Mrs. Arlene Stackpole.

ARRIVALS
Welcome aboard is extended to HN Billy C. Green who arrived from Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Virginia.

DEPARTURES
HMC E.F. Rogers and family departed via USNS JOHNSON fo. duty at NSHA, NNMC, Bethesda, Md. HMC Rogers was Personnel Chief here at USNH for the past 18 months. A few of the "old timers" took their last look at Gtmo as they boarded the Johnson en route to Receiving Station, Brooklyn for separation. They were: HM3 Paul S. Goldburg, past permanent Medical Shore Patrol in Gtmo City and currently assigned to the diet kitchen. Paul was famous, here at Gtmo, for his version of the Cha Cha Cha with his rhythmical partner "Mario;" HN W. Filer, a hard working member of the Medical Store Room crew and HM3 Tom Mulvihill, past member of the X-ray Department and MAA force. Last, but far from the least, was that legendary HN, J. J. Killilea. John, a veteran of the Battle of Gtmo, will report to the Naval Shipyard, Brooklyn, N. Y. for duty.
MEET THE STAFF
One of the "old timers" in the Hospital Laboratory is HM3 John J. Petery, with just over 15 months in Gtmo. "Pete" attended Corps School at Great Lakes and then to USNH Quantico, Va. He then chose ot be a Laboratory Technician and attended a course of instruction at Bethesda. His present duties in the Lab consist of Blood Chemistry and Parasitology examinations. Being an ardent sportsman, "Pete" has acquired a new interest in in Gtmo: golfing. He also has played soccer, baseball and follows the Sporting News with great enthusiasm. His plans for the future are to enter Kulztown State Teachers College in Pennsylvania.



NSD Supply Line

CDR and Mrs. E. W. Sutherling, enjoyed a very pleasant weekend at the El Rancho Hotel, Santiago de Cuba.
Jack Heavilin, SK2, departed 13 April via FLAW for his home in Parma, Ohio, where he will spend 30 days leave.
ENS J. R. Pope made a very exciting and scenic motor trip to Baracoa this passed Sunday. The NSD Boat Crew enjoyed a fabulous picnic at Escondico Bay Baracoa this past Sunday.
Charles Haymen, DK3, recently returned from Crisfield, Maryland, where he spent 10 days leave.


by Paul A. Hoffer
DEPARTURES
Last week via FLAW Sergeant Donald M. Lemos departed for the States. Sgt. Lemos will report to Marine Barracks, U. S. Naval Base, Boston, Mass. for discharge.
SKEET SHOOT
Another Skeet Shoot was held at the Marine Barracks Skeet Range and three more lucky marines won steak dinners at the Enlisted Club. Pfc. Michael J. Kovalich hit 12 out of a possible 16. Pfc. Herberd D. Varnadore 10 out of 16 and Pfc. Jack L. Simmons
9 out of 16.
DANCE
This weekend a dance will be held at the Marine Barracks Enlisted Club. Hostesses will be provided.
GOOD CONDUCT AWARDS
Three Marines were awarded good conduct awards last week. MSgt. John H. Johnston was awarded his 5th. Cpl. Edward F. Novack and Pfc. Gerald R. Reynolds their first.
BASEBALL
After a weekend of rest the Marine Barracks Baseball team will swing into practice this week. A series of practice games are scheduled. With the season drawing closer each day all marines are reminded to get out and back their team to another winning season.
MEET YOUR TEAM
Pfc. Charles W. Mason one of the returning veterans from last year's team will be at shorstop instead of centerfield. Pfc. Mason has proved himeslf a good fielder in the change from the outfield to the infield. Mason one of the leading hitters of last year was also high in the homerun department. Charlie hails from Sontag, Mississippi where he played high school football and baseball. Last year he was named to the Naval Base All Star Team.


FTG Bulletin
by M. Vandesteen
LT Magnus W. Hjalmarson, formerly attached to the USS MADDOX (DD 731) reported onboard for duty Friday, 15 April. Mr. Hjalmarson is assigned to the Operations Department. He is from Long Beach, California.
Paul D. Johnston, ET3, reported for duty with the Fleet Training Center Friday, 15 April. Johnston was formerly on duty at the U.S. Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Virginia. He hails from Marblehead, Essex, Massachusetts.
LCDR J. T. Usey of the CIC department received his appointment to LCDR Monday, 18 April. Effective date of rank is 1 January 1955.
CDR Robert G. Laurie departed by FLAW on TAD, Tuesday, 19 April to attend a gunnery conference in the Pentagon Building, Washington, D.C.. CDR Laurie is expected to return on this evening's flight.
James L. Leighton, SO1, departed by FLAW Wednesday 20 April enroute to the Receiving Station, Norfolk, Virginia for further transfer to USS OWL (MHC 35) which operates in the Canal Zone. The MHC 35 is a Coastal Mine Hunter.
Also on Wednesday's 2030 outbound FLAW flight was James H. Wright, PN2. Wright was selected to attend the Line Officer School in Newport, Rhode Island, upon the completion of which he will be appointed to the grade of Ensign in the Supply Corps. After completing General Line School, he will attend a six months course of instruction at the Naval Supply Corps School in Athens, Georgia.
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Barlow from Cranston, Rhode Island arrived in Guantanamo Bay, Wednesday, 13 April for a visit with CDR and Mrs. Robert Laurie. Mr. and Mrs. Barlow traveled by means of a freighter from New York City to Havana and then came to Guantanamo City via Cubana Airlines. They departed Friday on their return trip home.
Miss Winifred Connelly arrived in Guantanamo Bay Saturday, 16 April from Medford, Massachusetts. Miss Connely is visiting LCDR and Mrs. George Saunders. She will travel by commercial airlines on her return home Saturday, 30 April.
Mrs. J. W. Higdon, wife of Johnny W. Higdon, EMC, departed the Naval Base enroute to the U.S. with her sick daughter, Johnelle Gay. Elizabeth Ann accompanied her mother and sister. Fleet Training Group personnel wish Johnelle Gay a quick recovery and a rapid return to the area for Mrs. Highdon and her children.
SHIPS ARRIVALS


USS PAPAGO (ATF 150)
(To arrive 25 USS SAVAGE (DER 386)
(To arrive 25


Lady: "I'd like to buy two tickets to the show." Ticket Seller: "We have only two standing room tickets left." Lady: "Are they together?"
* * *

Sergeant: "Smith, what's the first thing you do when cleaning a rifle?"
Pvt.: "Look at the number."


