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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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_________________ _ , -_'Govers qcTMO Like Thke sttnsin-e" ___Vol. VII, No. 9 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 5 March 1955


MOB-i Equals MCB-4 Work Middle Cruises Set For June New $1,770,000 Destroyer Pier Opened


On Per-Man Basis
One month ago, Mobile Construction Battalion ONE releived Mobile Construction Battalion FOUR here on the Naval Base in the semiannual SeaBee switch. And since that time, MCB-4 has kept up with the record construction mark set by MCB-1 on a production-per-man basis. Actual figures, , however show that the number of units completed pcr week have fallen off by about nalf-from almost nine familv units a week to a little over four. The principal reason for the Coop is due to a smaller number of men maintaining the project. ihe work of the SeaBee crews and individuals is continuing at the same rate as before, but the smaller number of crews has caused the drop in production.
Taking over in full on 5 February, MCB-1 went to work on replacement housing in the Nob Hill !rea where eight families of the Naval Base were already living. M-annwhile other units in the area lacked only final finishing while others stood with the first and second story floors, walls, and ceilings complete ready for interior in Northwest Granadillo Point, the work. Within a week, work began location for 60 of the 100 aditional units. Progress in this area has been steady as can be ceen by several first floor walls and foundations completed.
In the future, no radical increase in production is expected until more manpower is made available to the battalion. And, as is the policy of Com CBLant, an advanced party from another SeaBee battalion will arrive here about two months prior to ONE's departure date. This boost in manpower of an extra company will increase production considerablv.
If the present rate of completion is maintained, it is expected that the Nob Hill area will be complete by mid-1955. No delay is expected in this area which will complete the original plan for 300 replacement units. Even the rainy season should cause no setback in production unless rain becomes so heavy that it would be impossible to transport men and materials to the job. This is because of the percent of completion in the area. All housing needs only interior finishing. The biggest task to be done away with yet in the Nob Hill area is utilities and a water main over a mile long.
The rainy season, however, will affect work in two areas- Northwest Granadillo Point and Caravella Point. By the time rains come construction will not have gone far enough to facilitate all interior wrok in the Granadillo section. And on Caravella Point where 40 units will be constructed as MOQ for junior officers, preliminary grading has only begun there.
At present, the biggest task facing MCB-1 is preliminary grading for the Caravella Point Housing. Estimates set the figure at 47,000 cubic yards of dirt to be moved in preliminary grading.


Arrive Here In July

According to an article in the Norfolk Virginian-Pilot, the annual Midshipman Cruises mill begin 5 June and end late in July when practical shipboard training will be climaxed by gunnery exercises off Guantanamo Bay for five days beginning 26 July.
Divided into Cruise Able, Baker, and Charlie, the force of 18 cruise ships will sortie from the Norfolk area on June for the two-month cruise to Europe and the Mediterranean.
The battleship Iowa and New Jersey will form the nucleus of the armada. Also scheduled for duty vr the carrier Siboney and the cruisers Columbus, Des Moines and Northampton. A force of 10 destroyers and two minelayers will round out the training task force.
The first movement will be labled "Cruise Able" and will include first and third clasman from the academy and 23 colleges through out the nation.
Plans for cruises "Baker" and "Charlie" have not been completed
During the period June 20-27, the ships will be in their first ports of call. Seven of the ships, led by the Iowa and the Hampton, will go into port at Barcelona, Spain. Others in the unit will be the Siboney, W.C. Lawe, Power, Glennon,
Malaga, Spain will be the port of and Warrington.
call for the Des Moines, Severn, Flechteler, Benner, D.J. Buckley,
(Continued on Page Three)


SeaBees Celebrate 13th

Birthday Here Today

Joining in with SeaBees throughout the Navy, the officers and men of MCB-1 will observe the thirteenth anniversary of the founding of the Navy's construction forces with an informal party in the enlisted men's mess hall in the AATC SeaBee camp today.
Beginning at 1400, coffee and refreshments and desert will be served to the men of the battalion and their official guests. Heading the list of guests is RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Comiander, Naval Base, anti CAPT G. M. Holley, Chief of Staff, and the commanding and executive officers of the Naval Base commands.
Even prior to today, special messages were received, congratulating the SeaBees on their thirteenth birthday and their fine work.
The Secretary of the Navy, Charles S. Thomas, stated, "The post war accomplishments of the SeaBees have reaffirmed their ex-ellent reputation. Our Navy's construction forces can look not only into the past with pride but also into the future with confidence. Best wishes to the SeaBees on their thirteenth birthday.


DesLant Flagship First To Tie Up













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Gathering at the new Pier Victor with the first ship to come alongside, the USS WILKINSON, officials participating in the opening ceremony look over the new pier. Left to right; RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Conmander Naval Base, RADM A. A. Burke, ComDesLant, CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, CDR D. G. Dockum, Connanding Officer, USS WILKINSON, CDR W. M. Gordon, Base Civil Engineering, Mr. J. R. Connor, Project Manager of Pier Vitcor for Frederick Snare Corp., CDR W. L. Rowan, Public Works Officer, and LTJG E. 0. Pfrang of the Base Civil Engineering Office.

On tuesday, 1 March, one of the largest construction projects undertaken in recent years on the main side of the bay was turned over to the Naval Base when Mr. J. R. Connor, Project Manager for Frederick Snare Corp. turned over the $1,770,000 Pier Victor to CDR W. M. Gordon, CEC, USN, Base Civil Engineer, who in turn presented the pier to CAPT. W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station.


Navy Set To Promote

92,000 EMs In May

The Navy expects to promote 92,000 enlisted men to higher rates following service-wide examinations in February.
The Bureau of, Naval Personel said it plans to advance 2,500 POs to CPO an increase of about 1,050 over last year despite the fact that exams in fewer ratings were given this year. Twenty three thousand PO1s were eligible to take the exams.
The largest number of promotions will be to the P03 rate, with 58,000 men scheduled to be advanced out of the 100,000 eligible for the test.
New POs will number 24,000 and 7,500 will be advanced to P01. A total of 65,000 were eligible for the P02 rates and 35,000 for PO1.
The 89,500 anticipated promotions to grades E-4 through E-6 are about 5,500 less than the advancements made after the August examsl However, fewer first class ratings were tested in February.
The planned promotions are only tentative, the Bureau explained, because the Navy's budget for the fiscal year 1956 has not been approved by Congress.


