Citation
Indian

Material Information

Title:
Indian
Added title page title:
The Indian
Creator:
U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Publisher:
U.S. Naval Base
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright, The Indian. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Sunday Supplement
Related Item:
Gitmo Review
Related Item:
Gitmo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Bay Gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text














ttGoviers, eTMQ Like The Sunshtine", Vol. VII, No. 10 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 12 March 1955


SecNav Here Tomorrow

On Caribbean Tour
Tomorrow morning, the Honorable Charles S. Thomas, Secretary of the Navy, will arrive on the Naval Base via special flight at the Naval Air Station on the first stop of a fifteen day tour of the Caribbean, South America, and Central American areas. The Secretary of the Navy will be accompanied by Gen. Lemuel C. Shepherd. Commandant of the Marine Corps, RADM Charles W. Wilkins, Director of


CHARLES S. THOMAS
Secretary of the Navy
the Pan American Affairs, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, and CAPT Andrew M. Jackson, Aide to the Secretary of the Navy. VADM Frank G. Fahrion, ComPhibLant, will join the SecNavy party here in Guantanamo Bay, arriving in his flagship the USS POCONO.
The itinery for the Secretary's fifteen day air trip includes a six day visit to Buenos Aires at the invitation of the government of Argentina. Besides his one-day stop here on the Naval Base, Mr. Thomas will make over-night stops in Panama; Lima, Peru; Rio de Janeiro, Trinidad, and San Juan.
Leaving Washington D.C. late today, the party will arrive here early tomorrow morning. After touring the base with RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, the party will continue their journey to Panama on Wednesday. From Panama, the next stop will be Lima, Peru and then Buenos Aires. From Buenos Aires, the party will fly to Rio de Janeiro and then wind up the tour with oneday visits to Trinidad and San Juan and finally returning to Washington, D. C. on 28 March.


Hints Offered -For

Filing '54 Tax Return
By this time of the year, the Internal Revenue Service has provided most taxpayers with forms for their 1954 income tax returns. If you have not received yours, they can be obtained from the personal affairs officer, the nearest revenue bureau or almost any bank or post office.
Here, briefly, are a few points to be remembered when you set down to figure out your income tax bill for 1954.
1. -If you are unmarried and
you can claim a number of deductions it probably would pay you to fill out a long form (1040) in' reporting your income.
2. Most married 'couples save
money if they file joint, rather than separate, returns.
3. You send no money when you
file on the short form (1040A)
4. Be sure to enclose the "B"
copy of your W-2 form when sending in your return. Don't forget that the W-2s provided by service finance departments do not list allowances
which are not taxable.
5. If you earned less than $5000
in 1954 and are filing on the long form, the income tax must be computed from the table p0vided by the Internal Revenue Service for such incomes. If you owe the gov.
ernment money, send it along
with your return.
6. Take time to find out what
deductions you are entitled to and also the requirements for exemptions-you might be able to save yourself money.
7. Be sure to report all your income for the year-if you don't and the government find out, you could be prosecuted.
8. If you intend to deduct the
wages you received during sick periods of last year, make sure you get the certificates needed to prove you were ill and also that you have been
paid.
9. Along the same lines, make
'certain that you have the documents to prove you are entitled to the deductions you claim on your income tax form.

Dry. Season Fire Dangers Noted
At this particular time of the year the grass and undergrowth is exceedingly dry. As a result, several fires have been started recently which could have developed into serious blazes with tragic consequences.
It has been determined that the majority of these fires were caused by carelessly tossed cigarettes or still-burning matches., All personnel are reminded of Naval Base Order 0224 which states that it is illegal to throw lighted cigarettes out of a car window. The base police have been instructed to issue summons to all offenders.


'Our Town' Opens at Community Theatre Tuesday; Little Theatre -Production Set For Five Day Run


Miss Pat Moe, one of the featured players in the forthcoming Little Theatre presentation of "Our Town" presents two tickets to CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding, Officer, Naval Station. Accompanying Miss Moe are ENS Alan Wagner, president of the Little Theatre organization and featured in the new production and Jim Bailey, also cast in the new play. "Our Town" opens at the Community Auditorium Tuesday night, March 15, for a 5-performance run through Saturday.


CAPT McElroy Joins

'Downwind -Cat Club'
Captain R. Y. McElroy, senior air observer of the Guantanamo Bay Fleet Training Group, recently became a charter member of the "Downwind Cat Club" organized by the USS TICONDEROGA.
The "Downwind Cat Club" is composed of flight personnel who have been steam-catapulted downwind off the carrier. The steam catapult is a comparatively new addition to aircraft carriers, and the TICONDEROGA has the distinction of being one of the first to have it installed on board.
Along with Captain McElroy, Major General C. C. Jerome, USMC and RADM W. E. Moore were also installed as charter members of the Ti's new, organization. General Jerome, Commanding General, FMFLant, Aircraft, was returning from observing Marine operations in TRAEX, It is believed. that General Jerome's flight was the first steam catapulted launching of an aircraft flying an officer holding the rank of general.,
Admiral Mbore is Commander, Training Command, Atlantic Fleet.


This is the story of a town, Grover's Corners, New Hampshire, and how it expanded. Like Lilliput and Shang-ri-la, it willi at first glance seem to posess an illusive, ephemeral quality.
Its main streets are crowded with familiar people, all throughly engrossed in each other's business. Fleeting, mirrored impressions of you and your neighbors flash into scope. On Tuesday evening, March 15, Grover's Corners, ("Our Town," to the unlimited) will relocate for a four night stand at Marina Point, the Little Theatre, Guantanamo Bay, presiding.
But if Rome wasn't built in a day, how can Grover's Corners materialize in one brief evening? Obviously even in drama, it takes some doing, especially when progress is interrupted by watch bills, transfers, other social obligations, and artistic temperment.
Even with elaborate scenes omitted, in lieu of what Alexander Basky termed 'presentational' theater, the stage:crew is far from extinct. Jim Cheek, who created the "Angel's" set, and Jim Seay are aided and abetted by a gallery of non-union volunteer painters. Talent, like anything else needs advertising, hence the addition of sign dabbers, program designers, photographers, ticket sellers and good word spreaders. Contributing in terms of light diffusion and color
(Continued on Page Three)


95G







!Wo~


m


M


Saturday, 12 March 1955


hat's Doin' Stateside Navy Wives' Club


i//.- x,',,,//lh i /\\\\'.Z'-. ------ ... I

Sunday, 13 March 1955
Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0980-Sunday School
0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study, Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)


The Chaplain's Corner




GRATITUDE
If it can be stated that "all the world loves a lover", then it is equally true that all the world respects a grateful person. How often have we not found it so in our lives, the detail done for the individual is made so much easier when we know that the person will be thankful. It is not for the motive of praise or reward, but when appreciation is shown or expressed for our actions, the relationship becomes one more of friendship than necessity. You have heard as often as I the remark, "that's the last time I'll ever do anything for that person, he didn't even say thanks". Our very expressions portray the fact that we are not looking so much for reward as for gratitude.
Perhaps the thing that bothers us in this matter of ingratitude is the impression of pride that may accompany it. Very often it is carelessness or thoughtlessness, but the air of superiority may also be given. Basically it is characteristic of our human nature to be sociable, and that sociability is made so much easier when thankfulness and appreciation are included in our every day contacts. Granted that our life is a bit unusual due to military circumstances, and granted that there is no room in a military order for "please", still there are many points of contact where military relationship should include gratitude. I've never heard yet of a man who was hurt by saying "thanks". Besides the restrictions due to the military, there is also a closeness of life due to the nature of this Base. Such demands thoughtfulness and care. How much easier would be our daily routine both military and social were the habit of "thank you" not only said but shown and meant in our daily living.
We are in the midst of the religious season of Lent, the purpose of which is self-improvement. It is indeed a satisfactory time to check our own lives and habits.


America's churches are taking note of the mounting numbers of both very young and old people in this country . . . The National Council of Churches says that clergymen should start devoting more time to the special needs of both age group . It points out that within the next 20 years, the number of Americans in their late sixties will increase nearly 50 percent- to about 20 million . . . At the same time, children under five will outnumber all other age groups . . . According to the Council, one of the major problems facing the churches is finding effective ways for retired older, people to, occupy their leisure . . . The boom in young children means steadily increasing pressure on the churches' already strained Sunday school facilities.

A new "miracle" drug, reported to be far more effective than cortisone, has just been made available for treatment of America's 7.5 million rheumatic arthritis sufferers . . . Called metacortandracin, it was put on the market after being successfully tested on more than 1,000 patients.

An extensive network of community colleges - built within commuting distance of virtually every U.S. high school graduatehas been proposed at a Chicago conference of educators . . . The group warned that the present number of colleges and universities is inadaquate to meet the problem of spiraling enrollments
If estimates prove right, college enrollments will jump from 2.5 million to five million or more by 1970. . . As a solution, the educators advised doubling the present number of 130,000 college teachers and creating several hundred two-and four year community-supported colleges.

New Jersey's recently opened Garden State Parkway is probably the most modern in the world - it boasts an automatic toll collector . . . The electronic de vice does everything the uniformed toll-taker used to do and much more efficehtly . . . If a motorist tries to get away without paying, an alarm rings, red signals flash, and a camera takes pictures of the driver, license plate and car.


We may often wish that the other person was better, but do we try to apply the same standards to our own lives. None of us are so self sufficient that we can exist without the help of our neighbor. If we have moved along so far with out this habit of gratitude, it has been due to the greater virtue of others who have excused our faults. Is it not about time that we contributed to the joyfulness of human relations by adding our contribution of gratitude. Despite the limitations of position and place there will be found in the lives of all of us many opportunities to express gratitude. Thinking it over we must honestly admit that there are some persons for whom we'd move the world and so often those persons are the ones who say "thanks".
T. J. Foley


by Pat Aldridge
The happy sound of. hilarious laughter eminated from the Marine Family Restaurant last night as members and guests of the Guantanamo Bay Navy Wives' Club were judged on the agility of their imaginations following an hour long unique "scavenger hunt". The motif of this unusual fun fest had been kept a strict secret and all who arrived at the appointed hour were completely surprised when handed lists ordering they sally forth to seek such imaginative items as "something found under someones' bed other than your own". One hour was allowed during which each couple attempted outdoing another in the gathering together of several more such nonspecific objects. The results of this exercise in mental and, in some cases, physical gymnastics judged during a rewarding late supper following reassemblage at the resteraunt provided many moments of vast amusement. Collections presented by the versatile "scavengers" were all so good as to cause the judges no little consternation prior to final decision and prize awarding.
Plans for future activities, under the able direction of Pearl Piercy, will include a St. Patricks' Day "Mad Hatter" luncheon at which members and guests are asked to appear under a chapeau of creative personal design. The following two Thursday afternoons, regular club social days will find members enjoying a "sew and gab" session in order to finish a project quilt of intricate pattern intended for raffle and a "bigger, better bingo". Both functions will take place at the Villamar Lyceum.


VU-1O Prop Blast

by Bill Wright
Reporting for duty with VU-10 this past week was Richard B. Smith, AT3, USN. Smith reported aboard from NATTC, Memphis, Tenn., and is a native of Ponca City, Okla. Welcome aboard "Smitty and we hope you enjoy your stay on the Rock.
William D. Jayne, ALC, USN, was sworn into the Naval service by the Commanding Officer, CDR D. E. McCoy 4 March 1955. Jayne has twelve and one half years previous service and reenlisted for the second time. Good Luck Chief.
With "Operation Springboard" rapidly coming to a close, VU-10 personnel can once again give a sigh of relief. For the past two months the squadron has maintained an average of 40 flights, six days a week. During the month of February the squadron flew a total of 1482 hours with three pilots putting over one hundred hours in the air. The top man on the totem pole was G. C. Pirtle, ACClAP flying 106.9 hours.
All squadron "White Hats" are invited to attend the joint VU-10, NAS Dances held at the NAS, EM Club frequently. Many of the squadron enlisted men enjoyed the evening of 7 March with enough drinks and girls for everyones dancing pleasure, but we want to see more smiling faces out next time.
Anyone desiring to learn the "Cuban Mombo" contact the PIO office for entrance to the C. E. Driskill, Dance Studio.


THE INDIAN


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.
Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615
Saturday, 12 March 1955
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LTJG J. D. Byerley ---- Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC ------------ Editor
H. L. Sisson, JO3 ------------------ News
F. L. Cannon, JO3 --------- Photographer
D. C. Roberts, JOSN ----------- Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not he reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


An Editorial ...



What's Your Line?