April) April)


SHIPS DEPARTURES
USS SAIPAN (CVL 48)
(To depart 29 April) USS C. J. BADGER (DD 657)
(To depart 27 April) USS HEERMAN (DD 532)
(To depart 27 April) USS STOCKHAN (DD 683)
(To depart 27 April) USS WOODSON (DE 359)
(To depart 29 April) USS R. F. KELLER (DE 419)
(To depart 29 April) USS CREENWICH BAY
(AVP 41)
(To depart 29 April)


Teenage Round-up

by Linda Thurston
Zero hour draws nigh for the cast of "He Couldn't Marry Five." Opening night looms on Monday night and everyone is in a mad rush getting costumes and props ready and tickets sold. Don't forget to mark the 25 the and 26th of April on your calendar and make a date to be at the Community Auditorium.
Did Ya' See . .. Pat McGowan celebrating her "sweet sixteenth and never been missed"... Penny, Burke, Rizzo, Frank and Stan the Man in the cactus exterminating business . . . Nancy, Doris and Wormie enjoying a life of workless bliss . . . Bobby and Edwin after their return from the grand tour. ... Betty Stone expecting the movies to close down at the full of the moon (It snows at Christmas down here, too) . . . JVC feeding his face the other study hall (Not only, JVC, but also Phil, Pistole, Toni, Pat Mc., Judy Inman and Evie) . . . Wormie's two hands in the fountain" . . . Shar K surveying the dump ... Melba aiding and abetting Cookie on the typewriter . . . Stanley Price, Paul and Stan H with their on-the-spot stage-handling . . . Cesar accidentally walking in on some of the characters in the play rehearsing at the Snack Shack ... Norma, Brad and Diana selling goodies in the hall for the Freshmen... Darling little Gale Wormwood making her debut in the Senior homeroom. ... Johnny McGee attentively squiring Linda Stinson around town ... Howie's toothache... Doris with only 19% months to go . . . Bobby Richardson and his stared-at feeling . . . Jack S and Mike and their chess games on Tuesdays....



VU-1O Prop Blast

by Richard D. Lackie
Wait six weeks and you won't know the place!" These are the words of John D. Williams, BMC, CMAA of.Barracks AV-51. Barracks renovation plans include: complete inside paint job; new tile flooring for upper port and starboard; brand-new steel lockers; and a paint job for all bunks. What's the matter, Willie, no murals on the bulkhead ?
Two members of the squadron were especially happy at the April pay raise. It seems that it helps those re-enlistment bonuses quite a bit. The men with the bulging wallets are George E. Turner, AD2 and Haorld R. Collins, AN, who recently shipped for six.
New blood at last! Five new men reported aboard this week. Bobby G. Vail, SN, arrived from NAS, Key West, Florida. Robert L. Clausen, AMAA, is a recent graduate of AM"A" school, Memphis, Tenneessee. William E. Colvin, SN; John D. Lloyd, SA; and James S. Postol, SA, reported from the U.S.S. Bushnell.
Congratulations and cigars are in order. LT George F. Guyer returned from lunch Tuesday sporting brand-new gold leaves of LCDR.


Professor: This exam will be conducted on the honor system. Please take seats three spaces apart in alternate rows.


q


Page Five


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Sav~'-.bPPO-iOND-Otmo..O745 ~~HE INDIAN Saturday, 23 April 1955


MOVIES

Saturday, 23 April
FIRE OVER AFRICA
Maureen O'Hara McDonald Carey
Beautiful woman acts as undercover agent with the International Police of Tangier. Her life is in jeapordy many times but she fer. rets out the head of the smugglers.
Sunday, 24 April
THE LAST TIME I SAW PARIS Van Johnson Elizabeth Taylor
Johnson marries the daughter of a fun-loving father. Their life together is spent in disregarding the practical things of everyday life which they later find out is a grave mistake.
Monday, 25 April
TONIGHT'S THE NIGHT
David Niven Yvonne DeCarlo
When the squire of a happy-golucky Irish village dies he is succeded by his distant cousin whose only interest is money. He tries to put the village on a business
-like basis with hilarious results.
Tuesday, 26 April
BRIGADOON
Van Johnson Gene Kelly
Two Americans happen on a village in the Scottish highlands the inhabitants of which sleep for a hundred years, then are awake for one day. Based on the Broadway play.
Wednesday, 27 Apirl
TROUBLE IN STORE Norman Wisdom
Margaret Rutherford
Department store clerk engages in comedy of errors surrounding plot to rob store.
Thursday, 28 April
GOLDEN MISTRESS
John Agar Rosemarie Bowe
Agar is a hunter of sunken treasure in the Caribbean. He and girl find "Treasure of the Untamed" for which they are condemned to death.
Friday, 29 April
THE VANQUISHED
John Payne Jan Sterling
During the reconstruction of the South after the Civil War, Union soldiers were stationed in many towns. This tells of a hometown boy returned to see that the terms of peace were rightly executed.

Prospect: Ye gad! What a tumbled down looking shack. What's holding it together?
Agent: The termites are holding hands.

Since the discovery of elastic, it is estimated that women take up one-third less space.


Anne Frances, M-G-M starlet, takes an upside-down look at the world from Hollwood's green pastures.



Radio's 'Tops' of the Week

SUNDAY, 24 April ... HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE... 10:00 P.M.
Old-timers Charles Laughton and Fay Bainter co-star in a rollicking radio adaptation of the screen success, "Holy Matrimony." A famous painter masquerades as his own valet and finds himself marrying a total stranger.
MONDAY, 25 April... BEST PLAYS ... 9:00 P.M.
"Kiss The Boys Goodbye" by Claire Booth Luce, presents Helen Claire in the starring role. It concerns the adventures of the daughter of a bombastic southern senator in her conquest of northern cafe' society.
TUESDAY, 26 April ... THE CHASE . . 9:00 P.M.
An American sailor acquires a little golden Buddha from a tatoo artist for delivery to a man on Formosa. In the process, he is captured by a group of Chinese Reds. When he escapes from them and tries to continue on his errand, the chase is on.
WEDNESDAY, 27 April . .. ON STAGE. . 9:00 P.M.
Inspector Peter Black gets a well deserved rest as a new show moves into the "Pursuit" spot. Elliot and Cathy Lewis (Mr. & Mrs. Radio) open their new series of dramatic broadcasts with a romantic play called "Miracle For Julie." It concerns an actress who discovers that her agent is out for a little more than the customary ten per-cent. We think you'll enjoy it.
THURSDAY, 28 April . . . FAMILY THEATRE ... 9:00 P.M.
Gene Lockhart is your host and Lyle Bettger stars in "The Criminal" a tense and engrossing story of a young lawyer who sets out to defend the town's most prominent citizen who is accused of embezzlement. The job is difficult and touchy, not only because there is good reason to believe the man guilty, but also because, he is the father of the lawyers fiancee'.
FRIDAY, 29 April .. . RADIO WORKSHOP . . 10:00 P.M.
Sammy Berger was a lonely little man who lived in the great wild forest of New York. Into Sammy's life came a beautiful woman, and Sammy found himself more lonely than ever before. That is, until his 'friends' tried to discover the reason for his dilema and found instead, "The Silent Room".
NEW SHOWS
In addition to "On Stage", two more shows break the air-ways of WGBY this week. In the daytime lineup, Bob Hope bows to a stateside favorite that has boasted a large following for a number of years, "Don McNeill's Breakfast Club". Listen for the familiar 'Good Morning, Breakfast Clubbers' Monday at 10:00 A.M.
And on Saturday evening at 7:30, Dennis Day heads his own show through a half-hour of comedy and melody that are sure to add a pleasant touch to your listening enjoyment.


