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Indian
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The Indian
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"Gove s qTMO Like The SuinshLtne"


U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 19 March 1955


The cast of "Our Town" makes another curtain call. The Little Theatre's production of Thorton Wilder's "life-in-life" drama, has been acclaimed as the best yet.


Smash Hit,


'Our Town' Closes Tonight


Old Thornton would have been pleased. Roses from the admiral and Mrs. Taylor were presented to a deserving cast Tuesday evening at the end of the opening night's performance of "Our Town" as presented by the Guantanamo Bay Little Theatre.
As the performers relaxed on the other side of the curtain, long after the applause had died down and the last of the audience had departed, the smiling and animated gestures of that troupe indicated that unceasing practices in an abbreviated rehearsal schedule had paid off like a savings bond.
In one corner was Alan Wagner, who, as producer and stage manager in Wilder's drama, has been as busy as a bug on a hot griddle. He was congratulating Evelyn Leach on achieving a perfect likeness of Emily (her "Oh, earth-" scene in Act Three produced more than a few tears from the audience). Alan was rolling the brim of his straw had and chewing on his corncob pipe, just as he had done in the play, as though there had been no curtain calls and other acts to follow.
The following flashbacks from the kaleidescope if life achieved the moments of impact that denote good theatre: "-the morning star gets awfully bright before it has to go-" bit by Alan Wagner in the Stage Manager's introduction ... the serious talk between George (George Engle) and Emily (Evelyn Leach) in Act Two . . . their own last-minute doubts and uncertainties just prior to the trip up to the altar . . . incidentally, the wedding gown worn in the second act by Emily is an authentic period
(Continued on Page Three)


IRO Conference

Begins Here Monday

Monday morning, the semi-annual Tenth Naval District Industrial Relations Conference will begin on the Naval Base. The conference, being held here in Guantanamo Bay for the first time, will run through Friday.
Heading the five day conference will be Mr. M. P. Brall, Tenth Naval District Civilian Personnel Director from San Juan. All Industrial Relations Officers and some members of the Industrial Relations staff of the various activities will attend.
The first three days, meetings will be held in the Building 27 Training Room, and such subjects as wage administration, safety, t r a i n i n g, loyalty - security programs, and many other topics will be covered.
On Thursday, the conference will move its meeting site to the Community Auditorium on Marina Point, and all military and civilian supervisors concerned with administration will be invited to attend the meetings.
Some of the high ranking Industrial Relations official attending the conference will include Mr. R.E. Seay, U.S. Civil Service Commission Representative; Mr. G. B. Gelvin and Mrs. Clara Cox, Office of Industrial Relations, Navy Department, Washington, D. C.; and Mr. C. A. Silvey, Associate Wage and Classification Chief from AWCO, Jacksonville, Fla.


Navy Guarantees Fleet Choice


For 1 Year for Reenlistments
That service-wide gripe about "I wish I could get over to the West (or East) Coast for duty" is a thing of the past now according to a new policy just announced by the Bureau of Personnel.
Effective immediately reenlistees
will be guaranteed their choice of
fleet for at least the next 12 months.
In addition to the fleet guarantee,
a man reenlisting may have four
On Naval Base sub-choices, and although these are not included in the guarantee, Fleet
According to Mr. H. P. McNeal, Distributors will do their best to Naval Base Industrial Relations honor them. Officer, there are presently several For instance: a man in the Atjobs open on the Naval Base for lantic Fleet ships over and requests civilians. Pacific Fleet duty. As his subDue to the rapid turnover of choices he requests (1) a destroymilitary dependents, there is still er, (2) any ship homeported in the continuing need for stenogra- Long Beach, (3) Service Force phers with a Civil Service rating Pacific, or (4) any ship homeported of GS-3 or GS-4. These jobs offer in San Diego. He will get his excellent employment for military Pacific Fleet assignment definitely, dependents on the base. and, if possible according to billet
Also, there is presently an open- allowances and vacancies, the Fleet ing in the Naval Station Special Distributors in the Bureau will Services Department for a Civilian place him in one of his four subAssistant. To qualify for this job, choices. Whatever his next duty a person must have had five years assignment, it is guaranteed to progressive experience in account- him for at least the following 12 ing and administration. Entrance months. pay for the job is $5,000 per year This new policy does not apply plus allowances for quarters equal to fleet shore duty or overseas to rent-free quarters, shore duty assignments.
There is a need for an Electrical The only exceptions to the policy Engineer with a Civil Service Rat- will be a few rates of certain speing of GS-9. The entrance rate of cialized job designators such as pay is $5,060 per year for, this job aviation guided misslemen, atomic with allowances for quarters, energy technician and the like.
Anyone who is qualified for these This new choice of assignment jobs, is urged to contact Mr. H. P. is open to all Regular Navy perMcNeal in the Industrial Relations sonnel who reenlist under contiOffice. nuous service (within three months after discharge), active duty reservists who join the Regular Navy,
and Naval Reservists and Fleet
Reservists who have been on active
duty for at least four years and
agree to remain on active duty for
another three or more years.
The new policy is part of the
stepped-up program to encourage
nmre reenlistments of Navy personnel, and will remain on the
books indefinitely unless war or a
national emergency makes it impossible.


There was no sharper sailor at last weeks' Naval Sattion inspection than A. K. Rymniak, BM2 of the 10th Division (Base Police), who was selected Honorman. Rymniak is a native of Pittsburg, Pa. He has been stationed here since 5 October, 1954 and has seen nine years service in the Navy.


Group Commanders Visit Gtmo
Last week, two more group commanders visited Guantanamo Bay in connection with spring operations of Fleet units presently undergoing training here.
RADM R. S. Clarke, Commander, Carrier Division 18, arrived here on board his flagship, the USS LEYTE. Admiral Clarke has been on board the LEYTE during "Operation Springboard" which has used Guantanamo Bay as its principle training center. Admiral Clarke arrived here Wednesday.
CAPT W. R. Laughon, ComSubGroup 12, arrived here on the NaBase at the Naval Air Station by flight from Key West. Captain Laughon is here on his quarterly visit observing submarine operations and training, Captain Laughon will return to Key West in a submarine.


10


Vol, VI, No. 11






as


THE INDIAN


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Saturday, 19 March 1955


Hospital Notes

t, nl AXT


Sunday, 20 March 1955
Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 1902000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services
Sunday: 100-Divine' Worship 0930-Sunday School
0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Naval V- se Chapel Christian Science
Sunday: 1000-Station Library Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J. J_ Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)


The Chaplain's Corner





WHAT MAKES A MAN?
There have been a number of answers to the question: "What makes a man?" One answer familiar to most of us is: "Clothes make the man." In days of old, men were not regarded as men unless they were built like Hercules or Atlas, large of limb and body with bulging muscles. Whatever answer is given reveals the philosophy of life held by the individual. For instance in the answer: "Clothes make the man" the emphasis of life is on the externals, the appearance, and the impression that appearance will make on others. According to the ancient concept, manhood was judged by the physical makeup of the individual. There are those today who have even lower standards for judging manhood.
But really, what does make a man? Is it the suit he wears, his physical strength or prowess, or the participation in certain activities ascribed by some to manhood? Or are these essential qualities that make a man? There must be!
What, for instance, is a man without self respect. Self respect is he product of living up to the highest moral principles that have come to be accepted and respected by mankind. Honesty and trustworththiness are essential to self respect. Three are two of the foundations of honor. Honesty is that quality which shows a man fair and truthful in speech, above cheat'ing, stealing, or misrepresentation in any form. The honest man has a sincere devotion to the recognized standards of that which is true and right. His honor and self respect are of the highest value to him. They are sacred as life itself. Shakespeare long ago gave the adominition: "To thine own self be true."
Everyone stamps his own value on himself. Judging from the cheap vulgar way some live, we wonder what their self evaluation really is. Self respect a guide for our


uy u. v. JL gon;
HEIRPORT NEWS
Sir Stork is again doing a slack business with only two births recorded for the past week. The two young ladies are: Kathleen Marie to BM3 and Mrs. Betty Hester; Sheila Marie to DC3 and Mrs. Lee M6Caul.
DEPARTURES
HM3 George E. Deveny departed this past Wednesday for U.S.N.H. Philadelphia, where he will attend 0. R. School. While here at Gtmo George has performed his duties as a Corpsman on Ward "C", in the Surgical Clinic and currently in the O.R. Also a departure is HN Herman C. Cash, better known as "Reb". He was transferred to U.S.N.H. Jacksonville, Florida, as a patient, for further treatment.
TAD
CDR L. E. Tebow returned from TAD to Atlantic Fleet Headquarters, Norfolk, Virginia; where he attended a four day course of instruction on Special Weapons. HMC P. J. Hofmann departed TAD to N.N.M.C. Bethesda, Maryland for medical consultation and studies.
FOR TOURISTS ONLY
CWOHC W. P. Johnson, HMC E. F. Rogers and their families departed on the USNS Johnson for a tourist's view of San Juan and Trinidad.

moral life that demands good, clean and healthy living. God gave us our wonderful bodies. It is our responsibility to Him, society, and ourselves to keep them. To do that requires clean speech, a pure mind, and self disiepline.
What is a man without self knowledge? "Know thyself" is an essential requisite for manhood. When the individual loses consciousness of his relationship to the Divine, he sacrifices a basic interpretation of life. He denies himself one of the fundamental distinctions between man and the animals. The man who recognizes himself as a son of God has attained that self knowledge which raises man up into the reah of true manhood. Such an individual possesses loyalty, courage and faith, and what is a man with these? Loyalty presupposes a leader or a cause. The man who knows himself, that is, the origin and purpose of his life has a leader and a 'cause that incites assures the outcome of every test.
Finally, what is a man without self-control. This fact may be clearly illustrated from baseball. What good is a pitcher who can throw the fastest ball if he cannot control his pitch. Man has many and great powers and possibilities, but if he cannot control them, they may destroy him. None of us are fond of restraints. We cry out for freedom and self expression. Too often the liberty we demand is closer to libertinism. The truest examples of manhood are men who have such control of themselves at all times and never become slaves. Their bodies and minds are always under control and responsive to the demands they may make upon them.
What makes a man? Among other things certainly, self respect, self knowledge and self control are essential.


The Toastmaster

by Joe West
SIR
Whether your eyelids are at half mast and you madly squelch the alarm clock, or awake with a gay song in your heart-your attitude is showing.
Wrong attitudes can be distracting or even disgusting. At times they are excusable, but when we are trying to put across an idea to another person or an audience, we must always consider our attitude. It can win or lose for us.
It is a mistake to allow ourselves to be put on the defensive-we must always be positive. We seldom win acceptance of our ideas when we scold or show a know-it-all superior attitude. What we really want is to share friendly enthusiasm.
We should face shortcomings and correct them instead of taking them out on someone else. We cannot afford to be hypocritical or hypercritical! We must use judgment and honest moderation in applying honey instead of vinegar if we would attract attention and favor for ourselves and our ideas.
Giving credit where credit is due, as we have learned in our evaluating of fellow Toastmasters, can work wonders in our speeches. It works equally well in our conversations and our relations on the job and at home.
If a man is happy, friendly and understanding, we are ready to work with him in a positive, constructive way. We appreciate his attitude.
If our attitudes must show-and they must-we can make them support our ideas and purposes. We can use them to create a receptive attitude in our listeners.
Let's give it a go in our speeches and evaluations. Remember, Sir, Your Attitude is Showing! TOASTMASTER PRAYER
Teach us economy in speech that neither wounds nor offends, that affords light without generating heat. Bridle our tongues lest they stampede us into utterances of which later we shall be ashamed. May we seek clarity rather than cleverness, sincerity instead of sarcasm. May we be kind in our criticisms of others, and helpful by telling how to correct the fault. Forgive us our friendly faces masking cold hearts, our fine words covering shabby thoughts, our big pretensions and our little deeds. Teach us to number our days that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom.


Langosta Season Closed

Due to the annual spawning season of langosta, the langosta season has been closed here from 15 March thromv 2h3 M-x N . l


losta fishing or hunting is permisKarl G. Peterson sable during this time. The season
LCDR, CHC, USN will open again on 1 Jne 1955.
it 0


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615
Saturday, 19 March 1955
U. S. NAVAL BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LTJG J. D. Byerley ------ Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC ..- - Editor H. L. Sisson, J03 ------------------- News
F. L. Cannon, JO3 ----- -- Photographer D. C. Roberts, JOSN ..........---Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.



An Editorial ....