Our friend Sturdley and his pals are anxious to make good as salesmen. They know what product they are trying to sell. How about you.
As Americans we have to sell the American way of life, not just knock the competition-which is Communism. But just what is this "American Way" we all talk about.
The basic concepts of America's way of life are contained in the Declaration of Independence. It's all there in a nutshell:


Americans believe that all men are created eual, and that Godnot the State-has given men certain rights which cannot be taken away. Some of these rights are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness-the right to put money in the bank, to own property, to speak and write freely, to worship without interference.
Americans believe that men set up governments to protect these rights, and that these governments are controlled by the people-not the people controlled by the State.
In short, Americans believe in the dignity of man. The Reds regard man simply as a tool of the almighty State. (AFPS)






m
Saturday, 12 March 195


a


THE INDIAN


VU-10 Chief Moves

To Trailer Home
Sometime next week, C. C. Roberts, ADC, of VU-10 will culminate eight months of work and planning when his family move from Central Bargo into a new home. The new home is a house trailer. Located behind Victory Hill across from the Navy Exchange Gas Station, Roberts' trailer is the first to ever be shipped to the Naval Base.
This particular trailer, however, is by no means new to the Roberts family except their youngest daugter who was born here on the Naval Base. Several years ago, Chief Roberts sold a home in Jacksonville, Florida to invest in this trailer home with the long-range plan of using it as their home until retirement from the Navy.
Actual planning for the moving of the trailer to Guantanamo Bay began shortly after Chief Roberts arrived here last May. Realizing that it would take "a bit of doing" since no one else had ever completed plans for bringing a trailer here, Chief Roberts went ahead and put his name on the base housing list. Next week there will be a vacancy on the housing list that wouldn't have been there if the Chief had not ventured to bring his home on wheels here.
From the beginning, it was Roberts' plan to bring the trailer here completely at his own expense, including the shipping costs from Florida . After the initial request was made and approved in June, the first difficulties arose. The trailer was rented out to another family, arrangements had to be made for shipping, plus the selection of a suitable site. The site was selected by Commanding Officer, Naval Station. Although much difficulty was encountered all the way through, Chief Roberts states that the cooperation from all concerned here on the base was "excellent." IActual shipping took two and a
half weeks at a cost of $200 by the East India Shipping Lines. And even when the trailer arrived, the Chief's problems were not finished. Unloading proved to be a problem


Mello, Luzzaro New

CPO Club Officers
J. B. Mello, AKC, from the Naval Air Station was elected President of the Chief Petty Officers' Club at the regular semi-annual election of officers last Saturday.
Frank Luzzaro, SKC, from Fleet Training Group was chosen to be vice-president for the next six months.
The position of secretary-treasurer is a permanent billet appointed by the commanding officer of the Naval Station and is currently filled by S. A. Roth, MMC.

since the ship's booms could not handle the 6,700 pound trailer. Then after the trailer was unloaded and moved to its location, water lines, power lines, and sewage lines had to be hooked up as well as the installation of a water meter and light meter along with minor grading and filling.
Utilities here on the base were another problem. With the permission of the Public Works Officer, Chief Roberts installed his own water, sewage and power lines. Bottle gas for the trailer stove will be purchased in 100 pound bottles in Guantanamo City.
Yet, with all the problems and waiting, the Roberts are still looking forward to their moving day next week. Both Chief and Mrs. Roberts like trailer living and are ardent supporters of the life. It has many advantages over even a modern house, and both are very convincing in their convictions.
The trailer itself originally cost $6,000. It is 35 feet long and will accomadate up to seven people. It has a completely modern kitchendinette, living room, and bedrooms. States Mrs. Roberts, "It's got everything that a modern house has except that it hasn't got as much room." Finally, the Roberts believe that the location will be a very convienent one with easy access to the Commissary Store, Navy Exchange, the Movie Lyceum. and the Naval Base School


C. C. Roberts, ADC, of VU-10 looks over his house trailer up its arrival on the Naval Base. Robert's trailer is the first ever to be shipped to Guantanamo Bay.


MCB- 1 Celebrates SeaBee 13th Anniversary


Miss Evelyn Ralston, Miss MCB-1 of 1955 presents the first piece of birthday cake to "Pappy" Gray, oldest man in MCB-1 during the recent celebration of the 13th anniversary of the SeaBees. Assisting Miss Ralston is John Rumberger, President of the Enlisted Men's Recreation Council.


'Our Town' .,,

(Continued from Page One)
nuance are Bob Pope, Milt Merz, and Fred Holland, craftsmen at the switchboad. Included also in our census, are House Manager, George Hodges, general manager Joe West, and stage manager (and director) Alan Wagner.
We've been neglecting "those ouija boards of the playwright's thought vibrations," the actors themselves. For, as Dobson stated, "this is the actor's gift; to share all moods, all passions, nor to care one whit for scene, for he without, can lead man's minds the roundabout".
But "Our Town," would soon be as a ghost village in the dessert, were it not for the final vital component. David Belasco expressed the last clue to a prominent theater goer: "Madame, you belong to opening nights. Your presence in the orchestra seat is just as vital to the play's success as the best performance of all my actors."
So it is, that next week, for a trivial price, you have the opportunity to become citizens of Grover's Corners, Sultan County, New Hampshire, United States of America, the solar system, the universe, the mind of God."
THE CAST
Stage Manager ---- Alan Wagner Emily ------------Evelyn Leach
George -----------George Engle
Dr. Gibbs -------- Chuck Dieterle Mrs. Gibbs ------- Evelyn Purdue Mr. Webb ---------Tom Judkins
Mrs. Webb ----- Mildred Morgan Simon Stimson ----- Fred Green Mrs. Soames ----------Pat Moe
Sam Craig -------- Roland Cailler Constable Warren Chet Blakelock Sally Webb -------- Susan Tipler Si Crowell ---------- Jim Bailey


Last Saturday, 5 March, the officers and men of Mobile Construction Battalion ONE joined in with SeaBees from Adak to Australia in the celebration of the founding of the Navy's construction forces.
Beginning at 1445 in the enlisted men's hall in the SeaBee camp, the celebration was high-lighted with the crowning of a SeaBee queen, Miss Evelyn Ralston, Miss MCB-1 of 1955.
Beginning the short program was a welcoming speech by CDR 0. J. Martyn, Commanding Officer, MCB-1, followed by the crowning of the queen by the president of the Enlisted Men's Recreation Council, John Rumberger, SW2. Miss Ralston then cut the immense birthday cake and presented the first slice to the man with the longest service in the battalion, Herschel Gray, CE2. who truly deserves his nickname of "Pappy," has seen five years service in MCB-1.
Guests at the celebration were RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander Naval Base, CAPT G. M. Holley, Chief of Staff, CDR W. M. Gordon, Base Civil Engineer, CDR E .L. Rowan, Public Works Officer, the Naval Base, chaplains, CDR J. J. Sullivan and LCDR K. G. Peterson, and other high ranking officers of the Naval Base commands.
Following the cake cutting ceremony, refreshments were served to members of MCB-1 and their guests. The Naval Base band furnished the music for the celebration.

Joe Crowell Jr .---- Larry Snyder Howie Newsome --Ronnie Estafan Rebecca Gibbs ----------Vi Merz Professor Willard ----- Joe West


4


0111


Pate Three


Pag _re





m


Saturday, 12 MaR 1955


VU-10 Golfers Hold Lead

In Intra-Command Tourney
The Intra-Command Golf Tournament swung into its second round of matches last week-end with VU10, the 1954 champions, holding their lead by downing the MCB-1 team, 13 to 2 last Sunday.
On Saturday Fleet Training Group edged the Hospital-Dental team, 13 to 11 and Naval Station doubled the NSD-CHB team, 16 to
8.
The standings to date are:


TEAM POINTS VU-10 Naval Sta. Hosp-Dent FTG NSD-CHB NAS
MCB-1


MATCHES 40 2 29 2 241/ 2 24 2 18 2 6 1 2 1


The matches scheduled for this week-end are as follows: at 1300 today Hosp-Dent goes against the Naval Station and the NSD-CHB team tees off against FTG: at 0815 tomorrow morning MCB-1 meets NAS. The league leaders VU-10, draw a bye for this weekend's play.
A team of Naval Base golfers will compete against the team from the USS POCONO Sunday morning at 0900.


Ladies Golf Shots

by Betty Lou Tipler
On Wednesday morning all four
flights played a Blind Five Tournament on the back nine holes. The results were:
FIRST FLIGHT
lst--Jane McElroy 2nd-tie
Marion Caruthers
Edna Edwards
SECOND FLIGHT ist-Marge Sheean 2nd-tie
Jean Vogel
Val Evans
THIRD FLIGHT
st--four-way tie
Cynthia Holley
Audrey Page
Vi Merz
Charlie Murphy 2nd-tie
Fran Shadowski
Twylla Drace
FOURTH FLIGHT st-Jean Grady 2nd-tie
Mary McFadden
Twylla Drace
After the tournament the prizes from the Ringer Tournament were presented. The nice silver pieces were received with great joy. The ladies are all proud of Doris Rothenberg's good sportsmanship for accepting an error made during the tournament with grace.
Bev Larson has just taken over the tremendous job of Treasurer for the Scotch Foursomes and we do appreciate it.
We got two new members this week to make up for the two we lost last week. A big welcome to Jean Grady and Sarah Brotherton.


High School Pirates Crown Basketball Queen


QUEEN OF THE COURTS. Pretty Sharon Keenan, a freshman at the Naval Base High School, is crowned "Queen of the 1955 Basketball Season" by Pirate captain Edgar Heimer during pre-game ceremonies last Monday night. The traditional ceremony marks the closing of the basketball season for High School. The Pirates, far down in the standings, outdid themselves to climax the evening by trouncing the Leeward Point Pointers, 60 to 32.

1955 Marine Intramural Bowling Champions


Top row left to right, James Morissette, Wayne Straw, Joe Androvich. Bottom row left to right, John Wert, Paul Hoffer, Bernard Lee.


Naval Station Special Services Department employees begin their periodic cleaning of the Naval Station enlisted men's swimming pool in the Fleet Recreation Area. The pool, the largest fresh water pool on the base, holds 310,000 gallons. It was 'drained last Sunday, the cleaning and painting took two days, and it was filled and ready for use again on Wednesday.


0


Ladies Bowling

With only three weeks remaining, Team#1 of the Ladies Bowling League still stands in first place with their narrow margin of one game. Since the begining of second half play, Team #1 has held the lead spot, never by more than two games. This past week, it suddenly looked dark for the leaders when the final scores showed two loses for the day, but P recount on the score was demanded, and another victory was added, by one pin.
Emily Griffin, the most consistent bowler in the league still holds her high average of 171 for the I e a d e r s h i p in that department. Francis Grounds, however, rolled the high game of the week with a high 211.
STANDINGS
TEAM W L Team#1 19 5 Team#2 18 6 Team#6 13 11 Team#8 13 11 Team#4 12 12 Team#5 12 12 Team#7 10 14 Team#3 9 15 Team#10 8 16 Team#9 6 18
HIGH TEN AVERAGES
E. Griffin 171 P. Way 150 F. Grounds 145
J. King 144 S. Wenderlich 140 M. Powers 140 C. Godbout 135
A. Tagliabue 135 B. Gardner 135 M. Green 134
HGH GAMES THIS WEEK
F. Grounds 211
M. Powers 189 E. Griffin 188 M. Green 187 J. King 180 L. Neely 177 M. Pugh 176 J. O'Brien 173 E. Saunders 173


Naval Station Bowling

STANDINGS
TEAM W L FTG#2 46 14 Third Div 44 16 NSD 43 17 Security Group 40 20 Fifth Div. "M" 39 21 FTG#1 38 22 Commissary Store 38 22 Fleet Boat Pool 33 27 MCB-I 33 27 Fleet Camera Party 28 32 Fifth Div. "R" 26 34 Second Div. 26 34 CHB-1 25 35 Fifth Div. "ET" 25 35 Hospital 24 36 11th Div. 13 47 First Div. 11 49 Sixth Div. 8 52
HIGH AVERAGE
Gagliano 171 Marshall 170 Schmidt 166
HIGH TEAM SINGLE
CHB-1 903 NSD 887 FTG#2 872


HIGH TEAM
CHB-1 Commissary Store NSD


SERIES
2576
2433 2411


4


-- o. . u . . ..rI[ III aI " " II- -


THE INDIAN






S


Saturday,~Pag 12Mac 1&5TvNDA


Indians Win 1955 Hoop Title;



Tournament Begins Monday

by Hal Davis
The Naval Station Indians slid sideways into the 1955 Base League championship last Monday night when the combined Hospital-Dental quintet upset a slightly favored Naval Air Station Flyer team, 40 to 38, to leave only a weakened Stevedore squad in the path of the Braves. The following night the Indians rolled over the Stevedores, 65 to 35, to clinch decisively the title.
As far as the Indians were concerned, it was fortunate the Medics were hitting in the game of the week Monday because Thursday night the Flyers came roaring back with Duke Snyder and Hal Ring hitting from all angles to swamp the champs, 57 to 40. Ring, clinching second place in the "top ten" scorers, dropped 20 through the cords while Snyder was busy pounding through 23 for himself to cop third place honors in the scoring department. Slewitzke, the tenth man on the "top ten" helped the Indians' cause with 11, but it wasn't enough.
With only two more games to go after The Indian's sports deadline, the standings that appear elsewhere in this section will very probably be the final order. The only change that could occur as far as place order is concerned is in the SeaBee niche. If the Stingers, just back from Norfolk and the ComServLant tourney, dropped last night's Edgar Heimer, of the Pirates game, they will be tied with Med- squad, one of the jumpin'est playical. Otherwise the standings re- ers on the court tops Pointer Fortmain as printed with the Indians on top and the Flyers in a solid in (9) and another unidentified second place. Pointer as he grabs the ball during


At this point we would like to give the Fleet Training Group Trainers a pat on their collective backs for their stick-to-it attitude. As the season wore on and it soon became apparent that the Trainers were unable to muster enough men to provide any stiff competition for the rest of the league, a "small" team would have quit and dropped out. But not the Trainers. They showed up at every scheduled game except two, ready to take their expected licking, but not take it lying down. So, a tip of The Indians head feathers goes to the Trainers for good sportsmanship.
THIS WEEK'S RESULTS FRIDAY, March 4:
VU-10-63; HiSchool-61
CHB-1--47; FTG-32 MONDAY, March 7:
HiSchool-60; CHB-1-35
Medical-40; NAS-38 TUESDAY, March 8:
NavSta-65; CHB-1-35 Marines-74; FTG-43 WEDNESDAY, March 9:
HiSchool-2; MCB-1-0 (frf't)
VU-10-75; Lwrd. Pt.-34 THURSDAY, March 10:
NAS-57; NavSta-40 Medical-62; FTG-22
THE POST-SEASON
TOURNAMENT
The post-season tournament starts Monday night. It will be single-elimination style with all ten teams competing. The drawing for positions will be held this morning at the Naval Station Special Services office.
The Naval Air Station Flyers


the Pirate avalanche last Monday night at Marine Site. Pirates swamped the Pointers, 60 to32.

were the winners of the 1954 post-season tourney, and there is a good possibility that they can repeat this year. The Indians will be out for a clean sweep of the hoop honors, and they are always dangerous. The Mallards loom as a potential dark-horse, and the Marines have been running hot and cold all season. The Medics are the question mark again, they could easily upset the applecart, just as they did in the league play. The Stingers returned from Norfolk minus several of their first string so they'll be putting almost a new unknown squad on the floor. The rest are outside shots.
All in all, it adds up to a tense week of basketball to wind up the season, and it's strictly a case of "pay your money and take your choice."