O OK* NOOK'

by Francis L. Cannon, J03

AN ENCYCLOPEDIA OF
MODERN AMERICAN HUMOR
Edited by Bennet Cerf
A great collection of poems stories, scenes from hit plays, parodies and radio fueds. Cerf is an old master in the field of collecting wit. His slection of material is effective and highly entertaining.
THE WAR AT SEA
by Captain S. W. Roshill, R. N.
This is the first of three volumes dealing with the fighting at sea by the British Navy during WWII. The author is in a unique position in writing this in that he has access to the captured files and archives of the German Navy, thus giving the reader a look at both sides of strategy. It is in the form of a continuous narrative with many informative maps and charts.
THE USES OF THE PAST
by Herbert J. Muller
With the vision of both philosopher and hisotrian the author surveys the golden ages of such societies as the Grecian, Roman and "Holy Russian" in a search for a pattern or lesson meaningful for the present time. He stresses the ambiguities, incongrueties and paradoxes of history.
THE NEW MEN
by C. P. Snow
A novel about a group of nuclear scientists and high government officials working together in England during the war. The story explores the relationship between two brothers, one a scientist the other in the government. They are both working on the project but from different aspects. Tension mounts when the scientist becomes engulfed with an urge for power. The story deals mainly with psychological effects.
SELECTED STORIES OF
EUDORA WELTY
Twenty five stories of dubious merit puporting to run the full range of human motion and experience.
FISHING THE ATLANTIC
by S. Kip Farrington, Jr.'
A guide book on where and how to hook the big ones and little ones all along the Atlantic coast. It covers surf casting, deep-sea fishing and from-the-bridge fishing as well. Complete descriptions of many fish types are given, their actions and how to hook and fight them.
GEORGE PIERCE BAKER AND
THE AMERICAN THEATRE
by Wisner Payne Kinne
G.P.B. is considered by many to have played one of the most profound roles in the development of the American theatre. Through his courses at Harvard, Radcliffe and Yale he gave self-confidence, enthusiasm and technical assistance to many of the greatest theatre figures of this century: Eugene O'Niell, Thomas Wolfe, Elia Kazan, to name a few of many. The book is a biography and an explanation and evaluation of his contribution.


F1


14&VF-bPPO-10ND-Gtmo.-0745


Saturday, 23 April 1955


4%


THE INDIAN




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8 "Govers q TMO Like The Sunshine" Vol. VI, No. 16 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 23 April 1955 Base School Commended In Committee Report CAPT G. M. Holley, Naval Base Chief of Staff, and head of the Naval Base School Board nas received the final report from the Committee of the Southern Association for Accrediting Secondary Schools and Colleges. The committee visited the Naval Base School early this year and observed extensively the activities, studies, methods and facilities of the Naval Base School from the pre-school group through the high school. Although some discrepencies were noted in the final report, the committee reported that the Naval Base School is a school "of which the parents, the faculty, and the officials can be justly proud," and that the community should be congratulated upon the fine association and keen interest in the activities of the school. The recommendations of the committee were summarized in the report as follows: 1. A principal should be employed to share in the administrative and supervisory responsibilities of the superintendent. 2. A definite amount of not less than two dollars per pupil should be included in the budget yearly for developing and maintaining a good selection of library books. 3. A site of not less than ten acres should be selected for a new elementary school center and classrooms and other necessary facilities contructed. 4. A site should be selected on Leeward Point for the construction of a primary school. 5. The science and library facilities should be expanded and improved. 6. The number of series of readers available to the pupils in the elementary grades should be increased. Also included in the recommendations was that liaison should be established with schools for dependents on otehr bases and also with other public schools to and from which pupils of the Naval Base School transfer. The commendable points mentioned in the report were several, including the following points: 1. Pupils transferring into or out of the base school should have little trouble in adjusting satisfactorily to the new school. 2. The program leading to graduation from this school adequately meets the standards of the Southern Association for Accrediting Secondary Schools and colleges. 3. The school board has wisely adopted a policy of maintaining a lower pupil-teacher ratio than is usually recognized as desirable for public schools. 4. The Naval Base School is to be commended for the provisions which have been made for nursery school and kindergarten experiences for young children on the base. wouldn't Marry Five' Opens At Marina Point Monday "He Couldn't Marry Five" opens at the Community Auditorium Monday night for a 2-performance run. Starting at 8 P.M. the play is this year's selection of the Junior-Senior class of the Naval Base High School for the benefit of the yearbook fund. The story concerns a young man who, running from one love affair, runs into another one with even more complications. He falls in love with five girls, all sisters, and to make it even more precarious, all five are in love with him. The ensuing situations bring forth some rich comedy sequences, and the young man's final choice will come as a surprise for the audience. The play is directed by Mrs. Ruth Liveakos of the school and includes: Anita Sierra, Pat Wormwood, Nancy Halentic, Linda Thurston, Doris Sigler, Irma Pina, Dolores Roguz, Bobbie Johnson, James Dalton and Phil Keenan. Navy Seeks EM For Sub Training Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has invited enlisted men in 15 ratings and qualified strikers to submit requests for submarine training. Enlisted men in the MM, QM, GM, FT, RM, SO, EN, TM, ET, EM, IC, YN, CS and SD ratings in pay grades E-4, E-5 and E-6 and HM in E-5, E-6 and E-7 are eligible for the program. However, they must meet the necessary requirements. The Navy also asked SN, SA, FN, FA, TN and TA to submit applications for initial submarine training. Eligibility requirements for the course, held at the U.S. Naval Submarine School, New London, Conn., are contained in BuPers Instruction 1540.2A. Archbishop Serantes Administers Confirmation, Ist Communion Sixteen persons of the Naval Base will receive Confirmation on Sunday, 24 April from His Excellency Enrique Perez Serantes, Archbishop of Santiago. The Confirmation Mass will take place in the Naval Base Chapel at 1400. Also, at 0900 Sunday morning, 33 persons will be administered First Holy Communion by Archbishop Serantes, assisted by Chapalin Jerome J. Sullivan. Immediately following the Cinfirmation ceremony, there will be a reception for the Archbishop and his party in the patio of the school. Accompanying the Archbishop here is Monsignor Angel Hernandez Cabanius, Father Desiderio Lopez, Mr. and Mrs. Fernando Canto, Dr. and Mrs. Antonio Civit, and Brother Leo, FSC. Mrs. Helen Bowler, American Red Cross Field Director for Guantanamo Bay, accepts a contribution for the Red Cross from RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, in the form of a check for $5,344.64. $344.64 of the Naval Base contribution was collected during the base drive, and $5,000 was alloted from the Base Community Fund. '55 Navy Otmo Carnival Nets $53,3271 Red Cross, 'Dimes' Get First Contributions Reenlistment Bonus Date Set At 1 Oct, 1949 The Assistant Comptroller General of the United States has handed down a ruling regarding the payment of the new reelistment bonus. The ruling was spurred by the confusion that had arisen regarding the method of computing reenlistment times. The new ruling states that all reenlistments or extensions entered into after 1 Oct. 1949 shall be computed for payment of the reenlistment bonus. The new bonus bill allows a bonus of 30 days pay for each year the man reenlists if it is his first reenlistment since 1 Oct. 1949; 20 days pay for each year of reenlistment if it is his second re-up; and ten days pay for each year of reenlistment on his third shipping over agreement. For example-if a man reenlisted in 1950 for six years, his next re-up will be his second and he will be entitled to 20 days pay for each year he reenlists. However, if a man enlisted, or reenlisted before October 1949 for six years, his next reenlistment will be his first and he will be entitled to 30 days pay for each year of new re-up. It is possible that the new ruling will force a rebate to the government by some personnel who were given erroneous bonus payments, but there are further instructions pending on that phase of the ruling. The 1955 Guantanamo Bay Carnival, held on the Naval Base 19, 20, 21, and 22 February, netted $53,327.90, topping the records of all previous years by over $10,000. Staged each year for National Charities, the Guantanamo Bay Community Fund, and other charities, the four-day carnival was a record-breaker in every respect. The check for the final increment of the net proceeds was presented to RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander Naval Base, at the final meeting of the 1955 Charity Carnival Committee by CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, Carnival Chairman. Out of the net proceeds from the Carnival, over $17,000 will go to National Charities, including the Navy Relief Society, the American Red Cross, the Cancer Society, the Heart Fund, the Salvation Army, the Tuberculosis Society, and the Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. Already the American Red Cross has received a check for $5,344.64, presented to the Guantanamo Bay Field Director, Mrs. Helen Bowler by RADM E. B. Taylor. Of this amount, $5,000 was drawn from the net proceeds of the carnival, and the remainder collected in a drive for the Red Cross on the Naval Base. Also, a check for $1,769.50 was forwarded to the March of Dimes. $269.50 was collected on the Naval Base, and an additional $1,500 was drawn from the Community Fund. Besides the national and local charities, part of the proceeds will (Continued on Page Three) V -w 9&