No sooner had the pier been officially opened than the USS WILKINSON (DL-5), carrying RADM A. A. Burke, ComDesLant, came alongside the 1000 foot pier, earning the dstinction of being the first destroyer type vessel to tie up at the long-awaited pier.
Immediately after the ship was moored to the dock, RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, was piped on board and informed Admiral Burke that DesLant flapship was the first ship to use the facilities of the new pier companies by CAPT W. R. Caruthers, and CDR D. G. Dockum, Afterwards, Admiral, Taylor, accommanding Officer of the WILKINSON had coffee with Admiral Burke in the wardroom of the ship.
Pier Victor, designed for faster handling and maintainence of destroyer type vessels, was originally begun in December 1953, and the pier itself was completed far ahead of the contract completion date. The adjoining target repair facilities will be complete prior to 24 June.
Capable of handling 12 destroyer in four nests of three each or three nests of three each and the AFDL-1, the pier is 1010 feet long and 60 feet wide with a deck capacity of 600 pounds per square
(Continued on Page Six)


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Page Two


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The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9635
Saturday, 5 March 1955
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William t. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LTJG J. D. Byerley ------Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC------------------Editor
H. L. Sisson, JO3-------------------News
F. L. Cannon, J3 ---------- Photographer
B. C. Roberts, JOSN ------------ Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AEPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


What's Dn' Stateside
Russia is turning out more than twice as many engineers yearly as the U.S.-54,000 to 20,000. . . The Soviets have almost overcome our longstanding advantage in technical and scientific manpower. . . This is the warning that came from a recent Chicago conference of government industrial and scientific authorities. . . Among suggestions offered by the conferees to reverse the trend were pay raises for engineers, particularly those working for the government; greater emphasis on technical training by American educational institutions; and expanded opportunities for women in the engineering professions.
The nation's first privately owned atomic power plant is to be built at Peekskill, N.Y., about 35 miles north of New York City. . .Costing $30-to$40 million, the plant will feed atomic generated electricity to New York and nearby Westchetes County. . .At the same time, plans have been anounced for private industry's first atomic pile for research purposes. . .The pile will be a joint project of several large business firms and is expected to be operating by 1956. . .According to present plans, the million dollar pile will be constructed on 250 acres in the New York City area.
Welcome news for the foot-sore. Moving sidewalks are on their way One has been installed in the municipal coliseum in Houston. . . Made of rubber and able to handle 15,000 persons an hour, it's the widest conveyor belt ever used commercially to transport humans. . . It will be used by an estimated one million coliseum visitors this year.
There are fewer daily newspapers in the U.S. than there used to be, but more people are reading them than ever before. . .For the first time in history, daily newspaper ciculation topped 55 million in 1954. . .But there were 20 fewer dailies than in the previous year.
Speaking of weather, Americans are saving more for a rainy day than ever before . . . According


VU- 10 Prop Blast

by Bill Wright
A hearty welcome aboard is extended to Ens Percy L. Smith USNR from all hands. ENS Smith, reported aboard VU-10 this past week from Flight Training at USNAS, Kingsville, Texas. Mr. Smith is a native of Nashville, Tenn.
Two men that are going to be missed, among both the officers and enlisted men of VU-10 is the CMAA, J. D. Williams, BMC and the barracks MAA, W. C. Bowers, BM1. The two Boatswain's are leaving soon for further duty with Commander, Air Force Atlantic Fleet. Good luck Boats, we're going to miss having you around to keep us in line.
ENS R. M. Greenfield, USNR will be advanced to the rank of LTJG March the 7th. Congratulations are extended from all hands, and don't forget the cigars!
The continuous mumble of "Lets have a party", is no longer heard in VU-10's Administration Dept. The department enjoyed an afternoon this past week at Windmill Beach with MUCHO steak and beer for everyone. The highlight of the afternoon was the touch football game, at least they called it TOUCH, but you can't prove it by LT George Guyer, who won't be flying for a few days due to a fractured arm.
We are glad to hear that Mrs. Evelyn Anderson is out of the hospital and doing fine.



Hospital Notes

by D. W. Degon
HEIRPORT NEWS
The stork is enjoying a well earned rest. The only births were two young gents. They are: Donald William to SN and Mrs. Susan Yale and Stephen Anthony to IM1 and Mrs. Genevieve Cushanick.
ARRIVALS
Welcome aboard to HM3 Kendall S. Kirtley and HN Daniel J. Sullivan who recently arrived from USNH Philadelphia for duty.
BON VOYAGE
HM1 Kenneth W. Eder departed via USNS Johnson for separation at Brooklyn Receiving Station. Ken was a leading corpsman in the operating room. One of his most notable achievements was advancing to the pay grade of E-6 in less than four years. Not exactly departures but neverless transfers, the last of the non-hospital rates moved their gear to Naval Station for duty. They are: BM3 Isaac Miller, who preformed his duties in transportation; SN Richard R. Burghert, a hard working member of the hospital commissary; SN Loren E. Hughart, the night duty driver for the past month. SN John J. Hudson, who was assigned to the Medical Storeroom, was also to be transfered, however emergency leave has delayed his departure.
REENLISTMENTS
HM2 Ronald Miller has taken the oath for a term of six years. The ceremony was held in the office of commanding officer.

to the U. S. Savings and Loan League, savings of all types totaled $231,300,000 at the end of 1954-an increase of 255 percent since the start of WWII.


Navy Wives' Club
by Pat Aldridge


The Guantanamo Bay Navy Wi7es' Club has donned the festive spirit of Spring with many pleasant activities planned for the coaing season. Friday evening, March 11, under the able direction of Pearl Piercy, Entertainment Chairman, a "surprise" party, beginning at 8 p. m. at the Marine Family Restuarant, will be held. This festivity, the first evening affair to include members' husbands, has piqued the curosity of all for the motif has been kept a closely guarded secret. All members are urged to attend as failure to do so may result in missing an exceptionally good time. Furthermore, all members are invited to bring another couple as guests. Couples are specified as the hidden motif almost necessitates an even number joining in the fun. Reservations for this affair must be made no later than Wednesday, March 9, by calling Mrs. Psercy at 9338. Don't iss this unique party at which the men in particular will vie with one another in the exercise of imagination.
Another fete is in the offing for March 17, again at the Marine Family Resteraunt at 1 p.m. This will be a "Mad Hatter" salad luncheon at which members of the Navy Wives' Club will be judged and awarded prizes for the best "crazy, mixed up" chapeaus of any imaginative design. Further entertainment will be provided by Helen Bowler, local Red Cross representive, who will display and tell the interesting stories behind her collection of fabulous jewlery acquired in many lands around the world. Reservations for this luncheon must be made by calling June Munson at 9352.
During the Board of Directors' meeting held at the home of Nancy Jones, Maybelle Clay and June Munson along with Sarah Barco and Larita Clark were appointed to the Activities Committee. Among the principle duties of new committee members will be the selection of bingo prizes for the regular Thursday afternoon Socials held at Villamar Lyceum.
Red roses for a little pink bloom were presented last week to Sally Cohanski honoring the arrival of tiny Denise Marcelle, a second daughter for the Cohanski family.