Basketball Standings

(Including Thursday night games)


TEAM NavSta NAS MCB-1 Medical Marines VU-10
CHB-1 HiSchool Lwrd. Pt. FTG


PCT .888 .833
.706 .666 .586 .470 .412 .222 .222 .000


. Medics Down Flyers


Moebus (10) of the Midics and Krygier (7) of the Flyers go after the rebound during the Medical- Flyer game last Monday night. Rose
(3), Snyder (11) and King (behind Moebus) stand by for the assist. The Medics knocked over the Flyers by two points, 40 to 38, thus practically insuring the Naval Station Indians the 1955 championship.

TOP TEN SCORERS


PLAYER Heimer Ring Snyder
Gerhardt * Houchin Morgan Holmes ** Gatti ** King Slewitzke (**Denotes player's


TEAM High School NAS
NAS CHB-1 VU-10
Naval Station Marines Marines Hospital-Dental Naval Station score as not final)


Special Bus Runs

For 'Our Town'
A Special bus has bee scheduled for personnel in the Bay Hill Barracks, the Fleet Recreation Area, and the Fleet Landing who wish to attend the Little Theatre's production of "Our Town." The bus will run all five nights, Tuesday through Saturday. Departing from Bay Hill at 1915 and stopping at the Fleet Recreation Area at 1925 and stopping at the Fleet Landing at 1935, the "Our Town" bus will arrive at the Community Auditorium on Marina Point fifteen minutes before curtain time.


GAMES POINTS AVG.
17 288 16.9 17 275 16.1 17 268 15.7
12 263 21.9 16 218 13.6 18 215 11.9 17 208 12.2 17 206 12.1 17 203 11.9 18 198 11.0


A Naval Base is where the sailors are full of life, happiness and the pursuit of liberty.

Throwing a kiss is like applauding in front of your TV set.

"Do you know anything about my wife's whereabouts?" Mr. Swanson asked his cook.
"Yes, sir," was the prompt ans-wer. "She put them in the wash,"

The busy Admiral asked his yoeman where his pencil was.
"It's behind your ear, admiral," he replied.
"Come, come, Brown, I'm busy man. Which ear."


]


go


m
Pate ~'ive


THE INDIAN







Pale Six


NAS Yeoman Wins

Foundation Award
Frederick J. Green, YN3, was notified that for his letter in the "What America Means to Me" contest, sponsored by the Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge, Pa., he has been awarded an honorable mention certificate.
The grand prize in the annual essay-writing contest was won by an Army corporal, James R. Odermatt, stationed at Fort Ord, Calif. Odermatt's letter was reprinted in The Indian last week.
Green assigned to the personnel office at Naval Air Station, is the only one on the base to be notified of an award in the contest. His letter follows.
What America Means To Me
There is no cloak and dagger shadow being cast across my threshold, awakening me from my peaceful slumber to forcibly carry me, screaming into the night of fear and sudden death. There is no danger of being reported to evil state officials for speaking my mind, and passing on to others my conception of our way of government. Out of the innumerable libraries in this country, I can read any manuscript of my chosing, composed by a censored or uncensored mind. There are no one-way streets of vocations, instead there are many tributaries, which will freely educate abilities so that utilization of talents can be a benefit to those who hunger for an unbiased appreciation of knowledge, that is so freely accessable.
Wherever one travels throughout this vast and beautiful land, there is always a house of devine worship. Here, the words of truth and love are freely spoken to all nationalities, regardless of race or creed. The soul prays in complete tranquility. No brutal force can take this away, for death is the final reward of devine grace. Wars have scarred hearts, but the light of almighty God has remained sustainable in the souls.
Every four years, the citizens of this noble nation take leave of their habitual routines to choose a president. This man is chosen to lead their country in a democratic way. No one is forced to vote, but it is a duty every citizen should fulfill. Not one is nominated to hold this highest and most respected position, several are, andhe one receiving the highest vote is elected. He so governs this Ia td according to the provisions of the Constitution, which is the foundation of AMERICA.
Along the avenues of this century, America has played a predominent role upon the stage of world affairs. Unfortunate nations, ravaged by the destructions of war, have called for help, which we have answered. Unaccountable lives have been given for the preservation of that which is so sacred.. FREEDOM!.
When an individual comits a crime against the laws of our society, he or she isn't guilty until proven as such. This individual is tried by a court composed of people whose sole purpose is to bring justice. This court could be convened indefinately until it is absolutely positive the innocent isn't accused of an unjustified guilt.
No where else can a man, moman or child be more contented. Never before has a more magnificent spectical been seen than the statue which guards the ocean entrance of the largest city of this land. This city alone signifies the pos-


Some Navy Children

Eligible For Scholarships
by William A. Johnson, PNI
Recently BUPERS issued a notice concerning two scholarships that may by awarded to children of service personnel. They are: The Clausey Medal of Honor Scholarship Foundation and the Navy Wives Clubs of America Scholarship Foundation.
The Clausey Medal of Honor Scholarship Foundation was established in memory of the late Lieutenant John Joseph Clausey, and will provide a scholarship award, to be used at or beyond the college level, for a child of an officer or enlisted man of the navy or Marine Corps who was killed in action or who died as a result of wounds received in actual combat during World War II or the Korean Conflict. The award made by this foundation will be in the form of an outright grant to be made each year in an amount not to exceed $500. This award may be given to one individual or it may be divided between two or more at the discretion of the Selection Committee.
The Navy Wives Clubs of America Scholarship Foundation was established in September of 1953 by the Navy Wives of America, and will make scholarship awards to sons and daughters of enlisted men in the first seven pay grades, to be used in obtaining college educations, vocational business, or other training which will enable the recipient to make more valuable contributions to society than would otherwise be possible. The applicant for this award must be the child, legally adopted child, or stepchild of an enlisted member of the Navy, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard on active duty, retired with pay, or deceased. Awards made by this foundation shall be outright grants to be made in at least the sum of $250. per academic year for the boy or girl selected. The number and value of the award to be offered each year shall be determined by the members of the foundation.
Another scholarship offered is the Valley Forge Military Academy Scholarship. The Valley Forge Military Academy has offered eight scholarships yearly to sons of Regular Officers of the Armed Forces having high academic standing and interested in military life. These scholarships are awarded for a 3 year period in the amount of $1,015 per year, which is about half of the all-inclusive tuition rate. The applicant must be either a boy between 14 and 16 years of age preparing to enter the 10th grade who will continue on a Valley Forge to receive his secondary school diploma, or a young man preparing to enter the 12th grade who will receive his secondary diploma and continue on for 2 years of junior college to receive a Junior College Associate in Arts diploma from the academy.
All information in regards to the General Eligibility Requirements and application can be obtained at the Information and Education Office, Bay Hill, Barracks #4, Across from Civilian Dental Office. Phone 8553.

terity which exists.
Let us never take all this magnificence for granted, because America must always retain it's traditions. These traditions have become the guiding light for the future of civilization. It never must loose it's brilliance.


Girl Scouts Observe

43rd Anniversary Here
To-day, March 12, 1955, The Girl Scouts of America are celebrating their Forty-third Birthday. Juliette Low, the Founder of Girl Scouting in the United States, started the first Girl Scout troop in Savannah, Georgia, on March 12, 1912. Very soon after the group was organized, younger girls wanted to join; so in 1914, the younger girls were organized and were called "Rosebuds". The little girls objected to the name, so in 1915, Lord Baden-Powell changed the name to "Brownies," naming them after the useful "little people" of Scotland and northern England. All girls in the second through fourth grades in school or aged seven thru ten, are eligible to be members of the Brownie program. Girls, ten years old thru thirteen, are Girl Scouts; and from about thirteen thru seventeen, they are the Senior Girl Scouts.
On the Naval Base there are over a hundred girls in the Brownies, over sixty girl Scouts, and several Senior Scouts.
The purpose of Girl Scouting is to help each girl become a happy, resourceful person herself, a responsible member of her group, growing up into a useful citizen.
The Scouting Program provides a wide choice of interesting and useful activities for the girls. Although the Girl Scout program on the base is rather limited in many ways, there are also a number of advantages for the girls here that groups in the United States do not have. The girls are able to have hikes, outings, arts and crafts, and many of the usual features of the program along with visits to the industries of Cuba. The Scouts have been able to participate in many of the Base activities that are useful and educational for the girls. During the recent Guantanamo Bay Charity Carnival, the Girl Scouts and Brownies sponsored the "Cake and Lemonade Booth". In August, the Scouts and Brownies take an active part in the Annual Scout Circus. Recently, the aircraft carrier, USS INTREPID, held openhouse for all the Scouts of the base, naming the day "Scout Day Aboard the INTREPID." The boys and girls of the base enjoyed the most interesting and informative visit to the ship.
This year the Girl Scouts and Brownies have participated in an expansion program in membership and in a fund-raising drive for the purpose of obtaining a "hut" or meeting place that is adequate for the growth of the group. The membership of the organization has more than doubled previous years and the girls are eagerly looking forward to moving into their new quarters.
On this, the forty-third birthday of the Girl Scouts, the members, leaders, parents of Scouts, and members of the troop Committee wish to express their thanks to all the people of the base who have helped to make the Scouting Program here on the base a success this past year. We are looking forward to a better and more complete program for the girls of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Policeman (to man staggering home at 0300): "Where are you going at this time of morning?"
Man: "To a lecture,"

4b


Dental Tech Quota

Still Open
In order to maintain the authorized strength of Dental Technicians throughout the Navy, approximately 30 candidates per month will be required during the period from now to 1 August 1955 to fill quotas at the Class "A" Dental Technician Schools. The schools are located at San Diego, Great Lakes, and Bainbridge.
Volunteer candidates are desired and must be qualified in accordance with current directives with the following exceptions:
1. A combined GCT/ARI score
will be waivered to 78.
2. Recommendation by a Dental
Officer may be based on a personal interview rather than serving a period as a dental
striker.
The course of instruction at the Class "A" School is of 16 weeks duration. The course is designed to prepare an individual entering the Dental Rating Group for the general duties of a dental technician.
In addition to the dental duties of the rating, the curriculum includes the study of hygiene, sanitation, first aid and minor surgery, property and accounting procedures, basic dental equipment maintenance procedures and elementry prosthetic labratory procedures.
Upon successful completion of the course, graduates are assigned duty with dental officers in a closely knit pattern of professional teamwork.
Interested personnel are requested to contact CWO Dote, Administration Officer, U. S. Naval Dental Clinic in person or phone 8556 for further details.


Legion Auxiliary Holds

Pot Luck Hoe Down
All you American Legion guys and Auxiliary dolls be sure and don your jeans, boots, and whirly dresses. Tonight is our covered dish diner and square dance. Last month's party was so much fun that we decided to have them every month, or at least until summer vacations begin. So, bring your favorite covered dish and we'll see you at 6:30 P. M.
Tuesday, March 15 is our regular meeting night. The American Legion Auxiliary's annual school spelling bee is in full swing. We will have our oral spelling bee the night of April 6th. A new feature has been added this year. A prize will be given to the most improved speller in each class of the 4th, 5th & 6th grades to be determined by two written tests. So, come on you kids, buckle down and see if you can't bring home a prize to show the folks.

Sign in laundry window-We do not tear your laundry with machinery. We do it carefully by hand.
Marine Guard: Halt! Who goes there. ?
Sailor: Friend-with a bottle.
Marine: Advance bottle to be recognized. Pass friend.

"Just because my eyes are red-is no sign I'm drunk. For all you know I may be a white rabbit."