PAGE 2

Page Two THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 23 April 1955 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LTJG J. D. Byerley -Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC---------Editor H. L. Sisson, JO-3 --------News F. L. Cannon, J03Photographer D. C. Roberts, JOSN--Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1944, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a members of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. An Editorial. Will It Go Or Grow An opportunity has just been handed to most of you to prepare for that rainy day without revising your present budget at all. Here's a chance to go on living as you have been on the same old payonly now you can spend it all and save some money at the same time. How? It's this simple: Instead of taking home the new pay raise make out an allotment for U.S. Savings Bonds. You won't miss it. So before you start spending all your raise stop a moment to realize that the lasting good you get from more pay depends entirely on what you do with it. By putting aside a little money each pay day in Savings Bonds it automatically accumulates into big money to buy worthwhile things, such as a new car, new home, college education for your children or a nice bundle waiting for you when you retire or leave the service. It is your decision whether your pay raise goes or grows. Make out that allotment now. If you wait and the pay raise works its way into your weekly spending you'll be right back in the same old rut. After all, you've been getting along without it up till now, haven't you? (AFPS) What's Doin' Stateside NSD Truck Driver (AFPS Weekly Feature) One of American industry's leading atomic experts predicts that, by 1980, 65 percent of all new U.S. electric generating plants will be fed by nuclear fission ...Atomic powered plants will go far toward meeting the spiraling U.S. demand for electricity-expected to triple during the next two decades. There seems to be an argument shaping up about the mental and emotional state of present-day American women ...One group of educators, the Commission on Education for Women, claims they're becoming increasingly unhappy and emotionally upset .. Why? ...Because they're trying to fulfill too many assignments simultaneously -as mother and housewife, career woman and glamour girl ...But a recent survey conducted among college coeds indicates that most girls desire marriage and children above all else and regard careers as strictly secondary. Young men graduating from U.S. engineering colleges this spring can write their own ticket, according to most reports ...The need for engineers is so acute that graduates of some institutions have received as many as five job offers each. Alcatraz may close down The world-famous prison and setting for innumerable movies may be replaced by a new "maximum security" institution within three or four years, Federal prison officials say. The uranium hunt is really at a fever pitch ...A southwestern air line whose route crosses prospecting areas of Colorado and Texas has begun a new service Awarded for Driving Perdrin P. Pruna, Truck Driver, was presented with a Safe Driving Award on 11 April. The certificate and lapel emblem which he received were in recognition of his performing 36 consecutive months of accident-free driving. The presentation was made by LT P. D. Larson, NSD Safety Officer. NSD has a very active safety program, which is paying daily dividends in human welfare. The NSD Safety Scoreboard on wharf "Baker" now shows that the whole Depot has worked over 550 days without a lost time accident. This is believed to be a record for major Supply Corps activities. for its passengers ...During the flight, a stewardess demonstrates how to operate a geiger counter, using a real hunk of uranium ore. The Toastmaster by Joe West If I could bestow upon my little boy one gift that would be most likely to insure his success and happiness, I would choose to endow him with the ability to use flattery, with grace and intelligence. I always believed that flattery was an evil thing, with a demoralizing effect on the characters of both the flatterer and the flattered. As I have watched people and things for the past two and a half decades, I have come to reverse this belief, and to regard flattery as a most effective lubricant of men and affairs. It has long been the custom to condemn flattery. Poets and writers have vied in attacking it, but those who censured it most severely have been most avid in seeking it under the guise of "appreciation." It has been said that a flatterer's throat is an open sepulcher; that no man can be both friend and flatterer; also that flattery is the food of fools. The last is probably true, for the scriptures and the philosophers agree that all men are fools, and cetrainly all men love flattery. Nobody loves it more than I do. The tolernace for flattery varies widely among individuals. Some accept it graciously and it becomes them like the morning dew on a rose, leaving them smiling and glowing with gratitude. On others it acts like a poison, making them puff up and swell like the skunk cabbage; but all of them love it. Remember that there is no soap like soft soap and a good soft soap is 90 percent lye. Of course flattery is not always successful. There was the case of the man who said to another; "Tis a fine lad you have there, a noble head and the manners of a gentleman. Will you lend me ten dollars?" And the other replied; "That I will not. 'Tis my wife's boy by a former husband." In spite of cases like this however, flattery has a large percentage of success. Flattery is the food of love, the vital part in every affair of the heart. What man among you, being in love, does not lie awake nights thinking up honeyed words to say about his sweetheart's beautiful face and figure, or her lovely disposition. Flattery is equally the cement that holds marriages together. Every husband knows the importance of the daily exchange of flattering words and gestures to still the troubled waters of matrimony. Do not think of flattery as merly a matter of words, for the subtlest flattery of all is expressed by a respectful attitude and a deferential manner. Neither should you despise flattery. Learn to use it as a handle which will fit many of the tools that will help you to carve out a successful career. Payroll savings is the ideal method for building a long-range savings plan for the "sunny day" of your future-the time you can retire with added income, when you buy a home or a business of your own, when you send your children to college, when you have the means and leisure for travelwhenever you get any of the good things of life which you are sure to get if you save systematically for them. Sunday, 24 April 1955 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Senioy, 0900--Naval Bose Chael Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel n. dar Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930-Sunday Schol 0930-Adult Bible Cs 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Cristian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. C. Peterson, CHC USN (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner "Did You Get The Word" We in the Navy are well acquained with the expression, "The Word." "Did you get the word on liberty?" or "What's the word on leave?" are typical of the questions that we hear. One has only to be in the Navy a short time to understand what is meant by "the word." It means "This is it. This is the straight scoop, This is the truth". And when someone questions us as to how we know that our information is the straight scoop, we answer that it is the truth because it has come down from higher authority. The author of the Gospel according to St. John also uses this very same expression, "The Word", and in much the same way as we do in the Navy. "In the beginning was the word and the word was with God and the word was God. And the word became flesh and dwelt among us and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the father full of grace and truth." John 1:1&14. Now what is John saying here? He is using the term, "Word" for Jesus and is saying that the two are synonomous. Why does he do this? Just as you and I use the expression in the Navy to describe a truth that has come down from higher authority, so John uses the "Word" meaning the truth about God which has come down from the highest authority of all. John refers to Jesus as the Word of God, for by this Word and the life of this Word, we have a true expression of Almighty God, the One who uttered it. In this day when words are so cheap, let us be thankful that we still have the "Word" of words. 9 a Saturday, 231 April 1955