M A q(C NUSMS8

ARRIVALS
Arriving via the USNS Johnson this past week were Staff Sergeant Harry F. Stadler and Sergeant Morris J. Sheeks. Staff Sergeant Stadler joins us from Camp Lejune, North Carolina and Sergeant Sheeks from Paris Island, South Carolina. Both are attached to the Exchange Section.
TALENT SHOW
The talent show Friday night proved to be another success. The highlight of the evening was PFC William Cooper's piano playing which won him first place in the talent show. Plenty of beer and chow were on hand and everyone enjoyed themselves.


Sunday, 6 March 1955
Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services
Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0030-Sunday School
0930-Adult Bible Class 1030-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Nava! V se Chapel Christian Science
Sunday: 1000-Station Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J. .. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)


The Chaplain's Corner


1t

A Minnesota Minister told a of a man who was standing among the sidewalk "superintendents" watching as a great excavation was being made in one of the large cities. Suddenly the work stopped. The power shovels became idle, and the man noticed that a great slide of earth in one corner had buried some of the workmen. He watched now with keener interest, hoping that the men would be released before they suffocated, but he still remained on the sidewalk.
Then someone touched his arm and said, "John, did you know that one of the men buried down there is your brother? "At that moment something happened to change that man. He left the sidewalk, hurried down into the excavation and, thowing off his coat, worked harder than anyone else to pull the dirt away from the threatend men.
Now what caused this man to change from a passive by-stander to an active rescue worker? Obviously the answer is that one of the men buried was his brother, and because he was his brother, he had a close relationship to him. Consequently he acted from a s-ense of responsibility, concern, and love.
Our Lord was once told that His mother and brothers were waiting to see and talk with Him. Jesus answered and said, "Who is my mother? And who are my brethren? And streaching forth His hand in the direction of those standing around Him He said in effect, "All of these are as much a brother as my blood relations and I have the same responsibility towards them all."
"Am I my brother's keeper?" "Most certainly," answered the Lord..
In this Lent season, it would be well for us to practice this brotherliness of Jesus.
Chaplain Roberts.
MCB-1


9


Saturday, 5 March 1955


THE INDIAN







Wuday, 5 March 1955


M


THE INDIAN


CORWIN GALWICK

New "0" Club Manager

Mr. Corwin Gelwick, who comes to Guantanamo Bay from Gainersville, Florida, recently took over as Manager of the Commissioned Officers Mess here, succeeding Mr. John Wingfield, who was manager


for the past 39 months.
Prior to taking over as manager of the "0" Club here, Mr. Gelwick was the general manager of the Gainersville Golf & Country Club in Florida for six years. Prior to that time, he managed the Myers Park Country Club in Charlotte, North Carolina.
During World War II, Mr. Gelwick served with the Navy and returned to the inactive Reserves in 1946 with the permanent rank of LCDR,
Mr. Gelwick has long been active in the Club Managers Association work. He served as President of the Florida Club Managers from 1949 to 1952 and is currently a member of the Board of Directors and Chairman of the Education Committee of Club Managers Association of America.
Mr Gelwick is unmarried and is a graduate of the University of Illinosis where he was a former athlete and coach.
Mr. Wingfield, the former manager, returned to his home in Owensburro, Kentucky where he plans to vacation for a while before carrying out any further plans.


Fortune Tellei's Fortune


Captain W. R. Caruthers, carnival chairman, presents one of the prizes in the recent carnival contest to a smiling Mrs. J. C. Warren. Mrs. Warren, a "fortune-teller" at the 4-day carnival said she had no inkling of her own good fortune.


'Let Freedom Ring'

Theme At Annual

Cub Blue & Gold Banquet

Last Monday night at the Naval Air Station Enlisted Men! Club, the Cub Scouts.of Pack 401, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, held their Annual Blue and Gold Banquet which proved a great success as there was a 100% parent attendance for all seven dens.
The theme for the month was "Let Freedom Ring" and all the tables were decorated with a center piece and place settings represening something along the line of Liberty or Freedom.
Mrs. G. S. Reynolds, as Den Mother for Den 7, took the third place award with a large imitation cake as a centerpiece. The cake was decorated w.th the Flags of the United Nations and the place settings were also minature flags from the different nations. Mrs. Minard, Den Mother for Den 1, took the second place award with a large American and Den 1 flag made from sheels as a centerpiece. Her place settings were small cards with the same color American and Den 1 Flags. The first place award was taken by Den 2, Mrs. Jones' Den. Her centerpiece was a large aluminum Liberty Bell with blue and gold pipe cleaner figures holding the name cards. Included were party hats made by the Cubs.
Upon completion of the dinner, a cake baked to commorate the 45th Birthday af the Boy Scouts was served.
After everone had eaten, W. A. Johnson, the Cubmaster, dresed in Indian blanket, complete with peace pipe and headress, held the Bobcat Induction Ceremony. Those inducted were: Pat Campbell, Steven Kuster, Steven Dougherty, Robert Zaborski, and Larry Kern.
Immediately folowing the Bobcat Ceremony, those who had advanced up the Cubbing ladder to the rank of Wolf were presented with their badges. They were: Bobbie Yost, Larry Corliss, Tod Cushman, Duane King and Billy Sutherling.
The Bear advancement Ceremony followed, and those who received their badges were: Peter Minard William Shaw, David King, Mike Gebler, and Duncan Tebow.
Prior to the Induction and Advancement Ceremonies, the Cub master was presented with an imitation campfire for the Packs use by Lairy Corliss, which he had made with some help from his father.


Upon completion of the ceremonies, the remaining awards were presented and very successfull Pack meeting was closed by a candle. lighting ceremony by Den 3.


RADM B. W. Hogan New Surgeon General


Washington (AFPS) - RADM Bartholomew W. Hogan has assumed the office of Surgeon General of the Navy. Admiral Hogan took the oath of office Feb. 15 His nomination to the position by President Eisenhower was confirmed by the Senate Feb.8.