- J


M
Saturday, 12 March 1955


THE INDIAN







Saturday. 12 March 1955


a


THE INDIAN


FTG Bulletin
by Ron Federman
Put out the welcome mat for ifwo new members of the staff at FTG CHELEC Abbott, and LT Dent. Mr. Abbott reported from the .USS EDISTO (AGB-2), and Mr Dent reported to our command froni the U.S. Naval , Ammunition Depot, Earle, New Jersey. Mr Abbott's hometowii is Noi'oton Heights, Connecticut, where his wife and two children are presently residing. He will work with the Engineering Department at FTG.
LT Dent is also married, and has a daughter 10 years old. He is a native of San Bernardino, Calif. and for the time being Mrs. Dent and her daughter are living in Brooklyn, New York. Mr Dent will relieve LT Hutton, who recently received his orders. He has been assigned to the Gunery Department.
CDR King, our former Navigation Officer, left Gtmo on the 5th of March for a tour of duty at the Naval Academy, Annapolis. It will be strange not seeing the commander's name on the top of the Golf Ladder. Incidently, LCDR Kuba is presently the top man on the aforementioned "ladder".
LT Stafford and LCDR Mathews will leave the area today. but they will be back in a matter of days. The two officers will attend a symposium at the U. S. Naval Damage Control Training Center, in Philadelphia, on TAD, for a period of about six days.
In the enlisted ranks, Gregloit, MMC, and Briggs, YN2, were transferred recently. The former will report to the Commanding Officer, U. S. Naval Receiving Station, Brooklyn, for transfer to Fleet Reserve and release to inactive duty The latter will report to NAS, Lakehurst, New Jersey, for a tour of shore duty.
Several days ago Wright, PN2 was glancing through the latest issue of "Navy Times", when his eyes lit up like a Christmas tree. His reaction was caused by the fact that his name was included in a list of men selected for Officer's Candidate School (Supply Corps) convening on 16 May. Although it's not official, in all probability Wright will be packing his seabag in readiness for a trip to Newport in the near future.
LT Gillespie, attached to the Communications Department, has an occasion to rejoice. Wednesday night his wife and two children are due to arrive here via airplane.
A word of advice! Watch for the March issue of "All Hands." This issue is devoted to the personnel of the Navy; officer and enlisted men and women. It is a "career issue", and presents a collection of arguements in favor of a naval career. It describes such benefits as pay and allowances, allotments, medical care, insurance, education and training, paths of promotion and advancement, housing for families, etc.
Those of you who have had the privilege of attending any of the character guidance lectures given by Chaplin Peterson recently, no doubt found it very interesting, as we did. A series of lectures are being presented at FTG on Saturday mornings, and all hands should avail themselves of the oportunity to attend.
The FTG Bowling Team#2 climaxed a tremendous season last week, as they took three games from Fleet Boat Pool, thus clinch-


The Toastmaster

by Joe West
God wove a web of lovliness Of clouds and stars and birds, But made not anything at all
So beautiful as words
UNZIP YOUR LIP
Having ideas in your mind and not putting them into circulation in speech is like having money in your pocket and not spending it. The potential value is there, but neither money nor ideas will buy anything until you turn loose. Selfexpression helps us to grow and to develop. The speaker has to sell his ideas, his goods, his hause-even himself. His speech is the sales process. In ordinary conversation, every man is "selling" himself everytime he talks. He is creating an impression on those Who hear him, and the good or bad that impression depends on how he presents himself through his words.
Ability to speak clearly, concisely and convincingly is the key by which the door of opportunity has been opened to many a man. People judge him very, largely by what he says, especially if his words are backed up by deeds. I have seen multitudes of men promote themselves, win advancement, step up to higher salary brackets, greater influence, and larger opportunities for achievement, simply because they learned to interpret themselves to other people through speech. The man who can talk in public is the natural \leader in his own circle, and in widening circles as his ability becomes known. Success in public speech almost invariably leads a man into a larger life and increased usefulness.
AND BEND AN EAR
Every speaker should learn to be a good listener. And by being a good listener, I mean a listener Who listens analytically-one who digests what he hears, who does not swallow it whole and without question, but always seeks to find the truth. Analytical listening, critical listening , or speech appraisal, as you may prefer to call it, should be practiced by every person as a protection against spellbinders, stampeders and inciters to mob action. It is like the well-known sales resistance in that it helps one to resist the emotions of the moment, and to act on sober second thought.
We learn to speak by speaking. Practice is the price of sucess in speech. The only way to become and continue to be a good speaker, in my opinion, is to keep at it. Even an able orator loses his inspiration and his fire when he grows rusty through lack of practice.

ing first place. Even with several games still to be played, it is impossible for FTG to vacate their present position in the league standings, and congratulations are in order.
SHIP'S ARRIVALS
USS Siboney Sat. 12 Mar USS Stockham Mon. 14 Mar USS Woodson Fri. 18 Mar USS Haverfield Mon. 7 Mar
Date Reporting to FTG Control USS Siboney 14 Mar USS Stockham 15 Mar USS Woodson 18 Mar USS Haverfield 18 Mar
SHIP'S DEPARTURES
USS H. J. Ellison Tues. 15 Mar


by Paul A. Hoffer USMC
DEPARTURES
One man from Headquarters and one from Security Section will depart for the States this week. Sgt. Richard F. Fournier will report to Marine Corps Schools, Quantico, Virginia for duty, and PFC. Earnest L. Noe will report to Norfolk, Virginia for discharge.
BOWLING
"Headquarters" became the Marine Barracks Bowling Champions for 1955 by winning both the first and second round of the bowling 'league. Winning 41 and losing only 15 for the season. The season will officially end this week with four games to go. Standings thus far are as follows:
HEADQUARTERS 21 7 Team#2 14 10 Taem#3 12 12 Team#1 12 12 SNCO's 12 12 Team#4 10 14
* OFFICERS 9 15 .,SUPPLY 6 14

BASEBALL
With one week of practice under their belt, Manager Swords is very pleased With the fine showing and candidate turn out. The past week has been mainly devoted to exercising and running. TSGT. Gradus will assist Captain Swords in coaching the team. TSGT. Gradus was assistant coach of last years team.
MEET YOUR TEAM
This is the first in a series of articles on players of the Marine Barracks baseball team.
WILLIAM J. WOOD better known as "Woody" to every one on Marine Site, is the newly appointed captain of the baseball team. Wood came to us from Parris Island where he played part of the "54" season before joining us. He played here last year and was an important factor in the winning of the Naval Base Baseball Championship. Wood hails from Lenox, Massachusetts where he played four years of high school baseball. He was named to the "All County" team all four years. Prior to coming in the Marine Corps Wood was offered a contract by the St Louis Browns, now the Baltimore Orioles, but did not sign because he was planning to enter college and did not want to lose his amature status. Wood plays right field, hits and throws from the left side.



Hospital Notes

by D. W. Degon
HEIRPORT NEWS
The blue again edges out the pink with three gents and a lady added to the Gtmo Birth Parade. The new occupants of the Nursery are Thomas Ray to ADI and Mrs. Agnes McDonald; Susan Marie to LCDR and Mrs. Eve McElroy; Donald Curtis to ML2 and Mrs. Elaine Kemp; Douglas Dale to SK3 and Mrs. Katherine Huston.
PARTY POSTPONED
CWO Huchcraft announced that
the Staff party has been postponed


Teenage Round-up

by Linda Thurston
Mild mayhem, as well as the Basketball Queen, reigned last Monday night as the Pirates crushed the Pointers in honor of "Coronation Night." The queen, lovely Sharon Keenan, didn't exactly "help" the team, though. The traditional kiss bestowed upon the captain of the basketball squad shook up Edgar so bad he missed the first few field goal attempts. But then the real effect took hold and he settled down to make 20 points and jump right into the lead of the base's top ten scorers.
"We Want Cavanaugh" finally paid off. Even Cavvie racked up a point for himself from the foul line. And Dave Shyver snapped to and presented Her Majesty with two tallies.
Everyone was pretty joyful about the whole thing. Even Sharon forgot her majestic role for a split second and started up of the bench for a cheer.
Did Ya See. . . Judy and Edgar stompin' at the Teen Age Club party after the game. They could win a prize . . . Maryalice and Howie rattling down Sherman in Neal's contraption, holding the doors closed and hoping the alleged car would hold out long enough to get Maryalice home before that magic hour . . . Bobby J telling us that she closes her prayers every night with, "and, please, make me clever like Phil Keenan" .., Our crazy mixed-up Queen. She's undecided now . . . Cookie, just asking questions . . . Pat B. and his sailing expeidition that didn't pan out . . . Irma and Bob handin-handing it toward Cable Station . . . Nita and Pat Carney harmonizing last Sunday night in their pink and blue outfits . . . Speaking of Pat C., he got the facts on Heimer's ranch and Cavie's driving all in one lump . . . Eunice telling herself "No, no, no," . . . Brenda, Dixie and Ana making remarks about the basketball players while munching pretzels. . . Sharon P dancing with that handsome Brad Inman . . . Betty and Bobby Stone making a hit with everybody. Welcome gals . . . Dexter yelling "Timber" in Junior English class . . . Nancy H trying to play "Can You Top This" . . . Sylvia losing her balance over her bookkeeping . . . Dolores R and her "particular boy friend".

until Tuesday, 15 March; due to
the filled schedule of Phillips Park.
SIDELIGHTS
Did you see "Radar" Edmunds' excursion of the deep, as he went high jumping in the Bay . . . Bob Dunn's damp experience with "ye olde outboard," even the oars got lost . . . Doc Hering's Medics edge out NAS 40 to 38. For the past week "Tricky" Fickes' Body and Fender Shop has done a slack business, possibly due to his orders to CLUSA. Frank "Hoss" Sparks is still smoking those big cigars and giving out with that friendly smile on the announcement of the birth of Frank Sparks III. Nick Greco, the Personnel Office's new Yo Yo, is still wondering how the door closed on his finger.


*


.3


Page Seveii







Navy-bP '0-10ND-Gtno.-0745


m


THE INDIAN


m


m
Saturday. 6 March 195


:THE SUSQUEHANNA
by Carl Carmer
This is the 48th book in the "Rivers of America" series. The Susquehanna winds through three states: New York, Pennsylvania, and Maryland. With it flows a history more exciting than fiction. Included in the book is the story of Lord Talbot, who kissed the King's tax collector, then promptly stabbed him to death.. He then fled to a river cave where trained falcons brought him food. Here too are the stories of the French noblemen who erected a grand log palace for Marie Atoinette; the Pinkerton agent, James McPalan, who sent many murderers to the gallows; the raids of Col. Hartley against upriver Indians and Tories. A fascinating book for a person interested in Susquehanna history.
TRIAL
by Don M. Mankiewicz
This is the 1955 Harper's Prize Novel. The story concerns a young lawyer, David Blake, who undertakes the defense of an accused murderer and rapist. The lawyer considered his purpose quite clear: get enough practice and experience in criminal law to hold down his job. Having taken the case he wanted to win. There was also the fact that the defendant was innocent. But Blake was no wide-eyed idealist; he was an ordinary man as such hated to be made a fool of at the hands of crooked politics. He turned around to fight and in doing so made nation-wide headlines.
THE BEST OF CRUNCH AND
DES
by Philip Wylie
Twenty one of Wylie's famed Crunch and Des fishing stories. C. and D. are two salty old anglers who know all there is to know about fishing-and storytelling. The publishers enthusiastically claim that you will get more real fishing excitement reading this than in a month of trolling the Gulf Stream. Depends on how much blood you have left.
THE SLEEPER
by Holly Roth
A mystery story relating what happened when a man reported a robbery. The F.B.I. and C.I.C. men were knocking at his door in short order. Seems that the ruckus was caused because the burglars loot was a manuscript of a series of interviews with an army officer turned traitor. The traitor commited sucide soon after the story appeared and the book form was being serialized in a magazine. The big question was "why steal the manuscript?" If you really care, read the book.
IMPACT OF EVIDENCE
by Carol Carne
A mystery about crime and violence on the Welsh border. Scotland yard comes to the rescue in grand style and uncovers all sorts of scandalous things going on among the peaceful Welsh farmers: blackmail, murder, questionable marriages. Lift a thatched roof and find a lawsuit.
JUST IN . . .
For photo fans: Filters and Their Uses, Movie Making for Beginners, Color Movies for the Beginners, Making Better Color Slides, Parts
1 and 2.
BIG OUTFIT, by Peter Dawson a western.


JUST LIKE YOU SAID, IT'S STARDOM FOR MARA! When movie audiences, 'specially the portion that whistles spotted Mara Corday in such U-I films as "So This Is Paris" and "Francis Joins the WACS," they were quick to predict stardom. Right! In her next, "The Man From Bitter Ridge." Mara will star with Lex Barker and Stephen McNally.

Radio's 'Tops' of the Week
SATURDAY, 12 MARCH . . . THEATRE ROYAL . .. 9:00 P. M.
Sir Ralph Richardson, your regular host, takes the starring role in the Viennese comedy, "Private Rooms." SUNDAY, 13 MARCH ... HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE ...
10:00 P. M.
A true-to-life story of a man serving a life-time prison term who makes an important contribution to the firearms industry. Starring in "Carbine Williams" will be Ronald Reagan, Wendell Corey, and Jean Hagen.
MONDAY, 14 MARCH ... BEST PLAYS... 9:00 P. M.
Burgess Meridith and Anthony Quinn star in John Steinbeck's "Of Mice and Men", an important story of two itinerant workers, one a shrewd and cunning character, and the other, a dull witted fellow whose kindness leads to his downfall.
TUESDAY, 15 MARCH ... HIGH ADVENTURE... 8:30 P. M.
Two fortune hunters run across a strange village while travelling down the Amazon River. The village is inhabited by English people who have ben out of touch with civilization for over three hundred years. Knowing nothing of modern automobiles and airplanes, the residents suspect that their discoverers are invaders from another planet. WEDNESDAY, 16 MARCH ... PURSUIT... 9:00 P. M.
Inspector Black has a difficult time in tracking down the murderer of "The Man Who Died Late". A man is brought into the morgue who has died from a bullet in the brain-.......a bullet that he had been fired a year before he died.
THURSDAY, 17 MARCH ... FAMILY THEATRE ... 9:00 P. M.
Eddie Fisher will be host and Marilyn Erskine will star in "Welcome Home", a very human story of a bride's thoughts on her wedding day when she belives she is loved for who she is rather than what she is.


MOVIES

Saturday, March 12 THE IRON GLOVE
Robert Stack Ursula Theiss
Story concerns devoted loyalty
of a soldier to his Prince who is kept from his rightful place on the throne by a schemer who had himself crowned.
Sunday, March 13
TROUBLE IN THE GLEN
Victor McLaglen Margaret Lockwood
A U. S. flyer who served in Scotland with the Air Force returns there to the people who befriended him during the war. He finds himself in the middle of a fued with an irascible old man causing all the trouble. Flyer falls in love with man's daughter.
Monday, March 14
THREE HOURS TO KILL
Dana Andrews Donna Reed
When the brother guardian of the girl he loves is killed, a young gunrider is forced to leave town to avoid being hanged for the deed. He returns later to find the guilty. man.
Tuesday, March 15 HELLS OUTPOST
Rod Cameron Joan Leslie
A Korean war vet who uses a letter-writing trick to get himself interest in a milion dollar tungsten mine finds that the friendship of honest people pays better than crime, after he finds himself against the tactics of real crooks.
Wednesday, March 16
BETRAYED
Clark Gable Lana Turner
Story concerns Dutch underground during WW II.
Thursday, March 17
THEY RODE WEST
Philip Cary Donna Reed
A young doctor comes west to take over the job of post surgeon on the frontier, but finds the army hostile to him because he treats whites and Indians alike. After a series of incidents two strange Indian tribes attack the fort.
Here lies the body of William Jay,
Who died maintaining his rights
of way.
He was right, dead right, as he sped along.
But he's just as dead as if he'd been wrong.