The Communist Machine

Karl Marx hated democracy, but at least he knew he was fighting. "Democracy," he wrote, "is based on the principle of the sovereign worth of the human being." In other words democracy is based on the concept of the "dignity of man."
Now, Marx thought that was a stupid mistake, To him, there was no basic difference between a man, an animal and a machine. Man,


said Marx, gets all his rights from the State.
But we Americans don't think that way. We consider man the most valuable creature on earth. We spend thousands of dollars to save one man, the Communists waste thousands of men to save a few rubles.
We believe in human rights; that a man has certain rights from the moment he's born. We believe in respecting those rights, and we believe they cannot be taken away from him.
In practice, it boils down to this in a democracy, the State is the tool of the people; under Communism, the people are the tools of the State. (AFPS)


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Page Two


Saturday, 19 March 1955


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f
Saturday, 19 March 1i55


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THE INDIAN


Mobile Unit Established

For Critical Blood Need
Volunteer blood donors continue to be urgently needed to furnish blood for the Hospital blood tranfusion facility during emergencies. The list of donors is presently so small and inadequate that several emergency calls and announcements have had to been made over Radio Station WGBY to meet the many emergencies.
To correct this situation, a mobile blood donor unit was activated recently. This, mobile unit will make one visit per week to each command or activity of the Naval Base. Already, the mobile unit has made trips to the Naval Air Station and the Naval Station where response was far from sufficient. Next Tuesday, the unit will be at the Marine Barracks.
The procedure of the mobile unit is to secure blood samples of individuals who volunteer to be placed on the Blood Donor Roster. The collecting of the blood samples requires only about one minute per man. Each blood sample is examined later to determine the Blood Type, Rh Factor, and that the individuals health is such that he may donate blood when called inpon.
Selected donors are then issued a Blood Donor Card (certified) furnishing the Blood Type and Rh Fatcor and a statement that any blood donated shall be voluntary on the part of the donor.
Volunteer blood donors, when selected, are placed on the Blood Donor Roster according to their Blood Type and Rh Factor. Blood donations are requested ONLY when an emergency arises that requires that particular Blood Type and Rh Factor.


VAUM F. G. Fahrion Heads PhibLant At 13th Anniversary


COMPHIBLANT-Vive Adm. F. G. Fahrion has been Commander Amphibious Force Atlantic since Jan. 5, 1952. A 1917 Naval Academy graduate, Adm. Fahrion attended Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he received the degree of Master of Science; served on Adm. Halsey's staff in the USS New Jersey during the Palau campaign; and was in command of all the naval task groups in operation "Crossroads." This latter involved planning and supervising the movement of some 300 vessels to and from Bikini Atoll. Before assuming command of the Amphibs, Adm. Fahrion was COMDESLANT, with his flag in the USS Yosemite.


28 NavSta Men Receive Good Conduct Medals


At the last Naval Station personnel inspection held on Bay Hill Saturday morning, 5 March, 28 men of the command were awarded Good Conduct medals by their commanding officer, CAPT W. R. Caruthers. Four of the men receiving the award, were given their second medal while the other 24 were given their first.
Those receiving medals were:
Second award: D. F. Slagle, EN1; G. De La Cruz, SD2; W. A. Scoggins, ME3; and R. W. Webb, BM3.
First award: J. A. Parker, MU1; B. E. Smith, PN2; J. E. Owens, CT2; A. J. Loreto, EN2; G. E. Williams, ME2, H. L. Sisson, J03; R. C. Allen, FP3; J. S. Ressler, MU3; W. L. Kelley, EN3; J. E. Howell, EN3; E. J. Malkowski, IC3; J. P. Coyle, RM3; C. M. Blake, YN3; W. M. Shock, BM3; E. N. Cotton, TESN; B. R. Scott, SN; C. R. Weisman, SN; B. F. Kemp, SN; R. L. Williams, FN; G. R. Beese, Jr., FN; L. Miller Jr., FN; and P. E. Huddleston, 1(MSN.

9


AmPhibs Mark 13th Anniversary


Cutting the first piece of cake to mark the Amphibious Force's 13th nniversary, Pocono C.O. Capt. S. C. Small (right) is the center of attention at ceremonies held on board the Amphibious Force flagship. The ship, currently undergoing ORI here, celebrated the Force's birthday Monday.
The Atlantic Fleet Amphibious Force... represented here by the Taconic (AGC 17) and the flagship Pocono (AGC 16), both currently undergoing ORI... marked its 13th anniversary Monday, March 14.
The Force originally started with one rear admiral, a staff of eight officers and an old transport as a flagship. That was 13 years ago. From that small group grew a mighty Force that today totals nearly 100 ships and some 20,000 officers and men in the Atlantic Fleet alone.


Our Town ., ,

(Continued from Page One)
dress. It was sent to Mrs. Leach by her mother-in-law, Mrs. George Henry Leach of Brockton, Mass. who wore it to be married almost 50 years ago . . . the father-in-law speech to George by Mr. Webb (Tom Judkins) . . . Simon Stimson's (Fred Green) bitter reprisal of the living in Act Three... the return to Emily's 12th birthday and the pathos in her final farewell to the world . . . the neighborly chat betwen Mrs. Webb (Mildred Morgan) and Mrs. Gibbs (Evelyn Perdue) . . . it goes on and on like that with each little sequence portrayed by the actors reflected as a personal experience in the minds of the audience.
Tonight is the final performance of "Our Town" at the Community Auditorium atop Marina Point. It's another hit for the local Little Theatre as has been proven by near-capacity crowds thus far. Curtain time is 8 P.M., and at about 10:20 the Stage Manager will close the run with " . . . it's eleven o'clock in Grovers Corners, and you get a good rest, too."


Atomic Power Soon
A leading Congressional authority says that within two years an atomic reactor will be developed to produce power as cheaply as oil, coal, or water. . . .. Rep. Carl T. Durham (D-N.C.) vice chairman of the Joint Atomic Energy Committee, offered the prediction. . . . He expects fullscale atomic power plants operating by 1960 in competition with conventional types of industrial power.


0


Today's Atlantic Fleet Amphibous Force, commanded by Vice Admiral F. G. Fahrion from his flagship USS Pocono, is an evergrowing, modern, efficient force capable of making an assault landing on enemy-held beaches any place in the world. This birthday finds ships and men deployed in Mediterranean, C a r i b b e a n, and Arctic waters where they are constantly working to improve amphibious techniques.
In a way, however, the word "amphibious," meaning the ability to live on land and water, isn't applicable. The Amphibs are airborne, too. The perfection of the helicopter and the close integration of tactical air support makes the Amphibs a formidable weapon. The command ships Pocono, Taconic, and Adirondack have been equipped with helicopter landing decks, as have many of the APAs.
Other Amphib groups have kept up with the accelerated training program, too:
The SeaBees, who recently had an anniversary of their own, have developed faster ways of building better roads, causeways, and encampments. Their individual combat training is constantly maintained at the high level.
The Frogmen compose a vital element of the Force, too. The UDT men experiment with the newest types of explosives and the newest methods of effectively employing them.
The Atlantic Fleet Amphibious Force shore installation, Naval Amphibious Base, Little Creek, Norfolk, Va., is constantly expanding. The long-range program includes new, modern barracks for the men, concrete LST and small craft piers, and a five million dollar harbor dredging project.


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Page qThree






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PF
Page Pour


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Saturday, 19 March 1955


Standings
Third Division 48 NSD 46 Fifth Division "M" 43 FTG #1 42 Security Group 40 Commissary Store 39 Fleet Boat Pool 39 MCB-1 83 Fleet Camera Party 32 CHB-1 29 Fifth Division "ET" 29 Fifth Division "R" 27 Second Division 26 Hospital 24 Eleventh Division 13 First Division 11 Sixth Division 8
High Team Series CHB-1 2 Commissary Sotre 2 NSD 2
High Team Single
CHB-1
NSD
FTG #2
High Average Gagliano
Marshall
Schmidt
High Individual Game
Marshall
Gagliano
O'Brien
High Individual Series Marshall
Gagliano
Hohman


Ladies Bowling

With only two weeks of play remaining, Team No. 1 of the Ladies Bowling League still stands on top, leading the nearest contender, Team No. 2, by a four game margin. Winning all games this week, Team No. 1 lacks only a few games to cinch the second half championship to earn the right to meet the first half champions in the post-season roll-offs. Peggy Way turned in the high game of the week, rolling a 212, while Emily Griffin rolled a 210 for the week to keep up her high average of 173.
The Ladies Bowling League banquet has been scheduled for 4 April.
Team Standings
W L
Team #1 23 5 Team #2 19 9 Team #8 16 12 Team #6 15 13 Team #4 14 14 Team #7 13 15 Team #3 12 16 Team #5 12 16 Team #10 9 19 Team #9 7 21
High 10 Averages
E. Griffin 173 P. Way 151 F. Grounds 146
J. King 145 S. Wenderlich 143 M. Powers 140 C. Godbout 136
B Gardner 135 D. Jayne 135
A. Tagliabue 134 High Games This Week
P. Way 212 E. Griffin 210 A. Forrester 210 F. Grounds 188 L. Burbage 185 S. Wenderlich 185 C. Godbout 179 P. Piercy 176 J. King 172 D. Jayne 170


-576 !433 411

903 887 872


166 A crew of fishermen from the Naval Station Boat Shed display the
six-foot 250 pound shark they caught last Saturday morning on a fishing 229 trip. Left to right, John Best, C. B. Coleman, Harry Hane, Richard 228 Lightfoot, and N. L. Henderson. The shark was caught off Leeward 226 Point and hauled up to the boat in ten minutes. However, rather than
bring the fish in the boat, it was towed across the bay to the NAS
Boat Landing where it was hauled ashore.


CO NavSta Receives Softball Trophy


CAPT W.R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, accepts the 1954 Naval Base Softball League trophy from "Mandy" Mandis, team captain of the 1954 Naval Base League Champion Indians. Looking on at the ceremony is LT J. W. Dempsey, team manager, and CDR V. J. Soballe, Executive Officer, Naval Station.


Gen. Snepperd Commends

Gtmo Marine Barracks

Gen. Lemuel C. Shepherd, Commandant of the Marine Corps, who arrived at Gtmo Sunday with Secretary of the Navy Charles S. Thomas, sent a congratulatory message to Col. R. E. Fojt, C.O. Marine Barracks.
The message, dated 14 March, said: "Commandant Marine Corps extends congratulations of excellent military bearing of officers


0


and men of your command and appearance of barracks and Marine facilities. My personal thanks for your warm hospitality. Best wishes to all hands. Signed, Lemuel C. Shepherd, Jr."
The SecNav party left Gtmo Monday after their first stop of the fifteen day tour of the Caribbean, South American and Central American areas. Members of the party include: Gen. Shepherd; RADM Charles W. Wilkins, Director of the Pan American Affairs, Office of CNO; CAPT Andrew M. Jackson, Aide to SecNav; and VADM F. G. Fahrion, ComPhibLant.

9


Wednesday, the 1st and 2nd flights of the Ladies Golf Association played 18 holes for low gross and low net while the 3rd and 4th flights played a blind five tournament on the front nine holes.
The results were:
1st Flight
Gross-Edna Edwards
Net-Marion Caruthers
2nd Flight
Gross-Val Evans
Net-Marge Sheehan
3rd Flight
Ist-Vi Merz
2nd-Charlie Murphy
4th Flight
1st-Mary McFadden
2nd-Florence Fortenberry
Another new member this week
-rather a former one returned. A big welcome back to Lillian North.
We have two big events coming up. The Ladder Tournament starts Wednesday, March 23rd, and our quarterly luncheon is to be on April 6th-so mark your calendars!



What's Doin' Stateside
(Weekly AFPS Feature)
Teachers at the nation's private colleges and universities are to have their salaries hiked by $50 million, maybe more. . . . The money is coming from the Ford Foundation. . . . It announced it will divide that sum among privately endowed institutions according to the needs of the individual colleges. . . . They'll be asked to match the grants with contributions from other sources if possible. , . * The aim is to make professors' salaries comparable to those in other highly trained fields.
Human arteries, damaged beyond repair, are being replaced with nylon ones in operations conducted at Baltimore's University of Maryland Hospital. . . . The nylon substitutes can be fashioned in any size and shape, making the surgeon's job that much easier ... Sometimes the ersatz arteries are "run up" on a sewing machine which has been placed just outside the operating room.
Preliminary blueprints have been completed for the recreation of an 18th Century conlonial village in New York City. . . . The $3 million project will restore Richmondtown, founded by the Dutch and once the seat of government on Staten Island, one of the five city boroughs. . . . Its sponsors say it will be second only to Virginia's Williamsburg as a dramatic example of what American life was like 200 years ago.


THE INDIAN


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Naval Station Bowling NAS Boatshed Crew Snags Six-Foot Shark Ladies Golf Shots






a


s


Saturday, 19 March 1955


THE INDIAN


Medics


Take '55 Tourney Cro wn


Medics Ground Flyers, SeaBees Scalp Indians


In Hard-Fought Contests For Finals Berths

by Hal Davis
The Hospital-Medical combine was crowned the post-season tournament champion last night with as brilliant an exhibition of basketball as has been seen on the local courts all season, downing a hard-fighting SeaBee Stinger squad, 46 to 42, in the closing seconds of play.