'Our Town' Nears Production Deadline


When the Stage-manager observes the wedding of George and Emily, in Act II of "Our Town," he says to the audience, "the cottage, the gocart, the Sunday afternoon drives in the Ford, the first rheumatism, the death bed, the reading of the will-once in a thouand times, its interesting."
How then does Thornton Wilder elude conformity and by pass the hackneyed cant of the soap operas polluting our daytime ether? Ob-


EVELYN LEACH
viously he has something to sell other than canned beer or miracle detergents. His product is life itself or the life in life, and the dialogue pulsates with the fascination and love of it. The formal structure has been compared to a scaffolding of a building in progress of construction, enabling the author to create the type of play to his own specifications.
Prepping for a faithful rendition of the Pulitzer prize drama, are some 20 Little Theatre mem-


PTA Sees Spanish Play;

Hears Panel On Teenagers

The monthly meeting of the Guantanamo Bay Parent-Teachers Association was held on Tuesday night, 1 March at the open air auditorium of the Naval Base School.
The highlight of the evening was a skit presented by the 3rd Grade class of Mrs. Savage, assisted by Mrs. Gordon Ward. The skit was written and produced by the pupils of Mrs Savage and was presented entirely in Spanish.
The feature of the evening was a palel discussion on the subject "Teenagers in the Guantanamo Environment". Mr. John Sanborn was moderator and Mrs. Lucille Burke, LT. L. B. Dalton, AD1 J. W. Dexter, Miss Sylvia Cavanaugh and Howard Rogers were members of the panel.
The attendance prizes, awarded on a percentage of parents from each classroom, were awarded to: 1st prize - Mrs. Savage (3rd
grade)
2nd prize - a tie, Mrs. McNeal
nursery) and Mrs. Burke (kindergarten)
3rd prize - Mrs. Usey 3rd Grade)


bers, who on March 15, will reactivate Grovers Corners on the Marina Point stage. Alan Wagner is both director and stage-manager Evelyn Leach has the feminine lead as Emily Webb, and George Engle is her romantic interest as George Gibbs. Evelyn Purdue and Chuck Dieterle are George's parents, and Mildred Morgan, Betty Lou Tipler, and Tom Judkins form the rest of the Webb clan.
Even the dead have their say in Act II, the graveyard scene, as "they wait for the eternal part in them to come out clear." Mrs. Soames' remarks from her plot, "Wasn't life awful . . and wonderful" Is Wilder then, retailing fantasy also? Or could both parts be one and the same, with death giving significance to the living?
"Our Town" should remind us to treasure ordinary life just as it is and encourages us to live it to the full before our day is over.


GEORGE ENGLE


In honor of the Secretary I
of the Navy, the Honorable I I Charles S. Thomas, Rear Ad- I
miral and Mrs. E. B. Taylor will be at home 1630 to 1830, Sunday, 13 March 1955 in lieu of their regular monIthly at home the first SunI day of March. All Officers
and civilians of equivalent rank, and wives are cordially invited to attend. Uniform
service dress white.



Middle Cruise .
(Continued from Page One)
and E.F. Larson. Leading a group into Barcelona, Spain will be the New Jersey. In her party will be the Columbus, R.L. Winson, Basilone, Shannon, and H.F. Bauer.
Second ports of call for the various groups will be Portsmouth, Weymouth, Plymouth, Torquay, and Sheerness. All are English ports
RADM R. E. Libby, ComBatCruLant will be commander of the cruise. Screen commander will be Capt. D. L. Carlson, ComDesRon.


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Page Three







Pagt hur


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Saturday, 5 March 1955


SPORTS ROUND-UP

(AFPS)
One of the top Army sportswriters, Sgt. Al Thomy of Ft. Jackson, S. C., has been discharged anD e:plcts to join the sports
f of the Atlanta Constitution. Know what ring veterans Al Andrews, Henry Davis, Ernie Durando, Ramon Fuentes, Rex Layne and Holly Mims all have in common? The Ring magazine they all started boxing while in the Armed Forces. The 1955 All-Navy Pacific area boxing finals will be held Apr. 5 at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard in California.
Former All-Army golf king Billy Maxwell won $3,000 in the pro-am tourney at the Oak Hills Country Club in San Antonio, Tex . . . Cpl. Mark Evans of the 21st Station Hospital in Korea claims to have done 1000 push-ups in the remarkable time of 23 minutes 21 seconds. Could be a world record. . Olympic diving champ Maj. Sammy Lee is now assigned to the hospital at Ft Carson, Colo. . . Pfc David S. Raleigh of the 2nd Bn., 9th Marines, Third Marine Div., is the grand prize winner in the third annual Leatherneck contest.
The Milwaukee Braves have 132 regular and farm players in the Armed Forces. About 80 of these are expected to be discharged during the 1955 season.
The Cincinnati Redlegs will meet the Washington Senators in a Grapefruit League game at Camp Gordon, Ga., Mar. 31 . . . Billy Martin will play shortstop and double as the manager of the Ft. Carson Mountaineers baseball nine until he gets his discharge in the summer. . . Bob Peterson, a sixfoot five and one half forward, who played 63 basketball games for Ft. Ord, Calif., is the newest rookie on the pro New York Knickerbocker squad.
QUOTABLE QUOTES
Here's what they're saying about the Armed Forces track team in New York: Jimmy Powers of the Daily News-"Fred Dwyer's win of the Baxter Mile (New York A. C. Games) was the greatest Garden track thrill of all time." Dan Daniel of the World Telegram & Sun-"Our service athletics, including Marine reservist Wes Santee, and invaders from Europe led by Denmarks Gunnar Nielsen, have helped make this indoor track and field season truly spectacular": Dan Ferris, secretary-treasure of the Amateur Athletic Union"They're wonderful." Ferris said its great the way they have been able to train for internationtl cometition.
In his final basketball game for Ft. Belvoir, Va., Dick Groat scored 72 points against Bainbridge, Md. The former Duke whiz netted 25 field goals and 22 out of free throws. . . Baltimore Colt grid quarterback Cotton Davidson is now in the Army.


Marine Sports

by Paul Hoffer
BOWLING
As the bowling season nears its end, Headquarters it still the nuber one teami. Team#2 is a close second with a 14-6 record. This week should decide the champions of the second round. A play off between the winner of the first half and the winner of the second half wil decide the champions of the league. The climax of the bowling season will be a tournament between the top 16 bowlers of the league. Don Schreck is still the high gamge bowler with 225 and Robert Rausch the high average with 165 and also the high series with 603. 1. Hdqus. Plt. 17 3
2, Team #2 14 6
3. Team#3 12 8
4. Team#4 10 10
5. Team#1 8 12
6. Staff NCO's 8 12
7. Supply 6 14
8. Officers 5 15
BASEBALL
The Naval Base "1954" Baseball Champions will be, rouindinig into shape this week to defend their title. A large turn out is expected. The loss of Joe Androvich, Tom Felak, Jim Pace, Charles Smith, Wayne Straw and Raoul Santos will be greatly missed. RetuiYrng from last years team are Paul Hoffer, Don Schreck, Bob Holmes, Ron Plante, Bill Wood, Larry Adams, Chuck Mason and Bob Clark. The team will be managed by Captain John J. Swords.