' "~~~~aura 5 Ma h1 1955I IIIl III




Full Text

PAGE 1

"Covers 9TMO Like The Sunshine" Vol. VII, No. 10 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 12 March 1955 SecNav Here Tomorrow On Caribbean Tour Tomorrow morning, the Honorable Charles S. Thomas, Secretary of the Navy, will arrive on the Naval Base via special flight at the Naval Air Station on the first stop of a fifteen day tour of the Caribbean, South America, and Central American areas. The Secretary of the Navy will be accompanied by Gen. Lemuel C. Shepherd. Commandant of the Marine Corps, RADM Charles W. Wilkins, Director of CHARLES S. THOMAS Secretary of the Navy the Pan American Affairs, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, and CAPT Andrew M. Jackson, Aide to the Secretary of the Navy. VADM Frank G. Fahrion, ComPhibLant, will join the SecNavy party here in Guantanamo Bay, arriving in his flagship the USS POCONO. The itinery for the Secretary's fifteen day air trip includes a six day visit to Buenos Aires at the invitation of the government of Argentina. Besides his one-day stop here on the Naval Base, Mr. Thomas will make over-night stops in Panama; Lima, Peru; Rio de Janeiro, Trinidad, and San Juan. Leaving Washington D.C. late today, the party will arrive here early tomorrow morning. After touring the base with RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, the party will continue their journey to Panama on Wednesday. From Panama, the next stop will be Lima, Peru and then Buenos Aires. From Buenos Aires, the party will fly to Rio de Janeiro and then wind up the tour with oneday visits to Trinidad and San Juan and finally returning to Washington, D. C. on 28 March. Hints Offered For Filing '54 Tax Return By this time of the year, the Internal Revenue Service has provided most taxpayers with forms for their 1954 income tax returns. If you have not received yours, they can be obtained from the personal affairs officer, the nearest revenue bureau or almost any bank or post office. Here, briefly, are a few points to be remembered when you set down to figure out your income tax bill for 1954. 1. -If you are unmarried and you can claim a number of deductions it probably would pay you to fill out a long form (1040) in reporting your income. 2. Most married couples save money if they file joint, rather than separate, returns. 3. You send no money when you file on the short form (1040A) 4. Be sure to enclose the "B" copy of your W-2 form when sending in your return. Don't forget that the W-2s provided by service finance departments do not list allowances which are not taxable. 5. If you earned less than $5000 in 1954 and are filing on the long form, the income tax must be computed from the table provided by the Internal Revenue Service for such incomes. If you owe the government money, send it along with your return. 6. Take time to find out what deductions you are entitled to and also the requirements for exemptions-you might be able to save yourself money. 7. Be sure to report all your income for the year-if you don't and the government find out, you could be prosecuted. 8. If you intend to deduct the wages you received during sick periods of last year, make sure you get the certificates needed to prove you were ill and also that you have been paid. 9. Along the same lines, make certain that you have the documents to prove you are entitled to the deductions you claim on your income tax form. Dry Season Fire Dangers Noted At this particular time of the year the grass and undergrowth is exceedingly dry. As a result, several fires have been started recently which could have developed into serious blazes with tragic consequences. It has been determined that the majority of these fires were caused by carelessly tossed cigarettes or still-burning matches. All personnel are reminded of Naval Base Order 0224 which states that it is illegal to throw lighted cigarettes out of a car window. The base police have been instructed to issue summons to all offenders. 'Our Town' Opens at Community Theatre Tuesday; Little Theatre Production Set For Five Day Run Miss Pat Moe, one of the featured players in the forthcoming Little Theatre presentation of "Our Town" presents two tickets to CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station. Accompanying Miss Moe are ENS Alan Wagner, president of the Little Theatre organization and featured in the new production and Jim Bailey, also cast in the new play. "Our Town" opens at the Community Auditorium Tuesday night, March 15, for a 5-performance run through Saturday. CAPT McElroy Joins 'Downwind Cat Club' Captain R. Y. McElroy, senior air observer of the Guantanamo Bay Fleet Training Group, recently became a charter member of the "Downwind Cat Club" organized by the USS TICONDEROGA. The "Downwind Cat Club" is composed of flight personnel who have been steam-catapulted downwind off the carrier. The steam catapult is a comparatively new addition to aircraft carriers, and the TICONDEROGA has the distinction of being one of the first to have it installed on board. Along with Captain McElroy, Major General C. C. Jerome, USMC and RADM W. E. Moore were also installed as charter members of the Ti's new organization. General Jerome, Commanding General, FMFLant, Aircraft, was returning from observing Marine operations in TRAEX. It is believed that General Jerome's flight was the first steam catapulted launching of an aircraft flying an officer holding the rank of general. Admiral Moore is Commander, Training Command, Atlantic Fleet. This is the story of a town, Grover's Corners, New Hampshire, and how it expanded. Like Lilliput and Shang-ri-la, it will, at first glance seem to posess an illusive, ephemeral quality. Its main streets are crowded with familiar people, all throughly engrossed in each other's business. Fleeting, mirrored impressions of you and your neighbors flash into scope. On Tuesday evening, March 15, Grover's Corners, ("Our Town," to the unlimited) will relocate for a four night stand at Marina Point, the Little Theatre, Guantanamo Bay, presiding. But if Rome wasn't built in a day, how can Grover's Corners materialize in one brief evening? Obviously even in drama, it takes some doing, especially when progress is interrupted by watch bills, transfers, other social obligations, and artistic temperment. Even with elaborate scenes omitted, in lieu of what Alexander Basky termed 'presentational' theater, the stage crew is far from extinct. Jim Cheek, who created the "Angel's" set, and Jim Seay are aided and abetted by a gallery of non-union volunteer painters. Talent, like anything else needs advertising, hence the addition of sign dabbers, program designers, photographers, ticket sellers and good word spreaders. Contributing in terms of light diffusion and color (Continued on Page Three) 0

PAGE 2

m Page Two M Saturday, 12 Mac st9s55s What's Doin' Stateside Navy Wives' Club by Pat Aldridge Sunday, 13 March 1955 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 145-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Roase Chapel Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. JI. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner GRATITUDE If it can be stated that "all the world loves a lover", then it is equally true that all the world respects a grateful person. How often have we not found it so in our lives, the detail done for the individual is made so much easier when we know that the person will be thankful. It is not for the motive of praise or reward, but when appreciation is shown or expressed for our actions, the relationship becomes one more of friendship than necessity. You have heard as often as I the remark, "that's the last time I'll ever do anything for that person, he didn't even say thanks". Our very expressions portray the fact that we are not looking so much for reward as for gratitude. Perhaps the thing that bothers us in this matter of ingratitude is the impression of pride that may accompany it. Very often it is carelessness or thoughtlessness, but the air of superiority may also be given. Basically it is characteristic of our human nature to be sociable, and that sociability is made so much easier when thankfulness and appreciation are included in our every day contacts. Granted that our life is a bit unusual due to military circumstances, and granted that there is no room in a military order for "please", still there are many points of contact where military relationship should include gratitude. I've never heard yet of a nan who was hurt by saying "thanks". Besides the restrictions due to the military, there is also a closeness of life due to the nature of this Base. Such demands thoughtfulness and care. How much easier would be our daily routine both military and social were the habit of "thank you" not only said but shown and meant in our daily living. We are in the midst of the religious season of Lent, the purpose of which is self-improvement. It is indeed a satisfactory time to check our own lives and habits. America's churches are taking note of the mounting numbers of both very young and old people in this country ...The National Council of Churches says that clergymen should start devoting more time to the special needs of both age group,. .It points out that within the next 20 years, the number of Americans in their late sixties will increase nearly 50 percentto about 20 million .At the same time, children under five will outnumber all other age groups ...According to the Council, one of the major problems facing the churches is finding effective ways for retired older people to occupy their leisure ..The boom in young children means steadily increasing pressure on the churches' already strained Sunday school facilities. A new "miracle" drug, reported to be far more effective than cortisone, has just been made available for treatment of America's 7.5 million rheumatic arthritis sufferers ...Called metacortandracin, it was put on the market after being successfully tested on more than 1,000 patients. An extensive network of community colleges -built within commuting distance of virtually every U.S. high school graduatehas been proposed at a Chicago conference of educators ...The group warned that the present number of colleges and universities is inadaquate to meet the problem of spiraling enrollments .If estimates prove right, college enrollments will jump from 2.5 million to five million or more by 1970. ..As a solution, the educators advised doubling the present number of 130,000 college teachers and creating several hundred two-and four year community-supported colleges. New Jersey's recently opened Garden State Parkway is probably the most modern in the world -it boasts an automatic toll collector ...The electronic de. vice does everything the uniformed toll-taker used to do and much more efficently ...If a motorist tries to get away without paying, an alarm rings, red signals flash, and a camera takes pictures of the driver, license plate and car. We may often wish that the other person was better, but do we try to apply the same standards to our own lives. None of us are so self sufficient that we can exist without the help of our neighbor. If we have moved along so far with out this habit of gratitude, it has been due to the greater virtue of others who have excused our faults. Is it not about time that we contributed to the joyfulness of human relations by adding our contribution of gratitude. Despite the limitations of position and place there will be found in the lives of all of us many opportunities to express gratitude. Thinking it over we must honestly admit that there are some persons for whom we'd move the world and so often those persons are the ones who say "thanks". T. J. Foley The happy sound of hilarious laughter eminated from the Marine Family Restaurant last night as members and guests of the Guantanamo Bay Navy Wives' Club were judged on the agility of their imaginations following an hour long unique "scavenger hunt". The motif of this unusual fun fest had been kept a strict secret and all who arrived at the appointed hour were completely surprised when handed lists ordering they sally forth to seek such imaginative items as "something found under someones' bed other than your own". One hour was allowed during which each couple attempted outdoing another in the gathering together of several more such nonspecific objects. The results of this exercise in mental and, in some cases, physical gymnastics judged during a rewarding late supper following reassemblage at the resteraunt provided many moments of vast amusement. Collections presented by the versatile "scavengers" were all so good as to cause the judges no little consternation prior to final decision and prize awarding. Plans for future activities, under the able direction of Pearl Piercy, will include a St. Patricks' Day "Mad Hatter" luncheon at which members and guests are asked to appear under a chapeau of creative personal design. The following two Thursday afternoons, regular club social days will find members enjoying a "sew and gab" session in order to finish a project quilt of intricate pattern intended for raffle and a "bigger, better bingo". Both functions will take place at the Villamar Lyceum. VU-10 Prop Blast by Bill Wright Reporting for duty with VU-10 this past week was Richard B. Smith, AT3, USN. Smith reported aboard from NATTC, Memphis, Tenn., and is a native of Ponca City, Okla. Welcome aboard "Smitty and we hope you enjoy your stay on the Rock. William D. Jayne, ALC, USN, was sworn into the Naval service by the Commanding Officer, CDR D. E. McCoy 4 March 1955. Jayne has twelve and one half years previous service and reenlisted for the second time. Good Luck Chief. With "Operation Springboard" rapidly coming to a close, VU-10 personnel can once again give a sigh of relief. For the past two months the squadron has maintained an average of 40 flights, six days a week. During the month of February the squadron flew a total of 1482 hours with three pilots putting over one hundred hours in the air. The top man on the totem pole was G. C. Pirtle, ACC/AP flying 106.9 hours. All squadron "White Hats" are invited to attend the joint VU-10, NAS Dances held at the NAS, EM Club frequently. Many of the squadron enlisted men enjoyed the evening of 7 March with enough drinks and girls for everyones dancing pleasure, but we want to see more smiling faces out next time. Anyone desiring to learn the "Cuban Mombo" contact the PIO office for entrance to the C. E. Driskill, Dance Studio. 0 The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 12 March 1955 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LTJG J. D. Byerley ------Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC .---.Editor H. L. Sisson, JO3 ---News F. L. Cannon, JO-3-------_Photographer D. C. Roberts, JOSN---------Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. An Editorial,. What's Your Line? Our friend Sturdley and his pals are anxious to make good as salesmen. They know what product they are trying to sell. How about you. As Americans we have to sell the American way of life, not just knock the competition-which is Communism. But just what is this "American Way" we all talk about. The basic concepts of America's way of life are contained in the Declaration of Independence. It's all there in a nutshell: Americans believe that all men are created eual, and that Godnot the State-has given men certain rights which cannot be taken away. Some of these rights are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness-the right to put money in the bank, to own property, to speak and write freely, to worship without interference. Americans believe that men set up governments to protect these rights, and that these governments are controlled by the people-not the people controlled by the State. In short, Americans believe in the dignity of man. The Reds regard man simply as a tool of the almighty State. (AFPS) THE INDIAN m7