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Saturday, 23 April 1965 Junior Music Makers Give Annual Recital On Friday, 16 April, the piano students of Mrs. H. P. McNeal, the Junior Music Makers Club, presented their annual recital on the lawn of Mrs. McNeal's home. The Music Makers presented 24 selections followed by a presentation of awards for the year by Mr. H. P. McNeal. Participating in the recital were: front row, left to right: Jackie Miles, Paula Knight, Peggy Echols, Carol Echols, Sallie Scarborough, Nancy Cushing, Billie Jean Matthews, Kathy Murphy, and Kathy Dalton. Rear row; left to right: Ralph Sierra, Margaret Matthews, Judy Yost, Dolores Sierra, Lucille Mahaffey, Sherry Pavlow, Frances Linder, Taft Albright, and Harold Ganus. Radio, Teleman Commended For Performance of Duty Phillips Park Swimming Ruled Out For Minors According to the Naval Station Special Services Officer, LTJG J. D. Byerley, there will be "no swimming" for minors under the age of sixteen at Phillips Park Recreation and Swimming Area. This ruling, however, is not new. As outlined in a Naval Base Instruction, Phillips Park gives first priority to the forces afloat. Naval Base commands and other groups may tentatively reserve the parkif not already reserved by Forces Afloat. Base reservations may be confirmed forty-eight hours in advance. After Naval Base commands, divisions and other organized parties may make reservations. Then, if no others have reservations, Individuals and family groups may make reservations. However, the "No swimming ruling for minors under 16 years of age" will be enforced at all times, and no exceptions will be made to the ruling. Naval Station Begins Disaster Plan Training This week, the Naval Station began a training schedule in connection with the base Disaster Operation Plan. The overall training program is primarily for the damage control teams, but will include practically all Naval Station Personnel. Set up in order to provide maximum readiness for any type of disaster, the training program will be climaxed by a battle problem on 23 June. The first training began Thursday afternoon when the damage control team officers met with LTJG H. L. Olsen and reviewed the revisions to the Disaster Operation Plan. Next week, training will begin for the 18 damage control teams as they will review the disaster plan. Then, beginning the 1st of May, the administrative teams will be briefed in their duties during the disaster operation. The importance of the training program is that the ability of the Naval Station to rapidly recover from disaster damage and restore services to the fleet and other acJunior Workshop Presents First Production 30 April Teh Junior Theatre Workshop, sponsored by the Little Theatre of Guantanamo Bay, is ready to present its first production at the Community Theatre on Friday and Saturday, 29 and 30 April. "Many Moons" was selected as the first play for the junior affiliate of the Little Theatre. Mrs. Lillian Armbruster is the director of the fairy tale depicting the ambition of a king to grant his daughter every wish she makes. Miss Anne Saxe is co-director. Include in the cast of "Many Moons" are Nancy Lea Nelson, Betty McGowan, Ronny Moseley, Edward Deegan, Susan Tipler, Tommy Mallia, Mickey Douglass, Margaret Larson, James Minard and Shirley Krouse. The Junior Theatre Workshop was organized under the sponsorship of the Little Theatre to stimulate interest of the younger people of the base in theatrical activities and to aid in the training of the future actors. Future plans call for presentation of "Once Upon A Clothesline" on 6 and 7 May as the second production of the junior group. Rehearsals for this second play are already in progress as the finishing touches are being put on "Many Moons." Tickets, costing 254, may be obtained in fornt of the Naval Station Navy Exchange or from any member of the cast or the Junior Workshop. Community Fund (Continued from Page One) be used by the Naval Base Community Fund for community betterment. Last year, the Community Fund financed projects for the Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Little League, Teen-age Club, Civilian and other base organizations; and provided funds for equipping several playgrounds on the base. tivities is dependent directly upon the adequate training of its personnel. The entire program will be under the direction of CDR V. J. Soballe, Executive Officer, Naval Station. CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, congratulates C. N. Alcordo, TN, for outstanding performance of duty while George H. Kraus, RM2, stands by to receive a commendation for outstanding performance of radio operation during Hurricane Hazel. Alcordo and Kraus were awarded commendations during a meritorious mast on 6 April. FSV1 Begins Courses For On-Campus Credit An educational program to be sponsored by the Florida State University, which will consist of courses that carry resident credit from the University, is being planed. These courses are conducted by regular faculty members or other competent instructors. Tentative planning indicates that courses offered will consist of all subjects contained in the standard curricula of the Colleges of Arts and Sciences or Humanities. The cost of these courses to the student is $12.00 per credit, which totals $36.00 for the average three (3) hour credit course. Information relative to this program is being published by all commands and includes copies of the courses that are planned which are to be filled out by anyone desiring to register for any of the future courses. 9 Mrs. Douglas L. Bell and Colonel Robert E. Fojt, CO, MarBks., pin 1st Lieutenant bars on Lieutenant Douglas L. Bell. Lt. Bell's date of rank is 23 Nov 54. ft THE INDIAN Page Three