Ladies Golf Shots

by Betty Lou Tipler
Our Ringer Tournament has ended after a month of work (or play) on it. The receivers of the nice silver pieces ar as follows:
First Flight
1st-Sue Scott 2nd-tie
Alma McCracken
Jane McElroy
Second Flight
1st-tie
Frances Grounds
Johnnie King
2nd-tie
Val Evans
Gladys Hamiliton
Third Flight
1st-Charlie Murphy 2nd-tie
Cynthia Holley
Vi Merz
Fourth Flight
1st-Doris Lee 2nd-Florence Fortenberry
On Wednesday, the First and Secend flights played 18 holes for low gross and net while the Third and Fourth Flights played a blind five tournament on the front nine holes. Winners were.
First Flight
Low Gross-Evelyn Leach Low Net-tie
Edna Edwards
Marion Caruthers
Second Flight
Low Gross-Frances Grounds Low Net-Johnnie King
Third Flight
1st-tie
Cynthia Holley
Vi Merz
2nd-tie
Vivian Soballe
Doris Rothenberg
Fourth Flight
1st-Mary McFadden 2nd-tie
Chris Guyer
Marie D'Amico


Intra-Command Golf

Swings Into Play

The first series of matches in the 1955 intra - Command Golf Tournament teed off last Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 26 and 27.
VU-10, the 1953 & 1954 champions, got off to a flying start by defeating the Naval Air Station team, 18 to 6. The Medical team, composed of members of the hospital and Dental Clinic nosed out the NSD-CHB combine by three points, 13 to 10 . Naval Station edged the 1952 champs, FTG, 13 to 11, MCB-1 diew a bye for the week-end.
Today at 1 P.M. the Medics go against FTG and the NSD-CHB team draws Naval Station.
Tomorow at 8:15 A.M. VU-10 meets MCB-1. Naval Air Station draws a bye for this week-end.


Naval Station Bowling

STANDING


Team
FTG#2
Third Division NSD
Fifth Division "M" Security Group FTG#1
Fleet Boat Pool Commissary Store MCB-1
Fleet Camera Party Fifth Division "R" CHB-1
Fifth Division "ET" Second Division Hospital Eleventh Division First Division Sixth Division


W
42 41 39 38 36 35 33 32 30 27 26 25 23 23 22 15
9
8


HOT AIR




-X

















"itly bws . ,


L
14 15 17 18 20
21 23
24 26 29 30 31 33 33
34 41 47 48


--5









I-


We are losing two of oir favorite golfers this week-Helen King and Emma Hutton. Certainly hate to see them go.


Basketball Standings

TEAM W L PCT
NavSta 15 1 .987
NAS 14 2 . 75
MCB-1 12 4 .750
Medical 10 6 .625
Marines 9 7 .562
CHB-1 6 9 .400
VU-10 6 9 .400
Lwrd. Pt. 4 12 .250
HiSchool 2 13 .133
FTG 0 15 .000
(Standings include games of Thursday, 3 March)



Basketball Schedule

MONDAY, 7 MARCH::
HiSchool vs Lwrd Pt.
NAS vs Medical
TUESDAY, 8 MARCH
CHB-1 vs NavSta
FTG vs Marines
WEDNESDAY, 9 MARCH*:
HiSchool vs MCB-1 Lwrd. Pt. vs VU-10 THURSDAY, 10 MARCH
NAS vs NavSta Medical vs FTG
FRIDAY, 11 MARCH:*
VU-10 vs Marines CHB-1 vs MCB-1
(Astericks denote games to be played at Marine Site)
This is the end of the regular season schedule. The post-season tournament is scheduled to start on Monday, 14 March.


Ladies Bowling

Team #1 of the Ladies Bowling League stands as the team to beat as play nears the final wire. Widening their margin, Team#1 holds first place by three games over Team#2. Team#2 recently nosed past Team#8 who had held second spot since the beginning of the second half. In the high averages department, Emily Griffin still stands on top with a 171 average while Betty Sentz, rolling the high game for this week with a 202 stands in second place with a 163 average.
STANDINGS


Team #1 Team #2 Team #8 Team#6 Team #7 Team#5 Team#4 Team #10 Team #3 Team #9


W 17
14 12 10 10
9
8
8
7
5


HGH TEN AVERAGES E. Giffin B. Sentz P. Way F. Grounds J. King S. Wenderlich M. Powers A. Tagliabue B. Gardner C. Godbout


L
3
6
8
10 10 11
12 12 13 15

171 163
149 145 143 140 139 135 135 133


HIGH GAMES THIS WEEK
B. Sentz 202
S. Wenderlich 188
F. Grounds 191
E. Griffin 183
C. Godbout 184
B. Gardner 182
B. Phillips 179
M. Green 178
-1. Albright 178
A. Forrester 171
J. King 170


9


THE INDIAN


m


Calling All Umpires

All persons interested in
positions as umpires or scorekeepers for the coming baseball season are requested to meet at the Naval Station Special Services office at 7 P. M. on Wednesday, 9 March.








Saturday, 5 March 1055


e


THE INDIAN


Indians, Flyers Race For Title;



Meet Thursday On NavSta Court


Flyers Face Medics Monday

by Hal Davis
The Naval Station Indians and the Naval Air Station Flyers, traditional rivals on the field of sport, gathered momentum in their headlong dash toward each other during the week. The Indians knocked over the Pointers and Medics and squeezed by a surprising VU-10 Mallard squad, while the Flyers had a free one from the absentStingers and walloped the Pointers in their games. The grand collision comes next Thursday night on the Indians' home court when the two big red teams meet head-on in the "game of the season" If we had to pick a winner, we'd


say UCLA by two touchdowns.
Both the Flyers and the Braves suffered important losses in the last week. The Flyers were hit hard with the transfer of Sherlacker, Bentely and Archibald, but the Indians lost the services of their setter specialist, Jack "Deadpan" Nigro.
A win for the Indians will clinch the 1955 title. A win for the Flyers would tie it all up and insure a playoff.
There's only one stumbling block on the Flyer runway-the Medics. And we'll have to call this one the "game of the week" when they meet Monday night at the Marine Site court. We give the Flyers a small edge, although the corpsman dumped them the last time out together, because this win is absolutely necessary for the Flyers to stay in the running, and the Ferenchak squad will be playing their best. The Flyer "best" is something to watch.
The Indians can almost coast until Thursday for they come up against only a greatly weakened CHB-1 squad which is currently tied for 6th place with the VU-10 Mallards.
MEDICS WIN CB FOREFIT INDIANS DUMP POINTERS; Closing out last week's play, the Indians pounced on rhe Leeward Pointers to the tune of 53 to 20 with coach Jerry Morgan leading the Braves with 16.
The Medics won a forefit from the Stingers who are playing in the ServLant tourney in Norfolk. MARINES DOWN POINTERS; INDIANS OVER MEDICS
Monday night the Marine Leathernecks jumped on the Pointers for 66 against the 34 of the Leeward-men. Holmes led the Marines with 20 tallies to boost him into 7th place in the "top ten". The Indians maintained their lead by defeating the Medical squad 45 to 35 in the "game of the week". Both teams threw up tight defenses and held them through the tilt, hut it was the sharpshooting of Jack Nigro that gave the Indians the edge. Nigro bagged 13, followed by Gitlin with 12 and Slewitzke with 10. Paul King knocked off


11. for the Medics. PIRATES EDGE TRAINERS; FLYERS TAKE CB FORFEIT The High School Pirates cracked the win colum for the second time this season against the hapless Trainers who haven't been able to do the same yet, 49 to45. Reffett hit the hoop for 13, over Hiemer's 11, but the Trainers' Fetterman rapped out 22 for the night.
The NAS Flyers were awarded the nightcap in a forfeit over the absent SeaBees.
INDIANS SQUEEK BY VU-10; MEDICS WHIP STEVEDORES Wednesday night the league leading Indians came out of a close one with the VU-10 Mallards, 67 to 64. It was the Mallards, behind Houchin's 21 tallies, that had the game until the last 20 seconds of play when the Braves knocked out the extra margin. The Mallards led at half-time with a 2-point edge, but the Indians, in their customary method, didn't really roll until the second half. It was almost too late this time, but with Morgan's 18 and Slewitzke's 15 they managed to hold their top spot in the standings.
In the nightcap the Medics pounded the Stevedores, 64 to33 with Paul King breaking into the "top ten" scorers by racking up 26 points.
FLYERS DOWN POINTERS
In the final game of the week, as far as the Indian deadline is concerned, the NAS Flyers whipped their fellow-airmen from across the Bay, 55 to 20. Ring climbed up to within five points of second place in the top scorers by hitting for 21.
THE FINAL WEEK
This is the week, coming up, that tells the tale. If the Flyers should drop Monday night's game with the Medics, its all over but the decorations. If they win it, and chances are they will by a narow spread, then the BIG ONE comes Thursday night. With the championship at stake and two big games in the offing, the only thing we can say is heaven have mercy on the referees.


Medics on three sides and a photographer on the other provided this basketball ballet sequence during the Naval Station Indian - Medical game last Monday night. In the center, Jerry Morgan, Indian coach, goes up in the air along with O'Brien (17) and Rose (3) of the Medics. Almost hidden behind Morgan is King of the Medics. Indians took it 45 to 35.


Getting through a defense was the order of the night during the Indian Medic gane last Monday. Here, Jerry Morgan flips a pass to Gitlin as the Indians work the ball toward the Medics forward line, Rose and Maddox.


PLAYER Gerhardt Heimer Ring Snyder Houchin Morgan Holmes Gatti Slewitzke King


TOP TEN SCORERS
TEAM Games Points Avg.
CHB-1 12 263 21.9
High School 15 248 16.5
NAS 15 243 16.2
NAS 15 234 15.6
VU-10 14 198 14.1
Naval Station 16 192 12.0
Marines 16 188 11.7
Marines 16 185 11.5
Naval Station 16 176 11.0
Hospital-Dental 15 170 113


m


e
Page Five








Page Six


M


Saturday, 5 March PS,


ComSecondFlt Here

On Annual Tour

Last week, VADM Edmund T. Wooldridge, CoinSecond Flt, arrived on the Naval Base for his annual tour of the base. The primary purpose of the visit is to look over facilities for the Second Fleet, in planning for the coming fiscal year's activities.
Arriving0 Thursday afternoon at


th


flight, Admiral Wooldridge was met by RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, CAPT. G. M. Holley, Chief of Staff, and other high ranking officers of Naval Base commands.
Accompanying Admiral Wooldridge was his staff, CAPT Raymond P. Hunter, CAPT Robert J. Hardy, CAPT George D. Good, CDR George C. Bullard, LCDR William C. Amick, Jr., LT Chester H. Dorchester, LT Arthur K. Bennett Jr., LTJG Joseph Sweedler, and LTJG


Base School 8th Grade Visits Refrigeration Plant


e Naval Air Station by special John J. Oliver.



CHB Sailor Makes Good Use of Spare Time


Mr. Figueras explains refrigeration machinery operation to visiting science students from the Naval Base School.


Shown being presented with his certificate for satisfactorily completing the High School Level General Educational Development Tests is Ronald J. Drace, BM3 of CHB-1. Drace has made good use of his spare time here and the facilities offered by the Information and Education office by completing two courses in Review Arithmatic, a course in "Criminology" and one in "Prison Work as a Career." He has also completed numerous Navy Correspondence Courses, amoung which are "Builder Third Class," "The Shorepatrolman," and he is presently working on a course in the Uniform Code of Military Justice.


"I have a (log that growls," said the spinster, "a parrot that swears, a fireplace that smokes, and a cat thats stays out all night. Why should I want a husband ?"


Did you see the TV western where the hero had to stop chasing the villian after one block? He'd reached the end of the chord on his electric guitar.