PAGE 3

ft Saturday, 12 March 1955 VU-10 Chief Moves To Trailer Home Sometime next week, C. C. Roberts, ADC, of VU-10 will culminate eight months of work and planning when his family move from Central Bargo into a new home. The new home is a house trailer. Located behind Victory Hill across from the Navy Exchange Gas Station, Roberts' trailer is the first to ever be shipped to the Naval Base. This particular trailer, however, is by no means new to the Roberts family except their youngest daugter who was born here on the Naval Base. Several years ago, Chief Roberts sold a home in Jacksonville, Florida to invest in this trailer home with the long-range plan of using it as their home until retirement from the Navy. Actual planning for the moving of the trailer to Guantanamo Bay began shortly after Chief Roberts arrived here last May. Realizing that it would take "a bit of doing" since no one else had ever completed plans for bringing a trailer here, Chief Roberts went ahead and put his name on the base housing list. Next week there will be a vacancy on the housing list that wouldn't have been there if the Chief had not ventured to bring his home on wheels here. From the beginning, it was Roberts' plan to bring the trailer here completely at his own expense, including the shipping costs from Florida .After the initial request was made and approved in June, the first difficulties arose. The trailer was rented out to another family, arrangements had to be made for shipping, plus the selection of a suitable site. The site was selected by Commanding Officer, Naval Station. Although much difficulty was encountered all the way through, Chief Roberts states that the cooperation from all concerned here on the base was "excellent." Actual shipping took two and a half weeks at a cost of $200 by the East India Shipping Lines. And even when the trailer arrived, the Chief's problems were not finished. Unloading proved to be a problem Mello, Luzzaro New CPO Club Officers J. B. Mello, AKC, from the Naval Air Station was elected President of the Chief Petty Officers' Club at the regular semi-annual election of officers last Saturday. Frank Luzzaro, SKC, from Fleet Training Group was chosen to be vice-president for the next six months. The position of secretary-treasurer is a permanent billet appointed by the commanding officer of the Naval Station and is currently filled by S. A. Roth, MMC. since the ship's booms could not handle the 6,700 pound trailer. Then after the trailer was unloaded and moved to its location, water lines, power lines, and sewage lines had to be hooked up as well as the installation of a water meter and light meter along with minor grading and filling. Utilities here on the base were another problem. With the permission of the Public Works Officer, Chief Roberts installed his own water, sewage and power lines. Bottle gas for the trailer stove will be purchased in 100 pound bottles in Guantanamo City. Yet, with all the problems and waiting, the Roberts are still looking forward to their moving day next week. Both Chief and Mrs. Roberts like trailer living and are ardent supporters of the life. It has many advantages over even a modern house, and both are very convincing in their convictions. The trailer itself originally cost $6,000. It is 35 feet long and will accomadate up to seven people. It has a completely modern kitchendinette, living room, and bedrooms. States Mrs. Roberts, "It's got everything that a modern house has except that it hasn't got as much room." Finally, the Roberts believe that the location will be a very convienent one with easy access to the Commissary Store, Navy Exchange, the Movie Lyceum. and the Naval Base School C. C. Roberts, ADC, of VU-10 looks over his house trailer up its arrival on the Naval Base. Robert's trailer is the first ever to be shipped to Guantanamo Bay. MCB-1 Celebrates SeaBee 13th Anniversary Miss Evelyn Ralston, Miss MCB-1 of 1955 presents the first piece of birthday cake to "Pappy" Gray, oldest man in MCB-1 during the recent celebration of the 13th anniversary of the SeaBees. Assisting Miss Ralston is John Rumberger, President of the Enlisted Men's Recreation Council. 'Our Town' ., (Continued from Page One) nuance are Bob Pope, Milt Merz, and Fred Holland, craftsmen at the switchboad. Included also in our census, are House Manager, George Hodges, general manager Joe West, and stage manager (and director) Alan Wagner. We've been neglecting "those ouija boards of the playwright's thought vibrations," the actors themselves. For, as Dobson stated, "this is the actor's gift; to share all moods, all passions, nor to care one whit for scene, for he without, can lead man's minds the roundabout". But "Our Town," would soon be as a ghost village in the dessert, were it not for the final vital component. David Belasco expressed the last clue to a prominent theater goer: "Madame, you belong to opening nights. Your presence in the orchestra seat is just as vital to the play's success as the best performance of all my actors." So it is, that next week, for a trivial price, you have the opportunity to become citizens of Grover's Corners, Sultan County, New Hampshire, United States of America, the solar system, the universe, the mind of God." THE CAST Stage Manager .--Alan Wagner Emily ------------Evelyn Leach George -----------George Engle Dr. Gibbs -Chuck Dieterle Mrs. Gibbs -Evelyn Purdue Mr. Webb --------Tom Judkins Mrs. Webb -Mildred Morgan Simon Stimson -Fred Green Mrs. Soames ---------Pat Moe Sam Craig -----Roland Cailler Constable Warren Chet Blakelock Sally Webb -----Susan Tipler Si Crowell -------Jim Bailey Last Saturday, 5 March, the officers and men of Mobile Construction Battalion ONE joined in with SeaBees from Adak to Australia in the celebration of the founding of the Navy's construction forces. Beginning at 1445 in the enlisted men's hall in the SeaBee camp, the celebration was high-lighted with the crowning of a SeaBee queen, Miss Evelyn Ralston, Miss MCB-1 of 1955. Beginning the short program was a welcoming speech by CDR 0. J. Martyn, Commanding Officer, MCB-1, followed by the crowning of the queen by the president of the Enlisted Men's Recreation Council, John Rumberger, SW2. Miss Ralston then cut the immense birthday cake and presented the first slice to the man with the longest service in the battalion, Herschel Gray, CE2. who truly deserves his nickname of "Pappy," has seen five years service in MCB-1. Guests at the celebration were RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander Naval Base, CAPT G. M. Holley, Chief of Staff, CDR W. M. Gordon, Base Civil Engineer, CDR E .L. Rowan, Public Works Officer, the Naval Base, chaplains, CDR J. J. Sullivan and LCDR K. G. Peterson, and other high ranking officers of the Naval Base commands. Following the cake cutting ceremony, refreshments were served to members of MCB-1 and their guests. The Naval Base band furnished the music for the celebration. Joe Crowell Jr. -Larry Snyder Howie Newsome -Ronnie Estafan Rebecca Gibbs ---------Vi Merz Professor Willard -Joe West 4 4m THE INDIAN m m Page Three

PAGE 4

am Pa e Four ma Saudy 12 Marc 1955 VU-10 Golfers Hold Lead In Intra-Command Tourney The Intra-Command Golf Tournament swung into its second round of matches last week-end with VU10, the 1954 champions, holding their lead by downing the MCB-1 team, 13 to 2 last Sunday. On Saturday Fleet Training Group edged the Hospital-Dental team, 13 to 11 and Naval Station doubled the NSD-CHB team, 16 to 8. The standings to date are: TEAM POINTS VU-10 Naval Sta. Hosp-Dent FTG NSD-CHB NAS MCB-1 High School Pirates Crown Basketball Queen MATCHES 40 29 24 24 181%z 6 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 The matches scheduled for this week-end are as follows: at 1300 today Hosp-Dent goes against the Naval Station and the NSD-CHB team tees off against FTG: at 0815 tomorrow morning MCB-1 meets NAS. The league leaders VU-10, draw a bye for this weekend's play. A team of Naval Base golfers will compete against the team from the USS POCONO Sunday morning at 0900. Ladies Golf Shots by Betty Lou Tipler On Wednesday morning all four flights played a Blind Five Tournament on the back nine holes. The results were: FIRST FLIGHT 1st-Jane McElroy 2nd-tie Marion Caruthers Edna Edwards SECOND FLIGHT 1st-Marge Sheean 2nd-tie Jean Vogel Val Evans THIRD FLIGHT 1st-four-way tie Cynthia Holley Audrey Page Vi Mers Charlie Murphy 2nd-tie Fran Shadowski Twylla Drace FOURTH FLIGHT 1st-Jean Grady 2nd-tie Mary McFadden Twylla Drace After the tournament the prizes from the Ringer Tournament were presented. The nice silver pieces were received with great joy. The ladies are all proud of Doris Rothenberg's good sportsmanship for accepting an error made during the tournament with grace. Bev Larson has just taken over the tremendous job of Treasurer for the Scotch Foursomes and we do appreciate it. We got two new members this week to make up for the two we lost last week. A big welcome to Jean Grady and Sarah Brotherton. QUEEN OF THE COURTS. Pretty Sharon Keenan, a freshman at the Naval Base High School, is crowned "Queen of the 1955 Basketball Season" by Pirate captain Edgar Heimer during pre-game ceremonies last Monday night. The traditional ceremony marks the closing of the basketball season for High School. The Pirates, far down in the standings, outdid themselves to climax the evening by trouncing the Leeward Point Pointers, 60 to 32. 1955 Marine Intramural Bowling Champions Ladies Bowling W ith only three weeks remaining, Team#1 of the Ladies Bowling League still stands in first place with their narrow margin of one game. Since the begining of second half play, Team #1 has held the lead spot, never by more than two games. This past week, it suddenly looked dark for the leaders when the final scores showed two loses for the day, but a rec'unt on the score was demnoided, and another victory was added, by one pin. Emily Griffin, the most consistent howler in the league still holds her high average of 171 for the l e a d e r s h i p in that department. Francis Grounds, however, rolled the high game of the week with a high 211. STANDINGS TEAM Team#1 Team#2 Team#6 Team#8 Team#4 Team #5 Team#7 Team#3 Team#10 Team#9 W 19 18 13 13 12 12 10 9 8 6 HIGH TEN AVERAGES E. Griffin P. Way F. Grounds J. King S. Wenderlich M. Powers C. Godbout A. Tagliabue B. Gardner M. Green L 5 6 11 11 12 12 14 15 16 18 171 150 145 144 140 140 135 135 135 134 HGH GAMES THIS WEEK F. Grounds M. Powers E. Griffin M. Green J. King L. Neely M. Pugh J. O'Brien E. Saunders Top row left to right, James Morissette, Wayne Straw, Joe Androvich. Bottom row left to right, John Wert, Paul Hoffer, Bernard Lee. 211 189 18s 187 180 177 176 173 173 Naval Station Bowling STANDINGS TEAM FTG#2 Third Div NSD Security Group Fifth Div. "M" FTG#1 Commissary Store Fleet Boat Pool MCB-1 Fleet Camera Party Fifth Div. "R" Second Div. CHB-1 Fifth Div. "ET" Hospital 11th Div. First Div. Sixth Div. HIGH AVERAGE Gagliano Marshall Schmidt Naval Station Special Services Department employees begin their periodic cleaning of the Naval Station enlisted men's swimming pool in the Fleet Recreation Area. The pool, the largest fresh water pool on the base, holds 310,000 gallons. It was drained last Sunday, the cleaning and painting took two days, and it was filled and ready for use again on Wednesday. W 46 44 43 40 39 38 38 33 33 28 26 26 25 25 24 13 11 8 HIGH TEAM SINGLE CHB-1 NSD FTG#2 HIGH TEAM SERIES CHB-1 Commissary Store NSD L 14 16 17 20 21 22 22 27 27 32 34 34 35 35 36 47 49 52 171 170 166 903 887 872 2576 2433 2411 4 THE INDIAN ft Saturday, 12 March 1955

PAGE 5

ft Saturday, 12 March 1955 Satus~~~~ag dV,12Micv95eH IDA Indians Win 1955 Hoop Title; Tournament Begins Monday by Hal Davis The Naval Station Indians slid sideways into the 1955 Base League championship last Monday night when the combined Hospital-Dental quintet upset a slightly favored Naval Air Station Flyer team, 40 to 38, to leave only a weakened Stevedore squad in the path of the Braves. The following night the Indians rolled over the Stevedores, 65 to 35, to clinch decisively the title. As far as the Indians were concerned, it was fortunate the Medirs were hitting in the game of the week Monday because Thursday night the Flyers came roaring back with Duke Snyder and Hal Ring hitting from all angles to swamp the champs, 57 to 40. Ring, clinching second place in the "top ten" scorers, dropped 20 through the cords while Snyder was busy pounding through 23 for himself to cop third place honors in the scoring department. Slewitzke, the tenth man on the "top ten" helped the Indians' cause with 11, but it wasn't enough. With only two more games to go after The Indian's sports deadline, the standings that appear elsewhere in this section will very probably be the final order. The only change that could occur as far as place order is concerned is in the SeaBee niche. If the Stingers, just back from Norfolk and the ComServLant tourney, dropped last night's game, they will be tied with Medical. Otherwise the standings remain as printed with the Indians on top and the Flyers in a solid second place. At this point we would like to give the Fleet Training Group Trainers a pat on their collective backs for their stick-to-it attitude. As the season wore on and it soon became apparent that the Trainers were unable to muster enough men to provide any stiff competition for the rest of the league, a "small" team would have quit and dropped out. But not the Trainers. They showed up at every scheduled game except two, ready to take their expected licking, but not take it lying down. So, a tip of The Indians head feathers goes to the Trainers for good sportsmanship. THIS WEEK'S RESULTS FRIDAY, March 4: VU-10-63; HiSchool-61 CHB-1-47; FTG-32 MONDAY, March 7: HiSchool-60; CHB-1-35 Medical-40; NAS-38 TUESDAY, March 8: NavSta-65; CHB-1-35 Marines-74; FTG-43 WEDNESDAY, March 9: HiSchool-2; MCB-1-0 (frf't) VU-10-75; Lwrd. Pt.-34 THURSDAY, March 10: NAS-57; NavSta-40 Medical-62; FTG-22 THE POST-SEASON TOURNAMENT The post-season tournament starts Monday night. It will be single-elimination style with all ten teams competing. The drawing for positions will be held this morning at the Naval Station Special Services office. The Naval Air Station Flyers Edgar Heimer, of the Pirates squad, one of the jumpin'est players on the court tops Pointer Fortin (9) and another unidentified Pointer as he grabs the ball during the Pirate avalanche last Monday night at Marine Site. Pirates swamped the Pointers, 60 to32. were the winners of the 1954 post-season tourney, and there is a good possibility that they can repeat this year. The Indians will be out for a clean sweep of the hoop honors, and they are always dangerous. The Mallards loom as a potential dark-horse, and the Marines have been running hot and cold all season. The Medics are the question mark again, they could easily upset the applecart, just as they did in the league play. The Stingers returned from Norfolk minus several of their first string so they'll be putting almost a new unknown squad on the floor. The rest are outside shots. All in all, it adds up to a tense week of basketball to wind up the season, and it's strictly a case of "pay your money and take your choice." Basketball Standings (Including Thursday night games) TEAM NavSta NAS MCB-1 Medical Marines VU-10 CHB-1 HiSchool Lwrd. Pt. FTG W 16 15 12 12 10 8 7 4 4 0 L PCT 2 .888 3 .833 5 .706 6 .666 7 .586 9 .470 10 .412 14 .222 14 .222 18 .000 Medics Down Flyers Moebus (10) of the Midics and Krygier (7) of the Flyers go after the rebound during the Medical -Flyer game last Monday night. Rose (3), Snyder (11) and King (behind Moebus) stand by for the assist. The Medics knocked over the Flyers by two points, 40 to 38, thus practically insuring the Naval Station Indians the 1955 championship. TOP TEN SCORERS PLAYER TEAM GAMES POINTS AVG. Heimer High School 17 288 16.9 Ring NAS 17 275 16.1 Snyder NAS 17 268 15.7 Gerhardt CHB-1 12 263 21.9 Houchin VU-10 16 218 13.6 Morgan Naval Station 18 215 11.9 Holmes Marines 17 208 12.2 Gatti Marines 17 206 12.1 King Hospital-Dental 17 203 11.9 Slewitzke Naval Station 18 198 11.0 (**Denotes player's score as not final) Special Bus Runs For 'Our Town' A Special bus has bee scheduled for personnel in the Bay Hill Barracks, the Fleet Recreation Area, and the Fleet Landing who wish to attend the Little Theatre's production of "Our Town." The bus will run all five nights, Tuesday through Saturday. Departing from Bay Hill at 1915 and stopping at the Fleet Recreation Area at 1925 and stopping at the Fleet Landing at 1935, the "Our Town" bus will arrive at the Community Auditorium on Marina Point fifteen minutes before curtain time. A Naval Base is where the sailors are full of life, happiness and the pursuit of liberty. Throwing a kiss is like applauding in front of your TV set. "Do you know anything about my wife's whereabouts?" Mr. Swanson asked his cook. "Yes, sir," was the prompt ans-wer. "She put them in the wash," The busy Admiral asked his yoeman where his pencil was. "It's behind your ear, admiral," he replied. "Come, come, Brown, I'm busy man. Which ear." 4 m m Page Five THE INDIAN