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Page Four NavSta Indians Down Cuban All-Stars In Pre-Season Exhibition Game Minard, Cuban center-fielder, hits the dirt at third as Ray Mawhinney attempts the tag in the Indian -Cuban All-Star game last Sunday. Indians blanked the All-Stars, 5 to 0 behind Dale Buss' scattered hit hurling. Jerry Morgan of the Indians hooks into third base during the Cuban All-Star game last Sunday, but Cabeza gets the tag on time. Morgan has been shifting from second to short during the pre-season training games of the Braves, swapping with Mandy Mandis. J. L. Neill, Jr., P. T. Ahlberg, H. L. Broughton, and E. H. Cavanaugh, the Public Works expedition team recently returned from an adventure on "La Gran Sabana," review their trip on a map. The team spent a forty day vacation in the little-explored area in Venezuela. 9 Little League Begins 48 Game Season Today The "Grape-Nut Circuit" starts its 1955 season today at 3 P. M. when the Little League Colts tangle with the Bears in the opening game of the schedule at the Little League diamond at Villamar. Opening ceremonies will be held just prior to game time. The Little League has a 48-game schedule for the 1955 season. Divided into two parts, the winner of the first half will play the winner of the second half at the end of the schedule for the base championship. With the exception of the first two games on the schedule, all games on week-ends will commence at 2 P. M. Games played on Tuesdays and Thursdays will start at 4 P. M. Tomorrw's game between the Hawks and the Tigers will begin at 1 P. M. The schedule for the week: Tues. 26 April -Tigers vs Colts Thurs. 28 April -Bears vs Hawks Sat. 30 April -Tigers vs Bears Sun. 1 May -Colts vs Hawks Naa Base 'Pony League' Downs Caimanera Colts The Pony League, a newly formed baseball organization for boys over the age limit for Little League play, got off to a local start last weekend when the Naval Base squad journeyed to Caimanera and beat the Caimanera Colts, 3 to 2. The Pony League is an international baseball organization made up on much the same basis as the Little League. Boys 13 to 15 are eligible to play. At present there are two teams in Cuba, one in Caimanera and the other in Guantanamo City, and one team from the Naval Base. J. F. Meredith, BMC, heads the team from the Naval Base. The game played last week-end was the first of a series planned for the new league. Sunday, April, 24, both Cuban teams will be on the base for a double-header with the local club. Richardson pitched for the base team, allowing eight hits while his mates committed two errors while knocking out three hits. The Cuban team chalked up three miscues. NSD Leads Second Half Inter-Command Golf Tourney The Intra-Command Golf Tournament swung into the second half of play weekend with the NSD squad taking a 15 to 9 victory over the Hospital-Dental combine to give NSD the lead in the close contest. Following in a tight race is the strong Naval Station team which banged out a win over FTG, 14% to 9/2. VU-10's squeaker over NAS, 13/2 to 10%, puts them in third place. MCB-1 drew a bye. Matches scheduled for this weekend: Saturday at 1300 the HospDent group meets FTG, and the leaders, NSD, tangle with the second place Naval Station squad: on Sunday at 0815 MCB-1 goes against VU-10. 0 SPORTS ROUND-UP by Joe Celentano, JO1, USN It wasn't too long ago that Willie Mays was a private in the Army. After his discharge he became one of Leo Durocher's major assets and now the Gaint slugger is a honorary lieutenant colonel in the Alabama State Militia. (Oppossing pitchers consider him a general-general nuisance, that is) Prediction: Wes Santee will be the first American to run the fourminute mile-and the Kansas cowboy will do it this year. Here's a tip on the Kentucky Derby, the Belmont Stakes and Preakness. Don't bet! ...Welterweight champ Tony DeMarco bids farewell to his throne on June 10, it says here. He won't last 10 rounds with challenger Carmen Basilio ...Bill Grieve, veteran American League umpire, recently completed a seven-day umpire's clinic at the Norfolk NAS, Va. It's only proper that the boxing trainer at Ft. Lee, Va., is named Sgt. James Battle. Remember Lyn "Schoolboy" Rowe? He's now a Detroit Tiger coach ...Lefty Warren Spahn of the Milwaukee Braves has been a 20-game winner in six of his nine years in the major leagues ... Look for 6-foot, 205-1b. Vince Monto to start at fullback for Navy next grid season. Righthander John Kucks, just out of the Army, has a good chance of sticking with the New York Yankees. He had an 11-3 record at Ft. Dix. N. J., and a 14-2 record in Germany .The Detroit Tigers have been strengthened in the outfield by the return of J. W. Porter from the Army. Last year Porter was player-manager of Ft. Ord, Calif., All-Army and Interservice champs. Harry Wismer, one of the country's top sportscasters, was recently presented with the Amvets of America sports award for 1955 for his work in the promotion of sports as a deterrent to juvenile delinquency ...The newest addition to the American League umpiring staff is John Rice, a WWII Marine Corps veteran of the South Pacific. Pfc. Ben Harrison of the Fleet Marine Force in Pearl Harbor, T. H., is in serious training for the National AAU swimming meet in Los Angeles, July 16-30. Lady Keglers Plan Summer Bowling League A summer base-wide Ladies Bowling League is being formed and will be played at the Naval Air Station Bowling Alleys. All interested lady keglers may enter the league by contacting Mrs. McGowan at 8791 or Mrs. Munson at 9352, by 30 April. Plans call for a three month league to end by August. ft a Saturday, 23 April 1955 THE INDIAN Don't Miss .. 'He Couldn't Marry Five', Monday and Tuesday at Marina Point.

