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Indian

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Indian
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"GoLevs qTMO Lke The Sunshine" Vol. VI, No. 15 U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday; 16 April 1955


Base Communications Officer Junior-Senior Play Opens Promoted to Commander 25 April at Marina Point


On 3 January, 1927, 0. L. Bramlett joined the Navy as an apprentice seaman. Last week, O.L. Bramlett received word of his appointment to the rank of commander, effective 1 January 1955-just two days over 28 years since his enlistment in the Navy.
Commander Bramlett, who is expecting to leave Guantanamo Bay sometime in June, donned the new gold leaf and "scrambled egg" cap shortly after receiving notification.
Since his entrance into the Navy, Commander Bramlett has served aboard so many ships that he can't remember the names of all of them. During World War II, he served in ships both in the Atlantic and Pacific Fleet and participated in many historic campaigns. Among the campaigns were the invasions at Casablanca, Normanday, and


With the ever-present cigar in hand, CDR 0. L. Bramlett, takes a lok at the "scrambled eggs" pn his new commander's cap. Commander Bramlett received notification of his appointment to the rank of commander last week.

Southern France and the battle of Sherbourg. In the Pacific, CDR Bramlett participated in the final stages of the capture of Guadalcanal and was a member of the task force at Bouganville.
Commander Bramlett, who originally hails from Donalsonville, Georgia, began his career as an officer aboard the USS DENEBOLA in February 1942 when he was appointed to the rank of Warrant Radio Electrician.
Prior to his assignment as Naval Base Communications Officer here, the new commander was stationed in Key West, Fla., working on development projects in anti-sub warfare, fire control, and many other highly important projects.
Aside from his duties as Naval Base Communications Officer, Commander Bramlett is an avid hamradio operator and is currently very high in the number of worldwide contacts.
At present, Commander Bramlett's family, his wife, Pat, and their daughter Patricia, age 7, are residing in Tampa, Florida.


If you are a young man and single, what would you do if you fell in love with five girls all at the same time? And to complicate things further, all five are in love with you. And just to make it a real harem-scarum deal, the five girls are sisters!
A possible answer will be provided on Monday and Tuesday nights, 25 and 26 April at the Community Auditorium atop Marina Point when the Junior-Senior students of the base high school present their annual play.
This year's play is Robert St. Clair's "He Couldn't Marry Five." It's a farcial comedy in three acts directed by Mrs. Ruth Liveakos of the school.
Included in the cast are Anita Sierra, Pat Wormwood, Linda Thurston, Nancy Halentic, Irma Pina, Bobbie Johnson, Doris Sigler, Dolores Roguz and Jaies Dalton. The "He" from the title is played by Phil Keenan.
The story revolves around a young man (Keenan) trying to forget a broken love affair. He visits the home of his father's employee (Dalton) and there encounters probably the most screwball family on the face of the globe. Five sisters presided over by an astrology-happy mother and, a man-hating aunt cavort through the various antics of their chosen professions which include a budding actress, a budding dancer and a budding painter among others. Confronted by the handsome young man, the buds suddenly become aware of the bee-and-flower theory and blosson forth into a riotous everyone-for-himself last act.
Almost needless to say, the twoperformance run of "He Couldn't Marry Five" will provide an evening of belly laughs for all who see it.
Tickets may be obtained from any high school student or at the school office. Price per ticket is 750. All proceeds will go to the school yearbook fund.


Public Works Expedition Team Returns

From 40 Day Adventure on 'La Gran Sabana'
Forty days after their departure from Guantanamo Bay for an expedition on "La Gran Sabana" in Southern Venezuela, a team of four men from the Public Works Department-E. H. Cavanaugh, P. T. Ahlberg, H. L. Broughton, and J. L. Neill, Jr.-returned to the Naval Base last week.


American Children Overseas

Slated for Salk Vaccine

The new Salk polio vaccine has been proved effective, safe and potent. Innoculations of school children in the United States has already begun in an effort to beat the polio season this year.
All overseas Navy shore stations will receive shipnments of the vaccine. It will be administered to minor dependents of Navy, Marine Corps and American civilian employees. Only children between the age -of 8 months and 16 years will be innoculated at present.

There is still a somewhat limited supply of the new vaccine, and in order that all children get their shots first, all city, state and government agencies are restricting the first immunizations to children only.
The vaccine has not been received at Guantanamo Bay as yet. Officials at the Naval Hospital here said they would have to wait for the official procedure-announcement from the Bureau of Medicine and Sugery before they could begin vaccinations. They added that, according to the primary instructions received so far, all innoculations will be on a voluntary basis.


AND THEY'RE OFF! Hundreds of children of the Naval Base surge from the starting line-with a bit of coaching from a proud parent here and there-on the Easter Egg hunt held Easter Sunday afternoon at the Trading Post Park
(See Story On Page Three)


Although the expedition was not as highly successful as hoped by the team, it was as "good as expected."
Leaving the Naval Base for Trinidad on the MSTS JOHNSON and flying inland to their starting point at Uriman on the Caroni River, the journey went as planned. From Uriman, the team started out on foot carrying light packs. The first snag in expedition plans occurred upon arrival in Ureyan, a small Indian Village, when they learned that the rainy season had set in and that travel was virtually impossible.
Although the expedition team was not the frst to travel in the area that they touched, they were the first American expedition team to travel in this area. In their travels, the team carried out as much of their purpose as possible. Mr. Neill, whose interests center in the science of minerology, was able to do some prospecting. (During the time they were in Venezuela, a 60-carat diamond was found not too distant from their location.) Ted Alhberg still was able to hunt, although the hunting was not as good as he expected. Perhaps the most successful was Mr. Broughton who saw more through the viewfinder of his 35mm Leica camera than he did with his own eyes.
The results of the trip are many. The team still plans to do an article for National Geographic magazine. And the team also brought back many Indian artifacts and souvenirs. And most important, plans call for a return trip in the future. According to Mr. Neill, recorder for the expedition, "We would like to have covered more country, but with the rainy season, it was impossible. However, we want to return in the next dry season."
Aside from the souveneir's and the accomplished purposes of the expedition, the team brought back many interesting facts; among them-largest village was about 15 families-one out of every ten Indians spoke passable Spanish, and most conversation was done with signs, smiles, and signalsand many others.
For their many friends, the team plans a showing of their souveneirs, slides, and other articles borught back, at one showing for all interested persons. Finally, the most potent souveneir brought back is a Jararaca, a small snake about 12 inches long. This particular snake is a large one of its species, but its size is deceiving for its potency. Within three hours after being bitten by the small creature, a person will die. There is only one known antidote amputation.


9





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Page Two


THE INDIAN


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The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615
Saturday, 16 April 1955
U. S. NAVAL BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LTJG J. D. Byerley ------ Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC ------------------ Editor
H. L. Sisson, J03 ------------------- News
F. L. Cannon, JO3 ---------- Photographer
D. C. Roberts, JOSN ------------Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1944, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a members of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.



What's Doin' Stateside

(Weekly AFPS Feature)
American scientists have found a way to transmit ordinary television signals beyond the horizon... In experimental efforts, they've beamed TV signals 200 miles without relay stations . . . This points the way to far more powerful video stations, possibly operating over as wide areas as radio does now.
President Eisenhower has asked Congress for funds to complete the Pan-American Highway within three years instead of 15 as Pow planned . . . Some $75 million is needed to finish the two lane, all-weather span which is to extend more than 7,000 miles from Fairbanks, Alaska, S.C. to the Canal Zone.
* * *
Injections of radioactive gold have saved the lives of at least 34 patients believed fatally stricken with cancer, according to a report by a group of Iowa surgeons . . . They no longer show any symptoms of the dread disease . . . Since 1951, the gold injections have been employed in 100 cases thought hopeless... Forty-eight are still alive.
* * *
About half of the nation's colleges and universities are operating at a financial loss despite increased grants from private sources... A survey by the Council for Financial Aid to Education indicates that the cost of educating a student has risen by 50 percent since 1948 . . . But tuition fees have been boosted an average of only 21 percent.
* * *
The 85 miles of New York City's subway system are going to get a thorough sweeping out for the fisrt time in 20 years . . . The task of cleaning up the cavernous tunnels will take five years and cost more than $2.5 million.


The Toastmaster An Editorial,,,,


by Joe West
Since I've been putting these Toastmaster articles in the Indian, there have been many questions asked me pertaining to Toastmasters. Some have asked what it is, what is the purpose of it, how does it operate, what is the membership, and other questions that I would like to answer.
Toastmasters is actually more than a club, it's an education. Men in business and professional life are usually the most readily interested in the club. It is an organized group of men, over 21 years of age, who seek to improve themselves in speech and leadership, as means of increasing their usefulness in business, social and civic relationships.
The organization was founded by Mr. Ralph C. Smedley, of Santa Ana, California. Incorporated in 1932, as a non-profit, non-commercial corporation. The movement has grown until now there are clubs chartered in almost every state, Hawaii, Alaska, Canada, Great Britain, South Africa and Guantanamo.
The fundamental purposes of the Toastmasters Club are, to aid its members to master the difficult art of public speaking; to teach them to appear effectively before any audience; to train them for leadership and for chairmanship in meetings of all kinds; and to correlate Toastmasters training with job training.
How does it operate? The club meets weekly, for dinner, at sixthirty P.M. During the mealtime or sometime prior to the beginning of the formal speech program, every member except those scheduled to make speeches has an opportunity to be on his feet. This is insured in connection with the business to be transacted plus the regular program feature, "Table Topics," in which many men have the chance to speak briefly and impromptu on topics of general interest.
The formal program begins when the President introduces the member who is to serve as Toastmaster


IT'S UP TO YOU
Everyone has heard at one time or another that "this base" or "that ship" is a good billet for duty.
And when you stop and think about it for a minute, you'll realize there is a reason.
By talking to the men from these "choice" installations you'll find they are 100 percent behind the "old man." Consequently, he leaves everyone alone because he knows from reports coming across his desk that things are running smoothly-just the way he directed they should.
Every base and ship can be choice duty if the "old man" gets the support and results he expects from his commands and decisions. Remember-do it his way and the pressure is off, tension relaxes and first thing you know you are sitting right in the middle of a choice billet. (AFPS)


SAVINGS BONDS
Payroll savings is the ideal method for building a long-range
savings plan for the "sunny day" of your future-the time you can retire with added income, when you buy a home or a business of your own, when you send your children to college, when you have the means and leisure for travelwhenever you get any of the good things of life which you are sure to get if you save systematically for them.

of the evening. If the meeting is carefully planned as to time, and if each participant is required to observe the time limit, the meeting can be completed in two hours.
A good Toastmaster like a trim sailing vessel, rides with the winds of enthusiasm, but avoids the typhoons of passion. He moves with the currents of conviction, but shuns the calms of prejudice. And so, with all sails set and homewardbound pennant flying high, he comes triumphantly to port.


The Guantanamo Bay Toastmaster Club 92 held its semi-annual installation of officers in the Officers Club at Deer Point on Wednesday evening. Mr. John L. Sanborn, center left, is handing the gavel to LTJG H. L. Olsen, center right. Mr. Olsen will preside over the toastmaster sessions for the next six month period. Mr. Olsen's supporting staff line up as follows, from left to right, Mr. John Dobry, Sergeant at arms; Mr. R. E. Zaizer, second vice president; Mr. Ralph Sierra, first vice president and Mr. J. L. West, secretary-treasurer.


Sunday, 17 April 1955
Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0930-Sunday School
0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal
Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Christian Science
Sunday: 1000--Station Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J.J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)


The Chaplain's Corner





Four firemen were injured but, miraculously, no one was killed when a seven-alarm fire early this month caused $425.000 damage to a furniture stoie in Milwaukee, my home city.
I say "miraculously" because of the experience of one of the firemen. THE MILWAUKEE JOURNAL relates that this fireman had entered the first floor of the building and had sprayed water on the ceiling and walls. When the fire seemed to have been subdued and he was preparing to leave, the ceiling suddenly collapsed and in a matter of seconds the interior was a blinding inferno.
The panicky fireman was unable to see, so on his hands and knees he straddled the hose and crawled, knowing that the hose led to the door.
But then he lost the hose, and coming to a wall he didn't know which way to turn. The searing flames permitted no time for deliberations. He scrambled to the right and soon came to a window and safety. It was later revealed that had he turned to the left he would have gone to his death, as there was no outlet in that direction for 100 feet.
"I thought I was all done. Fate or God or something got me out" he said. "My wife was after me to go to church last week. I guess I had better go next week."
How typical of all of us are these words. God performs a miracle for us and, like the fireman, we don't even know if we should give him the credit. "Fate or God or something got me out."
It was St. Paul who spoke with conviction, "I know whom I have believed." It would be well for us to imitate this faith, to acknowledge that it is God and not just "fate or something" that it is thing" that leads us and protects us every day of our lives.
M. E. Roberts
CHC, MCB-1


9


m
Saturday, 16 April 1955







m
Saturday, 16 April 1955


a


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THE INDIAN


"I know there's no eggs here, but I'm tired." One of the younger set takes life easy in the shade, in no particular hurry to find any eggs since there were plenty for everyone.

Egg Hunt Gives Prizes

To 35 Lucky Children

Easter Sunday afternoon, the new Trading Post Park was filled to the point of overflow with easter eggs, approximately 300 egg-hunting children of the Naval Base and many proud parents. Sponsored by the Fleet Reserve Association, the Fellowcrafters Club, the American Legion, the Villamar-Bargo Council, the Catholic Parish, and the Protestant Church, the egg hunt got off to a prompt start at 1500. Three hundred children surged happily from the starting line, and the hunt was on. Of the 1100 eggs hidden in the park, 35 were marked as "lucky eggs"-five for a prize of $5.00, and 30 for a prize of $1.00.
An hour and a half later, there wasn't a lucky egg left, and parents, children and spectators began leaving. For a few there was disappointment in not finding the lucky eggs, but still they had found some eggs. For those that did win, there was the job ahead of stuffing one and five dollar bills into piggy banks.