PAGE 6

Page Six NAS Yeoman Wins Foundation Award Frederick J. Green, YN3, was notified that for his letter in the "What America Means to Me" contest, sponsored by the Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge, Pa., he has been awarded an honorable mention certificate. The grand prize in the annual essay-writing contest was won by an Army corporal, James R. Odermatt, stationed at Fort Ord, Calif. Odermatt's letter was reprinted in The Indian last week. Green assigned to the personnel office at Naval Air Station, is the only one on the base to be notified of an award in the contest. His letter follows. What America Means To Me There is no cloak and dagger shadow being cast across my threshold, awakening me from my peaceful slumber to forcibly carry me, screaming into the night of fear and sudden death. There is no danger of being reported to evil state officials for speaking my mind, and passing on to others my conception of our way of government. Out of the innumerable libraries in this country, I can read any manuscript of my chosing, composed by a censored or uncensored mind. There are no one-way streets of vocations, instead there are many tributaries, which will freely educate abilities so that utilization of talents can be a benefit to those who hunger for an unbiased appreciation of knowledge, that is so freely accessable. Wherever one travels throughout this vast and beautiful land, there is always a house of devine worship. Here, the words of truth and love are freely spoken to all nationalities, regardless of race or creed. The soul prays in complete tranquility. No brutal force can take this away, for death is the final reward of devine grace. Wars have scarred hearts, but the light of almighty God has remained sustainable in the souls. Every four years, the citizens of this noble nation take leave of their habitual routines to choose a president. This man is chosen to lead their country in a democratic way. No one is forced to vote, but it is a duty every citizen should fulfill. Not one is nominated to hold this highest and most respected position, several are, and the one receiving the highest vote is elected. He so governs this land according to the provisions of the Constitution, which is the foundation of AMERICA. Along the avenues of this century, America has played a predominent role upon the stage of world affairs. Unfortunate nations, ravaged by the destructions of war, have called for help, which we have answered. Unaccountable lives have been given for the preservation of that which is so sacred-.FREEDOM!. When an individual comits a crime against the laws of our society, he or she isn't guilty until proven as such. This individual is tried by a court composed of people whose sole purpose is to bring justice. This court could be convened indefinately until it is absolutely positive the innocent isn't accused of an unjustified guilt. No where else can a man, moman or child be more contented. Never before has a more magnificent spectical been seen than the statue which guards the ocean entrance of the largest city of this land. This city alone signifies the posSome Navy Children Eligible For Scholarships by William A. Johnson, PN1 Recently BUPERS issued a notice concerning two scholarships that may by awarded to children of service personnel. They are: The Clausey Medal of Honor Scholarship Foundation and the Navy Wives Clubs of America Scholarship Foundation. The Clausey Medal of Honor Scholarship Foundation was established in memory of the late Lieutenant John Joseph Clausey, and will provide a scholarship award, to be used at or beyond the college level, for a child of an officer or enlisted man of the navy or Marine Corps who was killed in action or who died as a result of wounds received in actual combat during World War II or the Korean Conflict. The award made by this foundation will be in the form of an outright grant to be made each year in an amount not to exceed $500. This award may be given to one individual or it may be divided between two or more at the discretion of the Selection Committee. The Navy Wives Clubs of America Scholarship Foundation was established in September of 1953 by the Navy Wives of America, and will make scholarship awards to sons and daughters of enlisted men in the first seven pay grades, to be used in obtaining college educations, vocational business, or other training which will enable the recipient to make more valuable contributions to society than would otherwise be possible. The applicant for this award must be the child, legally adopted child, or stepchild of an enlisted member of the Navy, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard on active duty, retired with pay, or deceased. Awards made by this foundation shall be outright grants to be made in at least the sum of $250. per academic year for the boy or girl selected. The number and value of the award to be offered each year shall be determined by the members of the foundation. Another scholarship offered is the Valley Forge Military Academy Scholarship. The Valley Forge Military Academy has offered eight scholarships yearly to sons of Regular Officers of the Armed Forces having high academic standing and interested in military life. These scholarships are awarded for a 3 year period in the amount of $1,015 per year, which is about half of the all-inclusive tuition rate. The applicant must be either a boy between 14 and 16 years of age preparing to enter the 10th grade who will continue on a Valley Forge to receive his secondary school diploma, or a young man preparing to enter the 12th grade who will receive his secondary diploma and continue on for 2 years of junior college to receive a Junior College Associate in Arts diploma from the academy. All information in regards to the General Eligibility Requirements and application can be obtained at the Information and Education Office, Bay Hill, Barracks #4, Across from Civilian Dental Office. Phone 8553. terity which exists. Let us never take all this magnificence for granted, because America must always retain it's traditions. These traditions have become the guiding light for the future of civilization. It never must loose it's brilliance. 0 Girl Scouts Observe 43rd Anniversary Here To-day, March 12, 1955, The Girl Scouts of America are celebrating their Forty-third Birthday. Juliette Low, the Founder of Girl Scouting in the United States, started the first Girl Scout troop in Savannah, Georgia, on March 12, 1912. Very soon after the group was organized, younger girls wanted to join; so in 1914, the younger girls were organized and were called "Rosebuds". The little girls objected to the name, so in 1915, Lord Baden-Powell changed the name to "Brownies," naming them after the useful "little people" of Scotland and northern England. All girls in the second through fourth grades in school or aged seven thru ten, are eligible to be members of the Brownie program. Girls, ten years old thru thirteen, are Girl Scouts; and from about thirteen thru seventeen, they are the Senior Girl Scouts. On the Naval Base there are over a hundred girls in the Brownies, over sixty girl Scouts, and several Senior Scouts. The purpose of Girl Scouting is to help each girl become a happy, resourceful person herself, a responsible member of her group, growing up into a useful citizen. The Scouting Program provides a wide choice of interesting and useful activities for the girls. Although the Girl Scout program on the base is rather limited in many ways, there are also a number of advantages for the girls here that groups in the United States do not have. The girls are able to have hikes, outings, arts and crafts, and many of the usual features of the program along with visits to the industries of Cuba. The Scouts have been able to participate in many of the Base activities that are useful and educational for the girls. During the recent Guantanamo Bay Charity Carnival, the Girl Scouts and Brownies sponsored the "Cake and Lemonade Booth". In August, the Scouts and Brownies take an active part in the Annual Scout Circus. Recently, the aircraft carrier, USS INTREPID, held openhouse for all the Scouts of the base, naming the day "Scout Day Aboard the INTREPID." The boys and girls of the base enjoyed the most interesting and informative visit to the ship. This year the Girl Scouts and Brownies have participated in an expansion program in membership and in a fund-raising drive for the purpose of obtaining a "hut" or meeting place that is adequate for the growth of the group. The membership of the organization has more than doubled previous years and the girls are eagerly looking forward to moving into their new quarters. On this, the forty-third birthday of the Girl Scouts, the members, leaders, parents of Scouts, and members of the troop Committee wish to express their thanks to all the people of the base who have helped to make the Scouting Program here on the base a success this past year. We are looking forward to a better and more complete program for the girls of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Policeman (to man staggering home at 0300): "Where are you going at this time of morning?" Man: "To a lecture," 6 Dental Tech Quota Still Open In order to maintain the authorized strength of Dental Technicians throughout the Navy, approximately 30 candidates per month will be required during the period from now to 1 August 1955 to fill quotas at the Class "A" Dental Technician Schools. The schools are located at San Diego, Great Lakes, and Bainbridge. Volunteer candidates are desired and must be qualified in accordance with current directives with the following exceptions: 1. A combined GCT/ARI score will be waivered to 78. 2. Recommendation by a Dental Officer may be based on a personal interview rather than serving a period as a dental striker. The course of instruction at the Class "A" School is of 16 weeks duration. The course is designed to prepare an individual entering the Dental Rating Group for the general duties of a dental technician. In addition to the dental duties of the rating, the curriculum includes the study of hygiene, sanitation, first aid and minor surgery, property and accounting procedures, basic dental equipment maintenance procedures and elementry prosthetic labratory procedures. Upon successful completion of the course, graduates are assigned duty with dental officers in a closely knit pattern of professional teamwork. Interested personnel are requested to contact CWO Dote, Administration Officer, U. S. Naval Dental Clinic in person or phone 8556 for further details. Legion Auxiliary Holds Pot Luck Hoe Down All you American Legion guys and Auxiliary dolls be sure and don your jeans, boots, and whirly dresses. Tonight is our covered dish diner and square dance. Last month's party was so much fun that we decided to have them every month, or at least until summer vacations begin. So, bring your favorite covered dish and we'll see you at 6:30 P. M. Tuesday, March 15 is our regular meeting night. The American Legion Auxiliary's annual school spelling bee is in full swing. We will have our oral spelling bee the night of April 6th. A new feature has been added this year. A prize will be given to the most improved speller in each class of the 4th, 5th & 6th grades to be determined by two written tests. So, come on you kids, buckle down and see if you can't bring home a prize to show the folks. Sign in laundry window-We do not tear your laundry with machinery. We do it carefully by hand. Marine Guard: Halt! Who goes there.? Sailor: Friend-with a bottle. Marine: Advance bottle to be recognized. Pass friend. "Just because my eyes are red is no sign I'm drunk. For all you know I may be a white rabbit." Go' 4m THE INDIAN M Saturday, 12 March 1955