DISENROLLMENT POLICY

FOR USAFI CLARIFIED

by William A. Johnson, PN1
There seems to be some misunderstanding regarding the present policy governing disenrollment from USAFI Courses. Students will be disenrolled from a correspondence course after any six-month period of activity 'or eighteen months from date of enrollment if the course has not ben completed. Students will be disenrolled from a selfteaching course twelve months form date of enrollment if the course has not been completed.
The return of materials does NOT prevent automatic disenrolliment from a course at the expiration of the time limits allowed for activity in the course and/or course completion. Automatic disenrollment occurs as a result of failure of the student's record to show appropiate activity in the course (submision of lesons and/or satisfactory completion of the end of course test), and isn't affected in any way by his sending back or retaining his course materials. No provision exists for recording the return of materials for the purpose of future applications for enrollment without the required $2.00 fee after disenrollment has occured.
A student is required to return materials only in the event he requests transfer to another course. He is permitted to retain in his possession materials for courses which he completes or from which he has been disenrolled.
If student previously failed tc complete or to register activity in a course in accordance with current USAFI instructions, automatic disenrollment takes place and an additional $2.00 fee should accompany the new application.
In reference to completion of courses, bear in mind the words of Joseph Addison on Education, "Education is a companion which no misfortune can depress, no crime can destroy, no enemy can alienate, no despotism can enslave. At home a friend, abroad an introduction; in solitude a solace and in society an ornament. It chastens vice, it guides virtue, it gives, at once, grace and government to genius."


Last week, in connection with their studies of refrigeration, students of the 8th grade general science class at the 'laval Base School ~ de a field tril visit to the Naval Supply Depot ce Manufacturing plant on Sherman Avenue. They observed the cycle of ice manufacture from the pouring of water into the ice cans to the storing of the 3C0 lb. blocks of ice in the issuing room.
Mr. David Figueras, Chief-Quarterman in charge of NSD refrigeration plants, presented a lecture on the theory of refrigerants and the operation of pumps, compressors condensers and other ice manufacturing machinery. Others accompanying the students on their tour were Mr. W. A. McGill, science teacher at the school, and Lt. R.G. Whitman, administration officer at NSD.


PIER VICTOR . . .

(Continued from Page One)
foot. Two Gantry Crane tracks run the length of the pier on both sides and are connected with the present Gantry Crane track on pier Love. Piling for the new pier is cement and concrete type, and the piles, layed end to end, would si atch out to a length of over ten miles.
For the capacity of 12 destroyers that the pier can handle, which is only a basic figure with a potentiality of handling more, the pier has salt water lines, fresh water lines. telephone lines, compressed air lines, and 110/220 and 440 volt power lines. Plans have been made for the future installation of fuel lines.
Also included in the future plans is to move the AFDL-1 from its present birth at Pier Love to a berth at the west side at the head of Pier Victor.
Built by the Frederick Snare Corp. under contract NOy72,228C, Mr. J. R. Connor was Project Manager, and CAPT N. J. Drustrup, CEC, USN was the officer in charge of Construction for the 10th Naval District. CDR W. M. Gordon, CEC, USN, was ROINC, Others directly engaged in the project were, LTJG E. 0. Pfrang, CEC, USNR, E. E. Dean, Engineer, and Fred E. Knox, Inspector.


m


THE INDIAN







Saturday, 5 March 1955


so


THE INDIAN


FTG Bulletin

by Ron Federman
On 23 February, the USNS PVT. JOHNSON brought three new men to the shores of sunny Guantanamo Bay, for duty at FTG. The three additions to our staff are relatively new to the Navy. The newcomers are Jose Acevedo, SA, Joseph Leanzo, SA, and Robert Leno, SA; anll reporting from U.S. Naval Station, Newport, R. I. They received their inital training at Bainbridge, Maryland, prior to a brief tour of duty at Newport. Acevedo and Leno have been assigned to the MAA Force, and Leanzo will perform his duties with the transportation Department.
Also joining the ranks at FTG was George Thomas, ETC, who reported on the 28th of February, from the USS ROWE (DD-564). Thomas is married, and has two charming daughters. His wife and children are presently residing in Norfolk, Va. For the benefit of our "playboys" at FTG, it might be appropriate to further comment on Chief Thomas' two daughters Their ages are 14 months, and 3 years old - just a trifle too young.
Well, what do you know! It finally happened - LCDR Skadowski is now the proud recipient of another stripe and some "scrambled eggs" for his cap. On 25 February, after returning from ORI aboard the USS INTREPID, he was informed of his promotion, and almost immediately was sworn in by Captain Habecker. That evening Mrs. Skadowski treated her husband to a "thick juicy steak" at the Family Restaurant in celebration of the occasion, but because of the nervous effects produced by the good news, the steak went to waste All in all it was an exciting day for the Commander.
A sad farewell to CDR McIntosh, our former Operations Officer, who was released to the Naval Hospital, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, because of a contiijuous battle with poor health. It appears that the climate here is a hindrance to his full recovery, and apparently he will eventually be transfered to a hospital in the states. Good luck Commander - sorry to see you go!
For the benefit of personnel debating whether or not to "ship over", a few suggestions are on hand in the vicinity of the FTG Personnel Office. Mr. Bates, our Personnel Officer, has compiled facts and figures on the many advantages of a naval career, and are illustrated by several unique drawings posted on the bulkhead. Mr. Bates has recently assumed the title of "Recruiting Officer" and will be available and willing to accept all "reenlistments". While you have the opportunity, why not take the advantage of it.
The Navigation Department suffered a loss in the person of Mr. Graven, who was transfered to the U. S. Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Center, in Phonix, Arizona.
John Lindsay, SO1, who recently joined the holy bonds of matrimony, won't be seen too often around the FTG Barracks; especially since Mrs. Lindsay arrived at Guantanamo Bay last Sunday.
BOWLING
After vacating firstplace for approximately one week, an inspired and determined FTG Bowling Team
(#2) regained their top standing in the league as a result of last