"Now where did Mother go? She was here just a minute ago" says one young lass who evidently seems a bit befuddled by the amount of eggs, people, and fun.


Holy Name Society

Formed on Naval Base

A new organization has been formed on the Naval Base. However, this organization is by no means new since its world-wide founding goes back to 1264 when the Albigensian Heresy denied the divinity of Christ. Through the ages, this organization, the Holy Name Society, has fostered reverence to the person of Christ by assisting members to develop a sound spiritual life. Since the time of Pope Pious X, -the frequent reception of the Sacraments and a monthly Cooperate Communion have become the principle spiritual practices of the society.
Heading the Guantanamo Bay Chapter of the Holy Name Society is CDR V.J. Soballe, president, Mr. Norman Huddy, vice president, Mr. Robert Radcliffe, treasurer, R. P. Schuler, PN1, recording secretary, and Mr. Gordon Ward, corresponding secretary.
Meetings of the Guantanamo Bay Chapter are held monthly, after Holy Communion and a Communion breakfast. Anyone interested in joining the Holy Name Society may meet with the local chapter by joining them at 8:45 after Holy Communion on 8 May. Besides the monthly Communion breakfast and business meeting, the Holy Name Society will have a reception ceremony Sunday night, 8 May at 1800 in the Open-air auditorium on Chapel Hill. It is hoped to issue the charter at this time, and anyone joining before this time will be considered a charter member of the local chapter.


Opportunities for civilian employment on the Naval Base will reach a high in the next three months. According to Mr. H. P. McNeal, Naval Base Industrial Relations Officer, there are still two high paying civil service jobs open on the base-plus the always existing need for stenographers. Also, a great need for school teachers is expected at the beginning of the 1955-56 school year.
At present, there is still the need for a civilian assistant in the Naval Station Special Services Department as a Fscal Accounting Officer. This job, which requires five years of progressive experience in accounting and administration, carries a civil service rating of GS-10. Entrance pay for the job is $5,000 per year plus allowances for quarters equal to rentfree housing.
Also, there is a need for an Electrical Engineer with a Civil Service rating of GS-9. Entrance pay is $5,060 per year, with allowances for quarters.
Besides these two jobs, the need for qualified stenographers-GS-3 or GS-4-is always present. These jobs offer excellent opportunities for military dependents on the base.
With an anticipated transfer of several teachers at the Naval Base School, there will be openings on the faculty at the school for the coming year. Teachers with college degrees and/or two years teaching. experience are desired.
Anyone who is qualified for these jobs is urged to contact Mr. McNeal in the Industrial Relations Office.


At the Naval Station personnel inspection, held Saturday 9 April, on Bay Hill Road, 13 men of the Naval Station were awarded their first Good Conduct Medal, and three men were awarded campaign medals by their commanding officer, CAPT W. R. Caruthers.
Receiving the Good Conduct Medals were, Ernest Ray Backwell, CS3; Angelo John Mandis, CT3; Ellion Richard Galant, SN; Delbert Carl Roberts, JOSN; John Donald Slewitzke, SK3; Leo Thomas McCormack, EN3; Norman Thomas Ryan, RMSN; Joseph James Gullen, ME3; Joseph Martin, Jr. EM2; Raymond Wesley Ellis, YN2; Arthur Theadore Laney, SD3; and Theodore Walter Graca, GM2.
Receiving campaign awards were Wilson Myers Adams, BMC; Robert Donald Broussard, SN; and Schubert Ogan, CS2. Adams was awarded the China Service Medal and the United Nations Service Medal. Broussard received the American Campaign Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, and the World War II Victory Medal. Ogan received the World War II Victory Medal.


Washington (AFPS) - Servicewide competitive examinations for pay grades E-4, E-5, and E-6 to be conducted in August 1955 have been announced by the Navy.
Tests for petty officers third class (E-4) will be held Tuesday, Aug. 9. Petty officers second class (E-5) will be examined Tuesday, Aug. 16, and first class (E-6) Tuesday, Aug. 23. The August examinations will be provided for all ratings in pay grades E-4 through E-6, except Fire Controlman, Printer and Avaition Electronicsman, which are being consolidated with other ratings.
Full details on the examinations are contained in BuPers Notice 1418, Mar. 25, 1955.


Honor Man


H. M. Stone, BM2, was selected as Honor Man at the last Naval Station Personnel inspection held on Bay Hill Road, 9 April. Stone, who has been stationed on the Naval Base at the Fleet Boat Pool for one year, has seen nine and a half years service with the Navy. Stone's hometown is Eddyville, Ky.

First Holy Communion

Set For 24 April
First Holy Communion will be administered to Catholics on the Naval Base on 24 April by His Excellency Enrique Perez Serantes, Archbishop of Santiago.
The Communion Mass will take place at 0900 in the Naval Base Chapel.
Confirmation will also be administered by the Archbishop in the chapel at 1400.
Immediately following the Confirmation ceremony there will be a reception in the patio of the school for the Archbishop.

Public Works Dept. Begins
Telephone Trouble Service
Effective 4 April 1955 the Public Works Department established a Trouble Call and Service Force located in Building #806. Telephones 8459 and 8424 are set up for the receiving of any trouble calls for the entire Public Works Department, between 0800 and 2400 after which time the Public Works Duty Officer should be called.


Page Three


Base Civil Service Jobs Navy PO Exams Set for Open to Qualified Persons August in Grades 4, 5, 6







NO Four


Fire Department Urges Good Care For Fire Safety with Electrical Appliances


by Felix Lopez, Base Fire Inspector
1. How to treat your most obedient servant:
Nowadays we use electricity in every part of our homes. It's our most versatile and obliging servant . . . Providing us with light, warming and cooling us, furnishing us with entertainment, and doing dozens of domestic chores, such as cooking, cleaning, washing our clothes and our utensils. So accustomed are we to this marvelous "Push-Button" service that we may become negligent in giving it the attention and care it deserves.
2. Cord sets and power supply cords:
Portable wiring, as you use it, consists of "Cord Sets"; that is, lengths of flexible insulated wire with connecting devices at both ends, or "Power Supply Cords"the flexible wire which comes already attached to a lamp or ap. pliances.
What is a good supply cord or cord set? In the cord itself, the conductors are large enough to safely carry the electricity for the appliance or lamp without overheating. Overheating may soften the insulation or cause it to stiffen or crack, thereby shortening its life.
The insulation in a good cord set is of high quality, and the conductor is well centered, so that the insulation is the same thickness all around. Some cords used on heating appliances are asbestos covered, to resist high temperatures. Cords subjected to abrasion, water absorption or oil or grease conditions are equipped with an outside covering or jacket designed to protect against those adverse conditions.
The plug or connecting device is constructed so that it is not injured in ordinary handling or use. The blades fit securely into the outlet for good contact yet not so tightly that a hard jerk is necessary to remove the plug.
The flexible cord coming into the plug or connecting device is secured so the wires will not pull loose from the prongs. However, this attachment is not intended to carry the strain of a pull on the cord.
3. Safety valve of the electrical system:
The fuse is the safety valve of the electrical system. It includes a small link of soft metal, which melts when too much current passes through. If a short circuit occurs in the wiring system, too much current flows through the wiers and the fuse, causing the fuse link to melt. This cuts off current before harm is done. Because fuses are very important, they should not be tampered with. Never use makeshift fuses, or those of improper rating.
Fuses have a second function. They also protect in the case of overload. If too many appliances are connected to one circuit, more current will be drawn through the wires than they were meant to carry. Here, again the fuse link


melts or "blows", thus protecting the wires.
4. Give your electric housewares the attention they deserve:
Electric appliances, such as irons, heaters, etc., should not be merely shut off by the switch on the appliance. Disconnect them by removing the plug from the outlet.
They should never be immersed in water for washing but should be brushed clean-to get the crumbs out of your toaster, as an example. Water and Dampness may injure the heating elements and cause short circuits.
Here are a few suggestions for the care of appliances:
Mixer-Don't let batter or juice get into the mechanism. Use your instruction book for oiling instructions.
Waffle Maker-After use, open and allow grids to cool.
Vacuum Cleaner-Have it checked at least once a year. Keep cord properly coiled during storage.
Irons-Disconnect when not in use; above all, avoid dropping them.
Coffee Maker-Never put heating element in water.
5. Be sure to use the right cord for the right purpose:
There are many types of flexible cords, each designed for specific purposes. You can see this by comparing, for instance, a vacuum cleaner cord with a toaster cord, or the cord on a radio or TV set with one on a fan.
Living Room: In the living room the lighter cord are used for lamps, clocks, radios, TV sets and other equipment where the cords are not normally subjected to hard wear.
Kitchen: Cord sets used in the kitchen are usually water resisting or heat resisting. Toasters. percolators and waffle irons have heat resisting cords. Refrigerator and electric mixer cords are jacketed for moisture resistance.
Laundry: Laundry cords furnish power to the washer, ironer, and clothers dryer. The ironer and hand iron should have asbestos protected cords. The washer should have a jacketed cord to protect it from moisture, grease and abrasion.
Bedrooms: The use of sun and heat lamps, electric clocks, radios, ventilators, air conditioners, lamps, curling irons, etc., in bedrooms is increasing. Usually bedroom appliances are served lightweight cords.
Bathroom: Electric shavers and electric massagers are used in bathrooms. Here, because of the pressure of water (which conducts electricity), water pipes and radiators in a confined space, it is particularly necessary that worn power supply cords be examined frequently and replaced when necessary with new inspected cords.
Other Locations: Power tools have jacketed cords, resistant to abrasion, water, oil and grease.
And, always use convenience outlets, not lamp sockets, for electric apliances.


Grace Kelly, Marion Brando Hoover Commission Urges Named Best Actress, Actor Changes In Navy Policy


Grace Kelly and Marlon Brando smile happily as they clutch Oscars they won from the Motion Picture Academy of Arts and Sciences as the best actress and actor of 1954. Miss Kelly won hers as the frustarted wife of a drunkard in "The Country Girl," and Brando for portraying a moody, bewildered longshoreman in "On the Waterfront," which won eight Oscars.


NSD Employee Retires

After 26 Years Service


Mr. James F. Bowman, Liquid Fuels Pump Operator at the Naval Supply Depot is congratulated by the Commanding Officer, Naval Supply Depot, CDR E. W. Sutherling and the Fuel Division Officer LCDR John P. McFadden for his completion of 26% years of honorable government service on the occasion of his retirement on 31 March 1955. Mr. Bowman, who is a native of Jamaica B.W.I., served on the Naval Base with the Ship's Department and the Communications Department of the U.S. Naval Station, before coming to NSD. He spent his last fifteen years of government service with the Naval Supply Depot. Mr. Bowman started working as a laborer and was promoted to engineman and then to his present position of Liquid Fuels Pump Operator. His long, loyal service to the U.S. Government marks an achievement of which Mr. Bowman can well be proud.

It is more convenient, and more economical for payroll savers to invest in three $100 bonds a year than twelve $25 bonds.


The just-published report of the Hoover Commission, headed by former President Herbert Hoover urged several sweeping changes in present Navy policy.
The report recommends:
1. Cut off free shipment of service people's cars ovesreas.
2. Merge Navy Air Transportion systems into the Military Air Transport Service,- and then give a lot of business to private airlines.
3. Turn over a lot of the business done by the Military Sea Transport Service to private shipping companies.
4. Set up a transportation Chief in the Pentagon to coordinate all transportation activities.
Hoover Commission recommendations have no effect as such, but many of them are incorporated into future changes in military regulations.
The commission also urged the services to cut down on the present mileage allowance and to restrict the issuance of mileage to those who are bona-fide owners of automobiles.


Naval Uniform Board

Authorizes Changes

Dungaree rating badges for petty officers, optional wear of white socks until 1 Jan. and notched khaki collars were among several changes to the uniform just recently approved by the Secretary of the Navy.
The changes were originally recommended by the permanent Naval Uniform Board, and the appropriate ammendments to the uniform regulations are now in the hands of the printer. The changes are expected to become effective on 1 June, according to a report in the Navy Times.
P.O. RATING BADGES
Petty officers first, second and third class will wear a dark blue rating badge on the dungaree working uniform. The type decided upon is the new photo-printed badge without specailty mark, costing about ten cents each. It may be sewed on or ironed on.
WHITE SOCKS
The optional wear of white socks has been extended until 1 Jan. 1956. This change was recommended by the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts in order to use up the present supply in stock.
NOTCHED COLLAR
The collar of both the white and tropical khaki short sleeved shirt will be changed from the present straight, or shawl, type to a regular notched collar. And on the white shirt, shoulder marks instead of the collar insignia may be worn.
Among the other changes approved by the Secretary is one which makes the wearing of gray gloves with the dress blue uniform no longer mandatory. They will be worn only when prescribed.


This Is For The Birds!
Representative Cecil R. King (D-Calif) has proposed that Congress direct the Secretary of Defense to issue a citation to acknowledge the action of "G. I. Joe" in carrying a message to Allied Headquarters in Italy on Oct. 18, 1943.
"G. I. Joe" is a homing pigeon.


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THE INDIAN . Saturday, 16 April 1955





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Saturday. 16 Aprfi i95


Little League Tigers, Colts Win In First Exhibition Series Games


Despite tongue-in-teeth determination, Larry Smith of the Little League Bears misses a wide throw and a Colt scores during the Little League practice game last week-end.


Spring and baseball came to Guantanamo Bay with a bang last weekend as the Guantanamo Bay Little League teams faced each other on the under-sized diamond in Villamar to start off a series of exhibition games prior to the start of the regular schedule.
Thus the Little Leaguers got the jump on the Stateside major leagues by two days and on the base league by almost a month.
Saturday afternoon the 1954 runners-up, the Tigers, edged out the Hawks, 7 to 5, and on Sunday the Colts stomped the 1954 champions, the Bears, 12 to 9.
This week-end the Grape Nut circuit concludes their exhibition series when the Hawks meet the Colts on Saturday and the Tigers and Bears renew their rivalry on Sunday.
The regular season schedule will commence on 23 April with a schedule of 48 games to be played. This year the winner of the first half of the schedule will be determined on 2 June and the winner of the second half will emerge on 14 July. The two winners, if such is the case, will play for the base championship after the close of the regular schedule.
All Saturday and Sunday games will commence at 2 P.M. and games during the week will start at 4 P.M.