PAGE 7

Saturday, 12 March 1955 sm Page Sevei FTG Bulletin by Ron Federman Put out the welcome mat for two new members of the staff at FTG CHELEC Abbott, and LT Dent. Mr. Abbott reported from the USS EDISTO (AGB-2), and Mr Dent reported to our command froni the U;S. Naval Ammunition Depot, Earle, New Jersey. Mr Abbott's hometown is Noioton Heights, Connecticut, where his wife and two children are presently residing. He will work with the Engineering Department at FTG. LT Dent is also married, and has a daughter 10 years old. He is a native of San Bernardino, Calif. and for the time being Mrs. Dent and her daughter are living in Brooklyn, New York. Mr Dent will relieve LT Hutton, who recently received his orders. He has been assigned to the Gunery Department. CDR King, our former Navigation Officer, left Gtmo on the 5th of March for a tour of duty at the Naval Academy, Annapolis. It will be strange not seeing the commander's name on the top of the Golf Ladder. Incidently, LCDR Kuba is presently the top man on the aforementioned "ladder". LT Stafford and LCDR Mathews will leave the area today. but they will be back in a matter of days. The two officers will attend a symposium at the U. S. Naval Damage Control Training Center, in Philadelphia, on TAD, for a period of about six days. In the enlisted ranks, Gregloit, MMC, and Briggs, YN2, were transferred recently. The former will report to the Commanding Officer, U. S. Naval Receiving Station, Brooklyn, for transfer to Fleet Reserve and release to inactive duty The latter will report to NAS, Lakehurst, New Jersey, for a tour of shore duty. Several days ago Wright, PN2 was glancing through the latest issue of "Navy Times", when his eyes lit up like a Christmas tree. His reaction was caused by the fact that his name was included in a list of men selected for Officer's Candidate School (Supply Corps) convening on 16 May. Although it's not official, in all probability Wright will be packing his seabag in readiness for a trip to Newport in the near future. LT Gillespie, attached to the Communications Department, has an occasion to rejoice. Wednesday night his wife and two children are due to arrive here via airplane. A word of advice! Watch for the March issue of "All Hands." This issue is devoted to the personnel of the Navy; officer and enlisted men and women. It is a "career issue", and presents a collection of arguements in favor of a naval career. It describes such benefits as pay and allowances, allotments, medical care, insurance, education and training, paths of promotion and advancement, housing for families, etc. Those of you who have had the privilege of attending any of the character guidance lectures given by Chaplin Peterson recently, no doubt found it very interesting, as we did. A series of lectures are being presented at FTG on Saturday mornings, and all hands should avail themselves of the oportunity to attend. The FTG Bowling Team#2 climaxed a tremendous season last week, as they took three games from Fleet Boat Pool, thus clinchThe Toastmaster by Joe West God wove a web of lovliness Of clouds and stars and birds, But made not anything at all So beautiful as words UNZIP YOUR LIP Having ideas in your mind and not putting them into circulation in speech is like having money in your pocket and not spending it. The potential value is there, but neither money nor ideas will buy anything until you turn loose. Selfexpression helps us to grow and to develop. The speaker has to sell his ideas, his goods, his causeeven himself. His speech is the sales process. In ordinary conversation, every man is "selling" himself everytime he talks. He is creating an impression on those who hear him, and the good or bad that impression depends on how he presents himself through his words. Ability to speak clearly, concisely and convincingly is the key by which the door of opportunity has been opened to many a man. People judge him very largely by what he says, especially if his words are backed up by deeds. I have seen multitudes of men promote themselves, win advancement, step up to higher salary brackets, greater influence, and larger opportunities for achievement, simply because they learned to interpret themselves to other people through speech. The man who can talk in public is the natural leader in his own circle, and in widening circles as his ability becomes known. Success in public speech almost invariably leads a man into a larger life and increased usefulness. AND BEND AN EAR Every speaker should learn to be a good listener. And by being a good listener, I mean a listener who listens analytically-one who digests what he hears, who does not swallow it whole and without question, but always seeks to find the truth. Analytical listening, critical listening or speech appraisal, as you may prefer to call it, should be practiced by every person as a protection against spellbinders, stampeders and inciters to mob action. It is like the well-known sales resistance in that it helps one to resist the emotions of the moment, and to act on sober second thought. We learn to speak by speaking. Practice is the price of sucess in speech. The only way to become and continue to be a good speaker, in my opinion, is to keep at it. Even an able orator loses his inspiration and his fire when he grows rusty through lack of practice. ing first place. Even with several games still to be played, it is impossible for FTG to vacate their present position in the league standings, and congratulations are in order. USS USS USS USS SHIP'S ARRIVALS Siboney Sat. 12 Stockham Mon. 14 Woodson Fri. 18 Haverfield Mon. 7 Mar Mar Mar Mar Date Reporting to FTG Control USS Siboney 14 Mar USS Stockham 15 Mar USS Woodson 18 Mar USS Haverfield 18 Mar SHIP'S DEPARTURES USS H. J. Ellison Tues. 15 Mar 0 MAgiOC uostoes by Paul A. Hoffer, USMC DEPARTURES One man from Headquarters and one from Security Section will depart for the States this week. Sgt. Richard F. Fournier will report to Marine Corps Schools, Quantico, Virginia for duty, and PFC. Earnest L. Noe will report to Norfolk, Virginia for discharge. BOWLING "Headquarters" became the Marine Barracks Bowling Champions for 1955 by winning both the first and second round of the bowling league. Winning 41 and losing only 15 for the season. The season will officially end this week with four games to go. Standings thus far are as follows: HEADQUARTERS 21 7 Team#2 14 10 Taem#3 12 12 Team#1 12 12 SNCO's 12 12 Team#4 10 14 OFFICERS 9 15 SUPPLY 6 14 BASEBALL With one week of practice under their belt, Manager Swords is very pleased with the fine showing and candidate turn out. The past week has been mainly devoted to exercising and running. TSGT. Gradus will assist Captain Swords in coaching the team. TSGT. Gradus was assistant coach of last years team. MEET YOUR TEAM This is the first in a series of articles on players of the Marine Barracks baseball team. WILLIAM J. WOOD better known as "Woody" to every one on Marine Site, is the newly appointed captain of the baseball team. Wood came to us from Parris Island where he played part of the "54" season before joining us. He played here last year and was an important factor in the winning of the Naval Base Baseball Championship. Wood hails from Lenox, Massachusetts where he played four years of high school baseball. He was named to the "All County" team all four years. Prior to coming in the Marine Corps Wood was offered a contract by the St Louis Browns, now the Baltimore Orioles, but did not sign because he was planning to enter college and did not want to lose his amature status. Wood plays right field, hits and throws from the left side. Hospital Notes by D. W. Degon HEIRPORT NEWS The blue again edges out the pink with three gents and a lady added to the Gtmo Birth Parade. The new occupants of the Nursery are Thomas Ray to AD1 and Mrs. Agnes McDonald; Susan Marie to LCDR and Mrs. Eve McElroy; Donald Curtis to ML2 and Mrs. Elaine Kemp; Douglas Dale to SK3 and Mrs. Katherine Huston. PARTY POSTPONED CWO Huchcraft announced that the Staff party has been postponed Teenage Round-up by Linda Thurston Mild mayhem, as well as the Basketball Queen, reigned last Monday night as the Pirates crushed the Pointers in honor of "Coronation Night." The queen, lovely Sharon Keenan, didn't exactly "help" the team, though. The traditional kiss bestowed upon the captain of the basketball squad shook up Edgar so bad he missed the first few field goal attempts. But then the real effect took hold and he settled down to make 20 points and jump right into the lead of the base's top ten scorers. "We Want Cavanaugh" finally paid off. Even Cavvie racked up a point for himself from the foul line. And Dave Shyver snapped to and presented Her Majesty with two tallies. Everyone was pretty joyful about the whole thing. Even Sharon forgot her majestic role for a split second and started up of the bench for a cheer. Did Ya See. ..Judy and Edgar stompin' at the Teen Age Club party after the game. They could win a prize ...Maryalice and Howie rattling down Sherman in Neal's contraption, holding the doors closed and hoping the alleged car would hold out long enough to get Maryalice home before that magic hour ...Bobby J telling us that she closes her prayers every night with, "and, please, make me clever like Phil Keenan" Our crazy mixed-up Queen. She's undecided now ...Cookie, just asking questions ...Pat B. and his sailing expeidition that didn't pan out ...Irma and Bob handin-handing it toward Cable Station Nita and Pat Carney harmonizing last Sunday night in their pink and blue outfits ...Speaking of Pat C., he got the facts on Heimer's ranch and Cavie's driving all in one lump ...Eunice telling herself "No, no, no," .. Brenda, Dixie and Ana making remarks about the basketball players while munching pretzels ...Sharon P dancing with that handsome Brad Inman ...Betty and Bobby Stone making a hit with everybody. Welcome gals ...Dexter yelling "Timber" in Junior English class ...Nancy H trying to play "Can You Top This" ...Sylvia losing her balance over her bookkeeping ...Dolores R and her "particular boy friend". until Tuesday, 15 March; due to the filled schedule of Phillips Park. SIDELIGHTS Did you see "Radar" Edmunds' excursion of the deep, as he went high jumping in the Bay ...Bob Dunn's damp experience with "ye olde outboard," even the oars got lost ...Doc Hering's Medics edge out NAS 40 to 38. For the past week "Tricky" Fickes' Body and Fender Shop has done a slack business, possibly due to his orders to CLUSA. Frank "Hoss" Sparks is still smoking those big cigars and giving out with that friendly smile on the announcement of the birth of Frank Sparks III. Nick Greco, the Personnel Office's new Yo Yo, is still wondering how the door closed on his finger. m THE INDIAN

PAGE 8

Navy edi -10ND--Gtmo.-0745 gm THE INDIAN mt Saturday, 5 March 1955 BooK*NOOK by Francis L. Cannon, J03 THE SUSQUEHANNA by Carl Carmer This is the 48th book in the "Rivers of America" series. The usiqliehanna winds through three states: New York, Pennsylvania, and Maryland. With it flows a history nore exciting than fiction. Included in the book is the story of Lord Talbot, who kissed the King's tax collector, then promptly stabbed him to death. He then fled to a river cave where trained falcons brought him food. Here too are the stories of the French noblemen who erected a grand log palace for Marie Atoinette; the Pinkerton agent, James McPalan, who sent many murderers to the gallows; the raids of Col. Hartley against upriver Indians and Tories. A fascinating book for a person interested in Susquehanna history. TRIAL by Don M. Mankiewicz This is the 1955 Harper's Prize Novel. The story concerns a young lawyer, David Blake, who undertakes the defense of an accused murderer and rapist. The lawyer considered his purpose quite clear: get enough practice and experience in criminal law to hold down his job. Having taken the case he wanted to win. There was also the fact that the defendant was innocent. Put Blake was no wide-eyed idealist; he was an ordinary man as such hated to be made a fool of at the hands of crooked politics. He turned around to fight and in doing so made nation-wide headlines. THE BEST OF CRUNCH AND DES by Philip Wylie Twenty one of Wylie's famed Crunch and Des fishing stories. C. and D. are two salty old anglers who know all there is to know about fishing-and storytelling. The publishers enthusiastically claim that you will get more real fishing excitement reading this than in a month of trolling the Gulf Stream. Depends on how much blood you have left. THE SLEEPER by Holly Roth A mystery story relating what happened when a man reported a robbery. The F.B.I. and C.I.C. men were knocking at his door in short order. Seems that the ruckus was caused because the burglars loot was a manuscript of a series of interviews with an army officer turned traitor. The traitor commited sucide soon after the story appeared and the book form was being serialized in a magazine. The big question was "why steal the manuscript?" If you really care, read the book. IMPACT OF EVIDENCE by Carol Carne A mystery about crime and violence on the Welsh border. Scotland yard comes to the rescue in grand style and uncovers all sorts of scandalous things going on among the peaceful Welsh farmers: blackmail, murder, questionable marriages. Lift a thatched roof and find a lawsuit. JUST IN .. For photo fans: Filters and Their Uses, Movie Making for Beginners, Color Movies for the Beginners, Making Better Color Slides, Parts 1 and 2. BIG OUTFIT, by Peter Dawson a western. JUST LIKE YOU SAID, IT'S STARDOM FOR MARA! When movie audiences, 'specially the portion that whistles spotted Mara Corday in such U-I films as "So This Is Paris" and "Francis Joins the WACS," they were quick to predict stardom. Right! In her next, "The Man From Bitter Ridge." Mara will star with Lex Barker and Stephen McNally. Radio's 'Tops' of the Week SATURDAY, 12 MARCH .THEATRE ROYAL .9:00 P. M. Sir Ralph Richardson, your regular host, takes the starring role in the Viennese comedy, "Private Rooms." SUNDAY, 13 MARCH .HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE 10:00 P. M. A true-to-life story of a man serving a life-time prison term who makes an important contribution to the firearms industry. Starring in "Carbine Williams" will be Ronald Reagan, Wendell Corey, and Jean Hagen. MONDAY, 14 MARCH .BEST PLAYS .9:00 P. M. Burgess Meridith and Anthony Quinn star in John Steinbeck's "Of Mice and Men", an important story of two itinerant workers, one a shrewd and cunning character, and the other, a dull witted fellow whose kindness leads to his downfall. TUESDAY, 15 MARCH .HIGH ADVENTURE .8:30 P. M. Two fortune hunters run across a strange village while travelling down the Amazon River. The village is inhabited by English people who have ben out of touch with civilization for over three hundred years. Knowing nothing of modern automobiles and airplanes, the residents suspect that their discoverers are invaders from another planet. WEDNESDAY, 16 MARCH .PURSUIT .9:00 P. M. Inspector Black has a difficult time in tracking down the murderer of "The Man Who Died Late". A man is brought into the morgue who has died from a bullet in the brain._a bullet that he had been fired a year before he died. THURSDAY, 17 MARCH ...FAMILY THEATRE ...9:00 P. M. Eddie Fisher will be host and Marilyn Erskine will star in "Welcome Home", a very human story of a bride's thoughts on her wedding day when she belives she is loved for who she is rather than what she is. MOVIES Saturday, March 12 THE IRON GLOVE Robert Stack Ursula Theiss Story concerns devoted loyalty of a soldier to his Prince who is kept from his rightful place on the throne by a schemer who had himself crowned. Sunday, March 13 TROUBLE IN THE GLEN Victor McLaglen Margaret Lockwood A U. S. flyer who served in Scotland with the Air Force returns there to the people who befriended him during the war. He finds himself in the middle of a fued with an irascible old man causing all the trouble. Flyer falls in love with man's daughter. Monday, March 14 THREE HOURS TO KILL Dana Andrews Donna Reed When the brother guardian of the girl he loves is killed, a young gunrider is forced to leave town to avoid being hanged for the deed. He returns later to find the guilty. man. Tuesday, March 15 HELLS OUTPOST Rod Cameron Joan Leslie A Korean war vet who uses a letter-writing trick to get himself interest in a milion dollar tungsten mine finds that the friendship of honest people pays better than crime, after he finds himself against the tactics of real crooks. Wednesday, March 16 BETRAYED Clark Gable Lana Turner Story concerns Dutch underground during WW II. Thursday, March 17 THEY RODE WEST Philip Cary Donna Reed A young doctor comes west to take over the job of post surgeon on the frontier, but finds the army hostile to him because he treats whites and Indians alike. After a series of incidents two strange Indian tribes attack the fort. Here lies the body of William Jay, Who died maintaining his rights of way. He was right, dead right, as he sped along. But he's just as dead as if he'd been wrong. 0


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ESQ7HV3EA_3BTN8Q INGEST_TIME 2015-10-27T21:26:11Z PACKAGE AA00031277_00318
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES