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Indian

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Indian
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"Gole4s NTM Like T SunskAne" Vol, VI, No. 14 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 9 April 1955


Safety Goggles Save

NAS Seaman's Eyes

In case you're a non-believer in safety precautions, don't ever try to tell R. D. Rettig, SN, of the NAS Boatshed that safety goggles are a lot of unnecessary bother. Rettig is on his job at the Boatshed today, and is still seeing with both eyes-all because of safety goggles.
Tuesday morning at the Boatshed, Rettig was sanding a boat hull with a disc sander. Suddenly, when the sander hit a rough corner, Rettig lost control of the sander and it came screaming towards his head. He tried to get out of the way but couldn't. The disc wheel of the sander ground across the safety goggles, cut the bridge of


his nose and his forehead. But with safety goggles on, the sander didn't touch his eyes. The goggles were knocked off, cutting his eyelid slightly, but Rettig still has both eyes-some thing that he wouldn't have had if he hadn't taken the safety precaution of wearing goggles.
After first aid and minor treatment at the NAS Dispensary, Rettig was back on the job Tuesday afternoon-wearing a new pair of safety goggles. BOSN J. A. Hould, Officer-in-Charge at the NAS Boatshed, has the old broken pair in the Boatshed Office as an example of what safety precautions can do.



BM1 and Mrs. Robert C. I I Kirwan wish to acknowledge I i with grateful appreciation i the many kindnesses and expressions of sympathy extended after the loss of their
son.


Pay Grade E-4 Given

Dependents Travel
Washington (AFPS) -Enlisted men in pay grades E-4 with four years' or more of active duty now are allowed to move their dependents at government expense.
In the past, only E-4s with more than seven years' active duty have been allowed this privilege.
In addition, the Joint Service Per Diem and Travel Committee has added an extra, 1,500 pounds to the amount of household goods that E-4s with less than seven years' service can ship at government expense.
The new ruling applies only to those who were in pay grade E-4 on Mar. 31.


PTA Plans Summer

Recreation Program
The Guantanamo Bay Parent Teachers Association of the Naval Base School held their regular monthly meeting Tuesday, 5 April, in the open-air auditorium on Chapel Hill.
The enteratinment of the evening featured two skits by two rooms of the Second Grade class. Mrs. Grant's room presented the skit, "Two Billy Goats Gruff," and Mrs. R.L. Yarbor's class presented the skit, "Peter Cotten-Tail."
The program of the evening was "Summer Recreation for Guantanamo Bay Children." Mr. W. McGill, of the Naval Base School, and LTJG J.D. Byerley discussed the advantages of a summer recreation program and the recreational facilities available on the base. After much discussion, it was decided to appoint a director who in turn would select a committee to organize a summer recreation program.
Attendance prizes for the evening went to the three Second Grade classes. Mrs. J.P. Usey's roomwas awarded first, Mrs. R. L. Yarbor's room received second, and Mrs. Grant's room received third.


ComAirLant Here For

TICONDEROGA OBI
VADM Frederick W. McMahon, ComAirLant, arrived on the Naval Base here in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Thursday afternoon to inspect the USS Ticonderoga (CVA14) as it went through its final Operational Readiness Inspection yesterday.
While here, VADM McMahon stayed on board the "Big T" until his departure yesterday afternoon. The Ticonderoga will depart Guantanamo Bay upon the completion of the final inspection and return to its home port of Mayport, Florida.


Disbursing Revamps Records, Readies Pay Raise For 15 April


Egg Hunt Tomorrow

At Trading Post Park

For Gtmo Kiddies
The Easter Egg Hunt for all base children under eight years of age, will begin in the Trading Post Park across from the Little League Ball Diamond at 1500 on Easter Sunday.
Sponsored by the Fleet Reserve Association, the American Legion, and the Fellowcrafters Club, the hunt will feature five $5.00 prizes for the five Golden Eggs. The prize money has been donated by the Villamar-Bargo Council.
The actual hunt will begin at 1500, and parents are requested not to bring their children to the site prior to 1430. All parents are also requested to be present to watch over the children.
Three areas have been designated for auto parking. Cars may be parked either on the regular places in the Villamar streets, at the Bargo Canteen, or at the Little League Ball Diamond Parking Lot.


Lights in the Disbursing Office have been burning in the evenings lately and many manhours have been poured into the thousands of pay records, and, as a result, the paymaster has announced that the new pay raise will be ready for next payday.
The official directive was received at the Disbursing Office on Monday, and almost immediately the office personnel were set to the task of converting every pay record.
The new pay bill authorizes raises varying between 6% and 25% depending on the length of service and the rate or rank of the man concerned. Officers with less than three years and enlisted men with less than two years received no raise.
The new pay bill, steered through Congress in almost record time, was designed to halt the flood of trained Navy men back to civilian life. It was recommended by President Eisenhower last January, endorsed by the Department of Defense and given a shouted approval in Congress last week, reaching the .President's desk for signature just bare hours before the March 31 deadline for making it effective on 1 April.
The Disbursing Officer at Guantanamo Bay said the new bill was given top priority on the already heavy workload of the office and will be completed in time for all hands to feel the raise next Friday.


Miss Sharyn Ferris of the First Grade at the Naval Base Schooi gingerly handles her baby chick, given to her at the First Grade's Easter Party Tuesday afternoon.
(See Story on Page Three)








Page Two


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
SpeciAl Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615
Saturday, 9 April 1955
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LTJG J. D. Byerley ------- Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOG ------------------ Editor
H. L. Sisson, J03 News F. L. Cannon. J03 ----------- Photographer
D. C. Roberts, JOSN ---- Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1944, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
THE INDIAN is a members of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
� All photographs are official U. S. Navy .photos unless otherwise credited.



What's Doin' Stateside

(Weekly AFPS Feature)
A Mt. Vernon, N. Y., aircraft engineer says a one-man helicopter he has invented is designed to be flown by persons without pilot training. . . . Using handle bars to steer it, the helicopter already has been tested on several occasions by people with no flying experionce according to the inventor .... He claims the 130-lb. contraption can be mass-produced for as little as $1,200.
The historic San Francisco mint has gone out of the coin-making business for reasons of economy. . . . One of three mints in the nation authorized to produce hard currency, its distintive "S" on coins went back to the days of the California gold rush when prospectors often carried their nuggets there for minting.

The nation's economy is good and getting better, according to the Department of Commerce.... Personal income is running above last year, demands for consumer goods are increasing and more money is expected to be invested in new industrial plants and equipment this year than in 1954.

Almost half the nation will be on daylight saving time this summer and at least three eastern states will join the movement to extend daylight saving into October. . . . Connecticut, New York and portions of New Jersey are the latest converts to the plan for squeezing out an extra hour of sunlight for fully half of the year.


The Navy Today , ,, The Toastmaster LIN


The Navy Tomorrow? by Joe West
For Ladies Only Sunday, 10 April 1955


by LCDR G. E. Hoppe
Today-9 April 1955-you and I are collectively known as Naval personnel. In many instances we are very proud of our training and our experience, gained in the majority from schools and on-the-job training and in many cases by the blood shed by others in our same category.
Today we have a so called "New Navy". How many of us look forward to a "Navy of the Future"?
I don't think that the dyed in the wool Navy man, with twelve years or more of service, needs a reminder of changes that have been wrought. All of the old timers remember days when there were no electronic computers, radar, loran, sonar, jet aircraft, rockets or guided missiles, but there were cramped quarters, foul air in berthing compartments and frequent water hours. The old timers remember when recreation facilities consisted of a few ball diamonds and maybe a place to swim, movies, sometimes, and bowling and billiards. If you liked to read, you were well off as all ships had libraries. Of course these facilities were all after hours (i. e. after work) activities.
Today we have all the radar, sonor, jet aircraft and electronic and mechanical items mentioned above. It has become a more complicated Navy it is true-but a safer and more efficient Navy never-the-less. One result is more time for training in some casesand more time for recreation in others.
Today's Naval personnel have practically unlimited recreational opportunities-morale and welfare have been foremost in the minds of Naval planners and designers for several years. Ships are being equipped with air conditioners and almost all have laundries, and comprehensive recreational equipment. Bases offer recreational facilities, some at a price it is true, which rival those of fair sized cities.
Everyone knows of the Navy of today and many of us remember yesterday's Navy. But what of tomorrow's Navy.
Tomorrow's Navy could possibly be right out of a Jules Verne novel. My idea of it is rather futuristic.
I foresee a Navy driven by atomic energy. I also foresee aircraft designed for round the world cruises, ships with electronic, sonic and atomic devices which will reduce the upkeep and maintenance to a minimum but increase efficiency to a maximum. There will be adventure in the future, perhaps not as we see it today but in the fields of endeavor which will lead to inter-planetary travel. Man is rapidly reaching the point that he has been seeking for thousands of years. He will one day leave the confines of the earth and visit other bodies of our solar system.
Prior to going out into space man must answer problems-How to live and function, the two most vital. These answers are being sought today and the search will be more intense tomorrow-and your Navy will be be one of the leaders in the search.
To be a part of this search and re-search will be thrill enough for an adventure seeker. The satisfaction that will come from answering a problem not before answered will be satisfaction for the more pracp


Are you vitally interested in that husband of your? Then one of your chief concerns should be in his regular attendance at his Toastmasters meetings. You are concerned because he is being helped to bring out his true personality. Inwardly you knew he possessed it, if only it could be brought to the surface and put to good use.
Recently you have been witnessing an awakening in his latent potential ability. Through his association with Toastmasters, his speech and speaking ability have improved; his use and choice of words have broadened; he has learned to orient and organize his thoughts; his ease of manner has blossomed forth and his powers of attraction to others has increased. Toastmasters training along with persistent practice, has broadened his outlook on life.
Socially his popularity has increased in tempo. He has become more interesting and entertaining at home. His business life also has felt the impact of Toastmasters training. His boss, noting his development in self-assurance and improved speaking ability, has marked him for possible advancenient. You, fair lady, know only too well what that means and how you can use that increase in the pay envelope to expand the family budget.
Isn't it true that you are mighty proud of him when he is called upon to say a few words before scme group and he performs smoothly and with facility?
Toastmasters International is the only organization I know of that offers its members a specific program for personal betterment. It is this personalized feature which differentiates it from other luncheon or service clubs. Toastmasters International brings out the best in a man.
Appraise the "old boy!" From the shrinking violet you once knew, he has now become a man of unlimited potential and power, thanks to Toastmasters International and to you.
There is an excellent ouportunity for Toastmasters training here at Guantanamo Bay since there is a Toastmasters Club available right at the Naval Base. Toastmasters Club 92 meets every Wednesday evening at six thirty P.M. in the dining room of the Officers Club. For information on how to become a toastmaster call Mr. W. E. Sheppard at 8501 during working hours or come out to the club some Wednesday evening and meet the gang.

tical minded-the increase of security by advancement in the Naval sphere will be a satisfaction to all the people of the United -States.
Unless we have a Navy strong, efficient and progressive, we will not long be a leader in the world. A Navy that plans for the future of twenty five and fifty years from now must have smart and efficient personnel now. Their use now is to learn fundamentals and to train those coming later. Men who leave the service in many cases use this training but the majority of them forget it as useless. Men remaining in the service pass to others their knowledge and if the Navy can retain personnel who are sharp and efficient, there will be no problem. If we don't have these personnel, there will be no Navy.


Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Surolay, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0930-Sunday School
0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1930 Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal
Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Christian Science
Sunday: 1000-Station Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)



The Chaplain's Corner




THE EASTER ASSURANCE
Have you ever visited any of the beautiful caverns in Virginia? If you have, maybe you have heard this story. In one of the caverns a subterranean stream flowed along until it disappeared into the wall of the cavern. According to ancient legends it was supposed to be the entrance way to a larger, more beautiful chamber of the cavern. No one knew, nor did anyone dare to trust himself to the forboding stream. Then one day a young man determined to find out. Carefully he was lowered into the dark, cold stream and disappeared thru the opening in the rock. The group waited in tense silence. The minutes dragged on. Uncertainly and anxiety clouded the expression of all. Then came the tug on the line, the signal that all was well and that the adventurer was ready to return. Today a larger, more beautiful chamber of that cavern is open to the public because a young man dared to enter the unknown and returned.
On Easter we celebrate just such an event; such a discovery; such an assurance. For centuries mankind had been grouping for some assurance in regard to the world beyond death. The Egyptians with their secret of preserving the body were convinced of an existence beyond death, and nearly all the people upon earth have had some belief in a future existence. But no one knew for sure. No one had entered the cold, sullen stream of death and returned. Jesus, the Christ, voluntarily entered that stream and for three days remained in its grip, sealed in a tomb. Then on that first Easter He returned. Now because of His opening the way, and He further assures us that the future is even more glorious than the present. This is the heritage of all. Christ is risen and because He lives our life now has greater significance and our hope for life in the future has a foundation in fact.
Karl G. Peterson


THE INDIAN


M
Saturday, 9 April 1955






9


Saturday 9 April 1955 THE INDIAN


NSD Still Tops

Blood Donor List
The Naval Hospital's Mobile Blood Unit will begin its second round of base commands Tuesday when they set up for business at the NAS-VU-10 Hangar. Once again, the Mobile Unit will take samples of blood to be typed later for personnel of the Naval Air Station and VU-10 to be placed on the Blood Donor List at the Hospital. Hours for the Mobile Unit will be 0930 to 1100.
Last week, the Mobile Unit visited MCB-1, where response was much less than expected. Meanwhile, Naval Supply Depot still holds the record for number of personnel and percentage of personnel volunteering to be placed on the Blood Donor List. Fortyfour persons of the Supply Depot volunteered to be placed on the list. Marine Barracks still stands second with 22 donors.

Trash, Litter Cause

Many Home Fires
by Felix Lopez, Base Fire Inspector
Most fires start in trash piles, rubbish or stored odds and ends that accumulate in and around the house. Closets and attics are the main starting places of home fires, and plain ordinary good housekeeping is one of the best ways to prevent both the start of fire and its spread.
Real clean-up for fire safety boils down to a choice only you can make; either get rid of that extra stuff around the house that burns so easily-or keep on taking the long chance of living amid such ideal fuel for fire.
With this in mind, look over the things you have in your attics and closets. These items will burn fast: old linens and clothing, mattresses and wooden furniture, curtains, draperies, lampshades, magazines, papers, linoleum and rags-particularly dirty rags that have been used for painting or polishing.
This is the rubbish-the fuelthat too often means the difference between a small controllable fire and a fire-gutted home. .Don't stop when you have cleared out the inside of your house. Go


Supply Depot Opens Naval Base School First Graders Hold New Air Conditioning Plant rIator Part With iPhir, wn in Iuar Ar 6W


At the push of a button on 5 March the huge new 100 ton central air conditioning unit at NSD began grinding out the coolest, most refreshing air this side of heaven.
Public Works engineers claim that if the machine ran full blast long enough, the Main Supply Office building could be chilled to an Arctic 600. It has replaced 12 obsolete 5 ton units.
Work is now underway extending the air air ducts into the Disbirsing Office on the lower deck of the building.
Originally the equipment was installed at the Naval Station, Trinidad, but was never put into operation. Declared excess to Trinidad's requirements, it was dissembled and shipped to Naval Supply Depot, Guantanamo Bay.


Chief's Club Opens

'Lounge Tropicana'
An innovation to the base Chief Petty Officers' Club was begun last week-end with the opening of the new "Lounge Tropicana" in the club.
Designed as a cocktail lounge the new Tropicana room will be open on Sundays at 1400. During the week it will open from 1630 to 1830. A musical trio will be on hand to provide entertainment on Sundays.
Separated from the former "Family Room" of the club by drapes, the Tropicana has easychairs, settees and tables surrounding the bar. Tropical motif murals have been painted on the walls.
The addition of the Lounge Tropicana has provided the chief petty officers and their families a pleasant retreat for an afternoon of coktails and relaxing.

after rubbish in your back yard, in alleys and on vacant lots near your home. Dispose of trash regularly and often. Don't let it pile up.
Invite your fire department to inspect your home and instruct you on fire-safe housekeeping.


LUsUlI I UI IJ 111l1l UIIIUEIUII III LVUIJ MUUflUI
by Bud Sisson
With the First Grade Class of the Naval Base School outside taking a small "cooks tour" of the base, the room itself was a beehive of activity. Mothers on the Parents Social Living Committee buzzed busily about the room, mixing punch, arranging baskets of candy, laying out paper hats, and make ready for a party. Soon the sound of happy young voices outside gave the signal for the final move-the starting of "Here Comes Peter Cotton-Tail" on the record player. This was the scene of the First Grade's Easter Party held last Tuesday afternoon.
As the door opened, young voices took on an added air of happiness, and smiling faces revealed the joy Lv ., Kin Leaves of the surprise party. But even more was to come. When the chilF or Bethesda, Md, dren were seated, anxiously fingering and picking at their individual Easter Baskets, Mrs. A. D. Nelson, Tommorrow afternoon, one of committee chairman, had a "wonthe Naval Base's most active citi- derful little story" for them with zens will depart when LCDR . V. a surprise at the end. King, Administrative Officer at the "Once upon a time there was a mother hen who had laid 32 eggs. Naval Hospital will leave for duty . . ." Mrs. Nelson told the story as Administrative Officer at the of the mother hen and of her 32 Naval Medical Research Institute, baby chick, telling how careful Bethesda, Md. Commander King Mother Hen was-to make sure that her chicks were raised properly has been relieved by LCDR Ed- and well cared for. Then, as the ward W. Walker. story went on to the point where Mother Hen had to go to the fair Duing his tour of duty here, and couldn't take her chicks with Commander King's most outstand- her, the young faces took on a ing achievement was his work in worried look. What was going to connection with the new hospital happen to the baby chicks with no Mother Hen to take care of presently under construction on them? "I know," said Mrs. Nelson, Carvella Point. Mr. King was re- narrating Mother Hen's story. "I think that Sharyn Ferris could take care of one for me." No sooner had Mrs. Nelson completed her statement than a baby chick in a special Easter Basket was set before Sharyn Ferris and so on down through the class until there was a "chicken in every basket" for each of the 30 children of the class and one for Mr. T. G. Scar.. orough, School Superintendent.
Now the young faces had lost the rworied look, and there were smiles, shouts of glee, and sounds of happiness that could come only from a most contented group of . .... . ... Frist Graders.
V'. . After receiving their chickens,
/ .there was more to come for the happy and proud youngsters. There were Easter Bunny Games, reX freshments of cookies and punch, .:iii I....umbrellas, Easter Baskets and evsponsible for the site selection and cry imaginable sort of fun.
Finally, the party was over, the functional design of the interior chickens were taken up, and each of the hospital. The actual plan- child was taken home in a car to ning for the new building began make sure that he would get home shortly after Mr. King's arrival in safely with the baby chick. And for the parents responsible, it was Guantanamo Bay. a job well done. Heading the
Aside from his duties at the Parents Social Living Committee Hospital, Commander King was a was Mrs. A. D. Nelson, assisted by member of many organizations, Mrs. T. H. Cushman, Mrs. C. Colboards, and committees on the base. lins, Mrs. W. J. Tipler, and Mrs. ... - ........ wer t S er1 E. Rachek.


CAPT Tilden I. Moe, Commanding, Officer, Naval Hospital, presents certificates of appointment to the rank of Lieutenant Commander to Dr. G. V. Hering and Dr. E. D. Grady, surgeons at the hospital. Doctor Hering's date of rank is 1 July 1954, and Doctor Grady's date of rank is 1 August 1954.