The personal pride of accomplishment and the feeling of security that come from owning a nest-egg of U.S. Savings Bonds are among the richest rewards enjoyed by payroll savers.


VU- 10 Wins First Half

Base Inter-Command Golf

The first half of the anuual InterCommand Golf League was completed last weekend with VU-10, the 1954 Chamipons, still in first place by 14 points.
The second half, with teams playing each other for 24 points, starts today.
First Half Stadings
Team Points VU-10 105% Naval Station 91 NAS 80
Hospital-Dental 78 Fleet Training Group 68
Naval Supply Depot 62
MCB-1 18
Weekend Schedule Saturday, 16 April
1300
Hospital-Dental vs
Naval Supply Depot
1330
Fleet Training Group vs Naval Station Sunday, 17 April
0815
VU-10 vs NAS

The Best Umbrella for a
Rainy Day: Buy Bonds on
Payroll Savings.
Salt It Away the Easy
Way In U. S. Savings Bonds
on Payroll Savings.


SPORTS ROUND-UP
by Joe Celentano, JO1, USN
(AFPS Sports Writer)
NBC has been given the rights to televise the 1955 NCAA football program ... Wonder if the basketball fans at Camp Bussac, France, yell "Hey Mambo" everytime Sgt. Charles Italiano refs a game? ... A/2C Richard Grade of Itazuke AB, Japan, rolled a 21game pin total of 4,170 to win the all-events championship of the Far East Air Forces bowling tournament.
Capt. Forrest Cook, who recently returned from a tour of duty in Japan, has been named athletic business manager at the new Air Force Academy . . . The Rockets of Andrews AFB, Md., finished the regular cage season with a sensational 43-0 mark. In the past three years the Rockets have won 118 and lost only 20 .. . Kodiak Naval Station in Alaska copped the 17th Naval District cage title for the second consecutive year.
Charlie Chronopoulis, ace righthander of the Parris Island, S.C., mound staff, fanned 18 as he twirled a two-hit shutout against Newberry College. The Marines won, 8-0 ... Cpl. William Roetzhelm of Ft. Jackson, S. C., ran into tough luck in the gymnastic trials for the Pan-American Games. Roetzheim, a member of the '48 and '52 Olympic teams, missed making the U.S. squad by onethird of a point.
When it comes to predicting Cpl. Wililam McKnight of Ft. Lesley J. McNair, D. C., is one of the best. The sports editor of the Passing Review looked into his crystal ball and came up with this AFPS AllStar basketball team: Cliff Hagan, Larry Hennessy, Ernie Beck, Dick Groat and Richie Regan. He was 100% correct ... The Skyhawks of Lockbourne AFB, Ohio, downed Scott AFB, Ill., 74-55, to win the Great Lakes Conference cage crown.
Pvt. Brooks Dodge, USAREUR, selected to the U.S. Olympic ski team, recently won his fourth Eastern downhill title *t Pinkham Notch, N.H.


Ladies Golf Shots

by Betty Lou Tipler
On Wednesday morning the First and Second Flights played for low putting scores while the Third Flight played a Blind Five tournament. The results:
1st Flight-Jane McElroy
Frances Grounds
2nd Flight-Val Evans
Marge Sheehan and Bev Larsen
3rd Flight-Vivian Soballe
Dee Stadnick and
Katie McGregor
The Fourth Flight voted to play on Thursday morning from now on, so the results of their weekly tournament will be a week late in the column.
Most of the lady golfers are hard at work (or play) on the Ladder Tournament which gives everyone good parctice for the coming Championship Tournament.


NayBase Baseball League Props for Season


Bill Wood gets caught in a rundown between third and home during the Indian - Marine exhibition game last weekend. The Indian's Cordice holds the ball, ready to toss to 3rd sacker Guillmette. Mandy Mandis came in from shorstop and made the assist.


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Ticonderoga Completes

Training Cruise Here

In the Caribbean, aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. TICONDEROGA-The "Big T" returns to her home port of Norfolk this weekend (16-17 April) after a rigorous but successful eight-week shakedown training cruise at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
The modernized Essex Class carrier is scheduled to go into Norfolk Naval Shipyard for postshakedown availability and it is expected a large number of families of the officers and the crew will be taking up residence in the N o r f o 1 k-Portsmouth area this month.
Vice Admiral F. W. McMahon, USN, ComAirLant, was on hand to watch the ship's final battle problem which consisted of gunnery, air defense, seamanship, damage control and ship control exercises.
The Adimral, who in January welcomed the 33,000 ton man-ofwar to Norfolk when she rejoined the fleet, said he was "pleased to see the ship come along so well."
Captain A. S. Habecker, USN, ComFltTraGru, congratulated the officers and crew on the "great strides they have taken."
During her eight-week shakedown period, the "Big T":
1. operated the Navy's first carier-based F7U Cutlass Squadron
2. landed her 1,000th, and 2,000th and 3,000th plane
3. was host to the Honorable Roy T. Davis, United States Ambassador to Haiti, Vice Admiral McMahon, USN, ComAirLant, Major General C. C. Jerome, USMC, Commanding General, Aircraft, Fleet Marine Force, Atlantic Fleet, and Rear Admiral W. E. Moore, USN, Commander, Training Command, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. The latter two became first members of the TICONDEROGA'S Downwind Cat Club when they were steam catapulted downwind off the carrier in AD-5 Skyraiders following their concurrent two-day visit.
4. held an Open House aboard ship for Navy service families from the Guantanamo Naval Base. During the program the ship launched what was believed to be the first catapult at anchor of a jet aircraft from an American carrier.
5. visited the Haitian capital, Port-au-Prince, and watched Voodoo dancers and drummers and a Haiti male choir perform on the number one elevator for the duty section.


On-Site Survey Inspection

Begins Here 2 May

The annual On-Site Survey Inspection of the Naval Base will begin Monday 2 May, shortly after the arrival of the Survey Party at the Naval Air Station. Headed by RADM T. C. Ragan, the party will be on the Naval Base for a week, departing the following Monday,
9 April.
During their stay on the Naval Base, the Survey Party will inspect all commands of the Naval Base and wind up the annual survey with the departure conference on Saturday, 7 May.


Armed Forces Sponsor

Ham Radio Contest

The Army, Navy and Air Force are co-sponsors of a program for the participation of amateur radio operators in the celebration of Armed Forces Day, May 21, 1955.
A CW receiving competition will feature a message from the Secretary of Defense. All individuals amateur operators and others are eligible to participate. A certificate of merit will be issued to each participant who makes perfect copy. Transmissions will be at 25 words per minute.
Transcriptions should be submitted "as received." No attempt should be made to correct possible transmission errors. Copies should be mailed to Armed Forces Day Contest, Room BE1000, The Pentagon, Washington 25, D.C. Time, frequency, and call letters of the station copied should be indicated.
Military stations, WAR, NSS, and AIR will be on the air between 6:00 P.M. and 12:00 midnight (EST) on May 21, to contact and test with amateur radio stations. The miliatry stations will opertae on spot frequencies outside the amateur bands as follows: WAR4025 (Voice) 6997.5 (CW). NSS4010 (CW) 7375 (CW) 14385 (CW). AIR - 3347 (CW) 7635 (Voice) and 14405 (Voice).
In addition to the program outlined, it is considered to be in the spirit of the occasion for amateur radio stations at naval activities to engage extensively in contacts with other amateur stations on Armed Forces Day and to handle bona fide amateur traffic. However, artificial generation of messages such as "Greetings on Armed Forces Day" should be avoided.


BuPers Begins Charge

For Service Credit Check

by William A. Johnson, PN1
A law enacted by the 83rd Congress provided that certain services rendered to individuals by the various offices of the U.S. Government, formerly provided free of charge, should be placed on a selfsustaining basis to the fullest extent possible. In conformity with this law, beginning 1 February 1955 nomial fees are being charged for certain services such as copying, certifying and searching Bureau of Naval Personnel records. One such service affected is of concern to those seeking academic credit for in-service educational experiencies; And is explained as foll6ws:
Each member or former member of the Amed Forces who requests the Chief of Naval Personnel to provide a certification of his education or training for financial benefits (further education, for example) will be allowed one such certification free of charge. For each subsequent request, however, $1.00 fee will be charged. Payment should be by check, or money order, made payable to the Treasurer of the United States. Currency will also be accepted. Postage stamps, hoewver, are not acceptable as payment for this service.

A marine PFC returned to camp exhausted after a week-end of wine, women, and song. On the bunk that held his recumbent form, his buddies hung a sign: "Temporarily out of ardor."


Commissary Store Hires Civilian Check-Out Clerks


One of the new Civil Service check-out clerks at the Commissary Store totals up a sales for a customer. The job of check-out, which was formally held by Naval perosnnel, was changed to a Civil Service job with a rating of GS-3 due to a cut in military complement.


Ship's Department Leadingmen Receive Safety Awards


CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, congratulates Francisco Ross, Leading Man, in Ship's Department upon presenting Ross with an achievement award for five years of safety. Receiving the same award were, Antonio Perez, at left, and John A. Richardson, both leadingmen in Ship's Department. Looking on at the ceremony is Mr. G. Ward of the Base Safety Engineer's Office, and CDR A. J. Tervo, Officer in Charge, Ship's Department. The achievement award was for five consecutive calendar years of supervision without a lost-time accident to themselves or those under their supervision.


I never kiss, I never neck, I don't say darn, I don't say beck, I'm always good, I'm always nice, I play no poker, shake no dice, I never drink, I never flirt, I never gossip, or spread the dirt, I have no line of funny tricks, But what's the use, I'm only six.
* * *
A fat lady stepped on the scales, not knowing that'they were out of order.
The indicator stopped at 75 pounds.
"Holy smoke," exclaimed a drunk who watched her, "She's hollow."


The payroll saver who cashes every bond issued to him as soon as possible defeats the two primary purposes of the beneficial Payroll Savings Plan. He does not benefit himself or the national economy. He wastes what it cost Uncle Sam to issue his bonds so he could have an easy safe sure way to accumulate real personal savings.

Country constable: "Pardon, miss, but swimming is not allowed in this lake."
City flapper: "Why didn't you tell me before I undressed?"
Constable: "Well, there ain't no law against undressin'!"


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Saturday, 16 April 1955


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Saturday, 16 April 1955


THE INDIAN


by Paul A. Hoffer, USMC
SKEET SHOOT
Saturday, 9 April 55, a skeet shoot contest was held at the Marine Barracks, Skeet Range. The winner of the shoot was Cpl. Marvin Y. Holcomb who had a score of 12 out of a possible 16. Cpl. Ronald G. Plante and Pfc. LeRoy T. Pope both came in second with 11 out of 16. The three were all awarded a steak dinner at the Enlisted Club.
ARRIVALS
Arriving aboard the USNS PVT ELDEN H. JOHNSON last week were eight 8) new men. Cpl. Herbert G. Churchman, Pfc. Joseph Bland Jr., Pfc. Earl G. Castellow, Pfc. Charles G. Hunter, Pfc. Steven P. Kavulic, and Pfc. Phillip E. Patton all joined from Marine Corps Recurit Depot, Parris Island, S. C. Cpl. Anthony M. Cochrane, joined us from the 23d Rifle Co. USMCR, MCRTC, Lewiston, Maine. Pvt. James "L" Conway from HqCo., 2dMarDiv Camp Lejeune, N. C. "Welcome aboard and hope you enjoy your stay in Gtmo". BASEBALL
Wtih the baseball season drawing near the Marine Barracks Baseball Team is improving each day. We expect the team to show enough improvement to be a senior threat for the championship by opening day.


Navy Wives' Club

by Pat Aldridge '
April has been, and will continue to be a full month of activity for the Guantanamo Bay Navy Wives' Club. A regular business meeting was held on Thursday evening, April 7, at which time letters of resignation of office by May Belle Clay, Treasurer, and Irene June Munson, Vice President, were read and accepted. Doris Seagle was appointed temporary treasurer by club President, Elma Franklin, and will serve in that capacity until the next monthly business meeting at which time a special election will be held to fill the existing vacancies. Jean O'Brien, Corresponding Secretary, will notify all members of the forthcoming election in order that all interested members and guests may be in attendance.
Thursday afternoon, April 14, members and guests of the Navy Wives' Club attended another successful luncheon at Marine Family Restaurant. Pearl Pearcy, Activities Committee Chairman tentatively plans at least one Thursday afternoon each month devoted to luncheon gatherings of this sort. Adding to the variety of entertainment, a bingo party will be held beginning at 1:30 P.M. at the Villamar Lyceum to which guests of all members are always cordially invited. Under the aupices of committee member, June Munson, these bingo socials afford many delightful surprises. Mrs. Munson has also initiated the "money doll", another unique, add-a-number game.
Lorita Clark is busily in charge of another evening party to be held Thursday night, April 28th. This is a party designed to include the men and, although a strikingly different motif than the last, promises to be just as much fun. As plans stand now there will be a pot luck late supper for the hungry and a lot of laughs for all.