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mf Saturday, 23 April 1955 Hospital Notes eioc Nso6s by D. W. Degon HEIRPORT NEWS Congratulations to HM2 James C. and Mrs. Ruth Schuttle on the arrival of their second child, a boy, Jay "C". YN2 Bob and Mrs. Joann Heil welcomed their first child, a boy, Robert Michael. Bob, a former member of the hospital staff, is now attached to F.T.C. Also presented by the stork this past week are: Barbara Jean to ET1 and Mrs. Elaine Martin; Kathleen Laurdes to LCDR and Mrs. Marie Shaw; Barbara Elizabeth to AKAN and Mrs. Arlene Stackpole. ARRIVALS Welcome aboard is extended to HN Billy C. Green who arrived from Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Virginia. DEPARTURES HMC E. F. Rogers and family departed via USNS JOHNSON fduty at NSHA, NNMC, Bethesda, Md. HMC Rogers was Personnel Chief here at USNH for the past 18 months. A few of the "old tiuners" took their last look at Gtmo as they boarded the Johnson en route to Receiving Station, Brooklyn for separation. They were: HM3 Paul S. Goldburg, past permanent Medical Shore Patrol in Gtmo City and currently assigned to the diet kitchen. Paul was famous, here at Gtmo, for his version of the Cha Cha Cha with his rhythmical partner "Mario;" HN W. Filer, a hard working member of the Medical Store Room crew and HM3 Tom Mulvihill, past member of the X-ray Department and MAA force. Last, but far from the least, was that legendary HN, J. J. Killilea. John, a veteran of the Battle of Gtmo, will report to the Naval Shipyard, Brooklyn, N. Y. for duty. MEET THE STAFF One of the "old timers" in the Hospital Laboratory is HM3 John J. Petery, with just over 15 months in Gtmo. "Pete" attended Corps School at Great Lakes and then to USNH Quantico, Va. He then chose ot be a Laboratory Technician and attended a course of instruction at Bethesda. His present duties in the Lab consist of Blood Chemistry and Parasitology examinations. Being an ardent sportsman, "Pete" has acquired a new interest in in Gtmo: golfing. He also has played soccer, baseball and follows the Sporting News with great enthusiasm. His plans for the future are to enter Kulztown State Teachers College in Pennsylvania. NSD Supply Line CDR and Mrs. E. W. Sutherling, enjoyed a very pleasant weekend at the El Rancho Hotel, Santiago de Cuba. Jack Heavilin, SK2, departed 13 April via FLAW for his home in Parma, Ohio, where he will spend 30 lays leave. ENS J. R. Pope made a very exciting and scenic motor trip to Baracoa this passed Sunday. The NSD Boat Crew enjoyed a fabulous picnic at Escondico Bay Baracoa this past Sunday. Charles Haymen, DK3, recently returned from Crisfield, Maryland, where he spent 10 days leave. by Paul A. Hoffer DEPARTURES Last week via FLAW Sergeant Donald M. Lemos departed for the States. Sgt. Lemos will report to Marine Barracks, U. S. Naval Base, Boston, Mass. for discharge. SKEET SHOOT Another Skeet Shoot was held at the Marine Barracks Skeet Range and three more lucky marines won steak dinners at the Enlisted Club. Pfc. Michael J. Kovalich hit 12 out of a possible 16. Pfc. Herberd D. Varnadore 10 out of 16 and Pfc. Jack L. Simmons 9 out of 16. DANCE This weekend a dance will be held at the Marine Barracks Enlisted Club. Hostesses will be provided. GOOD CONDUCT AWARDS Three Marines were awarded good conduct awards last week. MSgt. John H. Johnston was awarded his 5th. Cpl. Edward F. Novack and Pfc. Gerald R. Reynolds their first. BASEBALL After a weekend of rest the Marine Barracks Baseball team will swing into practice this week. A series of practice games are scheduled. With the season drawing closer each day all marines are reminded to get out and back their team to another winning season. MEET YOUR TEAM Pfc. Charles W. Mason one of the returning veterans from last year's team will be at shorstop instead of centerfield. Pfc. Mason has proved himeslf a good fielder in the change from the outfield to the infield. Mason one of the leading hitters of last year was also high in the homerun department. Charlie hails from Sontag, Mississippi where he played high school football and baseball. Last year he was named to the Naval Base All Star Team. SCUTTLEBUTT Lady: "I'd like to buy two tickets to the show." Ticket Seller: "We have only two standing room tickets left." Lady: "Are they together?" Sergeant: "Smith, what's the first thing you do when cleaning a rifle?" Pvt.: "Look at the number." FTG Bulletin by M. Vandesteen LT Magnus W. Hjalmarson, formerly attached to the USS MADDOX (DD 731) reported onboard for duty Friday, 15 April. Mr. Hjalmarson is assigned to the Operations Department. He is from Long Beach, California. Paul D. Johnston, ET3, reported for duty with the Fleet Training Center Friday, 15 April. Johnston was formerly on duty at the U.S. Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Virginia. He hails from Marblehead, Essex, Massachusetts. LCDR J. T. Usey of the CIC department received his appointment to LCDR Monday, 18 April. Effective date of rank is 1 January 1955. CDR Robert G. Laurie departed by FLAW on TAD, Tuesday, 19 April to attend a gunnery conference in the Pentagon Building, Washington, D.C. CDR Laurie is expected to return on this evening's flight. James L. Leighton, SO1, departed by FLAW Wednesday 20 April enroute to the Receiving Station, Norfolk, Virginia for further transfer to USS OWL (MHC 35) which operates in the Canal Zone. The MIC 35 is a Coastal Mine Hunter. Also on Wednesday's 2030 outbound FLAW flight was James H. Wright, PN2. Wright was selected to attend the Line Officer School in Newport, Rhode Island, upon the completion of which he will be appointed to the grade of Ensign in the Supply Corps. After completing General Line School, he will attend a six months course of instruction at the Naval Supply Corps School in Athens, Georgia. Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Barlow from Cranston, Rhode Island arrived in Guantanamo Bay, Wednesday, 13 April for a visit with CDR and Mrs. Robert Laurie. Mr. and Mrs. Barlow traveled by means of a freighter from New York City to Havana and then came to Guantanamo City via Cubana Airlines. They departed Friday on their return trip home. Miss Winifred Connelly arrived in Guantanamo Bay Saturday, 16 April from Medford, Massachusetts. Miss Connely is visiting LCDR and Mrs. George Saunders. She will travel by commercial airlines on her return home Saturday, 30 April. Mrs. J. W. Higdon, wife of Johnny W. Higdon, EMC, departed the Naval Base enroute to the U.S. with her sick daughter, Johnelle Gay. Elizabeth Ann accompanied her mother and sister. Fleet Training Group personnel wish Johnelle Gay a quick recovery and a rapid return to the area for Mrs. Highdon and her children. SHIPS ARRIVALS USS PAPAGO (ATF 150) (To arrive 25 April) USS SAVAGE (DER 386) (To arrive 25 April) SHIPS DEPARTURES USS SAIPAN (CVL 48) (To depart 29 April) USS C. J. BADGER (DD 657) (To depart 27 April) USS HEERMAN (DD 532) (To depart 27 April) USS STOCKHAN (DD 683) (To depart 27 April) USS WOODSON (DE 359) (To depart 29 April) USS R. F. KELLER (DE 419) (To depart 29 April) USS CREENWICH BAY (AVP 41) (To depart 29 April) q4 Teenage Round-u1 by Linda Thurston Zero hour draws nigh for the cast of "He Couldn't Marry Five." Opening night looms on Monday night and everyone is in a mad rush getting costumes and props ready and tickets sold. Don't forget to mark the 25 the and 26th of April on your calendar and make a date to be at the Community Auditorium. Did Ya' See ...Pat McGowan celebrating her "sweet sixteenth and never been missed". Penny, Burke, Rizzo, Frank and Stan the Man in the cactus exterminating business ...Nancy, Doris and Wormie enjoying a life of workless bliss ...Bobby and Edwin after their return from the grand tour. ...Betty Stone expecting the movies to close down at the full of the moon (It snows at Christmas down here, too) ...JVC feeding his face the other study hall (Not only, JVC, but also Phil, Pistole, Toni, Pat Mc., Judy Inman and Evie) ...Wormie's two hands in the fountain" ...Shar K surveying the dump ...Melba aiding and abetting Cookie on the typewriter ...Stanley Price, Paul and Stan H with their on-the-spot stage-handling ...Cesar accidentally walking in on some of the characters in the play rehearsing at the Snack Shack ...Norma, Brad and Diana selling goodies in the hall for the Freshmen .Darling little Gale Wormwood making her debut in the Senior homeroom. .Johnny McGee attentively squiring Linda Stinson around town ...Howie's toothache Doris with only 19/2 months to go ...Bobby Richardson and his stared-at feeling ...Jack S and Mike and their chess games on Tuesdays. VU-10 Prop Blast by Richard D. Lackie Wait six weeks and you won't know the place!" These are the words of John D. Williams, BMC, CMAA of .Barracks AV-51. Barracks renovation plans include: complete inside paint job; new tile flooring for upper port and starboard; brand-new steel lockers; and a paint job for all bunks. What's the matter, Willie, no murals on the bulkhead? Two members of the squadron were especially happy at the April pay raise. It seems that it helps those re-enlistment bonuses quite a bit. The men with the bulging wallets are George E. Turner, AD2 and Haorld R. Collins, AN, who recently shipped for six. New blood at last! Five new men reported aboard this week. Bobby G. Vail, SN, arrived from NAS, Key West, Florida. Robert L. Clausen, AMAA, is a recent graduate of AM"A" school, Memphis, Tenneessee. William E. Colvin, SN; John D. Lloyd, SA; and James S. Postol, SA, reported from the U.S.S. Bushnell. Congratulations and cigars are in order. LT George F. Guyer returned from lunch Tuesday sporting brand-new gold leaves of LCDR. Professor: This exam will be conducted on the honor system. Please take seats three spaces apart in alternate rows. e THE INDIAN Page Five