The Medics held a slim lead at half time, 24 to 17, but never relinqished their advantage even though the Stingers kept closing in during the last few minutes. O'Brien topped the Medics with 14 points, but it was Joe Rose, ball hawking corpsman from the Dental Clinic who was chiefly responsible for the Medical victory. With less than minutes to go and the Stingers leading by a lone point, Rose took possession of the ball in mid-court, broke for the basket and dropped a right hand layup easily. A halfminute later, Rose again broke into the open and swished a one-handed push shot.
With the three point insurance racked up for them, the Medics drifted into their easy, smooth playing style until the final whistle. The Medics won the right to enter the finals by downing a favored NAS Flyer squad Thursday night. Finishing fourth in the Base League the medical combine was ayways a dangerous threat to the leaders, beating the runner-up Flyers every time on the courts.
Thus, the 1955 basketball season came to a close last night with a game to top all games this year. And as the '55 records slide into oblivion, the NavSta Indians emerge as the league champions and the Medics overpower the entire field to cop the 1955 post-season tournament championship. Leeward in Overtime Win, Marines
Swamp Stevedores
The first game of the post-season tournament opened on a surprising note when the cellar-dwelling FTG Trainers cut loose with a powerhouse against the Leeward Pointers, and it was only after an overtime that the Pointers came out on top, 54 to 49. Woolburt, of the Pointers, had a great night, racking up 27 tallies, while Lee of the Trainers dropped 15 for his squad.
The second game was a walkaway with the Marines trampling all over the CHB-1 Stevedores, 73 to 38. Holmes, the long Marine center, filed away 22 for the Leathernecks' cause while Rushman sank 15 for the Stevedores. Stingers Edge Mallards in Record
Game; Medics Whip Pirates
Tuesday night at the Naval Station court a record was established for the Naval Base basketballers to shoot at. In the opening game the VU-10 Mallards held the powerful MCB-1 Stingers to a draw for two overtime periods before


"C'mere!" And Weller (11) of the Stevedores goes after a free ball during the Marine-Stevedore fracas. Stevedores were eliminated in the tournament by the Marines.

bownig, 69 to 67. It was the first time in Naval Base history of organized basketball that a tournament game has gone into more than one extra period. The Mallards' Snyder contributed the greatest number of points with 25, closely followed by the Stingers' Davison with 23.
In the nightcap the Medics had a rough time for three periods with the HiSchool Pirates, leading by only two points at half-time. Experience and bench strength won out in the last quarter and the Medics whipped the Pirates, 58 to 38. Bill Maddox took credit for high scoring honors with 11 points for the Medics, and Edgar Heimer, as usual, topped the Pirates with 13.
Indians Eliminate Pointers,
Flyers Whip Marines
Wednesday night the champion Naval Station Indians pounced on the Pointers and eliminated them from the tourney, 46 to 23, with Walbolt leading the hitting parade with 16.
In the second game the Naval Air Station Flyers, runners-up in the league, stood off a strong Marine attack and came from behind to subdue the Leathernecks, 39 to 30. Snyder and Ring hit consistently for 13 and 12 respectively while Bob Gatti dropped 12 for the Marines.
Medics Upset Flyers, Stingers
Dump Indians
Thursday night was "upset" night on the Naval Station court. In the first game the Naval Air Station Flyers, favored contenders for the tourney crown, were knocked out of the race by their league nemesis, the Medics. The Flyers suffered three defeats during the league and this one in the tournaIt


Holnes (9), big Marine center, grabs the rebound from the Stevedores' basket, as the Leatherncks stomped the Cargo Handlers, 73 to 38 in the opening night of the post-season tournament. Reynolds (6) moves in for an assist if necessary.


PLAYER
Heimer Ring Snyder Gerhardt Gatti Holmes Houchin Morgan King Slewitzke


Final League Top Ten Scorers
TEAM GAMES SCORE
High School 17 288 NAS 17 275 NAS 17 268 CHB-1 12 263 Marines 18 220 Marines 18 219 VU-10 16 218 Naval Station 18 215 Hospital-Dental 17 203 Naval Station 18 198


ment. Of the four losses, three were administered at the hands of the Medics, giving the Flyers a 0 and 3 record against the Hospital-Dental combine this season. Moebus led the Medical scoring with 13 to give the corpsmen their 47 to 35 win over the Flyers in a thrilling contest.
The Stingers provided another surprise for the night when they held the champion. Indians to 44 points while chalking up 51 to enter the finals. The Braves, as usual, didn't get moving until the last half, but it was too late then. The Stingers held a 2-point lead at half-time and never relinquished it. Davison contributed 22 to the Stingers' total in the upset victory.

9


AVG. 16.9 16.1 15.7 21.9 12.2 12.1 13.6 11.9 11.9 11.0


Final League Standings


TEAM NavSta NAS MCB-1 Medical Marines VU-10
CHB-1 HiSchool Leeward Pt. FTG


W L PCT


0 18 .000


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i&a Six


THE INDIAN


Naval Supply Depot Ships Private Autos for Base Personnel Cuban Currency Clarified For Gtmo Tourists
S (More and more personnel and their dependents are traveling into Cuba and especially into the smaller, less-visited towns. The Indian has been requested to print a description of the Cuban coins to facilitate exchange in those towns where little or no United States money is on hand to make change. Mr. Henry Garcia, in the Industrial Relations office, compiled the following list of Cuban coins and their U.S. equivalent. r-e It is suggested that this ready reference be kept on hand for any future trading.)
INR CUBAN CURRENCY


COIN DENOMINATION HOW IT IS


Pictured above is a serviceman's automobile being loaded aboard an MSTS transport for the journey back to the States. Now that spring and order-writing season ;are just around the corner, the Traffic Branch of the Naval Supply Depot is emphasizing a few steps which each serviceman about to be transfered should take to insure that the shipment of his vehicle is accomplished smoothly and on schedule.


NSD ships private automobiles via three main routes: by MSTS vessels to New York; by ServLant vessels to Norfolk; and by YFR 1152 to Miami. Since there are often more automobiles to be shipped than there are spaces available on any particular vessel and sailing date, the first step to take as soon as your plans for returning to the States are made, is to visit the Traffic Branch representative at this office in the NSD Transit Shed on Wharf "Baker".
Bring with you 2 copies of your orders, your vehicle registration and your insurance policy. You will then be in a position to fill out Motor Vehicle Shipment Application (S & A Form 322) and make a reservation to have your automobile shipped to the port of your choice.
When it is time for your vehicle to be shipped you should deliver it to the Transit Shed 24 hours in advance of loading time. Since the government assumes no liability for anything packed in vehicles except car tools, no other items should be stored in the automobile. In respect to the tools as well as the hub caps, its a good idea to pack them in a carton inside the trunk. NSD personnel will attend to draining the gas tank and radiator and disconecting the battery. A representative of the Traffic Branch will inspect the automobile with you, noting on the shiping document any scratches, dents or other deficiencies. When you accept the automobile at the U. S. port, the government's liability as carrier will be limited to damage not noted on the form.

Once more, the most important step is an early visit to the Traffic Branch, NSD, where trained personnel will offer you every possible assistance in shipping your automobile.


Auto Mechanic Wins Suggestion Award


A Beneficial Suggestion which eliminates the use of electric pumps on "Hobart" arc welders and therefore saves the Government an estimated $119 per year, brought Mr. Jos6 Jiim~nez, Automotive Mechanic, a $10 check plus the inner satisfaction of having contributed to the economy of the Navy.
Captain W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, is shown here congratulating Mr. Jimdnez for his idea.


"May I have this dance?"
"I'm sorry, but I never dance with a child," she said with a grin.
"Oh, a thousand pardons," he said "I didn't know your condition."
9.


U.S. VALUE


UN CENTAVO ONE CENT
A small (about the size of an American dime) coin, of
nckel or copper. There are two types of one cent pieces in Cuba. The nickel cent has a star with a circle in the center, and the figure "I" in the circle. The copper cent, a little lighter in color than the U.S. coin, has the picture of Cuban patriot Jose Marti. All Cuban coins, regardless their denomination, are dated, and have their value written at the
bottom the same as American coins.
DOS CENTAVOS TWO CENTS
A coin a little bigger than the cent, made of nickel, with
a "II" in the center of the circle inside the star. (Most Cuban coins have a Cuban shield on one side and a star on
the other)
MEDIO FIVE CENTS
The size of an American nickel. Also made of nickel. A
"V" in the center of the circle indicates its value.
REAL TEN CENTS
The size of an American dime. Made of silver types. One
has the picture of Jose Marti. The other a star on one side
and a Cuban shield on the other.
PESETE TEN CENTS
About the size of a quarter. Two types. One has the shield
and star, and the other a wileel, a tree and a star in one side,
and the Morro Castle and a flag on the other.
CUARTO TWENTY FIVE CENTS
The size of a quarter. Can only be detected from the
twenty cent piece (peseta) by carefully reading the words
"VEINTICINCO CENTAVOS" at the bottom.
PESETA DE 40 FORTY CENTS
About the size of a half. Made of silver. Two types. Similar
to the "peseta", but with bottom reading "CUARENTA
CENTAVOS".
PESETA DE 50 FIFTY CENTS
The size of a half. Bottom reads "CINCUENTA CENTAVOS". Has the picture of Jose Marti.
PESO ONE DOLLAR
The size of a silver dollar. Made of silver. There are
several types. Bottom reads "UN PESO".


ComServLant Dental Officer Visits Gtmo Clinic


CDR J. B. Stoll, Executive Officer, Dental Clinic, CAPT Arthur Siegel, Dental Officer on the staff of Commander, Service Force Atlantic Fleet and Commander in Chief, Atlantic Fleet, and CAPT W. D. F. Stagner, Commanding Officer, Dental Clinic, observe the work of Paul King, DT1 in the Prosthetic Lab of the clinic here. Captain Siegel arrived here from his headquarters in Norfolk last week and toured the Dental Clinic with Captain Stagner. Captain Siegel departed Tuesday afternoon for San Juan, accompanied by Captain Stagner.


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Saturday, 19 March 1955








Saturday, 19 March 1955


THE INDIAN


Teenage Round-up

by Linda Thurston
The kats are flipping their doilies over all the latest imports from the States (both male and female). You might say that Dalton is all hung up over Betty Stone. Anyway, they looked cute dancing the other night.
Jerry Parker had one bang-up 16th birthday at the Teen Age Club the other P.M. He had one of the biggest crowds yet to wish him well. He was overwhelmed by birthday kisses.
Did Ya' See . . .
Patrick Kearney ( a fine EyeTalian lad) giving explicit instrucitons on the spelling of his name. : . James Vernon O'Cavanaugh is his "convertible" squiring Shar Keenan around. (The same Miss K known by her family to have been caught on the bottom shelf of her refrigerator flagging her father to be let out. No chow hounds, these Keenan kids). . . . Neil sweating it. . . . Gary and Nancy holding old-home week with Frank. � . . Speaking of Frank, we should pause now to quote the "word of the week"-"Play it cool, Stan. Your hair's standing on end." . . . Barbara North looking real happy about being a Teen-Ager at last. . . . My chile, you don't know what you're getting into. . . . Bobby J studying for her exam at the beach. . . . Jackie Lee's fabulous new pink and black shirt. . . . P. B. Burke discussing the revoking of devouring licenses through mouthfuls of sand. . . . The corpsmen always trying to get into the column .... Bob R being followed. . . . All the birthdays this month.... Happy, happy to: Eunice, Dolores R, Pat W, Anita, Bobby J and the HiSchool's favorite English teacher-Mrs. Campbell .... Sylvia thoroughly peeved after the lights came on again all over Teen Age Club (Ah'll never tell who did it). . . . Reuben a little shook about the landlubbers trying to steal his boat.... Dolores Sierra in her "dangerous curves" type bathing suit last Sunday....



VU- 10 Prop Blast

by Bill Wright
With VU-10's personnel count steadily dropping, the squadron lost three men this past week with no additions. C. E. Loggins, AN, C. (n) Van Meter, AN, and L. E. Gesche, AM3 departed for NAS, Jacksonville, Fla., for separation from the naval service.
Mr. Scuttlebutt recently advised this office that a certain AEC, will have to come off the "Skin List". It seems that after 15 years in the Navy he still suffers from "Airsickness". Sorry chief but you are making it tough on the crew. Right, Grounds?
Last Tuesday morning just three minutes after all hands were inspected at quarters, an F8F piloted by LCDR W. A. Racette developed engine trouble and was ditched at the Hicacal Bombing Target across the bay. Mr. Racette missed the Bull's-eye completely and escaped uninjured.
Anyone desiring to buy an "air cooled" 40 Ford contact Larry Cabral. He is ready to post the following sign: "Will sell cheap, uses no gas and no water". The cooling system is strictly air and oil, since it has no radiator.