Teenage Round-up

by Linda Thurston
There are some frantic people at school 'round this time of year. The Juniors and the Seniors are going around mumbling their lines for the play which comes off on the 25th and 26th. "He Couldn't Marry Five" is a comedy in which Nita runs around in a werewolf outfit, Nancy paints a mean picture and, to quote Wormie, "all men are beasts." All proceeds go to the Yearbook fund and you can buy tickets from any student.
Besides the play, the JuniorSenior Prom and Banquet will be he held on the 29th. The entire High School (grades 9- 12) is invited to the Prom which is free, formal and couples. The Banquet is for Juniors, Seniors, faculty and guests only.
On top of all this there is the Progressive Dinner given by the cheerleaders for the basketball team, a possible track meet in Santiago, and Graduation Day on 19 May coming up.
Oh well, we only live once, even if it almost kills us.
Did Ya' See ... Cavanaugh's hideway . . . Sharon (Dusty) Keenan. It happens to the best of us. ... Wormie's friendly Cuban admirer ... All the gals looking lovely on Easter ... To mention a few-Nancy Avila in a sweet, pink tucked dress; Evie Ralston in black and white, Linda Stinson in a cute suit; Cookie, Dolorice K, and Dolores S in lavender; Eunice in red; Sharon K in a darling pink suit; Lucille and Tim in church... Ronny Roguz umpiring for the Little League . . . Bob Rizzo and Pat Burke truckin' on down to church. ... Judy Inman prospering in the diving business . . . Branda, Dixie, Barbara and Ana everywhere together . . . Betty and Bobby Stone and their dates at Easter morning breakfast ... Bobby Johnson introducing a fellow who looks like Mr. Jones and talks like Liberace. ... Prissy and Marise lazying around during the vacation ... Sylvia completely relieved ....


NSD Supply Line

New arrivals at NSD-Garry Wakeman, SA, who reported from the U.S.S. WINDLASS (ARSD-4). Wakeman hails from Derby, Conn., where he was a 4 letter man and Captain of his High School Basketball team.
Adolphus Riley, SN, also served last aboard the WINDLASS. Riley calls New York City home.
Mr. L. A. Foote, an NSD "plankowner" and leading civilian supervisor of the Control Division, departed on leave Thursday for his home in Jamaica B.W.I. to be married. His many friends in the Depot presented him with a silver flatware set as a wedding present.
Mrs. Bonnie Cooper, Cash Accounting Clerk in the Disbursing Division has left the Depot. She and her husband will leave soon for their next duty station at the Naval Medical Center, Bethesda. Good luck, Bonnie.
Mrs. Elizabeth Tipler has replaced Mrs. Cooper in the Disbursing Division.

"Poor man! He was ruined by untold wealth."
"Untold wealth "
"Yes, he didn't tell about it in his income tax return."


Hospital Notes

by D. W. Degon
HEIRPORT NEWS
The following births were recorded for the past two weeks. The new occupants of the Nursery areLorna Maire to SK3 and Mrs. Shirley Metz; Terrance Kenneth to CAPT/USMC and Mrs. Ruth Kerrigan; April Allyson to Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Linder; Michael Thomas to CS2 and Mrs. Deborah Smith; Michael Joseph Fedo IV to DC2 and Mrs. Rosemary Fedo.
ARRIVALS
A hearty welcome aboard is extended to LCDR (MSC) Edward W. Walker arrived from U.S. Naval Medical School, N.N.M.C. Bethesda, Maryland. LCDR Walker attended the college of Marshall, Marshall, Texas. He relieved LCDR I. V. King as Administrative Officer. Also reporting aboard for duty is LTJG
(NC) Mary J. Nielubowicz from U.S.N.H. Corona, Califonria. Her present duties are on the Surgical Ward.
DEPARTURES
LCDR (MSC) I. V. King and family departed via automobile this past week for U.S. Naval Medical School, N.N.M.C. Behtesda, Maryland. LCDR King was Administrative Officer here for the past 24 months. Another loss to the staff was LCDR (NC) Olive M. Wilkinson who will assume her new duties at U.S.N.H. San Diego, California.
COMMENDATION
HM1 Austin J. Joyce and HM1 David J. Hollifield received a letter of commendation from the Commanding Officer. Joyce and Hollifield hold the responsibiltiy for manufacturing and repairing spectacles for the Caribbean area. The letter reads in part; "This devotion to duty, motivated entirely by you desire to render an important service efficiently and expeditiously is exemplary. t is a great satisfaction to me to pass this "well done" to you."
MEET THE STAFF
A prominent figure at USNH and boasting nine months longivity in Gtmo is HM2 Walter Z. Jones. Walt attened Corps School at Great Lakes and then to USNH Phila. He spent a good deal of time with the FMF being stationed in Camps Lejeune and Pendleton and Korea. Upon his return from this duty he again went to USNH Phila. N.N.M.C. Bethesda was his next calling ,where he received a letter of commendation "for outstanding performance of duty." Walt is currently assigned to Physiotheraphy, ECG and BMR Clinics. He and Mrs. Jones are residing in Villamar and have one son, Kelvin. With such a fine record may you continue to have a prosperous Navy Career.



LAFRA News

by Kitty Krekman
The Ladies Auxiliary of the Fleet Reserve Association sponsored an Easter musical program for the patients of the Hospital on Sunday 10 April. The program consisted of Betty Dalton on the marimba, Pat Fojt, accordian, Jim Dalton, trumpet, David Shriver, guitar. Mary Alice Murphy and Linda Stinson sang some beautiful songs. They were accompanied by their music teacher, Mrs. Lillian Armbruster. Joe Brenner added a mystical touch


FTG Bulletin
This past week three officers at FTG were promoted to the rank of commander and one officer to the rank of lieutenant commander.
Effective dates of rank are as follows:
CDR Roy J. Matthews, 1 January 1955; CDR Clarke R. Mahaffey, 1 January 1955; CDR Robert G. Laurie, 1 January 1955; LCDR William H. Shaw, 1 July 1954.
We bid farewell to LCDR Catanzarito, formerly with the Gunnery Department. Mr. Catanzarito departed on the JOHNSON, Thursday, 14 April. Mr. Catanzarito will be stationed at the U.S. Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Training Center, Portland, Oregon.
Boarding the FLAW flight Wednesday, 13 April was Tiaba, SD2 and Mrs. Tiaba. Upon completion of thirty days leave, Tiaba will report to the Commanding Officer, U.S. Naval Mine Depot, Yorktown, Virginia for a normal tour of BUPERS shore duty.
Departing on the JOHNSON, Thursday, 14 April was Donald Blanchard, SN. Upon arrival in New York City he will report to the Commanding Officer, U.S. Naval Receiving Station, Brooklyn for separation.
John J. Flynn, ET2, reported completing a course of instruction onboard for duty 6 April after at the ET school, Class A, U.S. Naval Training Center, Great Lakes, Illinois.
The FTG, NSD, Hospital and Dental combined baseball team is reported as developing into an able team. There are about thirtyfive to forty members out fighting for positions on the starting nine. It is expected that the above team will make an excellent showing in the forthcoming baseball season through their diligent efforts and practices so far.
With the season just around the corner, commencing in middle May, it should be remembered that the extra boost from all those faithful fans in the bleachers goes a long way to help make a winning team. Lets get behind our baseball team this year and give them the support they need. Baseball being the National Sport in the U.S. brings out the fact that there are many people that follow and enjoy the game. We must have our share of these people in the Training Group. Lets back up our team one hundred percent and fill our section of the seats in the bleachers this season.
SHIPS DUE TO REPORT
USS FORT SNELLING (LSD 30)
(To arrive 15 April) USS MARIAS (TAO 57)
(To arrive 18 April) USS DES MOINES (CA 134)
(To arrive 18 April)
SHIPS TO COMPLETE
TRAINING
USS GREENWOOD (DE 679)
(To depart 20 April) USS SIBONEY (CV3 112)
(To depart 22 April) USS TILIS (DE 748)
(To depart 22 April) USS McCLELLAND (DE 750)
(To depart 22 April)


wtih his excellent work as a magician.
The master of ceremonies was Burt Knight, who also sang some lovely songs. The program ended with everyone singing the Lord's Prayer.
Mrs. DiMaggio, Mrs. Rousseau, Mrs. Waltz, and Mrs. Krekman assisted Mrs. Helen Bowler, American Red Cross Field Director in serving refreshments.


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THE INDIAN


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Saturday, 16 April 1955


MOVIES

Saturday, 16 April
RIOT IN CELL BLOCK 11
Neville Brand Leo Gordon
A clever forceful leader starts a riot in a large prison that spreads from cell block to cell block. The prison officials are helpless until the militia arrives.
Sunday, 17 April
DRAGNET
Jack Webb Ben Alexander
When a man is shot down in a field of flowers, Sgt. Joe Friday and Officer Frank Smith work on the case to bring the murderer to justice.
Monday, 18 April
KING RICHARD AND THE
CRUSADERS
Rex Harrison Virginia Mayo
An historical adventure which takes place in 1192 when the Third Crusade was on.
Tuesday, 19 April
OPERATION MANHUNT
Harry Townes Irja Jensen
Story based on the experiences of Igor Gouzenko, the ex-Russian code clerk who for the past nine years has been under the protection of the Canadian Mounted Police.
Wednesday, 20 April BEAU BRUMMEL
Stewart Granger Elizabeth Taylor
Beau Brummel is a man who lived in the time of Napoleon, Wellington and Nelson. He revolutionized men's fashions for which he became famous.
-Thursday, 21 April
THE OTHER WOMAN
Hugo Heas Cleo Moore
Disapointed actress tries to blackmail Heas for $50,000 and threatens to reveal his all-night visit to her apartment. He strangles her in desperation.
Friday, 22 April
TRACK OF THE CAT
Robert Mitchum Teresa Wright
Huge mountain lion terrorizes family of eight living on snowbound cattle ranch in California in the 1890's. Several memebrs of the family are killed when they go after him.


Radio's 'Tops' of the Week

SATURDAY, 16 April . . . THEATRE ROYAL ... 9:00 P.M. Sir Ralph Richardson stars in an unusual story by Henry James entitled "Four Meetings". The plot revolves around a prim American Schoolteacher with a burning desire to visit Europe.
SUNDAY, 17 April .... HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE .... 10:00 P.M.
A radio adaptation of "Going My Way" will bring Barry Fitzgerald back in his original role as the lovable old pastor of a run-down Parish in New York. William Lundigan will co-star.
MONDAY, 18 April ... BEST PLAYS ... 9:00 P.M.
The confused love of a young girl for the doctor who lives next door provides the basis for this revival of a B'way favorite. Geraldine Page portrays the sensitive, neurotic, insecure herione in "Summer and Smoke".
TUESDAY, 19 April . . . HIGH ADVENTURE ... 9:00 P.M.
Host George Sanders relates a strange story of a talkative traveler who talks himself into his grave. "The Living Dead Men."
WEDNESDAY, 20 April . . . PURSUIT ... 9:00 P.M.
"Pursuit ... and The Portrait Of A Young Lady" finds Inspector Peter Black after another criminal through a neighborhood full of odd and interesting characters and several phony paintings
THURSDAY, 21 April ... FAMILY THEATRE ... 9:00 P.M. Bob Hope is host and star in "Citizen's Arrest", one of the finest comedy dramas of the year. A police desk sergeant tries to make sense out of three conflicting accounts of a hold-up.
FRIDAY, 22 April ... RADIO WORKSHOP ... 10:00 P.M.
A tense and engrossing story of a man who is being smothered with attention and affection by his wife is the presentation for this week by Radio Workshop players. The man looks for a way out this situation but his marriage contract clearly states, " 'Til Death Do us Part".


VU-10 Prop Blast

by Richard D. Lackie
If you see several members of UTRON TEN sporting dark sunglasses and long cigarette holders, here is the reason. LT G. F. Guyer, J. C. Brumfield, AD3, G. F. Fortune, AO1, and R. D. Crain, AD3, left TAD this week for San Juan, P. R., their duties will concern Navy Patricipation in University Picture's filming of "Away All Boats." UL-27 (JD) will be seen towing a sleeve-target. A powerful combination of VU-10 Chiefs literally "rolled over" all opposition to cop the NAS Bowling Championships last week. Emil Antulov, YNC, George Hill, ADC, Frank Richards, ADC, Stan Wenderlich, ADC, Herbert Pistole, AOC, and Carlton Brotherson, ADC, combined to humble NAS Aerology in the finals, 3-0.
"A tip of the hat" to Chief Richard L. Reed who leaves soon for Officer's Candidate School, Newport, Rhode Island. Congratulations and Good Luck?
Another UTRON TEN member soon to depart for schooling is George Tuner, AD2. Entering a comparatively new naval rate, George is going to Guided Missleman School.
One man who is soaking up all possible Gtmo sunshine these days is LT Weiland. This spring he applied for a transfer to the newly formed VX-6 at Patuxent River.


Lucky Poodle


We don't know who the lucky poodle is, but we do know the pretty girl is lovely actress Debbie Reynolds, who corrently has another pet in crooner Eddie Fisher. Lucky Poodle, lucky Eddie!

A couple of weeks ago, the good word came in and he will be Antartic bound via Patuxent, on the first of June.


CONQUEST BY MAN
by Paul Herrmann
A thoroughly fascinating book which delves into some of the lesser known points of history. The reader discovers the real reason for the Trojan War; the importance of the Chinese silk worm; some useful by- products of ancient slave-trades; the story behind the famous Kensington Stone, found by a farmer in Minnesota in the last century and containing inscriptions bearing the date 1362. Also related is the amazing fact that the Chinese, 500 years ago, were able to build junks that could accomodate 1200 persons, had first class cabins and toilet facilities.
JOURNEY TO THE FAR
AMAZON
by Alain Gheerbrant
In 1948 three Frenchmen and a Columbian undertook to cross from Venezuela to Brazil. By 1950 they completed the hazardous voyage, covering thousands of miles of the Orinoco and Amazon rivers. They are the first white men ever to join the Amazon across the Sierra Parina. They met constant danger from primitive tribes whose custom it was to kill strangers on sight. They also met excessive physical hardships but they returned with valuable anthropologic information and material as well as hundreds of photographs.
THE COMPLETE BOOK OF
HELICOPTERS
by D.N. Anstrom
The full, fascinating story of the first real flying machines is told here, in both words and pictures. An account of how it works and flies is given, as well as an explanation of its great versitality in peace and war.
THE DEATH OF HITLER'S
GERMANY
by Georges Blond
This book informs the reader what it was like to live in Hitler's dying Germany as either a soldier or civilian. The story of how the German army and people disintegrated is told in all its awesome reality. Essentialy a novel, the book is historically accurate and is good reading.

THE RED CARPET
by Marshall MacDuffie
As head of the UNRRA mission in the Ukrane, Marshall MacDuffie was able to obtain a 65-day tour through Russia. He traveled through all of Russia's 8 republics-from Leningrad to the Chinese border. He talked to people everywhere, took 1100 photographs and brought back 2100 pages of uncensored notes. The book gives a good close look at a potential enemy.
Also in stock at the library are six books which need no "reviewing": two volumes of Edgar Allen Poe's works and four of Shakespeare's works, two comedies and two tragedies.


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9~e -m Govers (jTMO Like The Sunskine" Vol. VI, No. 15 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 16 April 1955 Base Communications Officer Junior-Senior Play Opens Promoted to Commander 25 April at Marina Point On 3 January, 1927, 0. L. Bramlett joined the Navy as an apprentice seaman. Last week, 0. L. Bramlett received word of his appointment to the rank of commander, effective 1 January 1955-just two days over 28 years since his enlistment in the Navy. Commander Bramlett, who is expecting to leave Guantanamo Bay sometime in June, donned the new gold leaf and "scrambled egg" cap shortly after receiving notification. Since his entrance into the Navy, Commander Bramlett has served aboard so many ships that he can't remember the names of all of them. During World War II, he served in ships both in the Atlantic and Pacific Fleet and participated in many historic campaigns. Among the campaigns were the invasions at Casablanca, Normanday, and With the ever-present cigar in hand, CDR 0. L. Bramlett, takes a lok at the "scrambled eggs" on his new commander's cap. Commander Bramlett received notification of his appointment to the rank of commander last week. Southern France and the battle of Sherbourg. In the Pacific, CDR Bramlett participated in the final stages of the capture of Guadalcanal and was a member of the task force at Bouganville. Commander Bramlett, who originally hails from Donalsonville, Georgia, began his career as an officer aboard the USS DENEBOLA in February 1942 when he was appointed to the rank of Warrant Radio Electrician. Prior to his assignment as Naval Base Communications Officer here, the new commander was stationed in Key West, Fla., working on development projects in anti-sub warfare, fire control, and many other highly important projects. Aside from his duties as Naval Base Communications Officer, Commander Bramlett is an avid hamradio operator and is currently very high in the number of worldwide contacts. At present, Commander Bramlett's family, his wife, Pat, and their daughter Patricia, age 7, are residing in Tampa, Florida. If you are a young man and single, what would you do if you fell in love with five girls all at the same time? And to complicate things further, all five are in love with you. And just to make it a real harem-scarum deal, the five girls are sisters! A possible answer will be provided on Monday and Tuesday nights, 25 and 26 April at the Community Auditorium atop Marina Point when the Junior-Senior students of the base high school present their annual play. This year's play is Robert St. Clair's "He Couldn't Marry Five." It's a farcial comedy in three acts directed by Mrs. Ruth Liveakos of the school. Included in the cast are Anita Sierra, Pat Wormwood, Linda Thurston, Nancy Halentic, Irma Pina, Bobbie Johnson, Doris Sigler, Dolores Roguz and James Dalton. The "He" from the title is played by Phil Keenan. The story revolves around a young man (Keenan) trying to forget a broken love affair. He visits the home of his father's employee (Dalton) and there encounters probably the most screwball family on the face of the globe. Five sisters presided over by an astrology-happy mother and a man-hating aunt cavort through the various antics of their chosen professions which include a budding actress, a budding dancer and a budding painter among others. Confronted by the handsome young man, the buds suddenly become aware of the bee-and-flower theory and blosson forth into a riotous everyone-for-himself last act. Almost needless to say, the twoperformance run of "He Couldn't Marry Five" will provide an evening of belly laughs for all who see it. Tickets may be obtained from any high school student or at the school office. Price per ticket is 754. All proceeds will go to the school yearbook fund. Public Works Expedition Team Returns From 40 Day Adventure on La Gran Sabana' Forty days after their departure from Guantanamo Bay for an expedition on "La Gran Sabana" in Southern Venezuela, a team of four men from the Public Works Department-E. H. Cavanaugh, P. T. Ahlberg, H. L. Broughton, and J. L. Neill, Jr.-returned to the Naval Base last week. American Children Overseas Slated for Salk Vaccine The new Salk polio vaccine has been proved effective, safe and potent. Innoculations of school children in the United States has already begun in an effort to beat the polio season this year. All overseas Navy shore stations will receive shipments of the vaccine. It will be administered to minor dependents of Navy, Marine Corps and American civilian employees. Only children between the age of 8 months and 16 years will be innoculated at present. There is still a somewhat limited supply of the new vaccine, and in order that all children get their shots first, all city, state and government agencies are restricting the first immunizations to children only. The vaccine has not been received at Guantanamo Bay as yet. Officials at the Naval Hospital here said they would have to wait for the official procedur e-announcement from the Bureau of Medicine and Sugery before they could begin vaccinations. They added that, according to the primary instructions received so far, all innoculations will be on a voluntary basis. AND THEY'RE OFF! Hundreds of children of the Naval Base surge from the starting line-with a bit of coaching from a proud parent here and there-on the Easter Egg hunt held Easter Sunday afternoon at the Trading Post Park (See Story On Page Three) Although the expedition was not as highly successful as hoped by the team, it was as "good as expected." Leaving the Naval Base for Trinidad on the MSTS JOHNSON and flying inland to their starting point at Uriman on the Caroni River, the journey went as planned. From Uriman, the team started out on foot carrying light packs. The first snag in expedition plans occurred upon arrival in Ureyan, a small Indian Village, when they learned that the rainy season had set in and that travel was virtually impossible. Although the expedition team was not the first to travel in the area that they touched, they were the first American expedition team to travel in this area. In their travels, the team carried out as much of their purpose as possible. Mr. Neill, whose interests center in the science of minerology, was able to do some prospecting. (During the time they were in Venezuela, a 60-carat diamond was found not too distant from their location.) Ted Alhberg still was able to hunt, although the hunting was not as good as he expected. Perhaps the most successful was Mr. Broughton who saw more through the viewfinder of his 35mm Leica camera than he did with his own eyes. The results of the trip are many. The team still plans to do an article for National Geographic magazine. And the team also brought back many Indian artifacts and souvenirs. And most important, plans call for a return trip in the future. According to Mr. Neill, recorder for the expedition, "We would like to have covered more country, but with the rainy season, it was impossible. However, we want to return in the next dry season." Aside from the souveneir's and the accomplished purposes of the expedition, the team brought back many interesting facts; among them-largest village was about 15 families-one out of every ten Indians spoke passable Spanish, and most conversation was done with signs, smiles, and signalsand many others. For their many friends, the team plans a showing of their souveneirs, slides, and other articles borught back, at one showing for all interested persons. Finally, the most potent souveneir brought back is a Jararaca, a small snake about 12 inches long. This particular snake is a large one of its species, but its size is deceiving for its potency. Within three hours after being bitten by the small creature, a person will die. There is only one known antidote amputation. 9

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Page Two The Toastmaster An Editorial The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 16 April 1955 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LTJG J. D. Byerley ------Olicer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC-----------Editor H. L. Sisson, JOS-----------News P. L. Cannes, J03 ------Photographer D. C. Roberts, JOSN--Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1944, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a members of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. What's Doin' Stateside (Weekly AFPS Feature) American scientists have found a way to transmit ordinary television signals beyond the horizon. In experimental efforts, they've beamed TV signals 200 miles without relay stations ...This points the way to far more powerful video stations, possibly operating over as wide areas as radio does now. President Eisenhower has asked Congress for funds to complete the Pan-American Highway within three years instead of 15 as now planned ...Some $75 million is needed to finish the two lane, all-weather span which is to extend more than 7,000 miles from Fairbanks, Alaska, S.C. to the Canal Zone. Injections of radioactive gold have saved the lives of at least 34 patients believed fatally stricken with cancer, according to a report by a group of Iowa surgeons ...They no longer show any symptoms of the dread disease ...Since 1951, the gold injections have been employed in 100 cases thought hopeless .. Forty-eight are still alive. About half of the nation's colleges and universities are operating at a financial loss despite increased grants from private sources .A survey by the Council for Financial Aid to Education indicates that the cost of educating a student has risen by 50 percent since 1948 ...But tuition fees have been boosted an average of only 21 percent. The 85 miles of New York City's subway system are going to get a thorough sweeping out for the fisrt time in 20 years ...The task of cleaning up the cavernous tunnels will take five years and cost more than $2.5 million. by Joe West Since I've been putting these Toastmaster articles in the Indian, there have been many questions asked me pertaining to Toastmasters. Some have asked what it is, what is the purpose of it, how does it operate, what is the membership, and other questions that I would like to answer. Toastmasters is actually more than a club, it's an education. Men in business and professional life are usually the most readily interested in the club. It is an organized group of men, over 21 years of age, who seek to improve themselves in speech and leadership, as means of increasing their usefulness in business, social and civic relationships. The organization was founded by Mr. Ralph C. Smedley, of Santa Ana, California. Incorporated in 1932, as a non-profit, non-commercial corporation. The movement has grown until now there are clubs chartered in almost every state, Hawaii, Alaska, Canada, Great Britain, South Africa and Guantanamo. The fundamental purposes of the Toastmasters Club are, to aid its members to master the difficult art of public speaking; to teach them to appear effectively before any audience; to train them for leadership and for chairmanship in meetings of all kinds; and to correlate Toastmasters training with job training. How does it operate? The club meets weekly, for dinner, at sixthirty P.M. During the mealtime or sometime prior to the beginning of the formal speech program, every member except those scheduled to make speeches has an opportunity to be on his feet. This is insured in connection with the business to be transacted plus the regular program feature, "Table Topics," in which many men have the chance to speak briefly and impromptu on topics of general interest. The formal program begins when the President introduces the member who is to serve as Toastmaster IT'S UP TO YOU Everyone has heard at one time or another that "this base" or "that ship" is a good billet for duty. And when you stop and think about it for a minute, you'll realize there is a reason. By talking to the men from these "choice" installations you'll find they are 100 percent behind the "old man." Consequently, he leaves everyone alone because he knows from reports coming across his desk that things are running smoothly-just the way he directed they should. Every base and ship can be choice duty if the "old man" gets the support and results he expects from his commands and decisions. Remsember-do it his way and the pressure is off, tension relaxes and first thing you know you are sitting right in the middle of a choice billet. (AFPS) SAVINGS BONDS Payroll savings is the ideal method for building a long-range savings plan for the "sunny day" of your future-the time you can retire with added income, when you buy a home or a business of your own, when you send your children to college, when you have the means and leisure for travelwhenever you get things of life wh to get if you sa for them. of the evening. I carefully planned if each participa observe the time 1 can be completed A good Toastm sailing vessel, rid of enthusiasm, bu phoons of passion the currents of shuns the calms so, with all sails s bound pennant comes triumphan The Guantanamo Bay Toastmaster Club 92 held its se lation of officers in the Officers Club at Deer Point on We Mr. John L. Sanborn, center left, is handing the gave Olsen, center right. Mr. Olsen will preside over the toa for the next six month period. Mr. Olsen's supporting follows, from left to right, Mr. John Dobry, Sergeant a Zaizer, second vice president; Mr. Ralph Sierra, first v Mr. J. L. West, secretary-treasurer. Sunday, 17 April 1955 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Man. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner any of the good Four firemen were injured but, ich you are sure e ve ysteatically aculously, no one was killed ve ssteaticlly when a seven-alarm fire early this mnth caused $425,000 damage to a furniture stos e in Milwaukee, f the meeting is my home city. as to time, and I say "miraculously" because of nt is required to the experience of one of the fireimit, the meeting mer. THE MILWAUKEE JOURin two hours. NAL relates that this fireman had aster like a trim entered the first floor of the buildes with the winds ing and had sprayed water on the It avoids the tyceiling and walls. When the fire .He moves with seemed to have been subdued and conviction, but he was preparing to leave, the if prejudice. And ceiling suddenly collapsed and in et and homewarda matter of seconds the interior flying high, he was a blinding inferno. tly to port. The panicky fireman was unable o -H to see, so on his hands and knees She straddled the hose and crawled, knowing that the hose led to the dor. mut then he lost the hose, and coming to a wall he didn't know auihch way to turn. The searing flms permitted no time for delibesations. He scrambled to the right noo came to a window and safety. It was later revealed that thad he turned to the left he would have gone to his death, as there ceilingwas no outlet in that direction for 100 feet. I thought I was all done, Fate a atGod or something got me out" he said. "My wife was after me is w;:: s; to go to church last week. I guess I hsd better go next week." -How typical of all of us are these words, God performs a miracle for us and, like the fireman, we don't even know if we should give him the credit, "Fate or God or something got me out." It was St. Paul who spoke with conviction, "I know whom I have feleved" It would be well for us 1e-annual instalto initato this faith, to acknowidnesday e edge that it is God and not just to LTJGe ".L. fate or something that it is wtmaster sessions thing" that leads us and protects staff line u h as us every day of our lives. t arms; Mr. R. E. ice president and M. E. Roberts CHC, MOB-1 91 m ft THE INDIAN M Saturday, 16 April 1955