Committe for WGBY and the Indian, the Base School Board, the Base Housing Board, the Local Shore Station Development Board, and the Committee on Incentive Awards.
Commander King will leave the base by auto with his wife, Charlotte, and their son, Duane, age 10. The Kings will drive to Havana, Cuba, travel by steamship to Miami, and then drive to Maryland.

This is National Sunday School Week . . says Jno. (John) G. Pew, National Chairman, "The continuance of the American way of life is dependent on Religious training for our young."



A


The -bby chicks were flown in from Jacksonville, Florida, by CAPT W G.' Winslow, former executive officer 'of the Naval Air Station to Dr. A. D. Nelson.

Every United Statea Savings Bond owner tends to become -a bet, ter citizen. He takes mmw iat in his government andt how-it is run because he owns a shii-t of it. Ideologies or isms don't flourish on sound economic soil. They -grow only in surroundings of proverty and suffering. Thrifty people avoid poverty and suffering and gain in personal dignity, self-reliance and understanding of their rights and privileges. They oppose having their rights trampled and destroyed by Communism.


Page Three


THE INDIAN


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Pmjfe Four


Page Four THE INDIAN Saturday, 9 April 1955


April Showers


Ladies Bowling League Ends Season With Banquet


This Is Golf? (Or)

This Is Golf!
by Dick Friz
I am currently an old bounder on the local links, in fervent pursuit of that zaniest and most counterpoising sport termed golf. I use the word "bounder" rhetorically as one who still keeps his score a mystery, and "old" as one who has indulged before, and dubbed.
In my most recent safaris up the cactus and coral paved fairways of Fernando's Hideaway, I have made a 'plethora of oath inspired blunders that are most embarassing to a red blooded Americano. I have learned, however, that if one has a flair for theatrics or bravado, he can still squeak by without the rewarding eagles, birdies, or bogeys.
Illustration? The course itself offers ample excuse for blowing up. Lets begin on the front nine (which differs from the back nine, in that you don't get lost as easily, and is ostensibly 2 strokes easier.) In a display of power you swing not one but two woods, selecting one and flexing it over your shoulder. If perchance, you miss on your first try, step back almost imperceptably, swish the club vigorously, as if the initial try were a dry run. This is commenly known as addressing the ball or waggling.
Even a topped ball will roll generously on the rhinosceros hide surface, giving you a good lie for an iron approach. Replace your divot (or in this case shake the coral dust out of your shoes) and prepare to put. The phrase "put" comes from the provincial English, meaning "to clown," and you do just that taking 3 shots on the green to sink it. Now look at the shank of your club for some apparent. structural malfunction.
Your wood shot from number two ,caroms off a fossil, and the number three iron drives one on top of the dogleg, giving you an excellent view of the ladies foursome playing ahead of you. This is a reasonable alibi for any-score up to 5 over par on the hole. I will not bore those who have burned up the course (and vice versa) by conducting you through all 9 exasperating holes. But watch out for that Sahara desert of a bunker


Grapenut Gircut Begins

Exhibition Series Today
The Guantanamo Bay Little League jumps off to an early start this year to provide Navy Guantanamo with the first exhibition of baseball in the 1955 season.
Starting today the Little Leaguers commence an exhibition game series at their special ball diamond in Villamar. The exhibition, or Grapenut Circuit," kicks off the pre-season schedule when the Hawks go against the 1954 runner-up Tigers today at 2 P.M. Tomorrow, also at 2 P.M., the Colts take on the 1954 champion Bears.
Tuesday at 4 P.M. the Bears meet the Hawks and on Thursday the Tigers tangle with the Colts. Next Saturday the Hawks take on the Colts and on Sunday the Tigers meet the Bears in a repeat performance of their 1954 championship play-offs to wind up the exhibition series.
The regular Little League season will commence Saturday, 23 April. All gaines will be played on the small diamond at Villamar. Week-end games will commence at 1400 and week-day games will begin at 1600.
Handling the champion Bears this year will be David Dunlap, BM2. At the helm of the 1954 runners-up, the Tigers, will be BMC R.A. Winter. "Doc" G.V. Hering will mastermind strategy for the Colts, and CDR G. A. Gardes will guide the Hawks through the season.
Little League officials this year are: Pres.-CDR A. S. Archie, Jr; V-Pres: R.J. Modrow; and SecTreas: R. D. Groenveld.
on 6. It's par 3 but those who bury their ball in the sand, like a dog's bone, or spiral down the eroded ravine below, find that doubling the 122 yards, and dividing it by the number of muttered expletives, constitutes a more accurate tab.
As you wind up at number nine near the clubhouse, concoct a few post mortems. Drag yourself wearily to the bar, like a Hindu fakir over hot coals, and order a frothy Cerveza. Wipe the foam from your lips and decide against all odds

or


Monday afternoon at the Marine Site Family Restaurant, the Ladies Bowling League concluded their 1954-55 season with an end of season and awards banquet.
Receiving individual trophies for first place was Team No. 1 (above left to right) Nora Zaborski, Evelyn Grattan, Joyce Mickiewicz, Elaine Peck, and Gladys Rowan.
Receiving trophies for Individual Honors were, (below, left to right), Pearl Piercy, Most Improved Bowler; Stella Wenderlich, High Series; Emily Griffin, High.Average; Frances Grounds, High Game; Johnnie King,, Total Pins; and Stella Brooks, Second Most Improved Bowler.


Ladies Golf Shots National Rifle Club


by Betty Lou Tipler
This past Wednesday, there was no Ladies' Day event scheduled because of the Ladder matches being played. For the next two months there will be Wednesday events scheduled for nine holes; h owever, all ladies must make their own matches. The mathces made may or may not be Ladder Tournament matches.
The luncheon held Wednesday was a big success. We had five new members plus two guests.

and preemptive ulcers, to throw discretion to the winds and stay with the sport.- For Ben Hogan, who should know, says that golf is 93% mental. By quitting you are "ovealing intellectual dwarfism to all your friends. So as you face Mecca soaking up the vitamin D, be judicious in all that you say, and no one will be the wiser.


9%


Slated For Naval Base

Commander, Naval Base has approved the formation of a National Rifle Association affiliate for the base in Guantanamo Bay.
NRA requirements for a charter specify that a minimum of 25 persons be signed as members..
Monday night in the Chief Petty Officers' Club there will be a meeting of all persons interested in becoming members of the newest of the base organizations. Time for the meeting has been set at 1900. All persons interested are urged to attend to complete the necessary details for obtaining an NRA charter.


P


THE INDIAN


Saturilay, 9 April 1955


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d
Saturday, 9 April 1955


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THE INDIAN


FTG Bulletin

by Ron Federman
The State of Michigan approved a Korean War Bonus recently, and it appears that personnel in FTG who hail from that particular state are wasting no time in submitting their applications. LT Laskowski, Meyers FT1, Burchi SN, McKay YN3, and Vandesteen YN2, have already filed their claims.
Another promotion! Lieutenant Commander Tipler, of the ASW Department was a very happy man shortly after mail call, on Monday, 4 April. Captain Habecker called Mr. Tiplcer into his office to deliver the appointment and to congratulate the new Lieutenant Commander.
Last Sunday at the CPO Club, there was, a grand opening of the "Tropicana Lounge", and Joe Russek, RMSN, was instrumental in making the occasion a success by porviding entertainment with his accordion." Joe not only plays the accordion, but also does quite a job at the piano. At FTG he works with the Communications Department.
A recent arrival at FTG, Guest, ETSN, after a few days with the Fleet Training Group here, left on Friday, 1 April, for Culebra, Puerto Rico, for temporary additional duty with the Officer in Charge Gunfire Support Unit.
A welcome sight to Carr, RD1 of the CIC Department transpired this past Wednesday, when Mrs. Carr arrived on board the USNS PVT JOHNSON.
Captain and Mrs. Cushing left on the USNS PVT JOHNSON on Wednesday, 6 April, to make the round trip recreational cruise to San Juan and Trinidad.
Also arriving on board the USNS PVT JOHNSON this past Wednesday, was LTJG Averitt, attached to the Damage Control Department, and his family.
Golf :
The latest development in the
FTG Golf Ladder found LCDR Scott capturing the top rung on the ladder, which was previously held by LCDR Kuba. At present LCDR Kuba is trailing behind the leader in the second spot. In the "Inter- Command" competition, the Trainers were idle last weekend. However, today our team will meet the Naval Station Team, in what should prove to be quite a match.
Bowling:
Although the regular season of bowling is over, Gagliano, EN1, Schmitt, RM1, and Markham, SO1, have combined their talents with several other good bowlers of the Base, to form an impressive team. Recently, they defeated the Marine Team for the second straight time, displaying a great deal of strength and championship material. SHIPS DUE TO REPORT FOR
TRAINING:
USS WILHOITE (DER 397)
(Arrived 4 April)
USS GREENWICH BAY (AVP 41)
(To arrive 9 April) USS DYESS (DDR 880)
(To arrive 9 April)

Sure, it's hard to save nowadays. But when has it ever been easy? No one ever saves unless he wants to save badly enough to deny himself some of the many things he would like to have. For anyone who really wants to have security, prosperity, independence, there is no easier way to save than by signing up for Payroll Savings and keeping your savings bonds.


BuPers Schedules Navy NAS Crosswinds


Prep School Exams
by William A. Johnson, PN1
BUPERS has recently announced the date of the preliminary examination to be given to all enlisted men who desire to be assigned to the United States Naval Preparatory School as candidates for appointment to the United States Naval Academy by the Secretary of the Navy.
This examination will be given throughout the Naval Establishment on 5 July 1955.
The eligibility requirements are as follows: Enlisted men of the Regular Navy and Marine Corps and members of Reserve components thereof (including naval reservists on continuous active duty in connection with the Naval Reserve Program) who are serving on active duty other than active duty for training on or before 1 July 1955 are eligible for consideration for nominatoin.
A candidate can qualify mentally for admission to the Naval Academy if he passes the examination in each of th- following subjects: Algebra, Plane Geometry, English, and U.S. History. The educational qualifications in these subjects will be determnied by the Chief of Naval Personnel on the basis of the grade obtained on the July examination.
Any further information may be obtained by contacting the I&E Office, Bay Hill, Barracks No. 4, across from the Civilian Dental Office, Phone: 8553.

Did you hear about the man who
opened his refrigerator and found a rabbit inside it? He asked the rabbit what he was doing there. The rabbit asked, "Isn't this a Westinghouse refrigerator?" The man said, "Yes, it is." "Well," the rabbit replied, "I'm westing."


LT Everett E. Pierce, USN, LT William M. Chambliss, USNR, and LT R. F. Wall, USNR, accepted temporary appointments to the grade of lieutenant commander last week with dates of rank reverting to 1 July 1954. LCDR Chambliss reported aboard 13 March from N.A.S., Glenview, Ill. and will assume duties as Assistant Officer in Charge, Leeward Point Field. LCDR Pierce has been Photographic Officer and Special Services Officer since reporting for duty 16 July 1954 from Naval Photograpic Center, N.A.S., Aanacostia, D.C.
LT Raymond D. Colbert, CEC, USN, reported 17 March for duty as Public Works Officer. LT Colbert comes to us from Joint Landing Force Board, Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune, N.C.
LTJG Vincent J. D'Amico, USNR, former Assistant Communications Officer and PIO Officer, left last week on FLAW for N.A.S. Jacksonville for separation processing.
GUN Richard E. Ziegler, USN, reported 31 March for duty as Ordnance Officer relieving CHGUN J. D. Sentz, (destination unknown). GUN Ziegler reported to GTMO from USS TICONDEROGA.
Glenn M. Phillips, RMC reported 2 April 1955 from the USS CHIPOLA. Chief Phillips will assume duties in the Communications Division. Earlier last week, Richard E. Morgan, PHAA, from Pensacola, Albert L. Lakin, ABC, from the USS KULA GULF, and William R. Crews SN from USNRTC, Gainesville, Fla. helped boost the Air Station population. Welcome, men.

This is National Sunday School Week . . a time designed to prepare our young people that fundamentally the battle, their battle, between Christianity and Communism is essentially the difference between godliness and ungodliness.


THE BAY HILL BARREL CLUB SHOWS SIGNS OF GROWING PAINS with the addition of an enclosure fence and the beginning of a new concrete patio. Since the Club opened last year, its popularity with residents of Bay Hill and Fleet personnel has been ever increasing, necessitating an expansion program to handle the number of personnel.


t


Teenage Round-up

by Linda Thurston
The sophomore class has been on the rampage again. On April Fools' Day our "foolish-wise" ones threw a very successful Twirp Twirl. Gobs of gals showed up with their twips-which confirms something we've always thought-girls have more intestinal fortitude than boys when it comes to asking someone to a dance. Anyway, the music was way out and the floor show was the bitter end. Some of the shapelier sophomore boys donned girls' bathing suits and held a bathing beauty contest. Unfortunately, they didn't have a chance when Mr. Jones made his appearance as Miss America. Jere Warren as Miss Cotton Picker ran second. A real starling show!
Did Ya' See . . . Phil setting his lovely tresses in pin curls the other assembly (call him Phyllis) . . . JVC talking for six minutes without error. The rest of the school was just about gone with the wind . . . Judy Inman beginning to wonder about Eunice .. Sharon and Frank .... The happy wanderers back from Santiago. You never can tell about those seniors � . . Jim Dalton enjoying the "One for the Money" cheer . . . Jeanne Curtis disappearing over the softball season. . .Gloria playing assistant catcher . . . Peggy Lassiter turning over her riches so we could all go sailing . . . Neil receiving all sorts of mail from the Navy Department and all but getting his orders for Pensacola. "It was only a little tiny ad in the back of Mad Comics. Gee, you can't even sign your name to anything these days" ... Cookie "slipping" in Physics . . . Judy n' Edgar puddle jumpin' the other rainy night....



FRA Spotlite

by P.E. Gibson
Previously in this column we announced that a guest speaker would be present at our April 12th meeting. We are happy to announce that we were fortunate enough to have RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander Naval Base, accept an invitation to be our first guest speaker. A large crowd will be present so come early to be sure of a seat.
At the Board of Directors meeting held recently, the following business was discussed. It was decided to join equally with the American Legion and Fellowcrafters Club in sponsoring a base Easter egg hunt for the younger children. Shipmate Hamm was appointed chairman of this activity.
Tickets to our Membership Dance April 15th, were distributed and at this date we expect most couples have theirs. If you don't then procure some from any FRA member. One dollar includes a buffet dinner, all your drinks, and an evening's dancing pleasure.
This month being nomination month, the President has decided to hold two regular meetings---one 12 April and the other 26 April. We wish to emphasize the fact that most of the present officers and Board members are leaving Gtmo soon and the Branch is sorely in need of new leadership. So all you new members with new ideas come on out and put them into motion.


9


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THE WiiAN


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MOVIES


Saturday, 9 April HALF A HERO
Red Skelton Jean Hagen
A young copywriter tries to keep
out of debt by living frugally, but his wife talks him into buying a house and bills begin to rise. By accident he writes an article that gets him a raise and better position.
Sunday, 10 April
STORY OF VERNON AND
IRENE CASTLE
Fred Astaire Ginger Rogers
Story of one of the world's most famous dance teams. It depicts their struggle to gain recognition as dancers.
Monday, 11 April BLACK CASTLE
Richard Greene Boris Karloff
In the early part of the 18th century a young English adventurer traces down the Austrian Count who has killed his two companions.
Tuesday, 12 April
THE GLORY BRIGADE
Victor Mature Alexander Scourby
An American lieutenant in Korea and his men join up with their Greek allies to reconnoiter the enemy's area. The Greeks show their valor and cause the lieutenant to change his mind about them.
Wednesday, 13 April JOHNNY EAGER
Robert Taylor Lana Turner
A man so engrossed in his desire for money and power doesn't care who he hurts in getting what he wants. He finally realizes he is in love, but justice prevents him from starting a new life.
Thursday, 14 April
A YANK AT OXFORD
Robert Taylor Lionel Barrymore
An American meets with much resentment at Oxford. He is expelled when he falsely admits to being seen with a married woman, saving the real culprit from scandal. However, truth wins out in the end.
Friday, 15 April RIDE VAQUERO
Robert Taylor Ava Gardner
Story about two gunmen, one American, the other Mexican, who were raised together and are as brothers. When the Mexicans drive many settlers out of Texas they split up and become enemies.


Radio's 'Tops' of the Week

SATURDAY, 9 April . . . THEATRE ROYAL . . . 9:00 P.M.
"My Uncle Toby" by Lawrence Stern is the story of an old British military man who re-lives his war experiences and plans new battle campaigns in the no-mans-land of his back yard.
SUNDAY, 10 April . ... HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE .... 10:00 P.M.
Ida Lupino and Edmond O'Brien co-star in "The Star". Miss Lupino plays a Hollywood has-been trying to make a come-back and O'Brien is cast as the man who befriends her.
MONDAY, 11 April ... PARADE OF SPORTS . . . 3:00 P.M.
Monday marks the first day of the 1955 Baseball season for both the American and the National Leagues. A.F.R.S. will broadcast this first game and all succeeding aImes of the season with bigger and better sports coverage in 1955 than ever before.
MONDAY, 11 April... HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE.. 9:00 P.M.
A story of boaters on the Erie Canal a hundred years ago will star John Forsythe and Joan Lorring. Guitarist Tom Glazier will sing and play ballads of this period during the BEST PLAYS' version of "The Farmer Takes A Wife".
TUESDAY, 12 April . . . THE CHASE.. . 9:00 P.M. The Chase is on as a young girl and her beau set out to find a pyromaniac loose in a carnival. An old man has been killed and the carnival may go up in flames at any moment. THURSDAY, 14 April . . . FAMILY THEATREE. . 9:00 P.M. Grace Kelly is hostess for the presentation of "Stop-watch Finale", a tense and engrossing of a killer in the death house, re-living his crime before his appointment with death. Edmond O'Brien stars. FRIDAY, 15 April ... RADIO WORKSHOP.. . 10:00 P.M. The Radio Workshop players present a radio adaptation of Robert Louis Stephenson's classic story, "The Sire de Maletroits Door". A young French soldier is mysteriously trapped by an old man in a house of mystery. He is offered two alternatives, death by hanging or marriage to a girl he has never seen before.


More ofiMoreno


Rita Moreno, an up-and-coming Hollywood temptress, always sits this way when posing for photographers because it's good for her posture. Rita's posture is so good that her option has been renewed by 20th Century Fox and she'll appear next in "Seven Cities of Gold."


by Paul A. Hoffer, USMC
WELCOME ABOARD
Captain and Mrs. William E. Kerrigan, USMC are happy to announce the arrival of their newest addition who made his appear ance on the scene at 0245 hours on the morning of 31 March 1955. "Seven (7) pounds ten (10) ounces of real boy" is the description that was offered to this reporter when asking Captain Kerrigan for a fitting description of the new one.
ADIOS AMIGO'S
April the 14th Lieutenant and Mrs. Douglas L. Bell will depart from the land of the perpetual sunshine to sail away to another land of sunshine and assume duties with the 14th Rifle Co. in Kentfield, California. lstLt. Bell has been with Marine Barracks since February of last year, and has served in the capacity as Post Adjutant and numerous other duties.
SPORTS
Constant effort on the part of the Marine Barracks Baseball team has paid off with the results that the team is now in shape to be a serious threat to all comers in the forthcoming baseball season. Anyone still desiring to try out for the team are welcome as there are still positions open.
SPEAR FISHING
A spear fishing club has been organized here at Marine Barracks. Anyone wishing to enter the club contact Cpl. Powell.


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9


*BOOK*NOW
by Francis L. Cannon, J03
A TREASURY OF SHERLOCK HOLMES
by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Two novels and 27 short stories were selected for publication in this volume by Adrian Conan Doyle, the famed author's son. There isn't much you can say about the Holmes stories; you have either experienced their fascination or you have led a dull, complacent life.
IN THE CAUSE OF PEACE
by Trygvie Lie
The author tells how he met one of the most challenging problems ever faced by a man: that of attempting to keep peace among nations. As Secretary General of the United Nations statesmanship of the highest order was required. Looking back over the first seven years of the U.N. he reviews the problems which came before it: Gromyko walkout on the Security Council; the Iranian crisis; the Berlin Blockade; Communist victory in China. The same basic issues face us today. This book can be considered quite timely.
FRAGEBROGEN
by Ernest Von Saloman
At the end of the last war the U.S. Military Government issued questionaires to Germans suspected of association with the Nazi party. This book is based on the answers to the questions in the "fragebrogen". By using this form the author has written an autobiography, an outline of the German people during the war and after it, and-an aplogia for his actions during the war.. The book has caused a considerable stir in European and American circles because under it seems to lie all the old Nazi ideals and hates. More disturbing is the fact that it has been selling at a great rate in Germany and its popularity there is increasing. What it amounts to is a statement of beliefs from a former (?) Nazi. THE RED BADGE OF COURAGE
by Stephen Crane
This is the famous war story by Stephen Crane. It carries the reader right into the battlefield and is a portrayal of the psychology of a man engaged in battle. Local note: Crane Hill was named for this author. He was a correspondent covering the Spanish-American War in this part of Cuba.


INFANT AND CHILD CARE IN
THE CULTURE OF TODAY
by Arnold Gessell, M.D.
Based on research done at the Yale Clinic of Child Development, this book is concerned with the growth characteristics in the infant and child. It outlines techniques for effective guidence and wise psychological care. It also indicates the influence of culture on personality.
ASSIGNMENT: CHURCHILL by Inspector Walter H. Thompson
For almost twenty years inspector Thompson was Sir Winston's bodyguard. Through his watchful eyes we get a picture of the public and private life of this great statesman. Churchill has always had a great disregard for his personal safety. This fact made the Inspector's job nerve wracking on more than one occasion. A warm personal relationship was formed between them after so many years of close association.


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m -oOers q'CMO Like 'The SLLiSLn" -_ Vol, VI, No. 14 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 9 April 1955 Safety Goggles Save NAS Seaman's Eyes In case you're a non-believer in safety precautions, don't ever try to tell R. D. Rettig, SN, of the NAS Boatshed that safety goggles are a lot of unnecessary bother. Rettig is on his job at the Boatshed today, and is still seeing with both eyes-all because of safety goggles. Tuesday morning at the Boatshed, Rettig was sanding a boat hull with a disc sander. Suddenly, when the sander hit a rough corner, Rettig lost control of the sander and it came screaming towards his head. He tried to get out of the way but couldn't. The disc wheel of the sander ground across the safety goggles, cut the bridge of his nose and his forehead. But with safety goggles on, the sander didn't touch his eyes. The goggles were knocked off, cutting his eyelid slightly, but Rettig still has both eyes-some thing that he wouldn't have had if he hadn't taken the safety precaution of wearing goggles. After first aid and minor treatment at the NAS Dispensary, Rettig was back on the job Tuesday afternoon-wearing a new pair of safety goggles. BOSN J. A. Hould, Officer-in-Charge at the NAS Boatshed, has the old broken pair in she Boatshed Office as an example of what safety precautions can do. BM1l and Mrs. Robert C. Kirwan wish to acknowledge with grateful appreciation the many kindnesses and expressions of sympathy extended after the loss of their = Soi. Pay Grade E-4 Given Dependents Travel Washington (AFPS) -Enlisted men in pay grades E-4 with four years' or more of active duty now are allowed to move their dependents at government expense. In the past, only E-4s with more than seven years' active duty have been allowed this privilege. In addition, the Joint Service Per Diem and Travel Committee has added an extra, 1,500 pounds to the amount of household goods that E-4s with less than seven years' service can ship at government expense. The new ruling applies only to those who were in pay grade E-4 on Mar. 31. PTA Plans Summer Recreation Program The Guantanamo Bay Parent Teachers Association of the Naval Base School held their regular monthly meeting Tuesday, 5 April, in the open-air auditorium on Chapel Hill. The enteratinment of the evening featured two skits by two rooms of the Second Grade class. Mrs. Grant's room presented the skit, "Two Billy Goats Gruff," and Mrs. R. L. Yarbor's class presented the skit, "Peter Cotten-Tail." The program of the evening was "Summer Recreation for Guantanamo Bay Children." Mr. W. McGill, of the Naval Base School, and LTJG J. D. Byerley discussed the advantages of a summer recreation program and the recreational facilities available on the base. After much discussion, it was decided to appoint a director who in turn would select a committee to organize a summer recreation program. Attendance prizes for the evening went to the three Second Grade classes. Mrs. J.P. Usey's roomwas awarded first, Mrs. R. L. Yarbor's room received second, and Mrs. Giant's room received third. ComAirLant Here For TICONDEROGA ORI VADM Frederick W. McMahon, ComAirLant, arrived on the Naval Base here in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Thursday afternoon to inspect the USS Ticonderoga (CVA14) as it went through its final Operational Readiness Inspection yesterday. While here, VADM McMahon stayed on board the "Big T" until his departure yesterday afternoon. The Ticonderoga will depart Guantanamo Bay upon the completion of the final inspection and return to its home port of Mayport, Florida. Disbursing Revamps Records, Readies Pay Raise For Egg Hunt Tomorrow At Trading Post Park For Gtmo Kiddies The Easter Egg Hunt for all base children under eight years of age, will begin in the Trading Post Park across from the Little League Ball Diamond at 1500 on Easter Sunday. Sponsored by the Fleet Reserve Association, the American Legion, and the Fellowcrafters Club, the hunt will feature five $5.00 prizes for the five Golden Eggs. The prize money has been donated by the Villamar-Bargo Council. The actual hunt will begin at 1500, and parents are requested not to bring their children to the site prior to 1430. All parents are also requested to be present to watch over the children. Three areas have been designated for auto parking. Cars may be parked either on the regular places in the Villamar streets, at the Bargo Canteen, or at the Little League Ball Diamond Parking Lot. Lights in the Disbursing Office have been burning in the evenings lately and many manhours have been poured into the thousands of pay records, and, as a result, the paymaster has announced that the new pay raise will be ready for next payday. The official directive was received at the Disbursing Office on Monday, and almost immediately the office personnel were set to the task of converting every pay record. The new pay bill authorizes raises varying between 6% and 25, depending on the length of service and the rate or rank of the man concerned. Officers with less than three years and enlisted men with less than two years received no raise. The new pay bill, steered through Congress in almost record time, was designed to halt the flood of trained Navy men back to civilian life. It was recommended by President Eisenhower last January, endorsed by the Department of Defense and given a shouted approval in Congress last week, reaching the President's desk for signature just bare hours before the March 31 deadline for making it effective on 1 April. The Disbursing Officer at Guantanamo Bay said the new bill was given top priority on the already heavy workload of the office and will be completed in time for all hands to feel the raise next Friday. Miss Sharyn Ferris of the First Grade at the Naval Base School gingerly handles her baby chick, given to her at the First Grade's Easter Party Tuesday afternoon. (See Story on Page Three) 15 April

PAGE 2

Page Two The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 9 April 1955 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LTJG J. D. Byerley -Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC------------------Editor H. L. Sisson, J03 --------News F. L. Cannon, JO3 ---Photographer D. C. Roberts, JOSN ---_Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1944, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a members of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. What's Doin' Stateside (Weekly AFPS Feature) A Mt. Vernon, N. Y., aircraft engineer says a one-man helicopter he has invented is designed to be flown by persons without pilot training. ...Using handle bars to steer it, the helicopter already has been tested on several occasions by people with no flying experionce according to the inventor .. He claims the 130-1b. contraption can be mass-produced for as little as $1,200. The historic San Francisco mint has gone out of the coin-making business for reasons of economy. ...One of three mints in the nation authorized to produce hard currency, its distintive "S" on coins went back to the days of the California gold rush when prospectors often carried their nuggets there for minting. The nation's economy is good and getting better, according to the Department of Commerce. Personal income is running above last year, demands for consumer goods are increasing and more money is expected to be invested in new industrial plants and equipmlent this year than in 1954. Almost half the nation will be on daylight saving time this summer and at least three eastern states will join the movement to extend daylight saving into October. ...Connecticut, New York and portions of New Jersey are the latest converts to the plan for squeezing out an extra hour of sunlight for fully half of the year. The Navy Today , The Toastmaster The Navy Tomorrow? by LCDR G. E. Hoppe Today-9 April 1955-you and I are collectively known as Naval personnel. In many instances we are very proud of our training and our experience, gained in the majority from schools and on-the-job training and in many cases by the blood shed by others in our same category. Today we have a so called "New Navy". How many of us look forward to a "Navy of the Future"? I don't think that the dyed in the wool Navy man, with twelve years or more of service, needs a reminder of changes that have been wrought. All of the old timers remember days when there were no electronic computers, radar, loran, sonar, jet aircraft, rockets or guided missiles, but there were cramped quarters, foul air in berthing compartments and frequent water hours. The old timers remember when recreation facilities consisted of a few ball diamonds and maybe a place to swim, movies, sometimes, and bowling and billiards. If you liked to read, you were well off as all ships had libraries. Of course these facilities were all after hours (i. e. after work) activities. Today we have all the radar, sonor, jet aircraft and electronic and mechanical items mentioned above. It has become a more complicated Navy it is true-but a safer and more efficient Navy never-the-less. One result is more time for training in some casesand more time for recreation in others. Today's Naval personnel have practically unlimited recreational opportunities-morale and welfare have been foremost in the minds of Naval planners and designers for several years. Ships are being equipped with air conditioners and almost all have laundries, and comprehensive recreational equipment. Bases offer recreational facilities, some at a price it is true, which rival those of fair sized cities. Everyone knows of the Navy of today and many of us remember yesterday's Navy. But what of tomorrow's Navy. Tomorrow's Navy could possibly be right out of a Jules Verne novel. My idea of it is rather futuristic. I foresee a Navy driven by atomic energy. I also foresee aircraft designed for round the world cruises, ships with electronic, sonic and atomic devices which will reduce the upkeep and maintenance to a mininmumn but increase efficiency to a maximum. There will be adventure in the future, perhaps not as we see it today but in the fields of endeavor which will lead to inter-planetary travel. Man is rapidly reaching the point that he has been seeking for thousands of years. He will one day leave the confines of the earth and visit other bodies of our solar system. Prior to going out into space man nust answer problems-How to live and function, the two most vital. These answers are being sought today and the search will be more intense tomorrow-and your Navy will be be one of the leaders in the search. To be a part of this search and re-search will be thrill enough for an adventure seeker. The satisfaction that will come from answering a problem not before answered will be satisfaction for the more prac9 by Joe West For Ladies Only Are you vitally interested in that husband of your? Then one of your chief concerns should be in his regular attendance at his Toastmasters meetings. You are concerned because he is being helped to bring out his true personality. Inwardly you knew he possessed it, if only it could be brought to the surface and put to good use. Recently you have been witnessing an awakening in his latent potential ability. Through his association with Toastmasters, his speech and speaking ability have improved; his use and choice of words have broadened; he has learned to orient and organize his thoughts; his ease of manner has blossomed forth and his powers of attraction to others has increased. Toastmasters training along with persistent practice, has broadened his outlook on life. Socially his popularity has increased in tempo. He has become more interesting and entertaining at home. His business life also has felt the impact of Toastmasters training. His boss, noting his development in self-assurance and improved speaking ability, has marked him for possible advancemsent. You, fair lady, know only too well what that means and how you can use that increase in the pay envelope to expand the family budget. Isn't it true that you are mighty proud of him when he is called upon to say a few words before scee group and he performs smoothly and with facility? Toastmasters International is the only organization I know of that offers its members a specific program for personal betterment. It is this personalized feature which differentiates it from other luncheon or service clubs. Toastmasters International brings out the best in a man. Appraise the "old boy!" From the shrinking violet you once knew, he has now become a man of unlimited potential and power, thanks to Toastmasters International and to you. There is an excellent ounortunity for Toastmasters training here at Guantanamo Bay since there is a Toastmasters Club available right at the Naval Base. Toastmasters Club 92 meets every Wednesday evening at six thirty P.M. in the dining room of the Officers Club. For information on how to become a toastmaster call Mr. W. E. Sheppard at 8501 during working hours or come out to the club some Wednesday evening and meet the gang. tical minded-the increase of security by advancement in the Naval sphere will be a satisfaction to all the people of the United States. Unless we have a Navy strong, efficient and progressive, we will not long be a leader in the world. A Navy that plans for the future of twenty five and fifty years from now must have smart and efficient personnel now. Their use now is to learn fundamentals and to train those coming later. Men who leave the service in many cases use this training but the majority of them forget it as useless. Men remaining in the service pass to others their knowledge and if the Navy can retain personnel who are sharp and efficient, there will be no problem. If we don't have these personnel, there will be no Navy. 0 Sunday, 10 April 1955 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Surlay, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 000-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100Divine Worship 0930 Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930--Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Christian Science Sunday: 1000 Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner THE EASTER ASSURANCE Have you ever visited any of the beautiful caverns in Virginia? If you have, maybe you have heard this story. In one of the caverns a subterranean stream flowed along until it disappeared into the wall of the cavern. According to ancient legends it was supposed to be the entrance way to a larger, more beautiful chamber of the cavern. No one knew, nor did anyone dare to trust himself to the forboding stream. Then one day a young man determined to find out. Carefully he was lowered into the dark, cold stream and disappeared thru the opening in the rock. The group waited in tense silence. The minutes dragged on. Uncertainly and anxiety clouded the expression of all. Then came the tug on the line, the signal that all was well and that the adventurer was ready to return. Today a larger, more beautiful chamber of that cavern is open to the public because a young man dared to enter the tnnown and returned. On Easter we celebrate just such an event; such a discovery; such an assurance. For centuries mankind had been grouping for some assurance in regard to the world beyond death. The Egyptians with their secret of preserving the body were convinced of an existence beyond death, and nearly all the people upon earth have had some belief in a future existence. But no one knew for sure. No one had entered the cold, sullen stream of death and returned. Jesus, the Christ, voluntarily entered that stream and for three days remained in its grip, sealed in a tomb. Then on that first Easter He returned. Now because of His opening the way, and He further assures us that the future is even more glorious than the present. This is the heritage of all. Christ is risen and because He lives our life now has greater significance and our hone for life in the future has a foundation in fact. Karl G. Peterson e* e e Satra,9Arl15 THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 9 April 1955 NSD Still Tops Blood Donor List The Naval Hospital's Mobile Blood Unit will begin its second round of base commands Tuesday when they set up for business at the NAS-VU-10 Hangar. Once again, the Mobile Unit will take samples of blood to be typed later for personnel of the Naval Air Station and VU-10 to be placed on the Blod Donor List at the Hospital. Hours for the Mobile Unit will be 0930 to 1100. Last week, the Mobile Unit visited MCB-1, where response was much less than expected. Meanwhile, Naval Supply Depot still holds the record for number of personnel and percentage of personnel volunteering to be placed on the Blood Donor List. Fortyfour persons of the Supply Depot volunteered to be placed on the list. Marine Barracks still stands second with 22 donors. Trash, Litter Cause Many Home Fires by Felix Lopez, Base Fire Inspector Most fires start in trash piles, rubbish or stored odds and ends that accumulate in and around the house. Closets and attics are the main starting places of home fires, and plain ordinary good housekeeping is one of the best ways to prevent both the start of fire and its spread. Real clean-up for fire safety boils down to a choice only you can make; either get rid of that extra stuff around the house that burns so easily-or keep on taking the long chance of living amid such ideal fuel for fire. With this in mind, look over the things you have in your attics and closets. These items will burn fast: old linens and clothing, mattresses and wooden furniture, curtains, draperies, lampshades, magazines, papers, linoleum and rags-particularly dirty rags that have been used for painting or polishing. This is the rubbish-the fuelthat too often means the difference between a small controllable fire and a fire-gutted home. Don't stop when you have cleared out the inside of your house. Go Supply Depot Opens Naval Base School First Graders Hold New Air Conditioning Plant Eater Part With 'Chicken in Ever Basket' At the push of a button on 5 March the huge new 100 ton central air conditioning unit at NSD began grinding out the coolest, most refreshing air this side of heaven. Public Works engineers claim that if the machine ran full blast long enough, the Main Supply Office building could be chilled to an Arctic 60'. It has replaced 12 obsolete 5 ton units. Work is now underway extending the air air ducts into the Disbursing Office on the lower deck of the building. Originally the equipment was installed at the Naval Station, Trinidad, but was never put into operation. Declared excess to Trinidad's requirements, it was dissembled and shipped to Naval Supply Depot, Guantanamo Bay. Chief's Club Opens 'Lounge Tropicana' An innovation to the base Chief Petty Officers' Club was begun last week-end with the opening of the new "Lounge Tropicana" in the club. Designed as a cocktail lounge the new Tropicana room will be open on Sundays at 1400. During the week it will open from 1630 to 1830. A musical trio will be on hand to provide entertainment on Sundays. Separated from the former "Family Room" of the club by drapes, the Tropicana has easychairs, settees and tables surrounding the bar. Tropical motif murals have been painted on the walls. The addition of the Lounge Tropicana has provided the chief petty officers and their families a pleasant retreat for an afternoon of coktails and relaxing. after rubbish in your back yard, in alleys and on vacant lots near your home. Dispose of trash regularly and often. Don't let it pile up. Invite your fire department to inspect your home and instruct you on fire-safe housekeeping. CAPT Tilden I. Moe, Commanding Officer, Naval Hospital, presents certificates of appointment to the rank of Lieutenant Commander to Dr. G. V. Hearing and Dr. E. D. Grady, surgeons at the hospital. Doctor Hering's date of rank is 1 July 1954, and Doctor Grady's date of rank is 1 August 1954. y y by Bud Sisson With the First Grade Class of the Naval Base School outside taking a small "cooks tour" of the base, the room itself was a beehive of activity. Mothers on the Parents Social Living Committee buzzed busily about the room, mixing punch, arranging baskets of candy, laying out paper hats, and make ready for a party. Soon the sound of happy young voices outside gave the signal for the final move-the starting of "Here Comes Peter Cotton-Tail" on the record player. This was the scene of the First Grade's Easter Party held last Tuesday afternoon. LCDR I, V. King Leaves For Bethesda, Md. Tommorrow afternoon, one of the Naval Base's most active citizens will depart when LCDR I. V. King, Administrative Officer at the Naval Hospital will leave for duty as Administrative Officer at the Naval Medical Research Institute, Bethesda, Md. Commander King has been relieved by LCDR Edward W. Walker. Duing his tour of duty here, Commander King's most outstanding achievement was his work in connection with the new hospital presently under construction on Carvella Point. Mr. King was responsible for the site selection and functional design of the interior of the hospital. The actual planning for the new building began shortly after Mr. King's arrival in Guantanamo Bay. Aside from his duties at the Hospital, Commander King was a member of many organizations, boards, and committees on the base. Among these were the Steering Committe for WGBY and the Indian, the Base School Board, the Base Housing Board, the Local Shore Station Development Board, and the Committee on Incentive Awards. Commander King will leave the base by auto with his wife, Charlotte, and their son, Duane, age 10. The Kings will drive to Havana, Cuba, travel by steamship to Miami, and then drive to Maryland. This is National Sunday School Week ...says Jno. (John) G. Pew, National Chairman, "The continuance of the American way of life is dependent on Religious training for our young." As the door opened, young voices took on an added air of happiness, and smiling faces revealed the joy of the surprise party. But even more was to come. When the children were seated, anxiously fingering and picking at their individual Easter Baskets, Mrs. A. D. Nelson, committee chairman, had a "wonderful little story" for them with a surprise at the end. "Once upon a time there was a mother hen who had laid 32 eggs. Mrs. Nelson told the story of the mother hen and of her 32 baby chicks, telling how careful Mother Hen was to make sure that her chicks were raised properly and well cared for. Then, as the story went on to the point where Mother Hen had to go to the fair and couldn't take her chicks with her, the young faces took on a worried look. What was going to happen to the baby chicks with no Mother Hen to take care of them? "I know," said Mrs. Nelson, narrating Mother Hen's story. "I think that Sharyn Ferris could take care of one for me." No sooner had Mrs. Nelson completed her statement than a baby chick in a special Easter Basket was set before Sharyn Ferris and so on down through the class until there was a "chicken in every basket" for each of the 30 children of the class and one for Mr. T. G. Scarborough, School Superintendent. Now the young faces had lost the worried look, and there were smiles, shouts of glee, and sounds of happiness that could come only from a most contented group of Frist Graders. After receiving their chickens, there was more to come for the happy and proud youngsters. There were Easter Bunny Games, refreshments of cookies and punch, umbrellas, Easter Baskets and every imaginable sort of fun. Finally, the party was over, the chickens were taken up, and each child was taken home in a car to make sure that he would get home safely with the baby chick. And for the parents responsible, it was a job well done. Heading the Parents Social Living Committee was Mrs. A. D. Nelson, assisted by Mrs. T. H. Cushman, Mrs. C. Collins, Mrs. W. J. Tipler, and Mrs. E. Rachek. The baby chicks were flown in from Jacksonville, Florida, by CAPT W G. Winslow, former executive officer of the Naval Air Station to Dr. A. D. Nelson. Every United States Savings Bond owner tends to become a better citizen. He takes more interest in his government andherwit is run because he owns a share of it. Ideologies or isms don't flourish on sound economic soil. They grow only in surroundings of proverty and suffering. Thrifty people avoid poverty and suffering and gain in personal dignity, self-reliance and understanding of their rights and privileges. They oppose having their rights trampled and destroyed by Communism. m0 THE INDIAN Page Three

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mire Four I ~. Fo THE INDIAN Saturday, 9 April 1955 April Showers 6)) I, t 1 This Is Golf? (Or) This Is Golf! by Dick Friz I am currently an old bounder on the local links, in fervent pursuit of that zaniest and most counterpoising sport termed golf. I use the word "bounder" rhetorically as one who still keeps his score a mystery, and "old" as one who has indulged before, and .dubbed. In my most recent safaris up the cactus and coral paved fairways of Fernando's Hideaway, I have made a plethora of oath inspired blunders that are most embarassing to a red blooded Americano. I have learned, however, that if one has a flair for theatrics or bravado, he can still squeak by without the rewarding eagles, birdies, or bogeys. Illustration? The course itself offers ample excuse for blowing up. Lets begin on the front nine (which differs from the back nine, in that you don't get lost as easily, and is ostensibly 2 strokes easier.) In a display of power you swing not one but two woods, selecting one and flexing it over your shoulder. If perchance, you miss on your first try, step back almost imperceptably, swish the club vigorously, as if the initial try were a dry run. This is commenly known as addressing the ball or waggling. Even a topped ball will roll generously on the rhinosceros hide surface, giving you a good lie for an iron approach. Replace your divot (or in this case shake the coral dust out of your shoes) and prepare to put. The phrase "put" comes from the provincial English, meaning "to clown," and you do just that taking 3 shots on the green to sink it. Now look at the shank of your club for some apparent, structural malfunction. Your wood shot from number two caroms off a fossil, and the number three iron drives one on top of the dogleg, giving you an excellent view of the ladies foursome playing ahead of you. This is a reasonable alibi for any-score up to 5 over par on the hole. I will not bore those who have burned up the course (and vice versa) by conducting you through all 9 exasperating holes. But watch out for that Sahara desert of a bunker Grapenut Circut Begins Exhibition Series Today The Gusantanamo Bay Lit League jumps off to an early start this year to provide Navy Guantanamo with the first exhibition of baseball in the 1955 season. Starting today the Little Leaguers commence an exhibition game series at their special ball diamond in Villamar. The exhibition, or Grapenut Circuit," kicks off the pre-season schedule when the Hawks go against the 1954 runner-up Tigers today at 2 P.M. Tomorrow, also at 2 P.M., the Colts take on the 1954 champion Bears. Tuesday at 4 P.M. the Bears meet the Hawks and on Thursday the Tigers tangle with the Colts. Next Saturday the Hawks take on the Colts and on Sunday the Tigers meet the Bears in a repeat performance of their 1954 championship play-offs to wind up the exhibition series. The regular Little League season will commence Saturday, 23 April. All games will be played on the small diamond at Villamar. Week-end games will commence at 1400 and week-day games will begin at 1600. Handling the champion Bears this year will be David Dunlap, BM2. At the helm of the 1954 runners-up, the Tigers, will be BMC R. A. Winter. "Doc" G. V. Hering will mastermind strategy for the Colts, and CDR G. A. Gardes will guide the Hawks through the season. Little League officials this year are: Pres.-CDR A. S. Archie, Jr; V-Pres: R. J. Modrow; and SecTreas: R. D. Groenveld. on 6. It's par 3 but those who bury their ball in the sand, like a dog's bone, or spiral down the eroded ravine below, find that doubling the 122 yards, and dividing it by the number of muttered expletives, constitutes a more accurate tab. As you wind up at number nine near the clubhouse, concoct a few post mortems. Drag yourself wearily to the bar, like a Hindu fakir over hot coals, and order a frothy Cerveza. Wipe the foam from your lips and decide against all odds Ladies Bowling League Ends Season With Banquet Monday afternoon at the Marine Site Family Restaurant, the Ladies Bowling League concluded their 1954-55 season with an end of season and awards banquet. Receiving individual trophies for first place was Team No. 1 (above left to right) Nora Zaborski, Evelyn Grattan, Joyce Mickiewicz, Elaine Peck, and Gladys Rowan. Receiving trophies for Individual Honors were, (below, left to right), Pearl Piercy, Most Improved Bowler; Stella Wenderlich, High Series; Emily Griffin, High Average; Frances Grounds, High Game; Johnnie tie King, Total Pins; and Stella Brooks, Second Most Improved Bowler. Ladies Golf Shots by Betty Lou Tipler This past Wednesday, there was no Ladies' Day event scheduled because of the Ladder matches being played. For the next two months there will be Wednesday events scheduled for nine holes; I owever, all ladies must make their own matches. The mathees made may or may not be Ladder Tournament matches. The luncheon held Wednesday was a big success. We had five new members plus two guests. and preemptive ulcers, to throw discretion to the winds and stay with the sport. For Ben Hogan, who should know, says that golf is 9:) mental. By quitting you are -vealing intellectual dwarfism to all your friends. So as you face Mecca soaking up the vitamin D, be judicious in all that you say, and no one will be the wiser. National Rifle Club Slated For Naval Base Commander, Naval Base has approved the formation of a National Rifle Association affiliate for the base in Guantanamo Bay. NRA requirements for a charter specify that a minimum of 25 persons be signed as members. Monday night in the Chief Petty Officers' Club there will be a meeting of all persons interested in becoming members of the newest of the base organizations. Time for the meeting has been set at 1900. All persons interested are urged to attend to complete the necessary details for obtaining an NRA charter. THE INDIAN Saturday, 9 April 1955

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Saturday, 9 April 1955 m FTG Bulletin by Ron Federman The State of Michigan approved a Korean War Bonus recently, and it appears that personnel in FTG who hail from that particular state are wasting no time in submitting their applications. LT Laskowski, Meyers FT1, Burchi SN, McKay YN3, and Vandesteen YN2, have already filed their claims. Another promotion! Lieutenant Commander Tipler, of the ASW Department was a very happy man shortly after mail call, on Monday, 4 April. Captain Habecker called Mr. Tipler into his office to deliver the appointment and to congratulate the new Lieutenant Commander. Last Sunday at the CPO Club, there was a grand opening of the "Tropicana Lounge", and Joe Russek, RMSN, was instrumental in making the occasion a success by porviding entertainment with his accordion." Joe not only plays the accordion, but also does quite a job at the piano. At FTG he works with the Communications Department. A recent arrival at FTG, Guest, ETSN, after a few days with the Fleet Training Group here, left on Friday, 1 April, for Culebra, Puerto Rico, for temporary additional duty with the Officer in Charge Gunfire Support Unit. A welcome sight to Carr, RD1 of the CIC Department transpired this past Wednesday, when Mrs. Carr arrived on board the USNS PVT JOHNSON. Captain and Mrs. Cushing left on the USNS PVT JOHNSON on Wednesday, 6 April, to make the round trip recreational cruise to San Juan and Trinidad. Also arriving on board the USNS PVT JOHNSON this past Wednesday, was LTJG Averitt, attached to the Damage Control Department, and his family. Golf: The latest development in the FTG Golf Ladder found LCDR Scott capturing the top rung on the ladder, which was previously Leld by LCDR Kuba. At present LCDR Kuba is trailing behind the leader in the second spot. In the "Inter-Comnmand" competition, the Trainers were idle last weekend. However, today our team will meet the Naval Station Team, in what should prove to be quite a match. Bowling: Although the regular season of bowling is over, Gagliano, EN1, Schmitt, RM1, and Markham, SO1, have combined their talents with several other good bowlers of the Base, to form an impressive team. Recently, they defeated the Marine Team for the second straight time, displaying a great deal of strength and championship material. SHIPS DUE TO REPORT FOR TRAINING: USS WILHOITE (DER 397) (Arrived 4 April) USS GREENWICH BAY (AVP 41) (To arrive 9 April) USS DYESS (DDR 880) (To arrive 9 April) Sure, it's hard to save nowadays. But when has it ever been easy? No one ever saves unless he wants to save badly enough to deny himself some of the many things he would like to have. For anyone who really wants to have security, prosperity, independence, there is no easier way to save than by signing up for Payroll Savings and keeping your savings bonds. m THE INDIAN BuPers Schedules Navy NAS Crosswinds Prep School Exams by William A. Johnson, PN1 BUPERS has recently announced the date of the preliminary examination to be given to all enlisted men who desire to be assigned to the United States Naval Preparatory School as candidates for appointment to the United States Naval Academy by the Secretary of the Navy. This examination will be given throughout the Naval Establishment on 5 July 1955. The eligibility requirements are as follows: Enlisted men of the Regular Navy and Marine Corps and members of Reserve components thereof (including naval reservists on continuous active duty in connection with the Naval Reserve Program) who are serving on active duty other than active duty for training on or before 1 July 1955 are eligible for consideration for nominatoin. A candidate can qualify mentally for admission to the Naval Academy if he passes the examination in each of the following subjects: Algebra, Plane Geometry, English, and U.S. History. The educational qualifications in these subjects will be determnied by the Chief of Naval Personnel on the basis of the grade obtained on the July examination. Any further information may be obtained by contacting the I&E Office, Bay Hill, Barracks No. 4, across from the Civilian Dental Office, Phone: 8553. Did you hear about the man who opened his refrigerator and found a rabbit inside it? He asked the rabbit what he was doing there. The rabbit asked, "Isn't this a Westinghouse refrigerator?" The man said, "Yes, it is." "Well," the rabbit replied, "I'm westing." LT Everett E. Pierce, USN, LT William M. Chambliss, USNR, and LT R. F. Wall, USNR, accepted temporary appointments to the grade of lieutenant commander last week with dates of rank reverting to 1 July 1954. LCDR Chambliss reported aboard 13 March from N.A.S., Glenview, Ill. and will assume duties as Assistant Officer in Charge, Leeward Point Field. LCDR Pierce has been Photographic Officer and Special Services Officer since reporting for duty 16 July 1954 from Naval Photograpic Center, N.A.S., Aanacostia, D.C. LT Raymond D. Colbert, CEC, USN, reported 17 March for duty as Public Works Officer. LT Colbert comes to us from Joint Landing Force Board, Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune, N.C. LTJG Vincent J. D'Amico, USNR, former Assistant Communications Officer and PIO Officer, left last week on FLAW for N.A.S. Jacksonville for separation processing. GUN Richard E. Ziegler, USN, reported 31 March for duty as Ordnance Officer relieving CHGUN J. D. Sentz, (destination unknown). GUN Ziegler reported to GTMO from USS TICONDEROGA. Glenn M. Phillips, RMC reported 2 April 1955 from the USS CHIPOLA. Chief Phillips will assume duties in the Communications Division. Earlier last week, Richard E. Morgan, PHAA, from Pensacola, Albert L. Lakin, ABC, from the USS KULA GULF, and William R. Crews SN from USNRTC, Gainesville, Fla. helped boost the Air Station population. Welcome, men. This is National Sunday School Week ...a time designed to prepare our young people that fundamentally the battle, their battle, between Christianity and Communism is essentially the difference between godliness and ungodliness. THE BAY HILL BARREL CLUB SHOWS SIGNS OF GROWING PAINS with the addition of an enclosure fence and the beginning of a new concrete patio. Since the Club opened last year, its popularity with residents of Bay Hill and Fleet personnel has been ever increasing, necessitating an expansion program to handle the number of personnel. 9 Page Five Teenage Round-up by Linda Thurston The sophomore class has been on the rampage again. On April Fools' Day our "foolish-wise" ones threw a very successful Twirp Twirl. Gobs of gals showed up with their twips-which confirms something we've always thought-girls have more intestinal fortitude than boys when it comes to asking someone to a dance. Anyway, the music was way out and the floor show was the bitter end. Some of the shapelier sophomore boys donned girls' bathing suits and held a bathing beauty contest. Unfortunately, they didn't have a chance when Mr. Jones made his appearance as Miss America. Jere Warren as Miss Cotton Picker ran second. A real starling show! Did Ya' See ...Phil setting his lovely tresses in pin curls the other assembly (call him Phyllis) ...JVC talking for six minutes without error. The rest of the school was just about gone with the wind ...Judy Inman beginning to wonder about Eunice .. Sharon and Frank ...The happy wanderers back from Santiago. You never can tell about those seniors ...Jim Dalton enjoying the "One for the Money" cheer ...Jeanne Curtis disappearing over the softball season ...Gloria playing assistant catcher ...Peggy Lassiter turning over her riches so we could all go sailing ...Neil receiving all sorts of mail from the Navy Department and all but getting his orders for Pensacola. "It was only a little tiny ad in the back of Mad Comics. Gee, you can't even sign your name to anything these days" ..Cookie "slipping" in Physics Judy n' Edgar puddle jumpin' the other rainy night. ... FRA Spotlite by P. E. Gibson Previously in this column we announced that a guest speaker would be present at our April 12th meeting. We are happy to announce that we were fortunate enough to have RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander Naval Base, accept an invitation to be our first guest speaker. A large crowd will be present so come early to be sure of a seat. At the Board of Directors meeting held recently, the following business was discussed. It was decided to join equally with the American Legion and Fellowerafters Club in sponsoring a base Easter egg hunt for the younger children. Shipmate Hamm was appointed chairman of this activity. Tickets to our Membership Dance April 15th, were distributed and at this date we expect most couples have theirs. If you don't then procure some from any FRA member. One dollar includes a buffet dinner, all your drinks, and an evening's dancing pleasure. This month being nomination month, the President has decided to hold two regular meetings-one 12 April and the other 26 April. We wish to emphasize the fact that most of the present officers and Board members are leaving Gtmo soon and the Branch is sorely in need of new leadership. So all you new members with new ideas come on out and put them into motion. 19

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m THE INDIAR m Saturday, 9 April 1955 MOVIES Saturday, 9 April HALF A HERO Red Skelton Jean Hagen A young copywriter tries to keep out of debt by living frugally, but his wife talks him into buying a house and bills begin to rise. By accident he writes an article that gets him a raise and better position. Sunday, 10 April STORY OF VERNON AND IRENE CASTLE Fred Astaire Ginger Rogers Story of one of the world's most famous dance teams. It depicts their struggle to gain recognition as dancers. Monday, 11 April BLACK CASTLE Richard Greene Boris Karloff In the early part of the 18th century a young English adventurer traces down the Austrian Count who has killed his two companions. Tuesday, 12 April THE GLORY BRIGADE Victor Mature Alexander Scourby An American lieutenant in Korea and his men join up with their Greek allies to reconnoiter the enemy's area. The Greeks show their valor and cause the lieutenant to change his mind about them. Wednesday, 13 April JOHNNY EAGER Robert Taylor Lana Turner A man so engrossed in his desire for money and power doesn't care who he hurts in getting what he wants. He finally realizes he is in love, but justice prevents him from starting a new life. Thursday, 14 April A YANK AT OXFORD Robert Taylor Lionel Barrymore An American meets with much resentment at Oxford. He is expelled when he falsely admits to being seen with a married woman, saving the real culprit from scandal. However, truth wins out in the end. Friday, 15 April RIDE VAQUERO Robert Taylor Ava Gardner Story about two gunmen, one American, the other Mexican, who were raised together and are as brothers. When the Mexicans drive many settlers out of Texas they split up and become enemies. OPERATION BLONDE t~~'t t t t"mcrg Radio's'Tops' of the Week SATURDAY, 9 April ...THEATRE ROYAL ...9:00 P.M. "My Uncle Toby" by Lawrence Stern is the story of an old British military man who re-lives his war experiences and plans new battle campaigns in the no-mans-land of his back yard. SUNDAY, 10 April ..HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE .. 10:00 P.M. Ida Lupino and Edmond O'Brien co-star in "The Star". Miss Lupino plays a Hollywood has-been trying to make a come-back and O'Brien is cast as the man who befriends her. MONDAY, 11 April .PARADE OF SPORTS ...3:00 P.M. Monday marks the first day of the 1955 Baseball season for both the American and the National Leagues. A.F.R.S. will broadcast this first game and all succeeding ames of the season with bigger and better sports coverage in 1955 than ever before. MONDAY, 11 April. HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE. 9:00 P.M. A story of boaters on the Erie Canal a hundred years ago will star John Forsythe and Joan Lcrring. Guitarist Tom Glazier will sing and play ballads of this period during the BEST PLAYS' version of "The Farmer Takes A Wife". TUESDAY, 12 April .THE CHASE ...9:00 P.M. The Chase is on as a young girl and her beau set out to find a pyromaniac loose in a carnival. An old man has been killed and the carnival may go up in flames at any moment. THURSDAY, 14 April .FAMILY THEATRE .9:00 P.M. Grace Kelly is hostess for the presentation of "Stop-watch Finale", a tense and engrossing of a killer in the death house, re-living his crime before his appointment with death. Edmond O'Brien stars. FRIDAY, 15 April .RADIO WORKSHOP ..10:00 P.M. The Radio Workshop players present a radio adaptation of Robert Louis Stephenaon's classic story, "The Sire de Maletroits Door". A young French soldier is mysteriously trapped by an old man in a house of mystery. He is offered two alternatives, death by hanging or marriage to a girl he has never seen before. More of Moreno Rita Moreno, an up-and-coming Hollywood temptress, always sits this way when posing for photographers because it's good for her posture. Rita's posture is so good that her option has been renewed by 20th Century Fox and she'll appear next in "Seven Cities of Gold." &O T cHRC. TgHs PASSAGEwUAY, -RNj2, STAzSzAgp aALk Ut' TOO ~Act'eC Y TH-E OARl.SCTORO_ Ti.s-i cr^,q AS-ItvU'LS IND THE StuTTLea i7rs -1-Ne SOL