M~q(OC MS1C'6S

by Paul A. Hoffer, USMC
Departures
Seven men departed for stateside duty the past week. Cpl. Dorsey W. Straw and Pvt. John A. Drexel left via FLAW. Both men will report to Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Men leaving via MSTS are Sgt. Eugene P. Frontz, Pfc. Manuel Gomez and Pfc. Eugene J. Hruby; they will report to Camp Lejeune, N.C. Sgt. Richard F. Sim will report to Marine Corps Schools, Quantico, Virginia and Pfc. Charles F. Corcoran will report to the Naval Gun Factory, Washington D.C.
Commandant Visits Marine
Barracks
Sunday, March 13th, the Commandant of the Marine Corps, General L. C. Shepherd Jr., paid the Marine Barracks a visit. The Commandant inspected the Barracks and area. General Shepherd is accompanying the Secretary of the Navy, Charles S. Thomas, on a Caribbean tour.
Bowling
With the bowling league over attention is now on the tournament between the top 16 bowlers of the league. Pfc. Don Schreck bowled the top game of the season with a 225, Capt. John J. Swords the high series with with 580 and Staff Sergeant Robert C. Rausch the high average with 165.
BASEBALL
With the opening game getting closer the Marine Barracks baseball team is beginning to round into shape. Pitching will be the big problem. With two or three good pitchers the Marine's could repeat their peiformance of last year.
Meet Your Team
CPL. Ronald G. Plante will be behind the plate for the Marine's this year. Plante is a veteran friom last years team. An all around ball player Plante plays on the basketball team. His home is in Salem, Massachusetts where he started in both baseball and football. In high school he was named to the All Star Team in baseball and football. On last years Marine Barracks baseball team Plante shared the catching duties with Cpl. Tom Felak. With Felak gone, Plante will have to be the iron man of the team. Plante throws and hits right.


NSD Supply Line
CHPCLK Goolsby's wife arrived. from Norfolk aboard the JOHNSON on Thursday. Instead of Mrs. Goolsby leaving the ship, Hank went aboard and they are off on the "round robin" cruise.
Miss Patricia E. Ralston, formerly clerk-typist in the Control Division was presented with a going-away gift by the girls of the Depot last Friday. Miss Ralston has accepted a position in the Office of the Resident Officer-in-Charge of Construction.
There will be no more daily round-trips to Caimanera for two NSD'ers. The Emorys and the Ruckles have been assigned housing in Bargo. Mrs. Emory is employed in the Stock Control Division and Ruckel is in Disbursing.
R. H. Millar, SK3, has been assigned quarters in Bargo. Mrs. Millar arrived aboard the JOHNSON Thursday.
Mrs. Etta Ray Chetlin, wife of LT Norman D. Chetlin of CHBONE, departed for the States Tuesday after a month's visit in Gtmo B4


FTG Bulletin

by Ron Federman
Heading the list of departures this past week was LT Wisniewski. He quietly left Guantanamo Bay last Monday for Jacksonville, Florida, pending release to a civilian status and retirement. On 1 April April Mr. Wisniewski will complete a mere "30" years of naval service!
On Friday, 11 March, LT Hutton, former member of the Gunnery Department, set out for Newport News, Virginia. He will report to the Supervisor, Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, for a normal tour of duty. Mr. Hutton, noted for his miniature height, wrote a few parting words on the Gunnery Department Blackboard as follows: "Goodbye, you all-the little lieutenant", or words to that affect.
Also reporting to the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company is CHELEC Friebele, but only for temporary duty in connection with the fitting out of the USS FORRESTAL (CVA 59). Upon completion of the temporary duty, he will further proceed to the abovementioned vessel for duty. Mr. Friebele departed Guantanamo Bay on the 14th of March. While serving with FTG he worked in the Engineering Department.
The FTG Basketball Team played a hectic, well-fought, basketball game against Leeward Point Monday Night, but were nosed out by 3 points in overtime. It was the final game of the season for the Trainers, and they went down fighting. It must be remembered that while FTG didn't break into the win column all year, they consistently displayed a "sportsmanlike attitude", and wouldn't quit when the chips were down. The members of the team have turned in their uniforms for the year, but their untiring spirit shown thoughout the basketball season will not easily be cast aside. They were loosers in the "league standings", but champions in the field of "athletic competition" as a result of their determination to stay in there and fight despite the fact that they were losing. It would be fitting at this time to pay homage to the members of the basketball team, and look forward to a better season next year.
An opportunity that few people take advantage of at FTG, and the Armed Forces as a whole, is USAFI. The amount of knowledge to be derived through USAFI is unlimited, and the courses available represent a vast scope of education in various degrees. Personnel can enroll in two methods of study; either the correspondence method, or the self-teaching method. The former requires written lessons to be submitted to-your nearest USAFI, with end-of-course tests available upon request. The latter does not require submission of lessons, and an end-of-course test may be requested in most cases. It will only take a few minutes of your time to fill out an application for enrollment after you have selected a course best suited to your aims. The Communications Yeoman at FTG will be only too happy to offer his advice and services to meet this end. Why not drop in to see him?

SHIP'S ARRIVALS
USS GREENWOOD (DE 679)Arrived 15 March USS TILLS (DE 0 -21 March


NAS Crosswinds

by Dick Friz
Three more NAS residents have decided to ship over this week Sterling J. Clark, HM2, will sign his papers on 23 March, Edward Watkins CS2, re-ups in accordance with AlNav 2 and George Zappas AB2 of Leeward is also slated for a post graduate course in Navy life.
Vic Perez has decided to emulate his old stable mate, Lulu Perez and hopes to fight professionally at Guantanamo City. Lulu a neighblrhood sparring mate in good ol' Brooklyn, is doing quite well, disposing of Tommy Collins in two rounds recently.
Robert J. Mason, SN, from the commissary, pulled in a struggling victim at the NAS pool Sunday afternoon, breaking his wrist watch in the process, but certainly advertising the merits of life guards.
Harper's has solved the problem of "tough fowl" in a recent article. "When a chicken is seized to kill," the article stated, "the muscles tense and the glands become active." Rum is the answer: one spoonful and the bird is anesthetised, and it dies happily pied, ready for the oven." Since Navy chow lines receive only frozen birds, it behooves the consumer to administer the rum to himself, at the Barrel Club.
Pete Putz, AG3 from Aero, was recently stationed at Charleston as the Admiral's weather man, when he received his orders. They directed him to proceed to Guantanamo Bay, marking the third time he is serving here, twice in Aerology and once in seismology.
The Aerology Bowling team tightened its grip on first place last week and how boasts a 39 and 9 mark in the NAS League. The weather guessers were still tops in hi-singles with 891, and lpague hi-series. 2578. Administration with a 33 and 11 mark is runnerup.
The NAS golf team moved up from 6th to third at the course last weekend. They took 211/ out of a possible 24 in stopping MCB-1 on the links. Chief Rogers, LCDR Vonderhoef, CDR Lawlor, Mel Clements, and CAPT R.R. McCracken are the top five seeded men at present.
I-leading for stateside discharges on Wednesday (FLAW to Jax) are B.A. Tate, AM3, H. E. Wakefield, AN, W.A. Forton, AN, and R. P. Tait, AN. The word from Jacksonville receiving station is that the discharges are now moving out faster, and when the line becomes too long, Charleston now takes the over-flow.
With all the vital codes and nuclear formulas-, the military now possesses, it is obvious that a new system of security must be advanced. Added to the file of "confidential' and 'secret' information would be the top hush-hush category of all; 'combustible,' or "burn before reading."

USS HEERMAN (DD 532)18 March
USS HAZELWOOD (DD 531)19 March
SHIP'S DEPARTURES
USS FISKE (DDR 842)22 March
USS W. A. LEE.(DL 4)25 March
USS C. J. BADGER (DD 657)18 March


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THE INDIAN


Saturday, 19 March 1955


And Who Wouldn't!


MOVIES

Saturday, March 19
CAINE MUTINY
Humphrey Bogart Jose Ferrer
A sea story of how a young ensign reached maturity and manhood in the Navy and the conditions that brought about trouble on the USS Caine.

Sunday, March 20
SIGN OF-THE PAGAN
Jeff Chandler Jack Palance
The king of the Huns plots an assault on Rome in 450 A. D. The emperor is forced to abdicate when he refuses to defend the city.

Monday, March 21 THE DETECTIVE
Alec Guiness Joan Greenwood
The story of a padre with a penchant for amateur detective work. Story is based on the G. K. Chesterton series with Father Brown as the hero. Alec Guiness is cast as Father Brown.

Tuesday, March 22 SILENT RAIDERS
Richard Bartlett Earle Lyon
Story of a 7-man patrol landing in Normandy to work its way through enemy forces in preparation for the Dieppe commando raid.

Wednesday, March 23 PRIVATE HELL #36
Ida Lupino Howard Duff
Some bills from a robbery and murder are circulating in Los Angeles. Thief is found and chased by two policemen and is killed. One of the policemen pockets $80,000 and induces the other to became his partner in the theft.

Thursday, March 24
THE BIGAMIST
Edmond O'Brien Joan Fontaine A traveling man's loneliness when he is away from his wife causes him to foolishly marry another. His downfall cames when the second wife tries adopt a baby and an investigation is started.


U-I- LIKES J.C.! (AND. WHO WOULDN'T?) Jeanne Crain, who recently finished her first movie for Universal-International, "Man Without A Star," starring her opposite Kirk Douglas, is so popular at the Universal City, Calif., studio that its management has re-signed her for a second film, "Second Greatest Sex." She'll star with Goerge Nader, Keith Andes and Paul Gilbert.



Radio's 'Tops' of the Week


SATURDAY, 19 March .... THEATRE ROYAL ... . 9:00 P.M.
The brilliant British Comedian-actor Alec Guiness stars in H. G. Wells' fascinating story, "The Man Who Could Perform Miracles".
SUNDAY, 20 March .... HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE .... 10:00 P.M.
Co-starring in "Blueprint For Murder" will be Dan Dailey and Dorothy McGuire. Dailey becomes convinced that his brother's widow is a murderess and sets out to prove it.
MONDAY, 21 March .... BEST PLAYS .... 9:00 P.M.
Two plays selected from Noel Coward's "Tonight at 8:30" will be presented. The first is a comedy starring Madeleine Carroll and Jerome Cowan called "Ways and Means", about a couple who find themselves cut of funds after overstaying their welcome at a house party. The second is "Still Life", concerning a man and woman who keep a lucheon engagement weekly and find themselves falling in love.
TUESDAY, 22 March .... THE CHASE . ... 9:00 P.M.
A crooked fight-manager, unable to make his fighter take a dive, gives him poisoned water. The boy dies, and though no charge is ever proven against him, the manager pays for his crime.
WEDNESDAY, 23 March .. . . PURSUIT . . . 9:00 P.M.
Inspector Black has to work fast to prevent international disgrace to his country when a Soviet Ambassador is murdered by a member of his own party and the blame is laid on the British Government.
THURDAY, 24 March. ... FAMILY THEATRE .... 9:00 P.M.
Danny Thomas portrays a milkman with ambitions to become a songwriter in "Early Bird".
FRIDAY, 25 March . . . . GUNSMOKE .... 9:00 P.M.
U.S. Marshal Matt Dillon has trouble with one of the citizens of Dodge City who walks out on his wife and 13 children after 35 years of married life to have a "Last Fling"


by Francis L. Cannon, J03
SIR WALTER SCOTT, HIS LIFE
AND PERSONALITY
by Hesketh Pearson
In this biography the author recreates the infiinitely appealing literary figure of Sir Walter Scott. As a young man Scott studied law at the wish of his father. But his energies and enthusiasm were turned towards writing. He was greatly attracted to Scottish folklore and collected old Scotti'sh ballads. The Lay of the Last Minstrel was his first successful book and it firmly established him as a professional writer. His works were awaited, read and praised with such eagerness that he could have become a literary lion in London society had he so chosen. But his heart' lay in the Scottish moors and at his country home, Abbotsford. Later in life he met misfortune when he invested all his earnings in a publishing company which failed. In order to redeem his obligations he worked so hard his health broke down and he died a short time later.
TREADMILL TO OBLIVION
by Fred Allen
The great humorist own story covering his beginnings in radio and up to the present time. In 1932 when Allen first broke into radio, all the reigning comedians in radio were doing essentially what had been done in vaudeville-playing to the people in the studio audience. The mike just happened to be there. But Allen played to the unseen audience. By sound effects, situation comedies, etc., he created a mental image in the mind of the radio audience. He has become one of 'the most penetrating and satirical artists of our time. In the book are many pages of dialogue taken from the best of the old radio shows.
THREE BY TEY
by Josephine Tey
This contains the first three mysteries to be published in the United States by the late Josephine Tey: "Miss Pyre Disposes", "The Franchise Affair" and "Brat Farrar." All three add up to first rate detective fiction. Why? it says so on the cover.
THE TASTEMAKERS
by Russell Lynes
"Taste", says the author, "is our personal pleasure, our private dilemma and our public facade." This books is the lively story of the people and pressures that have shaped American taste for the last dozen decades. The author recreates our homes, the homes of our grandparents and their parents. He relates the battles of taste that account for our likes and dislikes today.
FACE VALUE
by Robert Standish
Twenty two warm and witty tales about England, the Continent and the Far East. Some are quietly amusing, others on the spicy side. All sorts of characters run through the book from retired British colonels and their ladies to odd orientals. Good for an evenings' reading if your only other choice is to hang yourself.


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4M cyA~ S---Oecs (QTMO Like The Sunshine"----______ Vol, VI, No. 11 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 19 March 1955 Navy Guarantees Fleet Choice _ .__ For 1 Year for Reenlistments The cast of "Our Town" makes another curtain call. The Little Theatre's production of Thorton Wilder's "life-in-life" drama, has been acclaimed as the best yet. 'Our Town' Closes Tonight Old Thornton would have been pleased. Roses from the admiral and Mrs. Taylor were presented to a deserving cast Tuesday evening at the end of the opening night's performance of "Our Town" as presented by the Guantanamo Bay Little Theatre. As the performers relaxed on the other side of the curtain, long after the applause had died down and the last of the audience had departed, the smiling and animated gestures of that troupe indicated that unceasing practices us an abbreviated rehearsal schedule had paid off like a savings bond. In one corner was Alan Wagner, who, as producer and stage manager in Wilder's drama, has been as busy as a bug on a hot griddle. He was congratulating Evelyn Leach on achieving a perfect likeness of Emily (her "Oh, earth-" scene in Act Three produced more than a few tears from the audience). Alan was rolling the brims of his straw had and chewing on his corneob pipe, just as he had sone in the play, as though there had been no curtain calls and other acts to follow. The following flashbacks from the kaleidoscope if life achieved the moments of impact that denote good theatre: "-the morning star gets awfully bright before it has to go-" bit by Alan Wagner in the Stage Manager's introduction .the serious talk between George (George Engle) and Emily (Evelyn Leach) in Act Two .their own last-minute doubts and uncertainties just prior to the trip up to the altar ...incidentally, the wedding own --m iiworn in the second acl by Emily is an authentic period (Continued on Page Three) IO Conference Begins Here Monday Monday morning, the semi-annual Tenth Naval District Industrial Relations Conference will begin on the Naval Base. The conference, being held here in Guantanamo Bay for the first time, will run through Friday. Heading the five day conference will be Mr. M. P. Brall, Tenth Naval District Civilian Personnel Director fronn San Juan. All Industrial Relations Officers and some members of the Industrial Relations staff of the various activities will attend. The first three days, meetings will be held in the Building 27 Training Room, and such subjects as wage administration, safety, t r a ini n g, loyalty -security programs, and many other topics will be covered. On Thursday, the conference will move its meeting site to the Community Auditorium on Marina Point, and all military and civilian supervisors concerned with admiinistration will be invited to attend the meetings. Some of the high ranking Industrial Relations official attending the conference will include Mr. R.E. Seay U.S. Civil Service Commsusission Representative; Mr. G. B. Gelvin and Mrs. Clara Cox, Office of Industrial Relations, Navy Departmient, Washington, D. C.; and Mr. C. A. Silvey, Associate Wage and Classification Chief from AWC O, Jacksonville, Fla. That service-wide gripe about "I wish I could -et over to the West (or East) Coast for duty" is a thing of the past now according to a new policy just announced by the Bureau of Personnel. Ef fective immediately reenlistees will he guaninteed their choice ot Civiian DIJJOpenfleet for it least the next 12 mouths. Civilian Jobs Open BaseIn addiitioii to the fleet guarantee, On Naval Base a mai reenlisting may have four On subi-cnoies, and a lthough these are inut included in the guarantee, Fleet According to Mr. H. P. McNeal, Distiiutos will io their best to Naval Base Industrial Relations honor theii Officer, there are presently several For instance: a man in the Atjobs open on the Naval Base for lantic Fleet ships over and requests civilians. Pacific Fleet doty As his subDue to the rapid turnover of choices he reqsts (1) alestroymilitary dependents, there is still er, (2) aiy ship homeported in the continuing need for stenograLong Beach, (3) Sriie Force hers with a Civil Service rating Pacific, or (4) any ship homeported of GS-3 or GS-4. These jobs offer in San Diego He will get his excellent employment for military Pacitic Fleet assignment definitely, dependents on the base. and, if possible accrdiig Io billet. Also, there is presently an openallowances aid vacancies the Fleet ing in the Naval Station Special Distributors in the Buieau will Services Department for a Civilian place him in oie oi his four subAssistant. To qualify for this job, choices Whatever his next duty a person must have had five years asignnt, it is guaiaiteed to progressive experience in accounthin fin at lea1 the following I2 ng and administration. Entrance months pay for the job is $5,000 per year Ihis new policy iies ist apply plus allowances for quarters equal to fleet stoic duty ir overseas to rent-free quarters. shore duty assignments There is a need for an Electrical The only exceptions to the policy Engineer with a Civil Service Ratwill he a few ra of cerIain sliing of GS-9. The entrance rate f cialized oh desigiators such as pay is $5,060 per year for this job aviation guided misslensen atomic with allowances for quarters e gy technici and the lie. Anyone who is qualified for these Tsis new choice of assignment jobs, is urged to contact Mr. H. P is open to ill RPgula. Nivy perMcNeal in the Industrial Relations soiiel who reenlist uiidei cotiOffice. nuous service (within threi months after discharged active senlsts servists who join the Regulari Navy, d Nay ga Reater vistas and Fleet s Reser vists wvho have been oin active feuty for at least foir years and agree t remnisn on active duty for s another three or ltou years e The ne plic y is pant of the X0X stepsped-ip pirog-iam tio encourage ise reemistwilts of Navy peFsonel, and will remain oil the hooks ihefiiitely unless ai osr a ,nati()l inyergemy i nakes it liandossialep There was no sharper sailor at last weeks' Naval Sattion inspection than A. K. Rymniak, BM2 of the 10th Division (Base Police), who was selected Holnormian. Rymniak is a native of Pittsburg, Pa. He has been stationed here since 5 October, 1954 and has seen nine yearil servile in the Navy. Group Commanders Visit Gtmo Last week, two more group colmanders visited Guantanamo Bay in connection with spring operations of Fleet units presently Undergoing training here. RADMV R. S. Clarke, Commsiander, Carrier Division 18, arrived here on board his flagship, the USS LEYTE. Admiral Clarke has been on board the LEYTE during "Operation Springboard" which has used Guantanamo Bay as its principle training center. Admiral Clarke arrived ere Wednesday. CAPT W. R. Laugihon, ComSUbGroup 12, arrived here on the NaBase at the Naval Air Station by flight from Key West. Captain Laughon is here on his quarterly visit observing submarine operations and training Captain Laug-hon will retni to tey West in a sutiiisne. 9 m Smash Hit, Z

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M Hospital Notes Sunday, 20 March 1955 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900--Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900 Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Ise Chapel Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner WHAT MAKES A MAN? There have been a number of answers to the question: "What makes a manl?" One answer familiar to moost of us is: "Clothes make the man." In days of old, men were not regarded as men unless they were built like Hercules or Atlas, large of limb and body with bulging muscles. Whatever answer is given reveals the philosophy of life held by the individual. For instance in the answer: "Clothes make the man" the emphasis of life is on the externals, the appearance, and the impression that appearance will make on others. According to the ancient concept, manhood was judged by the physical makeup of the individual. There are those today who have even lower standards for judging manhood. But really, what does make a man? Is it the suit he wears, his physical strength or prowess, or the participation in certain activities ascribed by some to manhood? Or are these essential qualities that make a man ? There mlust be! What, for instance, is a man without self respect. Self respect is the product of living up to the highest moral principles that have come to be accepted and respected by mankind. Honesty and trustworththiness are essential to self respect. Three are two of the foundations of honor. Honesty is that quality which shows a man fair and truthful in speech, above cheating, stealing, or misrepresentation in any form. The honest man has a sincere devotion to the recognized standards of that which is true and right. His honor and self respect are of the highest value to him. They are sacred as life itself. Shakespeare long ago gave the adominition: "To thine own self be true." Everyone stamps his own value on himself. Judging from the cheap vulgar way some live, we wonder what their self evaluation really is. Self respect a guide for our y3 egon HEIRPORT NEWS Sir Stork is again doing a slack business with only two births recorded for the past week. The two young ladies are: Kathleen Marie to BM3 and Mrs. Betty Hester; Sheila Marie to DC3 and Mrs. Lee McCaul. DEPARTURES HM3 George E. Deveny denarted this past Wednesday for U.S.N.H. Philadelphia, where he will attend 0. R. School. While here at Gtmo George has performed his duties as a Corpsman on Ward "C", in the Surgical Clinic and currently in the O.R. Also a departure is HN Herman C. Cash, better known as "Reb". He was transferred to U.S.N.H. Jacksonville, Florida, as a patient, for further treatment. TAD CDR L. E. Tebow returned from TAD to Atlantic Fleet Headquarters, Norfolk, Virginia; where he attended a four clay course of instruction on Special Weapons. HMC P. J. Hofmann departed TAD to N.N.M.C. Bethesda, Maryland for medical consultation and studies. FOR TOURISTS ONLY CWOHC W. P. Johnson, HMC E. F. Rogers and their families departed on the USNS Johnson for a tourist's view of San Juan and Trinidad. moral life that demands good, clean and healthy living. God gave us our wonderful bodies. It is our responsibility to Him, society, and ourselves to keep them. To do that requires clean speech, a pure mind, and self disicpline. What is a ian without self knowledge? "Know thyself" is an essential requisite for manhood. When the individual loses consciousness of his relationship to the Divine, lie sacrifices a basic interpretation of life. He denies himself one of the fundamental distinctions between man and the animals. The man who recognizes himself as a son of God has attained that self knowledge which raises lan up into the realm of true manhood. Such an individual possesses loyalty, courage and faith, and what is a man with these? Loyalty presupposes a leader or a cause. The man who knows himself, that is, the origin and purpose of his life has a leader and a cause that incites assures the outcome of every test. Finally, what is a man without self-control. This fact may be clearly illustrated from baseball. What good is a pitcher who can throw the fastest ball if he cannot control his pitch. Man has many and great powers and possibilities, but if he cannot control them, they may destroy him. None of ts are fond of restraints. We cry out for freedom and self expression. Too often the liberty we demand is closer to libertinism. The truest examples of manhood are men who have such control of themselves at all times and never become slaves. Their bodies and minds are always under control and responsive to the demands they may make upon them. What makes a man ? Among other things certainly, self respect, self knowledge and self control are essential. The Toastmaster by Joe West SIR Whether your eyelids are at half mast and you madly squelch the alarm clock, or awake with a gay song in your heart-your attitude is showing. Wrong attitudes can be distracting or even disgusting. At times they are excusable, but when we are trying to put across an idea to another person or an audience, we must always consider our attitude. It can win or lose for us. It is a mistake to allow ourselves to be put on the defensive-we must always be positive. We seldom wiln acceptance of our ideas when we scold or show a know-it-all superior attitude. What we really want is to share friendly enthusliasi. We should face shortcomings and correct them instead of taking them out on someone else. We cannot afford to be hypocritical or hypercritical! We must use judgment and honest moderation in applying honey instead of vinegar if we would attract attention and favor for ourselves and our ideas. Giving credit where credit is due, as we have learned in our evaluating of fellow Toastmasters, can work wonders in our speeches. It works equally well in our conversations and our relations on the job and at home. If a man is happy, friendly and understanding, we are ready to work with him in a positive, constructive way. We appreciate his attitude. If our attitudes must show-and they must-we can make them support our ideas and purposes. We can use them to create a receptive attitude in our listeners. Let's give it a go in our speeches and evaluations. Remember, Sir, Your Attitude is Showing! TOASTMASTER PRAYER Teach us economy in speech that neither wounds nor offends, that affords light without generating heat. Bridle our tongues lest they stampede us into utterances of which later we shall be ashamed. May we seek clarity rather than cleverness, sincerity instead of sarcasm. May we be kind in our criticisms of others, and helpful by telling how to correct the fault. Forgive us our friendly faces masking cold hearts, our fine words covering shabby thoughts, our big pretensions and our little deeds. Teach us to number our days that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom. Langosta Season Closed Due to the annual spawning season of langosta, the langosta season has been closed here from 15 'leMachi thro h 30i Ma., No. l. n Mac hogh y. aa -o1 losta fishing or hunting is permisKaurl G. Peterson sable during this time. The season LCDR, CHC, USN will open again on 1 Ju e 1955. The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 19 March 1955 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LTJG J. D. Byerley --Ollicer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC---Editor H. L. Sisson, JO3-------News F. L. Cannon, JOLPhotographer D. C. Roberts, JOSN---------Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExes P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official tU. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. An Editorial ... The Communist Machine Karl Marx hated democracy, but at least ie knew he was fighting. "Democracy," he wrote, "is based on the principle of the sovereign worth of the human being." In other words democracy is based on the concept of the "dignity of man." Now, Marx thought that was a stupid mistake. To him, there was no basic difference between a man, an animal and a machine. Man, said Marx, gets all his rights from the State. But we Americans don't think that way. We consider man the most valuable creature on earth. We spend thousands of dollars to save one man, the Communists waste thotlsands of mien to save a few rubles. We believe in human rights; that a man has certain rights from the moment he's born. We believe in respecting those rights, and we believe they cannot be taken away from him. In practice, it boils down to this in a democracy, the State is the tool of the people; under Colmunism, the eople are the tools of the State. (AFFS) M Page Two 4m Saturday, 19 March 1955 THE INDIAN

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m Saturday, 19 March 1955 Mobile Unit Established For Critical Blood Need Volunteer blood donors continue to be urgently needed to furnish blood for the Hospital blood tranfusion facility during emergencies. The list of donors is presently so small and inadequate that several emergency calls and announcements have had to been made over Radio Station WGBY to meet the many emergencies. To correct this situation, a mobile blood donor unit was activated recently. This mobile unit will make one visit per week to each command or activity of the Naval Base. Already, the mobile unit has made trips to the Naval Air Station and the Naval Station where response was far from sufficient. Next Tuesday, the unit will be at the Marine Barracks. The procedure of the mobile unit is to secure blood samples of individuals who volunteer to be placed on the Blood Donor Roster. The collecting of the blood samples requires only about one minute per man. Each blood sample is examined later to determine the Blood Type, Rh Factor, and that the individuals health is such that he may donate blood when called apor. Selected donors are then issued a Blood Donor Card (certified) furnishing the Blood Type and Rh Fatcor and a statement that any blood donated shall be voluntary on the part of the donor. Volunteer blood donors, when selected, are placed on the Blood Donor Roster according to their Blood Type and Rh Factor. Blood donations are requested ONLY when an emergency arises that requires that particular Blood Type and Rh Factor. VADM F. G. Fahrion Heads Phiblant At 13th Anniversary COMPHIBLANT-Vive Adm. F. G. Fahrion has been Commander Amphibious Force Atlantic since Jan. 5, 1952. A 1917 Naval Academy graduate, Adm. Fahrion attended Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he received the degree of Master of Science; served on Adm. Halsey's staff in the USS New Jersey during the Palau campaign; and was in command of all the naval task groups in operation "Crossroads." This latter involved planning and supervising the movement of some 300 vessels to and from Bikini Atoll. Before assuming command of the Amphibs, Adm. Fahrion was COMDESLANT, with his flag in the USS Yosemite. 28 NaYSta Men Receive Good Conduct Medals At the last Naval Station personnel inspection held on Bay Hill Saturday morning, 5 March, 28 men of the command were awarded Good Conduct medals by their commanding officer, CAPT W. R. Caruthers. Four of the men receiving the award, were given their second medal while the other 24 were given their first. Those receiving medals were: Second award: D. F. Slagle, EN1; G. De La Cruz, SD2; W. A. Scoggins, ME3; and R. W. Webb, BM3. First award: J. A. Parker, MUl; B. E. Smith, PN2; J. E. Owens, CT2; A. J. Loreto, EN2; G. E. Williams, ME2, H. L. Sisson, JO3; R. C. Allen, FP3; J. S. Ressler, MU3; W. L. Kelley, EN3; J. E. Howell, EN3; E. J. Malkowski, IC3; J. P. Coyle, RM3; C. M. Blake, YN3; W. M. Shock, BM3; E. N. Cotton, TESN; B. R. Scott, SN; C. R. Weisman, SN; B. F. Kemp, SN; R. L. Williams, FN: G. R. Beese, Jr., FN; L. Miller Jr., FN; and P. E. Huddleston, RMSN. AmPhibs Mark 13th Anniversary Cutting the first piece of cake to mark the Amphibious Force's 13th anniversary, Pocono C.O. Capt. S. C. Small (right) is the center of attention at ceremonies held on board the Amphibious Force flagship. The ship, currently undergoing ORI here, celebrated the Force's birthday Monday. The Atlantic Fleet Amphibious Force. represented here by the Taconic (AGC 17) and the flagship Pocono (AGC 16), both currently undergoing ORI. ..marked its 13th anniversary Monday, March 14. The Force originally started with one rear admiral, a staff of eight officers, and an old transport as a flagship. That was 13 years ago. From that small group grew a mighty Force that today totals nearly 100 ships and some 20,000 officers and men in the Atlantic Fleet alone. Our Town .. (Continued from Page One) dress. It was sent to Mrs. Leach by her mother-in-law, Mrs. George Henry Leach of Brockton, Mass. who wore it to be married almost 50 years ago ...the father-in-law speech to George by Mr. Webb (Tom Judkins) ...Simuon Stimson's (Fred Green) bitter reprisal of the living in Act Three the return to Emily's 12th birthday and the pathos in her final farewell to the world ..the neighborly chat between Mrs. Webb (Mildred Morgan) and Mrs. Gibbs (Evelyn Perdue) ...it goes on and on like that with each little sequence portrayed by the actors reflected as a personal experience in the minds of the audience. Tonight is the final performance of "Our Town" at the Community Auditorium atop Marina Point. It's another hit for the local Little Theatre as has been proven by near-capacity crowds thus far. Curtain time is 8 P.M., and at about 10:20 the Stage Manager will close the run with .it's eleven o'clock in Grovers Corners, and you get a good rest, too." Atomic Power Soon A leading Congressional authority says that within two years an atomic reactor will be developed to produce power as cheaply as oil, coal, or water. .Rep. Carl T. Durham (D-N.C.) vice chairman of the Joint Atomic Energy Committee, offered the prediction. ...He expects fullseale atomic power plants operating by 1960 in competition with conventional types of industrial power. Today's Atlantic Fleet Amphibous Force, commanded by Vice Admiral F. G. Fahrion from his flagship USS Pocono, is an evergrowing, modern, efficient force capable of making an assault landing on enemy-held beaches any place in the world. This birthday finds ships and men deployed in Mediterranean, C a r i b b e a n, and Arctic waters where they are constantly working to improve amphibious techniques. In a way, however, the word "amphibious," meaning the ability to live on land and water, isn't applicable. The Amphibs are airborne, too. The perfection of the helicopter and the close integration of tactical air support makes the Amphibs a formidable weapon. The command ships Pocono, Taconic, anl Adirondack have been equipped with helicopter landing decks, as have many of the APAs. Other Amphib groups have kept up with the accelerated training program, too: The SeaBees, who recently had an anniversary of their own, have developed faster ways of building better roads, causeways, and encamments. Their individual combat training is constantly maintained at the high level. The Frogmen compose a vital element of the Force, too. The UDT men experiment with the newest types of explosives and the newest methods of effectively employing them. The Atlantic Fleet Amphibious Force shore installation, Naval Amphibious Base, Little Creek, Norfolk, Va., is constantly expanding. The long-range program includes new, modern barracks for the men, concrete LST and small craft piers, and a five million dollar harbor dredging project. m THE INDIAN M Page Three

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m Page Four Naval Station Bowling N A S Boatshed Crew Snags Six -Foot Shark Ladies Golf Shots Standings Third Division NSD Fifth Division "M" FTG #1 Security Group Commissary Store Fleet Boat Pool MCB-1 Fleet Camera Party CHB-1 Fifth Division "ET" Fifth Division "R" Second Division Hospital Eleventh Division First Division Sixth Division High Team Series CHB-1 Commissary Sotre NSD High Team Single CHB-1 NSD FTG #2 High Average Gagliano Marshall Schmidt High Individual Gan Marshall Gagliano O'Brien High Individual Marshall Gagliano Hohman 48 16 46 18 43 21 42 22 40 24 39 25 36 28 33 31 32 32 29 35 29 35 27 37 26 38 24 40 13 51 11 53 8 56 2576 2433 2411 903 887 872 172 170 166 me 229 228 226 Series 585 582 558 Ladies Bowling With only two weeks of play remaining, Team No. 1 of the Ladies Bowling League still stands on top, leading the nearest contender, Team No. 2, by a four game margin. Winning all games this week, Team No. 1 lacks only a few games to cinch the second half championship to earn the right to meet the first half champions in the post-season roll-offs. Peggy Way turned in the high game of the week, rolling a 212, while Emily Griffin rolled a 210 for the week to keep up her high average of 173. The Ladies Bowling League banquet has been scheduled for 4 April. Team Standings W L Team #1 23 5 Team #2 19 9 Team #8 16 12 Team #6 15 13 Team #4 14 14 Team #7 13 15 Team #3 12 16 Team #5 12 16 Team #10 9 19 Team #9 7 21 High 10 Averages E. Griffin 173 P. Way 151 F. Grounds 146 J. King 145 S. Wenderlich 143 M. Powers 140 C. Godbout 136 B Gardner 135 D. Jayne 135 A. Tagliabue 134 High Games This Week P. Way 212 E. Griffin 210 A. Forrester 210 F. Grounds 188 L. Burbage 185 S. Wenderlich 185 C. Godbout 179 P. Piercy 176 J. King 172 D. Jayne 170 A crew of fishermen from the Naval Station Boat Shed display the six-foot 250 pound shark they caught last Saturday morning on a fishing trip. Left to right, John Best, C. B. Coleman, Harry Hane, Richard Lightfoot, and N. L. Henderson. The shark was caught off Leeward Point and hauled up to the boat in ten minutes. However, rather than bring the fish in the boat, it was towed across the bay to the NAS Boat Landing where it was hauled ashore. CO NavSta Receives Softball Trophy CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, accepts the 1954 Naval Base Softball League trophy from "Mandy" Mandis, team captain of the 1954 Naval Base League Champion Indians. Looking on at the ceremony is LT J. W. Dempsey, team manager, and CDR V. J. Soballe, Executive Officer, Naval Station. Gen, Snepperd Commends Gtmo Marine Barracks Gen. Lemuel C. Shepherd, Commandant of the Marine Corps, who arrived at Gtmo Sunday with Secretary of the Navy Charles S. Thomas, sent a congratulatory message to Col. R. E. Fojt. C.O. Marine Barracks. The imessage, dated 14 March, said: "Commandant Marine Corps extends congratulations of excellent military hearing of officers and men of your command and appearance of barracks and Marine facilities. My personal thanks for your warm hospitality. Best wishes to all hands. Signed, Leimuel C. Shepherd, Jr." The SecNav party left Gtmo Monday after their first stop of the fifteen day tour of the Caribbean, South American and Central American areas. Members of the party include: Gen. Shepherd; RADM Charles W. Wilkins, Director of the Pan American Affairs, Office of CNO; CAPT Andrew M. Jackson, Aide to SecNav; and VADM F. G. Fahrion, ComPhibLant. Wednesday, the 1st and 2nd flights of the Ladies Golf Association played 18 holes for low gross and low net while the 3rd and 4th flights played a blind five tournament on the front nine holes. The results were: 1st Flight Gross-Edna Edwards Net-Marion Caruthers 2nd Flight Gross-Val Evans Net-Marge Sheehan 3rd Flight 1st-Vi Merz 2nd-Charlie Murphy 4th Flight 1st-Mary McFadden 2nd-Florence Fortenberry Another new member this week -rather a former one returned. A big welcome back to Lillian North. We have two big events coming up. The Ladder Tournament starts Wednesday, March 23rd, and our quarterly luncheon is to be on April 6th-so mark your calendars! What's Doin' Stateside (Weekly AFPS Feature) Teachers at the nation's private colleges and universities are to have their salaries hiked by $50 million, maybe more. .The money is coming from the Ford Foundation. ...It announced it will divide that sum among privately endowed institutions according to the needs of the individual colleges. ...They'll be asked to match the grants with contributions from other sources if possible. ...The aim is to make professors' salaries comparable to those in other highly trained fields. Human arteries, damaged beyond repair, are being replaced with nylon ones in operations conducted at Baltimore's University of Maryland Hospital. ...The nylon substitutes can be fashioned in any size and shape, making the surgeon's job that much easier. ... Sometimes the ersatz arteries are "run up" on a sewing machine which has been placed just outside the operating room. Preliminary blueprints have been completed for the recreation of an 18th Century conlonial village in New York City. ...The $3 million project will restore Richmondtown, founded by the Dutch and once the seat of government on Staten Island, one of the five city boroughs. ...Its sponsors say it will be second only to Virginia's Williamsburg as a dramatic example of what American life was like 200 years ago. SCUTTLEBUTT -s( 4J "lSe said for you to meet he, ot the Stork Club!' Saturday, 19 March 1955 m f THE INDIAN

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fm Saturday, 19 March 1955 Medics Take '55 Tourney Crown Medics Ground Flyers, SeaBees Scalp Indians In Hard-Fought Contests For Finals Berths by Hal Davis The Hospital-Medical combine was crowned the post-season tournament champion last night with as brilliant an exhibition of basketball as has been seen on the local courts all season, downing a hard-fighting Seallee Stinger quad, 46 to 42, in the closing seconds of play. The Medics held a slim lead at half time, 24 to 17, but never relinqished their advantage even though the Stingers kept closing in during the last few minutes. O'Brien topped the Medics with 14 points, but it was Joe Rose, ball hawking corpsman from the Dental Clinic who was chiefly responsible for the Medical victory. With less than minutes to go and the Stingers leading by a lone point, Rose took possession of the ball in mid-court, broke for the basket and dropped a right hand layup easily. A halfminute later, Rose again broke into the open and swished a one-handed push shot. With the three point insurance racked up for them, the Medics drifted into their easy, smooth playing style until the final whistle. The Medics won the right to enter the finals by downing a favored NAS Flyer squad Thursday night. Finishing fourth in the Base League the medical combine was ayways a dangerous threat to the leaders, beating the runner-up Flyers every time on the courts. Thus, the 1955 basketball season came to a close last night with a game to top all games this year. And as the '55 records slide into oblivion, the NavSta Indians emerge as the league champions and the Medics overpower the entire field to cop the 1955 post-season tournament championship. Leeward in Overtime Win, Marines Swamp Stevedores The first game of the post-season tournament opened on a surprising note when the cellar-dwelling FTG Trainers cut loose with a powerhouse against the Leeward Pointers, and it was only after an overtime that the Pointers came out on top, 54 to 49. Woolburt, of the Pointers, had a great night, racking up 27 tallies, while Lee of the Trainers dropped 15 for his squad. The second game was a walkaway with the Marines trampling all over the CHB-1 Stevedores, 73 to 38. Holmes, the long Marine center, filed away 22 for the Leathernecks' cause while Rushman sank 15 for the Stevedores. Stingers Edge Mallards in Record Game; Medics Whip Pirates Tuesday night at the Naval Station court a record was established for the Naval Base basketballers io shoot at. In the opening game the Vt-10 Mallards held the powerful MCB-1 Stingers to a draw for iwo overtime periods before "C'mere!" And Weller (11) of the Stevedores goes after a free ball during the Marine-Stevedore fracas. Stevedores were eliminated in the tournament by the Marines. bownig, 69 to 67. It was the first time in Naval Base history of organized basketball that a tournament game has gone into more than one extra period. The Mallards' Snyder contributed the greatest number of points with 25, closely followed by the Stingers' Davison with 23. In the nightcap the Medics had a rough time for three periods with the HiSchool Pirates, leading by only two points at half-time. Experience and bench strength won out in the last quarter and the Medics whipped the Pirates, 58 to 38. Bill Maddox took credit for high scoring honors with 11 points for the Medics, and Edgar Heimer, as usual, topped the Pirates with 13. Indians Eliminate Pointers, Flyers Whip Marines Wednesday night the champion Naval Station Indians pounced on the Pointers and eliminated them from the tourney, 46 to 23, with Walbolt leading the hitting parade with 16. In the second game the Naval Air Station Flyers, runners-up in the league, stood off a strong Marine attack and came from behind to subdue the Leathernecks. 39 to 30. Snyder and Ring hit consistently for 13 and 12 respectively while Bob Gatti dropped 12 for the Marines. Medics Upset Flyers, Stingers Dump Indians Thursday night was "upset" night on the Naval Station court. In the first game the Naval Air Station Flyers, favored contenders for the tourney crown, were knocked out of the race by their league nemesis, the Medics. The Flyers suffered three defeats during the league and this one in the tourna9 Holmes (9), big Marine center, grabs the rebound from the Stevedores' basket, as the Leatherneks stomped the Cargo Handlers, 73 to 38 in the opening night of the post-season tournament. Reynolds (6) moves in for an assist if necessary. PLAYER Heimer Ring Snyder Gerhardt Gatti Holmes Houchin Morgan King Slewitzke Final League Top Ten Scorers TEAM GAMES SCORE High School NAS NAS CHB-1 Marines Marines VU-10 Naval Station Hospital-Dental Naval Station nient. Of the four losses, three were administered at the hands of the Medics, giving the Flyers a 0 and 3 record against the Hospital-Dental combine this season. Moebus led the Medical scoring with 13 to give the corpsmen their 47 to 35 win over the Flyers in a thrilling contest. The Stingers provided another surprise for the night when they held the champion. Indians to 44 points while chalking up 51 to enter the finals. The Braves, as usual, didn't get moving until the ladst half, but it was 'too late then. The Stingers held a 2-point lead at half-time and never relinquished it. Davison contributed 22 to the Stingers' total in the upset victory. 17 288 17 275 17 268 12 263 18 220 18 219 16 218 18 215 17 203 18 198 Final Le TEAM NavSta NAS MCB-1 Medical Marines VU-10 CH13-1 IIiSchool Leeward Pt. 'TG AVG. 16.9 16.1 15.7 21.9 12.2 12.1 18.6 11.9 11.9 11.0 ague Standings W L PCT 16 2 .888 15 3 .833 13 5 .722 12 6 9 6 8 9 11 14 11 .666 .55.5 .500 4m m THE INDIAN Page Five

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m Iid Six 4 Saturday, 19 March t955 Naval Supply Depot Ships Private Autos for Base Personnel Cuban Currency Clarified For Gimo 1ouris (More and more personnel and their dependents are traveling into Cuba and especially into the smaller, less-visited towns. The Ildian has been requested to print a description of the Cuban coins to facilitate exchange in those towns where little or no United States money is on hand to make change. Mr. Henry Garcia, in the Industrial Relations office, compiled the following list of Cuban coins and their U.S. equivalent. It is suggested that this ready reference be kept on hand for any future trading.) CUBAN CURRENCY COIN DENOMINATION HOW IT IS Pictured above is a serviceman's automobile being loaded aboard an MSTS transport for the journey back to the States. Now that spring and order-writing season are just around the corner, the Traffic Branch of the Naval Supply Depot is emphasizing a few steps which each serviceman about to be transfered should take to insure that the shipment of his vehicle is accomplished smoothly and on schedule. NSD ships private automobiles via three main routes: by MSTS vessels to New York; by ServLant vessels to Norfolk; and by YFR 1152 to Miami. Since there are often more automobiles to be shipped than there are spaces available on any particular vessel and sailing date, the first step to take as soon as your plans for returning to the States are made, is to visit the Traffic Branch representative at this office in the NSD Transit Shed on Wharf "Baker". Bring with you 2 copies of your orders, your vehicle registration and your insurance policy. You will then be in a position to fill out Motor Vehicle Shipment Application (S & A Form 322) and make a reservation to have your automobile shipped to the port of your choice. When it is time for your vehicle to be shipped you should deliver it to the Transit Shed 24 hours in advance of loading time. Since the government assumes no liability for anything packed in vehicles except car tools, no other items should be stored in the automobile. In respect to the tools as well as the hub caps, its a good idea to pack them in a carton inside the trunk. NSD personnel will attend to draining the gas tank and radiator and disconecting the battery. A representative of the Traffic Branch will inspect the automobile with you, noting on the shiping document any scratches, dents or other deficiencies. When you accept the automobile at the U. S. port, the government's liability as carrier will be limited to damage not noted on the form. Once more, the most important step is an early visit to the Traffic Branch, NSD, where trained personnel will offer you every possile assistance in shipping your automobile. Auto Mechanic Wins Suggestion Award A Beneficial Suggestion which eliminates the use of electric pumps on "Hobart" are welders and therefore saves the Government an estimated $119 per year, brought Mr. Jose Jimenez, Automotive Mechanic, a $10 check plus the inner satisfaction of having contributed to the economy of the Navy. Captain W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, is shown here congratulating Mr. Jimenez for his idea. "May I have this dance?" "I'm sorry, but I never dance with a child," she said with a giin. "Oh, a thousand pardons," he said "I didn't know your condition." 9 U.S. VALUE UN CENTAVO ONE CENT A small (about the size of an American dime) coin, of nickel or copper. There are two types of one cent pieces in Cuba. The nickel cent has a star with a circle in the center, and the figure "I" in the circle. The copper cent, a little lighter in color than the U.S. coin, has the picture of Cuban patriot Jose Marti. All Cuban coins, regardless their denomination, are dated, and have their value written at the bottom the same as American coins. DCS CENTAVOS TWO CENTS A coin a little bigger than the cent, made of nickel, with a "II" in the center of the circle inside the star. (Most Cuban coins have a Cuban shield on one side and a star on the other) MEDIO FIVE CENTS The size of an American nickel. Also made of nickel. A "V" in the center of the circle indicates its value. REAL TEN CENTS The size of an American dime. Made of silver types. One has the picture of Jose Marti. The other a star on one side and a Cuban shield on the other. PESETE TEN CENTS About the size of a quarter. Two types. One has the shield and star, and the other a wheel, a tree and a star in one side, and the Morro Castle and a flag on the other. CUARTO TWENTY FIVE CENTS The size of a quarter. Can only be detected from the twenty cent piece (peseta) by carefully reading the words "VEINTICINCO CENTAVOS" at the bottom. PESETA DE 40 FORTY CENTS About the size of a half. Made of silver. Two types. Similar to the "peseta", but with bottom reading "CUARENTA CENTAVOS". PESETA DE 50 FIFTY CENTS The size of a half. Bottom reads "CINCUENTA CENTAVOS". Has the picture of Jose Marti. PESO ONE DOLLAR The size of a silver dollar. Made of silver. There are several types. Bottom reads "UN PESO". ComServLant Dental Officer Visits Gtmo Clinic CDR J. B. Stoll, Executive Officer, Dental Clinic, CAPT Arthur Siegel, Dental Officer on the staff of Commander, Service Force Atlantic Fleet and Commander in Chief, Atlantic Fleet, and CAPT W. D. F. Stagner, Commanding Officer, Dental Clinic, observe the work of Paul King, DTI in the Prosthetic Lab of the clinic here. Captain Siegel arrived here from his headquarters in Norfolk last week and toured the Dental Clinic with Captain Stagner. Captain Siegel departed Tuesday afternoon for San Juan, accompanied by Captain Stagner. 9 THE INDIAN

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4m Saturday, 19 March 1955 Teenage Round-up by Linda Thurston The kats are flipping their doilies over all the latest imports from the States (both male and female). You might say that Dalton is all hung up over Betty Stone. Anyway, they looked cute dancing the other night. Jerry Parker had one bang-up 16th birthday at the Teen Age Club the other P.M. He had one of the biggest crowds yet to wish him well. He was overwhelmed by birthday kisses. Did Ya' See ... Patrick Kearney ( a fine EyeTalian lad) giving explicit instrueitons on the spelling of his name. .James Vernon O'Cavanaugh is his "convertible" squiring Shar Keenan around. (The same Miss K known by her family to have been caught on the bottom shelf of her refrigerator flagging her father to be let out. No chow hounds, these Keenan kids). .Neil sweating it. ...Gary and Nancy holding old-home week with Frank. Speaking of Frank, we should pause now to quote the "word of the week"-"Play it cool, Stan. Your hair's standing on end." ... Barbara North looking real happy about being a Teen-Ager at last. ...My chile, you don't know what you're getting into. Bobby J studying for her exam at the beach. ...Jackie Lee's fabulous new pink and black shirt. ...P. B. Burke discussing the revoking of devouring licenses through mouthfuls of sand. ...The corpsmen always trying to get into the column. ...Bob R being followed. ...All the birthdays this month. .Happy, happy to: Eunice, Dolores R, Pat W, Anita, Bobby J and the HiSchool's favorite English teacher-Mrs. Campbell. ...Sylvia thoroughly peeved after the lights came on again all over Teen Age Club (Ah'll never tell who did it). .Reuben a little shook about the landlubbers trying to steal his boat. Dolores Sierra in her "dangerous curves" type bathing suit last Sunday. VU-10 Prop Blast by Bill Wright With VU-10's personnel count steadily dropping, the squadron lost three men this past week with no additions. C. E. Loggins, AN, C. (u) Van Meter, AN, and L. E. Gesche, AM3 departed for NAS, Jacksonville, Fla., for separation from the naval service. Mr. Scuttlebutt recently advised this office that a certain AEC, will have to come off the "Skin List". It seems that after 15 years in the Navy he still suffers from "Airsickness". Sorry chief but you are making it tough on the crew. Right, Grounds? Last Tuesday morning just three minutes after all hands were inspected at quarters, an F8F piloted by LCDR W. A. Racette developed engine trouble and was ditched at thse Hicacal Bombing Target across the bay. Mr. Racette missed the Bull's-eye completely and escaped uninjured. Anyone desiring to buy an "air cooled" 40 Ford contact Larry Cabral. He is ready to post the following sign: "Will sell cheap, uses no gas and no water". The cooling system is strictly air and oil, since it has no radiator. by Paul A. Hoffer, USMC Departures Seven men departed for stateside duty the past week. Cpl. Dorsey W. Straw and Pvt. John A. Drexel left via FLAW. Both men will report to Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Men leaving via MSTS are Sgt. Eugene P. Frontz, Pfc. Manuel Gomez and Pfe. Eugene J. Hruby; they will report to Camp Lejeune, N.C. Sgt. Richard F. Sim will report to Marine Corps Schools, Quantico, Virginia and Pfc. Charles F. Corcoran will report to the Naval Gun Factory, Washington D.C. Commandant Visits Marine Barracks Sunday, March 13th, the Commandant of the Marine Corps, General L. C. Shepherd Jr., paid the Marine Barracks a visit. The Commandant inspected the Barracks and area. General Shepherd is accompanying the Secretary of the Navy, Charles S. Thomas, on a Caribbean tour. Bowling With the bowling league over attention is now on the tournament between the top 16 bowlers of the league. Pfc. Don Schreck bowled the top game of the season with a 225, Capt. John J. Swords the high series with with 580 and Staff Sergeant Robert C. Rausch the high average with 165. BASEBALL With the opening game getting closer the Marine Barracks baseball team is beginning to round into shape. Pitching will be the big problem. With two or three good pitchers the Marine's could repeat their performance of last year. Meet Your Team CPL. Ronald G. Plante will be behind the plate for the Marine's this year. Plante is a veteran from last years team. An all around ball player Plante plays on the baskethall team. His home is in Salem, Massachusetts where he started in both baseball and football. In high school he was named to the All Star Team in baseball and football. On last years Marine Barracks baseball team Plante shared the catching duties with Cpl. Tom Felak. With Felak gone, Plante will have to be the iron man of the team. Plante throws and hits right. NSD Supply Line CHPCLK Goolsby's wife arrived, from Norfolk aboard the JOHNSON on Thursday. Instead of Mrs. Goolsby leaving the ship, Hank went aboard and they are off on the "round robin" cruise. Miss Patricia E. Ralston, formerly clerk-typist in the Control Division was presented with a going-away gift by the girls of the Depot last Friday. Miss Ralston has accepted a position in the Office of the Resident Officer-in-Charge of Construction. There will be no more daily round-trips to Caimanera for two NSD'ers. The Emorys and the Ruckles have been assigned housing in Bargo. Mrs. Emory is employed in the Stock Control Division and Ruckel is in Disbursing. R. H. Millar, SK3, has been assigned quarters in Bargo. Mrs. Millar arrived aboard the JOHNSON Thursday. Mrs. Etta Ray Chetlin, wife of LT Norman D. Chetlin of CHBONE, departed for the States Tuesday after a month's visit in Gtmo Ba FTG Bulletin by Ron Federman Heading the list of departures this past week was LT Wisniewski. He quietly left Guantanamo Bay last Monday for Jacksonville, Florida, pending release to a civilian status and retirement. On 1 April April Mr. Wisniewski will complete a mere "30" years of naval service! On Friday, 11 March, LT Hutton, former member of the Gunnery Department, set out for Newport News, Virginia. He will report to the Supervisor, Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, for a normal tour of duty. Mr. Hutton, noted for his miniature height, wrote a few parting words on the Gunnery Department Blackboard as follows: "Goodbye, you all-the little lieutenant", or words to that affect. Also reporting to the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company is CHELEC Friebele, but only for temporary duty in connection with the fitting out of the USS FORRESTAL (CVA 59). Upon completion of the temporary duty, he will further proceed to the abovementioned vessel for duty. Mr. Friebele departed Guantanamo Bay on the 14th of March. While serving with FTG he worked in the Engineering Department. The FTG Basketball Team played a hectic, well-fought, basketball game against Leeward Point Monday Night, but were nosed out by 3 points in overtime. It was the final game of the season for the Trainers, and they went down fighting. It must be remembered that while FTG didn't break into the win column all year, they consistently displayed a "sportsmanLke attitude", and wouldn't quit when the chips were lown. The members of the team have turned in their uniforms for the year, but their untiring spirit shown thoughout the basketball season will not easily be cast aside. They were looses in the "league standings", but champions in the field of "athletic competition" as a result of their determination to stay in there and fight despite the fact that they were losing. It would be fitting at this time to pay homage to the members of the basketball team, and look forward to a better season next year. An opportunity that few people take advantage of at FTG, and the Armed Forces as a whole, is USAFI. The amount of knowledge to be derived through USAFI is unlimited, and the courses available repre sent a vast scope of eiduication in various degrees. Personnel can enroll in two methods of study; either the correspondence method, or the self-teachingmethod. The former requires written lessons to be submitted to your nearest USAFI, with end-of-course tests available upon request. The latter does not require submission of lessons, and an end-of-course test may be requested in most cases. It will only take a few minutes of your time to fill out an application for enrollment after you have selected a course best suited to your aims. The Communications Yeoman at FTG will be only too happy to offer his advice and services to meet this end. Why not drop in to see him? USS USS SHIP'S AI1VALS GREENWOOD (DE (i79)_ Arrived 15 March TILLS (DE ^ '-21 March NAS Crosswinds by Dick Friz Three more NAS residents have decided to ship over this week Sterling J. Clark, HM2, will sign his papers on 23 March, Edward Watkins CS2, re-ups in accordance with AINav 2 and George Zappas AB2 of Leeward is also slated for a post graduate course in Navy life. Vic Perez has decided to emulate his old stable mate, Lulu Perez and hopes to fight professionally at Guantanamo City. Lulu a neighb-rhood sparring mate in good oh' Brooklyn, is doing quite well, disposing of Tommy Collins in two rounds recently. Robert J. Mason, SN, from the commissary, pulled in a struggling victim at the NAS pool Sunday afternoon, breaking his wrist watch in the process, but certainly advertising the merits of life guards. Harper's has solved the problem of "tough fowl" in a recent article. "When a chicken is seized to kill," the article stated, "the muscles tense and the glands become active." Rum is the answer: one soonful and the bird is anesthetised, and it dies happily pied, ready for the oven." Since Navy chow lines receive only frozen birds, it behooves the consumer to administer the rum to himself, at the Barrel Club. Pete Putz, AG3 from Aero, was recently stationed at Charleston as the Admiral's weather man, when hse received his orders. They directed him to proceed to Guantanamo Bay, marking the third time he is serving here, twice in Aerology and once in seismology. The Aerology Bowling team tightened its grip on first place last week and how boasts a 39 and 9 mark in the NAS League. The weather guesses were still tops in hi-singles with 891, and league hi-series. 2578. Administration with a 33 and 11 mark is runnerup. The NAS golf team moved up from Gth to third at the course last weekend. They took 21/ out of a possible 24 in stopping MCB-1 on the links. Chief Rogers, LCDR Vsnderhoef, CDR Lawlor, Mel Clements, and CAPT R. R. McCracken are the top five seeded men at present. Heading for stateside discharges on Wednesday (FLAW to Jax) ire B. A. Tate, AM3, H. E. Wakefield, AN, W. A. Forton, AN, and R. P. Tai', AN. The word from JacksonNille receiving station is that the discharges are now moving out faster, and when the line becomes too long, Charleston now takes the ovir-flow. With all the vital codes aul nuclear formulas, the military now possesses, it is obvious that a new system of security must he advanced. Added to the file of "confidential' and 'secret' information would be the top hush-hush category of all; 'combustible,' or "burn before reading." USS HEERMAN (DD 532)18 March USS HAZELWOOD (DD 531.)19 March SHIP'S DEPARTURES USS FISKE (DDR 842)22 March USS W. A. LEE -(DL 4)25 March USS C. J. BADGER (DD 657)18 March 40 m THE INDIAN m Pag Seve

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m m NavyB PbiPO-10Nm Dinia.-0745 4m THE INDIAN M Saturday 19 Marc 1955 And Who Wouldn't! MOVIES Saturday, March 19 CAINE MUTINY Humphrey Bogart Jose Ferrer A sea story of how a young cnsign reached maturity and manhood in the Navy and the conditions that brought about trouble on the USS Caine. Sunday, March 20 SIGN OF THE PAGAN Jeff Chandler Jack Palance The king of the Huns plots an assault on Rome in 450 A. D. The emperor is forced to abdicate when he refuses to defend the city. Monday, March 21 THE DETECTIVE Alec Guiness Joan Greenwood The story of a padre with a penchant for amateur detective work. Story is based on the G. K. Chesterton series with Father Brown as the hero. Alec Guiness is cast as Father Brown. Tuesday, March 22 SILENT RAIDERS Richard Bartiett Earle Lyon Story of a 7-man patrol landing in Normandy to work its way through enemy forces in preparation for the Dieppe commando raid. Wednesday, March 23 PRIVATE HELL #36 Ida Lupino Howard Duff Some bills from a robbery and murder are circulating in Los Angeles. Thief is found and chased by two policemen and is killed. One of the policemen pockets $80,000 and induces the other to became his partner in the theft. Thursday, March 24 THE BIGAMIST Edmond O'Brien Joan Fontaine A traveling man's loneliness when he is away from his wife causes him to foolishly marry another. His downfall came when the second wife tries adopt a baby and an investigation is started. U-ILIKES J.C.! (AND WHO WOULDN'T?) Jeanne Crain, who recently finished her first movie for Universal-International, "Man Without A Star," starring her opposite Kirk Douglas, is so popular at the Universal City, Calif., studio that its management has re-signed her for a second film, "Second Greatest Sex." She'll star with Goerge Nader, Keith Andes and Paul Gilbert. Radio's 'Tops' of the Week SATURDAY, 19 March ....THEATRE ROYAL .9:00 P.M. The brilliant British Comedian-actor Alec Guiness stars in H. G. Wells' fascinating story, "The Man Who Could Perform Miracles". SUNDAY, 20 March ..HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE .. 10:00 P.M. Co-starring in "Blueprint For Murder" will be Dan Dailey and Dorothy McGuire. Dailey becomes convinced that his brother's widow is a muri'eress and sets out to prove it. MONDAY, 21 March ....BEST PLAYS .9:00 P.M. Two plays selected from Noel Coward's "Tonight at 8:30" will be presented. The first is a comedy starring Madeleine Carroll and Jerome Cowan called "Ways and Means", about a couple who find themselves cut of funds after overstaying their welcome at a house party. The second is "Still Life", concerning a man and woman who keep a lucheon engagement weekly and find themselves falling in love. TUESDAY, 22 March ....THE CHASE ...9:00 P.M. A crooked fight-manager, unable to make his fighter take a (live, gives him poisoned water. The boy (lies, and though no charge is ever proven against him, the manager pays for his crime. WEDNESDAY, 23 March ....PURSUIT ....9:00 P.M. Inspector Black has to work fast to prevent international disgrace to his country when a Soviet Ambassador is murdered by a member of his own party and the blame is laid on the British Government. THURDAY, 24 March ...FAMILY THEATRE ....9:00 P.M. Danny Thomas portrays a milkman with ambitions to become a songwriter in "Early Bird". FRIDAY, 25 March ....GUNSMOKE ....9:00 P.M. U.S. Marshal Matt Dillon has trouble with one of the citizens of Dodge City who walks out on his wife and 13 children after 35 years of married life to have a "Last Fiing" *BO OK N0 by Francis L. Cannon, JO3 SIR WALTER SCOTT, HIS LIFE AND PERSONALITY by Hesketh Pearson In this biography the author recreates the infinitely appealing literary figure of Sir Walter Scott. As a young man Scott studied law at the wish of his father. But his energies and enthusiasm were turned towards writing. He was greatly attracted to Scottish folklore and collected old Scottish ballads. The Lay of the Last Minstrel was his first successful book and it firmly established him as a professional writer. His works were awaited, read and praised with such eagerness that he could have become a literary lion in London society had be so chosen. But his heart lay in the Scottish moors and at his country home, Abbotsford. Later in life he met misfortune when he invested all his earnings in a publishing company which failed. In order to redeem his obligations he worked so hard his health broke down and he died a short time later. TREADMILL TO OBLIVION by Fred Allen The great humorist own story covering his beginnings in radio and tip to the present time. In 1932 when Allen first broke into radio, all the reigning comedians in radio were doing essentially what had been done in vaudeville-playing to the people in the studio audience. The mike just happened to be there. But Allen played to the unseen audience. By sound effects, situation comedies, etc., he created a mental image in the mind of the radio audience. He has become one of the most penetrating and satirical artists of our time. In the book are many pages of dialogue taken from the best of the old radio shows. THREE BY TEY by Josephine Tey This contains the first three mysteries to be published in the United States by the late Josephine Tey: "Miss Pym Disposes", "The Franchise Affair" and "Brat Farrar." All three add up to first rate detective fiction. Why? it says so on the cover. THE TASTIEMAKERS by Russell Lynes "Taste", says the author, "is our personal pleasure, our private dilemma and our public facade." This books is the lively story of the people and pressures that have shaped American taste for the last dozen decades. The author recreates our homes, the homes of our grandparents and their parents. le relates the battles of taste that account for our likes and dislikes today. FACE VALUE by Robert Standish Twenty two warm and witty tales about England, the Continent and the Far East. Some are quietly amusing, others on the spicy side. All sorts of characters run through the book from retired British cok>nels and their ladies to odd orientals. Good for an evenings' reading if your oily other choice is to hang yourself. R STUFFY Ft /


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