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M Saturday, 16 April 1956 m THE INDIAN "I know there's no eggs here, but I'm tired." One of the younger set takes life easy in the shade, in no particular hurry to find any eggs since there were plenty for everyone. Egg Hunt Gives Prizes To 35 Lucky Children Easter Sunday afternoon, the new Trading Post Park was filled to the point of overflow with easter eggs, approximately 300 egg-hunting children of the Naval Base and many proud parents. Sponsored by the Fleet Reserve Association, the Fellowerafters Club, the American Legion, the Villamar-Bargo Council, the Catholic Parish, and the Protestant Church, the egg hunt got off to a prompt start at 1500. Three hundred children surged happily from the starting line, and the hunt was on. Of the 1100 eggs hidden in the park, 35 were marked as "lucky eggs"-five for a prize of $5.00, and 30 for a prize of $1.00. An hour and a half later, there wasn't a lucky egg left, and parents, children and spectators began leaving. For a few there was disappointment in not finding the lucky eggs, but still they had found some eggs. For those that did win, there was the job ahead of stuffing one and five dollar bills into piggy banks. "Now where did Mother go? She was here just a minute ago" says one young lass who evidently seems a bit befuddled by the amount of eggs, people, and fun. Holy Name Society Formed on Naval Base A new organization has been formed on the Naval Base. However, this organization is by no means new since its world-wide founding goes back to 1264 when the Albigensian Heresy denied the divinity of Christ. Through the ages, this organization, the Holy Name Society, has fostered reverence to the person of Christ by assisting members to develop a sound spiritual life. Since the time of Pope Pious X, the frequent reception of the Sacraments and a monthly Cooperate Communion have become the principle spiritual practices of the society. Heading the Guantanamo Bay Chapter of the Holy Name Society is CDR V. J. Soballe, president, Mr. Norman Huddy, vice president, Mr. Robert Radcliffe, treasurer, R. P. Schuler, PN1, recording secretary, and Mr. Gordon Ward, corresponding secretary. Meetings of the Guantanamo Bay Chapter are held monthly, after Holy Communion and a Communion breakfast. Anyone interested in joining the Holy Name Society may meet with the local chapter by joining them at 8:45 after Holy Communion on 8 May. Besides the monthly Communion breakfast and business meeting, the Holy Name Society will have a reception ceremony Sunday night, 8 May at 1800 in the Open-air auditorium on Chapel Hill. It is hoped to issue the charter at this time, and anyone joining before this time will be considered a charter member of the local chapter. Base Civil Service Jobs Open to Qualified Persons Opportunities for civilian employment on the Naval Base will reach a high in the next three months. According to Mr. H. P. Mc eal, Naval Base Industrial Relations Officer, there are still two high paying civil service jobs open on the base-plus the always existing need for stenographers. Also, a great need for school teachers is expected at the beginning of the 1955-56 school year. At present, there is still the need for a civilian assistant in the Naval Station Special Services Department as a Fscal Accounting Officer. This job, which requires five years of progressive experience in accounting and administration, carries a civil service rating of GS-10. Entrance pay for the job is $5,000 per year plus allowances for quarters equal to rentfree housing. Also, there is a need for an Electrical Engineer with a Civil Service rating of GS-9. Entrance pay is $5,060 per year, with allowances for quarters. Besides these two jobs, the need for qualified stenographers-GS-3 or GS-4-is always present. These jobs offer excellent opportunities for military dependents on the base. With an anticipated transfer of several teachers at the Naval Base School, there will be openings on the faculty at the school for the coming year. Teachers with college degrees and/or two years teaching, experience are desired. Anyone who is qualified for these jobs is urged to contact Mr. McNeal in the Industrial Relations Office. At the Naval Station personnel inspection, held Saturday 9 April, on Bay Hill Road, 13 men of the Naval Station were awarded their first Good Conduct Medal, and three men were awarded campaign medals by their commanding officer, CAPT W. R. Caruthers. Receiving the Good Conduct Medals were, Ernest Ray Backwell, CS3; Angelo John Mandis, CT3; Ellion Richard Galant, SN; Delbert Carl Roberts, JOSN; John Donald Slewitzke, SK3; Leo Thomas McCormack, EN3; Norman Thomas Ryan, RMSN; Joseph James Gullen, ME3; Joseph Martin, Jr. EM2; Raymond Wesley Ellis, YN2; Arthur Theadore Laney, SD3; and Theodore Walter Graca, GM2. Receiving campaign awards were Wilson Myers Adams, BMC; Robert Donald Broussard, SN; and Schubert Ogan, CS2. Adams was awarded the China Service Medal and the United Nations Service Medal. Broussard received the American Campaign Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, and the World War II Victory Medal. Ogan received the World War II Victory Medal. Navy PO Exams Set for August in Grades 4, 5, 6 Washington (AFPS) -Servicewide competitive examinations for pay grades E-4, E-5, and E-6 to be conducted in August 1955 have been announced by the Navy. Tests for petty officers third class (E-4) will be held Tuesday, Aug. 9. Petty officers second class (E-5) will be examined Tuesday, Aug. 16, and first class (E-6) Tuesday, Aug. 23. The August examinations will be provided for all ratings in pay grades E-4 through E-6, except Fire Controlman, Printer and Avaition Electroniesman, which are being consolidated with other ratings. Full details on the examinations are contained in BuPers Notice 1418, Mar. 25, 1955. Honor Man H. M. Stone, BM2, was selected as Honor Man at the last Naval Station Personnel inspection held on Bay Hill Road, 9 April. Stone, who has been stationed on the Naval Base at the Fleet Boat Pool for one year, has seen nine and a half years service with the Navy. Stone's hometown is Eddyville, Ky. First Holy Communion Set For 24 April First Holy Communion will be administered to Catholics on the Naval Base on 24 April by His Excellency Enrique Perez Serantes, Archbishop of Santiago. The Communion Mass will take place at 0900 in the Naval Base Chapel. Confirmation will also be administered by the Archbishop in the chapel at 1400. Immediately following the Confirmation ceremony there will be a reception in the patio of the school for the Archbishop. Public Works Dept, Begins Telephone Trouble Service Effective 4 April 1955 the Public Works Department established a Trouble Call and Service Force located in Building #806. Telephones 8459 and 8424 are set up for the receiving of any trouble calls for the entire Public Works Department, between 0800 and 2400 after which time the Public Works Duty Officer should be called. 4m Page Three

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NiR Four Fire Department Urges Good Care For Fire Safety with Electrical Appliances by Felix Lopez, Base Fire Inspector melts or "blows", thus protecting the wires, 1. How to treat your most obedient servant: Nowadays we use electricity in every part of our homes. It's our most versatile and obliging servant ...Providing us with light, warming and cooling us, furnishing us with entertainment, and doing dozens of domestic chores, such as cooking, cleaning, washing our clothes and our utensils. So accustomed are we to this marvelous "Push-Button" service that we may become negligent in giving it the attention and care it deserves. 2. Cord sets and power supply cords: Portable wiring, as you use it, consists of "Cord Sets"; that is, lengths of flexible insulated wire with connecting devices at both ends, or "Power Supply Cords"the flexible wire which comes already attached to a lamp or appliances. What is a good supply cord or cord set? In the cord itself, the conductors are large enough to safely carry the electricity for the appliance or lamp without overheating. Overheating may soften the insulation or cause it to stiffen or crack, thereby shortening its life. The insulation in a good cord set is of high quality, and the conductor is well centered, so that the insulation is the same thickness all around. Some cords used on heating appliances are asbestos covered, to resist high temperatures. Cords subjected to abrasion, water absorption or oil or grease conditions are equipped with an outside covering or jacket designed to protect against those adverse conditions. The plug or connecting device is constructed so that it is not injured in ordinary handling or use. The blades fit securely into the outlet for good contact yet not so tightly that a hard jerk is necessary to remove the plug. The flexible cord coming into the plug or connecting device is secured so the wires will not pull loose from the prongs. However, this attachment is not intended to carry the strain of a pull on the cord. 3. Safety valve of the electrical system: The fuse is the safety valve of the electrical system. It includes a small link of soft metal, which melts when too much current passes through. If a short circuit occurs in the wiring system, too much current flows through the wiers and the fuse, causing the fuse link to melt. This cuts off current before harm is done. Because fuses are very important, they should not be tampered with. Never use makeshift fuses, or those of improper rating. Fuses have a second function. They also protect in the case of overload. If too many appliances are connected to one circuit, more current will be drawn through the wires than they were meant to carry. Here, again the fuse link 4. Give your electric housewares the attention they deserve: Electric appliances, such as irons, heaters, etc., should not be merely shut off by the switch on the appliance. Disconnect them by removing the plug from the outlet. They should never be immersed in water for washing but should be brushed clean-to get the crumbs out of your toaster, as an example. Water and Dampness may injure the heating elements and cause short circuits. Here are a few suggestions for the care of appliances: Mixer-Don't let batter or juice get into the mechanism. Use your instruction book for oiling instructions. Waffle Maker-After use, open and allow grids to cool. Vacuum Cleaner-Have it checked at least once a year. Keep cord properly coiled during storage. Irons-Disconnect when not in use; above all, avoid dropping them. Coffee Maker-Never put heating element in water. 5. Be sure to use the right cord for the right purpose: There are many types of flexible cords, each designed for specific purposes. You can see this by comparing, for instance, a vacuum cleaner cord with a toaster cord, or the cord on a radio or TV set with one on a fan. Living Room: In the living room the lighter cord are used for lamps, clocks, radios, TV sets and other equipment where the cords are not normally subjected to hard wear. Kitchen: Cord sets used in the kitchen are usually water resisting or heat resisting. Toasters. percolators and waffle irons have heat resisting cords. Refrigerator and electric mixer cords are jacketed for moisture resistance. Laundry: Laundry cords furnish power to the washer, ironer, and clothers dryer. The ironer and hand iron should have asbestos protected cords. The washer should have a jacketed cord to protect it from moisture, grease and abrasion. Bedrooms: The use of sun and heat lamps, electric clocks, radios, ventilators, air conditioners, lamps, curling irons, etc., in bedrooms is increasing. Usually bedroom appliances are served lightweight cords. Bathroom: Electric shavers and electric massagers are used in bathrooms. Here, because of the pressure of water (which conducts electricity), water pipes and radiators in a confined space, it is particularly necessary that worn power supply cords be examined frequently and replaced when necessary with new inspected cords. Other Locations: Power tools have jacketed cords, resistant to abrasion, water, oil and grease. And, always use convenience outlets, not lamp sockets, for electric apliances. Brace Kelly, Marion Brando Hoover Commission Urges Named Best Actress, Actor Changes in Navy Policy Grace Kelly and Marlon Brando smile happily as they clutch Oscars they won from the Motion Picture Academy of Arts and Sciences as the best actress and actor of 1954. Miss Kelly won hers as the frustarted wife of a drunkard in "The Country Girl," and Brando for portraying a moody, bewildered longshoreman in "On the Waterfront," which won eight Oscars. NSD Employee Retires After 26 Years Service Mr. James F. Bowman, Liquid Fuels Pump Operator at the Naval Supply Depot is congratulated by the Commanding Officer, Naval Supply Depot, CDR E. W. Sutherling and the Fuel Division Officer LCDR John P. McFadden for his completion of 26%A years of honorable government service on the occasion of his retirement on 31 March 1955. Mr. Bowman, who is a native of Jamaica B.W.I., served on the Naval Base with the Ship's Department and the Communications Department of the U.S. Naval Station, before coming to NSD. He spent his last fifteen years of government service with the Naval Supply Depot. Mr. Bowman started working as a laborer and was promoted to engineman and then to his present position of Liquid Fuels Pump Operator. His long, loyal service to the U.S. Government marks an achievement of which Mr. Bowman can well be proud. It is more convenient and more economical for payroll savers to invest in three $100 bonds a year than twelve $25 bonds. The just-published report of the Hoover Commission, headed by former President Herbert Hoover urged several sweeping changes in present Navy policy. The report recommends: 1. Cut off free shipment of service people's cars ovesreas. 2. Merge Navy Air Transportion systems into the Military Air Transport Service, and then give a lot of business to private airlines. 3. Turn over a lot of the business done by the Military Sea Transport Service to private shipping companies. 4. Set up a transportation Chief in the Pentagon to coordinate all transportation activities. Hoover Commission recommendations have no effect as such, but many of them are incorporated into future changes in military regulations. The commission also urged the services to cut down on the present mileage allowance and to restrict the issuance of mileage to those who are bona-fide owners of automobiles. Naval Uniform Board Authorizes Changes Dungaree rating badges for petty officers, optional wear of white socks until 1 Jan. and notched khaki collars were among several changes to the uniform just recently approved by the Secretary of the Navy. The changes were originally recommended by the permanent Naval Uniform Board, and the appropriate ammendments to the uniform regulations are now in the hands of the printer. The changes are expected to become effective on 1 June, according to a report in the Navy Times. P.O. RATING BADGES Petty officers first, second and third class will wear a dark blue rating badge on the dungaree working uniform. The type decided upon is the new photo-printed badge without specailty mark, costing about ten cents each. It may be sewed on or ironed on. WHITE SOCKS The optional wear of white socks has been extended until 1 Jan. 1956. This change was recommended by the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts in order to use up the present supply in stock. NOTCHED COLLAR The collar of both the white and tropical khaki short sleeved shirt will be changed from the present straight, or shawl, type to a regular notched collar. And on the white shirt, shoulder marks instead of the collar insignia may be worn. Among the other changes approved by the Secretary is one which makes the wearing of gray gloves with the dress blue uniform no longer mandatory. They will be worn only when prescribed. This Is For The Birds! Representative Cecil R. King (D-Calif) has proposed that Congress direct the Secretary of Defense to issue a citation to acknowledge the action of "G. I. Joe" in carrying a message to Allied Headquarters in Italy on Oct. 18, 1943. "G. I. Joe" is a homing pigeon. m m THE INDIAN M Saturday, 16 April 1955

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Saturday, 16 April 1955 Little League Tigers, Colts Win In First Exhibition Series Games Despite tongue-in-teeth determination, Larry Smith of the Little League Bears misses a wide throw and a Colt scores during the Little League practice game last week-end. Spring and baseball came to Guantanamo Bay with a bang last weekend as the Guantanamo Bay Little League teams faced each other on the under-sized diamond in Villamar to start off a series of exhibition games prior to the start of the regular schedule. Thus the Little Leaguers got the jump on the Stateside major leagues by two days and on the base league by almost a month. Saturday afternoon the 1954 runners-up, the Tigers, edged out the Hawks, 7 to 5, and on Sunday the Colts stomped the 1954 champions, the Bears, 12 to 9. This week-end the Grape Nut circuit concludes their exhibition series when the Hawks meet the Colts on Saturday and the Tigers and Bears renew their rivalry on Sunday. The regular season schedule will commence on 23 April with a schedule of 48 games to be played. This year the winner of the first half of the schedule will be determined on 2 June and the winner of the second half will emerge on 14 July. The two winners, if such is the case, will play for the base championship after the close of the regular schedule. All Saturday and Sunday games will commence at 2 P.M. and games during the week will start at 4 P.M. The personal pride of accomplishment and the feeling of security that come from owning a nest-egg of U.S. Savings Bonds are among the richest rewards enjoyed by payroll savers. VI-10 Wins First Half Base Inter-Command Golf The first half of the anuual InterCommand Golf League was completed last weekend with VU-10, the 1954 Chamipons, still in first place by 14 points. The second half, with teams playing each other for 24 points, starts today. First Half Stadings Team VU-10 Naval Station NAS Hospital-Dental Fleet Training Group Naval Supply Depot MCB-1 Points 105% 91% 80% 78 68 62% 18 Weekend Schedule Saturday, 16 April 1300 Hospital-Dental vs Naval Supply Depot 1330 Fleet Training Group vs Naval Station Sunday, 17 April 0815 VU-10 vs NAS The Best Umbrella for a Rainy Day: Buy Bonds on Payroll Savings. Salt It Away the Easy Way In U. S. Savings Bonds on Payroll Savings. SPORTS ROUNDUP by Joe Celentano, JO1, USN (AFPS Sports Writer) NBC has been given the rights to televise the 1955 NCAA football program ...Wonder if the basketball fans at Camp Bussac, France, yell "Hey Mambo" everytime Sgt. Charles Italiano refs a game? ...A/2C Richard Grade of Itazuke AB, Japan, rolled a 21game pin total of 4,170 to win the all-events championship of the Far East Air Forces bowling tournament. Capt. Forrest Cook, who recently returned from a tour of duty in Japan, has been named athletic business manager at the new Air Force Academy ...The Rockets of Andrews AFB, Md., finished the regular cage season with a sensational 43-0 mark. In the past three years the Rockets have won 118 and lost only 20 ...Kodiak Naval Station in Alaska copped the 17th Naval District cage title for the second consecutive year. Charlie Chronopoulis, ace righthander of the Parris Island, S. C., mound staff, fanned 18 as he twirled a two-hit shutout against Newberry College. The Marines won, 8-0 ...Cpl. William Roetzheim of Ft. Jackson, S. C., ran into tough luck in the gymnastic trials for the Pan-American Games. Roetzheim, a member of the '48 and '52 Olympic teams, missed making the U.S. squad by onethird of a point. When it comes to predicting Cpl. Wililam McKnight of Ft. Lesley J. McNair, D. C., is one of the best. The sports editor of the Passing Review looked into his crystal ball and came up with this AFP AllStar basketball team: Cliff Hagan, Larry Hennessy, Ernie Beck, Dick Groat and Richie Regan. He was 100% correct ...The Skyhawks of Lockbourne AFB, Ohio, downed Scott AFB, Ill., 74-55, to win the Great Lakes Conference cage crown. Pvt. Brooks Dodge, USAREUR, selected to the U.S. Olympic ski team, recently won his fourth Eastern downhill title at Pinkham Notch, N. H. Ladies Golf Shots by Betty Lou Tipler On Wednesday morning the First and Second Flights played for low putting scores while the Third Flight played a Blind Five tournament. The results: 1st Flight-Jane McElroy Frances Grounds 2nd Flight-Val Evans Marge Sheehan and Bev Larsen 3rd Flight-Vivian Soballe Dee Stadnick and Katie McGregor The Fourth Flight voted to play on Thursday morning from now on, so the results of their weekly tournament will be a week late in the column. Most of the lady golfers are hard at work (or play) on the Ladder Tournament which gives everyone good parctice for the coming Championship Tournament. PAYRoL. SAwIMAS A RD TOBEAT * O. WR TCW bR TY.m NavBase Baseball League Preps for Season Bill Wood gets caught in a rundown between third and home during the Indian -Marine exhibition game last weekend. The Indian's Cordice holds the ball, ready to toss to 3rd sacker Guillmette. Mandy Mandis came in from shorstop and made the assist. m THE 11NDIAN M Wage Five 1

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m Ticonderoga Completes Training Cruise Here In the Caribbean, aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. TICONDEROGA-The "Big T" returns to her home port of Norfolk this weekend (16-17 April) after a rigorous but successful eight-week shakedown training cruise at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The modernized Essex Class carrier is scheduled to go into Norfolk Naval Shipyard for postshakedown availability and it is expected a large number of families of the officers and the crew will be taking up residence in the N o r f o 1 k-Portsmouth area this month. Vice Admiral F. W. McMahon, USN, ComAirLant, was on hand to watch the ship's final battle problem which consisted of gunnery, air defense, seamanship, damage control and ship control exercises. The Adimral, who in January welcomed the 33,000 ton man-ofwar to Norfolk when she rejoined the fleet, said he was "pleased to see the ship come along so well." Captain A. S. Habecker, USN, ComFltTraGru, congratulated the officers and crew on the "great strides they have taken." During her eight-week shakedown period, the "Big T": 1. operated the Navy's first carier-based F7U Cutlass Squadron 2. landed her 1,000th, and 2,000th and 3,000th plane 3. was host to the Honorable Roy T. Davis, United States Ambassador to Haiti, Vice Admiral McMahon, USN, ComAirLant, Major General C. C. Jerome, USMC, Commanding General, Aircraft, Fleet Marine Force, Atlantic Fleet, and Rear Admiral W. E. Moore, USN, Commander, Training Command, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. The latter two became first members of the TICONDEROGA's Downwind Cat Club when they were steam catapulted downwind off the carrier in AD-5 Skyraiders following their concurrent two-day visit. 4. held an Open House aboard ship for Navy service families from the Guantanamo Naval Base. During the program the ship launched what was believed to be the first catapult at anchor of a jet aircraft from an American carrier. 5. visited the Haitian capital, Port-au-Prince, and watched Voodoo dancers and drummers and a Haiti male choir perform on the number one elevator for the duty section. On-Site Survey Inspection Begins Here 2 May The annual On-Site Survey Inspection of the Naval Base will begin Monday 2 May, shortly after the arrival of the Survey Party at the Naval Air Station. Headed by RADM T. C. Ragan, the party will be on the Naval Base for a week, departing the following Monday, 9 April. During their stay on the Naval Base, the Survey Party will inspect all commands of the Naval Base and wind up the annual survey with the departure conference on Saturday, 7 May. Armed Forces Sponsor Ham Radio Contest The Army, Navy and Air Force are co-sponsors of a program for the participation of amateur radio operators in the celebration of Armed Forces Day, May 21, 1955. A CW receiving competition will feature a message from the Secretary of Defense. All individuals amateur operators and others are eligible to participate. A certificate of merit will be issued to each participant who makes perfect copy. Transmissions will be at 25 words per minute. Transcriptions should be submitted "as received." No attempt should be made to correct possible transmission errors. Copies should be mailed to Armed Forces Day Contest, Room BE1000, The Pentagon, Washington 25, D.C. Time, frequency, and call letters of the station copied should be indicated. Military stations, WAR, NSS, and AIR will be on the air between 6:00 P.M. and 12:00 midnight (EST) on May 21, to contact and test with amateur radio stations. The miliatry stations will opertae on spot frequencies outside the amateur bands as follows: WAR 4025 (Voice) 6997.5 (CW). NSS 4010 (CW) 7375 (CW) 14385 (CW). AIR -3347 (CW) 7635 (Voice) and 14405 (Voice). In addition to the program outlined, it is considered to be in the spirit of the occasion for amateur radio stations at naval activities to engage extensively in contacts with other amateur stations on Armed Forces Day and to handle bona fide amateur traffic. However, artificial generation of messages such as "Greetings on Armed Forces Day" should be avoided. BuPers Begins Charge For Service Credit Check by William A. Johnson, PN1 A law enacted by the 83rd Congress provided that certain services rendered to individuals by the various offices of the U.S. Government, formerly provided free of charge, should be placed on a selfsustaining basis to the fullest extent possible. In conformity with this law, beginning 1 February 1955 nomial fees are being charged for certain services such as copying, certifying and searching Bureau of Naval Personnel records. One such service affected is of concern to those seeking academic credit for in-service educational experiencies; And is explained as follows: Each member or former member of the Amed Forces who requests the Chief of Naval Personnel to provide a certification of his education or training for financial benefits (further education, for example) will be allowed one such certification free of charge. For each subsequent request, however, $1.00 fee will be charged. Payment should be by check, or money order, made payable to the Treasurer of the United States. Currency will also be accepted. Postage stamps, hoewver, are not acceptable as payment for this service. A marine PFC returned to camp exhausted after a week-end of wine, women, and song. On the bunk that held his recumbent form, his buddies hung a sign: "Temporarily out of ardor." Commissary Store Hires Civilian Check-Out Clerks One of the new Civil Service check-out clerks at the Commissary Store totals up a sales for a customer. The job of check-out, which was formally held by Naval perosnnel, was changed to a Civil Service job with a rating of GS-3 due to a cut in military complement. Ship's Department Leadingmen Receive Safety Awards CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, congratulates Francisco Ross, Leading Man, in Ship's Department upon presenting Ross with an achievement award for five years of safety. Receiving the same award were, Antonio Perez, at left, and John A. Richardson, both leadingmen in Ship's Department. Looking on at the ceremony is Mr. G. Ward of the Base Safety Engineer's Office, and CDR A. J. Tervo, Officer in Charge, Ship's Department. The achievement award was for five consecutive calendar years of supervision without a lost-time accident to themselves or those under their supervision. I never kiss, I never neck, I don't say darn, I don't say heck, FIm always good, I'm always nice, I play no poker, shake no dice, I never drink, I never flirt, I never gossip, or spread the dirt, I have no line of funny tricks, But what's the use, I'm only six. A fat lady stepped( on the scales, not knowing that they were out of order. The indicator stopped at 75 pounds. "Holy smoke," exclaimed a drunk who watched her, "She's hollow." The payroll saver who cashes every bond issued to him as soon as possible defeats the two primary purposes of the beneficial Payroll Savings Plan. He does not benefit himself or the national economy. He wastes what it cost Uncle Sam to issue his bonds so he could have an easy safe sure way to accumulate real personal savings. Country constable: "Pardon, miss, but swimming is not allowed in this lake." City flapper: "Why didn't you tell me before I undressed?" Constable: "Well, there ain't no law against undressin'!" 0 Prae Six a Saturday, 16 April 1955 THE INDIAN Page Six