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THE INDIAN Saturday, 23 April 1955 MOVIES Saturday, 23 April FIRE OVER AFRICA Maureen O'Hara McDonald Carey Beautiful woman acts as undercover agent with the International Police of Tangier. Her life is in jeapordy many times but she fer. rets out the head of the smugglers. Sunday, 24 April THE LAST TIME I SAW PARIS Van Johnson Elizabeth Taylor Johnson marries the daughter of a fun-loving father. Their life together is spent in disregarding the practical things of everyday life which they later find out is a grave mistake. Monday, 25 April TONIGHT'S THE NIGHT David Niven Yvonne DeCarlo When the squire of a happy-golucky Irish village dies he is sueceded by his distant cousin whose only interest is money. He tries to put the village on a business -like basis with hilarious results. Tuesday, 26 April BRIGADOON Van Johnson Gene Kelly Two Americans happen on a village in the Scottish highlands the inhabitants of which sleep for a hundred years, then are awake for one day. Based on the Broadway play. Wednesday, 27 Apirl TROUBLE IN STORE Norman Wisdom Margaret Rutherford Department store clerk engages in comedy of errors surrounding plot to rob store. Thursday, 28 April GOLDEN MISTRESS John Agar Rosemarie Bowe Agar is a hunter of sunken treasure in the Caribbean. He and girl find "Treasure of the Untamed" for which they are condemned to death. Friday, 29 April THE VANQUISHED John Payne Jan Sterling During the reconstruction of the South after the Civil War, Union soldiers were stationed in many towns. This tells of a hometown boy returned to see that the terms of peace were rightly executed. Prospect: Ye gad! What a tumbled down looking shack. What's holding it together? Agent: The termites are holding hands. Since the discovery of elastic, it is estimated that women take up one-third less space. Anne Frances, M-G-M starlet, takes from Hollwood's green pastures. an upside-down look at the world Radio's 'Tops' of the Week SUNDAY, 24 April .HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE. 10:00 P.M. Old-timers Charles Laughton and Fay Bainter co-star in a rollicking radio adaptation of the screen success, "Holy Matrimony." A famous painter masquerades as his own valet and finds himself marrying a total stranger. MONDAY, 25 April ...BEST PLAYS .9:00 P.M. "Kiss The Boys Goodbye" by Claire Booth Luce, presents Helen Claire in the starring role. It concerns the adventures of the daughter of a bombastic southern senator in her conquest of northern cafe' society. TUESDAY, 26 April .THE CHASE ..9:00 P.M. An American sailor acquires a little golden Buddha from a tatoo artist for delivery to a man on Formosa. In the process, he is captured by a group of Chinese Reds. When he escapes from them and tries to continue on his errand, the chase is on. WEDNESDAY, 27 April .ON STAGE. .9:00 P.M. Inspector Peter Black gets a well deserved rest as a new show moves into the "Pursuit" spot. Elliot and Cathy Lewis (Mr. & Mrs. Radio) open their new series of dramatic broadcasts with a romantic play called "Miracle For Julie." It concerns an actress who discovers that her agent is out for a little more than the customary ten per-cent. We think you'll enjoy it. THURSDAY, 28 April .FAMILY THEATRE .9:00 P.M. Gene Lockhart is your host and Lyle Bettger stars in "The Criminal" a tense and engrossing story of a young lawyer who sets out to defend the town's most prominent citizen who is accused of embezzlement. The job is difficult and touchy, not only because there is good reason to believe the man guilty, but also because, he is the father of the lawyers fiancee'. FRIDAY, 29 April ...RADIO WORKSHOP ..10:00 P.M. Sammy Berger was a lonely little man who lived in the great wild forest of New York. Into Sammy's life came a beautiful woman, and Sammy found himself more lonely than ever before. That is, until his 'friends' tried to discover the reason for his dilema and found instead, "The Silent Room". NEW SHOWS In addition to "On Stage", two more shows break the air-ways of WGBY this week. In the daytime lineup, Bob Hope bows to a stateside favorite that has boasted a large following for a number of years, "Don McNeill's Breakfast Club". Listen for the familiar 'Good Morning, Breakfast Clubbers' Monday at 10:00 A.M. And on Saturday evening at 7:30, Dennis Day heads his own show through a half-hour of comedy and melody that are sure to add a pleasant touch to your listening enjoyment. *BO K* NO0OK by Francis L. Cannon, J03 AN ENCYCLOPEDIA OF MODERN AMERICAN HUMOR Edited by Bennet Cerf A great collection of poems stories, scenes from hit plays, parodies and radio fueds. Cerf is an old master in the field of collecting wit. His slection of material is effective and highly entertaining. THE WAR AT SEA by Captain S. W. Roshill, R. N. This is the first of three volumes dealing with the fighting at sea by the British Navy during WWII. The author is in a unique position in writing this in that he has access to the captured files and archives of the German Navy, thus giving the reader a look at both sides of strategy. It is in the form of a continuous narrative with many informative maps and charts. THE USES OF THE PAST by Herbert J. Muller With the vision of both philosopher and hisotrian the author surveys the golden ages of such societies as the Grecian, Roman and "Holy Russian" in a search for a pattern or lesson meaningful for the present time. He stresses the ambiguities, incongrueties and paradoxes of history. THE NEW MEN by C. P. Snow A novel about a group of nuclear scientists and high government officials working together in England during the war. The story explores the relationship between two brothers, one a scientist the other in the government. They are both working on the project but from different aspects. Tension mounts when the scientist becomes engulfed with an urge for power. The story deals mainly with psychological effects. SELECTED STORIES OF EUDORA WELTY Twenty five stories of dubious merit puporting to run the full range of human motion and experience. FISHING THE ATLANTIC by S. Kip Farrington, Jr. A guide book on where and how to hook the big ones and little ones all along the Atlantic coast. It covers surf casting, deep-sea fishing and from-the-bridge fishing as well. Complete descriptions of many fish types are given, their actions and how to hook and fight them. GEORGE PIERCE BAKER AND THE AMERICAN THEATRE by Wisner Payne Kinne G.P.B. is considered by many to have played one of the most profound roles in the development of the American theatre. Through his courses at Harvard, Radcliffe and Yale he gave self-confidence, enthusiasm and technical assistance to many of the greatest theatre figures of this century: Eugene O'Niell, Thomas Wolfe, Elia Kazan, to name a few of many. The book is a biography and an explanation and evaluation of his contribution. a 1431v y-b PPO0-10 ND-G tm o.-0 745 Saturday, 23 April 1955 TPHE IND>IAN