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S Saturday, 16 April 1955 MAgmC MoS1eS by Paul A. Hoffer, USMC SKEET SHOOT Saturday, 9 April 55, a skeet shoot contest was held at the Marine Barracks, Skeet Range. The winner of the shoot was Cpl. Marvin Y. Holcomb who had a score of 12 out of a possible 16. Cpl. Ronald G. Plante and Pfc. LeRoy T. Pope both came in second with 11 out of 16. The three were all awarded a steak dinner at the Enlisted Club. ARRIVALS Arriving aboard the USNS PVT ELDEN H. JOHNSON last week were eight 8) new men. Cpl. Herbert G. Churchman, Pfc. Joseph Bland Jr., Pfc. Earl G. Castellow, Pfc. Charles G. Hunter, Pfc. Steven P. Kavulic, and Pfc. Phillip E. Patton all joined from Marine Corps Recurit Depot, Parris Island, S. C. Cpl. Anthony M. Cochrane, joined us from the 23d Rifle Co. USMCR, MCRTC, Lewiston, Maine. Pvt. James "L" Conway from HqCo., 2dMarDiv Camp Lejeune, N. C. "Welcome aboard and hope you enjoy your stay in Gtmo". BASEBALL Wtih the baseball season drawing near the Marine Barracks Baseball Team is improving each day. We expect the team to show enough improvement to be a senior threat for the championship by opening day. Navy Wives' Club by Pat Aldridge April has been, and will continue to be a full month of activity for the Guantanamo Bay Navy Wives' Club. A regular business meeting was held on Thursday evening, April 7, at which time letters of resignation of office by May Belle Clay, Treasurer, and Irene June Munson, Vice President, were read and accepted. Doris Seagle was appointed temporary treasurer by club President, Elma Franklin, and will serve in that capacity until the next monthly business meeting at which time a special election will be held to fill the existing vacancies. Jean O'Brien, Corresponding Secretary, will notify all members of the forthcoming election in order that all interested members and guests may be in attendance. Thursday afternoon, April 14, members and guests of the Navy Wives' Club attended another successful luncheon at Marine Family Restaurant. Pearl Pearcy, Activities Committee Chairman tentatively plans at least one Thursday afternoon each month devoted to luncheon gatherings of this sort. Adding to the variety of entertainment, a bingo party will be held beginning at 1:30 P.M. at the Villamar Lyceum to which guests of all members are always cordially invited. Under the aupices of committee member, June Munson, these bingo socials afford many delightful surprises. Mrs. Munson has also initiated the "money doll", another unique, add-a-number game. Lorita Clark is busily in charge of another evening party to be held Thursday night, April 28th. This is a party designed to include the men and, although a strikingly different motif than the last, promises to be just as much fun. As plans stand now there will be a pot luck late supper for the hungry and a lot of laughs for all. Teenage Round-up by Linda Thurston There are some frantic people at school 'round this time of year. The Juniors and the Seniors are going around mumbling their lines for the play which comes off on the 25th and 26th. "He Couldn't Marry Five" is a comedy in which Nita runs around in a werewolf outfit, Nancy paints a mean picture and, to quote Wormie, "all men are beasts." All proceeds go to the Yearbook fund and you can buy tickets from any student. Besides the play, the JuniorSenior Prom and Banquet will be he held on the 29th. The entire High School (grades 9 -12) is invited to the Prom which is free, formal and couples. The Banquet is for Juniors, Seniors, faculty and guests only. On top of all this there is the Progressive Dinner given by the cheerleaders for the basketball team, a possible track meet in Santiago, and Graduation Day on 19 May coming up. Oh well, we only live once, even if it almost kills us. Did Ya' See ...Cavanaugh's hideway ...Sharon (Dusty) Keenan. It happens to the best of us. ...Wormie's friendly Cuban admirer ...All the gals looking lovely on Easter ...To mention a few-Nancy Avila in a sweet, pink tucked dress; Evie Ralston in black and white, Linda Stinson in a cuth suit; Cookie, Dolorice K, and Dolores S in lavender; Eunice in red; Sharon K in a darling pink suit; Lucille and Tim in church Ronny Roguz umpiring for the Little League ...Bob Rizzo and Pat Burke truckin' on down to church. Judy Inman prospering in the diving business ...Branda, Dixie, Barbara and Ana everywhere together ...Betty and Bobby Stone and their dates at Easter morning breakfast ..Bobby Johnson introducing a fellow who looks like Mr. Jones and talks like Liberace. .Prissy and Marise lazying around during the vacation .. Sylvia completely relieved. NSD Supply Line New arrivals at NSD-Garry Wakeman, SA, who reported from the U.S.S. WINDLASS (ARSD-4). Wakeman hails from Derby, Conn., where he was a 4 letter man and Captain of his High School Basketball team. Adolphus Riley, SN, also served last aboard the WINDLASS. Riley calls New York City home. Mr. L. A. Foote, an NSD "plankowner" and leading civilian supervisor of the Control Division, departed on leave Thursday for his home in Jamaica B.W.I. to be married. His many friends in the Depot presented him with a silver flatware set as a wedding present. Mrs. Bonnie Cooper, Cash Accounting Clerk in the Disbursing Division has left the Depot. She and her husband will leave soon for their next duty station at the Naval Medical Center, Bethesda. Good luck, Bonnie. Mrs. Elizabeth Tipler has replaced Mrs. Cooper in the Disbursing Division. "Poor man! He was ruined by untold wealth." "Untold wealth "Yes, he didn't tell about it in his income tax return." Hospital Notes by D. W. Degon HEIRPORT NEWS The following births were recorded for the past two weeks. The new occupants of the Nursery are: Lorna Maire to SK3 and Mrs. Shirley Metz; Terrance Kenneth to CAPT/USMC and Mrs. Ruth Kerrigan; April Allyson to Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Linder; Michael Thomas to CS2 and Mrs. Deborah Smith; Michael Joseph Fedo IV to DC2 and Mrs. Rosemary Fedo. ARRIVALS A hearty welcome aboard is extended to LCDR (MSC) Edward W. Walker arrived from U.S. Naval Medical School, N.N.M.C. Bethesda, Maryland. LCDR Walker attended the college of Marshall, Marshall, Texas. He relieved LCDR I. V. King as Administrative Officer. Also reporting aboard for duty is LTJG (NC) Mary J. Nielubowicz from U.S.N.H. Corona, Califonria. Her present duties are on the Surgical Ward. DEPARTURES LCDR (MSC) I. V. King and family departed via automobile this past week for U.S. Naval Medical School, N.N.M.C. Behtesda, Maryland. LCDR King was Administrative Officer here for the past 24 months. Another loss to the staff was LCDR (NC) Olive M. Wilkinson who will assume her new duties at U.S.N.H. San Diego, California. COMMENDATION HM1 Austin J. Joyce and HM1 David J. Hollifield received a letter of commendation from the Commanding Officer. Joyce and Hollifield hold the responsibility for manufacturing and repairing spectacles for the Caribbean area. The letter reads in part; "This devotion to duty, motivated entirely by you desire to render an important service efficiently and expeditiously is exemplary. t is a great satisfaction to me to pass this "well done" to you." MEET THE STAFF A prominent figure at USNH and boasting nine months longivity in Gtmo is HM2 Walter Z. Jones. Walt attended Corps School at Great Lakes and then to USNH Phila. He spent a good deal of time with the FMF being stationed in Camps Lejeune and Pendleton and Korea. Upon his return from this duty he again went to USNH Phila. N.N.M.C. Bethesda was his next calling ,where he received a letter of commendation "for outstanding performance of duty." Walt is currently assigned to Physiotheraphy, ECG and BMR Clinics. He and Mrs. Jones are residing in Villamar and have one son, Kelvin. With such a fine record may you continue to have a prosperous Navy Career. LAFRA News by Kitty Krekman The Ladies Auxiliary of the Fleet Reserve Association sponsored an Easter musical program for the patients of the Hospital on Sunday 10 April. The program consisted of Betty Dalton on the marimba, Pat Fojt, accordian, Jim Dalton, trumpet, David Shriver, guitar. Mary Alice Murphy and Linda Stinson sang some beautiful songs. They were accompanied by their music teacher, Mrs. Lillian Armbruster. Joe Brenner added a mystical touch FTG Bulletin This past week three officers at FTG were promoted to the rank of commander and one officer to the rank of lieutenant commander. Effective dates of rank are as follows: CDR Roy J. Matthews, 1 January 1955; CDR Clarke R. Mahaffey, 1 January 1955; CDR Robert G. Laurie, 1 January 1955; LCDR William H. Shaw, 1 July 1954. We bid farewell to LCDR Catanzarito, formerly with the Gunnery Department. Mr. Catanzarito departed on the JOHNSON, Thursday, 14 April. Mr. Catanzarito will be stationed at the U.S. Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Training Center, Portland, Oregon. Boarding the FLAW flight Wednesday, 13 April was Tiaba, SD2 and Mrs. Tiaba. Upon completion of thirty days leave, Tiaba will report to the Commanding Officer, U.S. Naval Mine Depot, Yorktown, Virginia for a normal tour of BUPERS shore duty. Departing on the JOHNSON, Thursday, 14 April was Donald Blanchard, SN. Upon arrival in New York City he will report to the Commanding Officer, U.S. Naval Receiving Station, Brooklyn for separation. John J. Flynn, ET2, reported completing a course of instruction onboard for duty 6 April after at the ET school, Class A, U.S. Naval Training Center, Great Lakes, Illinois. The FTG, NSD, Hospital and Dental combined baseball team is reported as developing into an able team. There are about thirtyfive to forty members out fighting for positions on the starting nine. It is expected that the above team will make an excellent showing in the forthcoming baseball season through their diligent efforts and practices so far. With the season just around the corner, commencing in middle May, it should be remembered that the extra boost from all those faithful fans in the bleachers goes a long way to help make a winning team. Lets get behind our baseball team this year and give them the support they need. Baseball being the National Sport in the U.S. brings out the fact that there are many people that follow and enjoy the game. We must have our share of these people in the Training Group. Lets back up our team one hundred percent and fill our section of the seats in the bleachers this season. SHIPS DUE TO REPORT USS FORT SNELLING (LSD 30) (To arrive 15 April) USS MARIAS (TAO 57) (To arrive 18 April) USS DES MOINES (CA 134) (To arrive 18 April) SHIPS TO COMPLETE TRAINING USS GREENWOOD (DE 679) (To depart 20 April) USS SIBONEY (CV3 112) (To depart 22 April) USS TILIS (DE 748) (To depart 22 April) USS McCLELLAND (DE 750) (To depart 22 April) wtih his excellent work as a magician. The master of ceremonies was Burt Knight, who also sang some lovely songs. The program ended with everyone singing the Lord's Prayer. Mrs. DiMaggio, Mrs. Rousseau, Mrs. Waltz, and Mrs. Krekman assisted Mrs. Helen Bowler, American Red Cross Field Director in serving refreshments. 0 m THE INDIAN Page Seven

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m m Navy -i i0-10ND-Gtmo.-0745 m Saturday, 1(1 April 1955 'HE INDIAN MOVIES Saturday, 16 April RIOT IN CELL BLOCK 11 Neville Brand Leo Gordon A clever forceful leader starts a riot in a large prison that spreads from cell block to cell block. The prison officials are helpless until the militia arrives. Sunday, 17 April DRAGNET Jack Webb Ben Alexander When a man is shot down in a field of flowers, Sgt. Joe Friday and Officer Frank Smith work on the case to bring the murderer to justice. Monday, 18 April KING RICHARD AND THE CRUSADERS Rex Harrison Virginia Mayo An historical adventure which takes place in 1192 when the Third Crusade was on. Tuesday, 19 April OPERATION MANHUNT Harry Townes Irja Jensen Story based on the experiences of Igor Gouzenko, the ex-Russian code clerk who for the past nine years has been under the protection of the Canadian Mounted Police. Wednesday, 20 April BEAU BRUMMEL Stewart Granger Elizabeth Taylor Beau Brummel is a man who lived in the time of Napoleon, Wellington and Nelson. He revolutionized men's fashions for which he became famous. Thursday, 21 April THE OTHER WOMAN Hugo Heas Cleo Moore Disapointed actress tries to blackmail Heas for $50,000 and threatens to reveal his all-night visit to her apartment. He strangles her in desperation. Friday, 22 April TRACK OF THE CAT Robert Mitchum Teresa Wright Huge mountain lion terrorizes family of eight living on snowbound cattle ranch in California in the 1890's. Several memebrs of the family are killed when they go after him. Radio's 'Tops' of the Week SATURDAY, 16 April .THEATRE ROYAL .9:00 P.M. Sir Ralph Richardson stars in an unusual story by Henry James entitled "Four Meetings". The plot revolves around a prim American Schoolteacher with a burning desire to visit Europe. SUNDAY, 17 April .HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE .. 10:00 P.M. A radio adaptation of "Going My Way" will bring Barry Fitzgerald back in his original role as the lovable old pastor of a run-down Parish in New York. William Lundigan will co-star. MONDAY, 18 April ..BEST PLAYS .9:00 P.M. The confused love of a young girl for the doctor who lives next door provides the basis for this revival of a B'way favorite. Geraldine Page portrays the sensitive, neurotic, insecure herione in "Summer and Smoke". TUESDAY, 19 April ...HIGH ADVENTURE .9:00 P.M. Host George Sanders relates a strange story of a talkative traveler who talks himself into his grave. "The Living Dead Men." WEDNESDAY, 20 April .PURSUIT .9:00 P.M. "Pursuit ..and The Portrait Of A Young Lady" finds Inspector Peter Black after another criminal through a neighborhood full of odd and interesting characters and several phony paintings THURSDAY, 21 April .FAMILY THEATRE .9:00 P.M. Bob Hope is host and star in "Citizen's Arrest", one of the finest comedy dramas of the year. A police desk sergeant tries to make sense out of three conflicting accounts of a hold-up. FRIDAY, 22 April .RADIO WORKSHOP .10:00 P.M. A tense and engrossing story of a man who is being smothered with attention and affection by his wife is the presentation for this week by Radio Workshop players. The man looks for a way out this situation but his marriage contract clearly states, 'Til Death Do us Part". VU-10 Prop Blast by Richard D. Lackie If you see several members of UTRON TEN sporting dark sunglasses and long cigarette holders, here is the reason. LT G. F. Guyer, J. C. Brumfield, AD3, G. F. Fortune, AO1, and R. D. Crain, AD3, left TAD this week for San Juan, P. R., their duties will concern Navy Patricipation in University Picture's filming of "Away All Boats." UL-27 (JD) will be seen towing a sleeve-target. A powerful combination of VU-10 Chiefs literally "rolled over" all opposition to cop the NAS Bowling Championships last week. Emil Antulov, YNC, George Hill, ADC, Frank Richards, ADC, Stan Wenderlich, ADC, Herbert Pistole, AOC, and Carlton Brotherson, ADC, combined to humble NAS Aerology in the finals, 3-0. "A tip of the hat" to Chief Richard L. Reed who leaves soon for Officer's Candidate School, Newport, Rhode Island. Congratulations and Good Luck? Another UTRON TEN member soon to depart for schooling is George Tuner, AD2. Entering a comparatively new naval rate, George is going to Guided Missleman School. One man who is soaking up all possible Gtmo sunshine these days is LT Weiland. This spring he applied for a transfer to the newly formed VX-6 at Patuxent River. OPERATION BLONDE ________________ Nr ~-/ K ~ Lucky Poodle We don't know who the lucky poodle is, but we do know the pretty girl is lovely actress Debbie Reynolds, who corrently has another pet in crooner Eddie Fisher. Lucky Poodle, lucky Eddie! A couple of weeks ago, the good word came in and he will be Antartic bound via Patuxent, on the first of June. *BO OK* NOO CONQUEST BY MAN by Paul Herrmann A thoroughly fascinating book which delves into some of the lesser known points of history. The reader discovers the real reason for the Trojan War; the importance of the Chinese silk worm; some useful byproducts of ancient slave-trades; the story behind the famous Kensington Stone, found by a farmer in Minnesota in the last century and containing inscriptions bearing the date 1362. Also related is the amazing fact that the Chinese, 500 years ago, were able to build junks that could accommodate 1200 persons, had first class cabins and toilet facilities. JOURNEY TO THE FAR AMAZON by Alain Gheerbrant In 1948 three Frenchmen and a Columbian undertook to cross from Venezuela to Brazil. By 1950 they completed the hazardous voyage, covering thousands of miles of the Orinoco and Amazon rivers. They are the first white men ever to join the Amazon across the Sierra Parina. They met constant danger from primitive tribes whose custom it was to kill strangers on sight. They also met excessive physical hardships but they returned with valuable anthropologic information and material as well as hundreds of photographs. THE COMPLETE BOOK OF HELICOPTERS by D. N. Anstrom The full, fascinating story of the first real flying machines is told here, in both words and pictures. An account of how it works and flies is given, as well as an explanation of its great versitality in peace and war. THE DEATH OF HITLER'S GERMANY by Georges Blond This book informs the reader what it was like to live in Hitler's dying Germany as either a soldier or civilian. The story of how the German army and people disintegrated is told in all its awesome reality. Essentialy a novel, the book is historically accurate and is good reading. THE RED CARPET by Marshall MacDuffie As head of the UNRRA mission in the Ukrane, Marshall MacDuffie was able to obtain a 65-day tour t h r o u g h Russia. He traveled through all of Russia's 8 republics-from Leningrad to the Chinese border. He talked to people everywhere, took 1100 photographs and brought back 2100 pages of uncensored notes. The book gives a good close look at a potential enemy. Also in stock at the library are six books which need no "reviewing": two volumes of Edgar Allen Poe's works and four of Shakespeare's works, two comedies and two tragedies. 9


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