NAS Crosswinds Army Corporal Wins


by Dick Friz
D. W. Parker, AG1, (on leave) and Victor Perez SN, are awaiting orders to depart on the Antartic cruise. Understand the boys are expected to recieve double sea duty pay, plus extra for hazardous duty.
Three gents prediction for long cars and buxom blondes may prove to be other than a mere caprice, should a certain mining development bear fruit. The three prospectors, March Norton, AN, Ed Bell, AC3, and Art Manthorne, AOAN. will vacation out Utah way next summer after discharge time. The pitch is for pitch blonde. Bob Pace, TD3, who hails from that region, will bide his time a little longer. Personally, our only association with radium was on the dial of a Bulova, but good luck, boys; we hope all gieger counters palpitate generously.
Twenty-seven new men arrived last week, but 20 others will leave via the JOHNSON for transfer and discharge. Departing are David Archibald, Glenn Bell Ed Bently, Bob Bonham, Frank Carkart, Art Crump, Ron Griffin, Ken Isakson, Gerd Kaestler, Win. Kovach, Waren Lampkin, Robert Morris, Jake Pittler, Bob Prunty, Vernon Pyke, Frank Ruggieri, Paul Storer, Bert Swersky, Norm Yingling and Eugene Young.
Spelling these men ,for a turn at the wheel, were 13 men. They are Gene Blair,AOAN, Robert Braeuner ADAN, Joe Brennan AB3, Ron Hall, ADAA, Lynn Harter, A03, Tom Henderson AOU3, Don Kirk, ADAN, Bill Kygier AN, Jerry Mandel, AN, Ron Manley AT3, Bob Nebeling A03, P. J. Rizzo ABAN, and Bob Springhorn AB3. NAS Brunswick sent Charles Almasi AD3, Micheal Hood AT3, Ad Newbert AKC, Bob Stromwall ATAN, and Jim Tucker AD3. Bob Brister AK3, Hal Goad, AT3, and Fred Gunther AT3 come from NAS So. Weymouth, Mass. From the Intrepid come L. B. Dickson AEC, and D. 0. Mamlad SD2. Tom Burns,
AK2 (Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Boson, Mass.) Ray Clement AC1, NAS Chincoteague, Va.) Kieth Fairchild AC1 (NAS Olathe) and Bob Guindon, AKAN (NAS Jax) round out the group.
Stan Colarusse TD1, and Marion Keefe TD2, have been accepted in Tradevman (Class B School) at Memphis, Tenn. They will leave G'tmo the end of April.
Chief W. B. Robinson (ETC) and wife take pleasure in announcing the arrival at Base Hospital of Skylar Robinson, weight 7 pounds 15 ounces. The boy was born at 11:30, 1 March.
"Navy Times" reported last week that Ted Coleman ACC/AP had entered Officers Candidate School at Newport, R. I. Coleman, the future ensign, was formerly a "flying chief" in the SAR Helicopter Unit at McCalla Field.

week's play. At this stage of the game, FTG Bowling Team (#2) definitely appears to be the team to beat, and with a few good nights of bowling they can clinch first place once and for all.
SHIP'S ARRIVALS
Monday, 7 March USS KYNE_(DE-744)
USS SNYDER
(DE-745)
USS WORCHESTER (CL-4)
SHIP'S DEPARTURES Tuesday, 8 March
USS SIGOURNEY (DD-643)


Freedom Foundation's


Annual Essay Contest

The $1,000.00 prize winner in the Freedoms Foundation essay contest on "What America Means to Me" was Corporal James R. Odermatt, stationed at Fort Ord, California.
Corporal Odermat's letter is reprinted below.

What America Means to Me
"As an individual, a citizen, and a soldier, America means to me the goodness of Life, the greatness of Liberty, and the granted pursuit of Happiness with the pride and personal dignity of being "master of my fate, captain of my soul." America means the privilege of choice in all things concerning me: the right to vote or not-to work where, when and how I decide-to worship as I believe-to speak and write according to my judgment-plus the other innumerable benefits I receive through God's grace and through my being born in this country. During the learning years of my young life I've gradually come to realize that my personal rights and privilages are only one part of what America really means to me.
America means my obligations too: my responsibility to share freedom, for without freedom for others there can be none for me; my responsibility to never use my liberty to lessen another's liberty; my liberty to protest against any violation of the basic rights of men; and my willingness, if necessary, to give up individual rights for the rights of the whole. My obligation is to be tolerant, yet vigilant, for my rights and privileges as an American citizen have not been handed to me dutyfree. America is an ideal that each must win for himself, and having been won she must be sheltered, nourished and protected to keep her a living reality.
America means the pursuit of the ideal, like the planning and building of the perfect home. A sturdy foundation has been laid with the strength of concrete determination and held fast by the steel will of God's truth and justice. It is an invincible base that neither time nor tumult can undermine. A good start has been made but the building isn't finished. It will never be entirely completed for remodeling must always be done. Mistakes will be made and corrected-improvements made and retained. New hope and light will come from our churches better education from our schools. Greater world interest will be aroused through our press, radio and television. Better citizens will be developed through our democratic system. Better health and better living for all will result from the efforts of science and industry.
America is a nation of builders with a faith to believe in and a hope to work for: a blessed nation building for a pledged future, wellguided by the framework of our pioneered past."


Teenage Round-up

by Linda Thurston
The past week saw the gang working off the extra energy left over from the carnival. Last Saturday a rash of tennis playing broke out and Pat B and Maryalice and Ceaser and Charon Pavlow spent the afternoon batting the ball around. Stan H and Penny were seen thundering down the court, leaping gracefully into the air over chairs and landing with a thump on their wrong end. All this activity was due to a rumor that the HiSchool will form an intra-mural track team. Pat Burke is allegedly the coach with Neil, Ed, Phil, etc on the team. "Etc" being future members. Neil is planing to be a second Bob Mathias and go to the Olympics. Good luck Boys.
Bobby R had a real wing-ding of a gathering the other "September Song". Everyone had a chance to get acquainted with Pat Carny and also with the fact that Bobby's walls have ears. Hmmm.
Nancy's night out with the girls turned out to be a ball. The evening was spent cavorting around the countryside in her car singing the top pops of the platter poll.
Did Ya' See . . . Anita turning linguist, trying to teach Bobby R how to say "vinegar" . . . Wormie camping out the other 3 A.M. . . . Peggy P's pretty scarf .. . Nancy A's cute new hair-do . . . Jere and Pat F these past few nights . .. Cavie listening intently to "Ol' Man River" . . . . (Grandma has a lovely voice) - - . 01' Dirty Dan Dalton hamming it up for his role in the Junior assembly play . . . . DeeDee K's spaghetti . . . . Cookie asking personal questions . . . . Sylvia and her hate for mountains . . . Mike M and Dave opening a free escort service . . . . Jackie Lee Stafford resenting the fact that some people persist in calling him Jackie Lee when his name is actually John Jerome Joseph Stafford.


JEST -A -SECOND

Daffynitions: Rasin-a grape with worries. Goblet-a small sailor. T r o u b I e-opportunity in work clothes. Cocktail-a drink that makes you see double and feel single.

A good salesman is a guy who can convince his wife she looks fat in a mink coat.

A good woman inspires a man; a brilliant woman interests him; a beautiful woman fascinates him; and a sympathetic woman marries him.

Some women say they could marry anyone they please, only they can't please anyone.

A wife is a woman who sticks with her husband through all the trouble he wouldn't have if he hadn't married her.

Four out of five woman-haters are women.

Conceit is a form of "I" strain.


am


Page Seven










rn THE INDIAN


Na y-- PP-)10ND-Gtmo.-0745


M


Saturday, 5 March i 55


MOVIES

Saturday, 5 March
THE CLOWN
Red Skelton Jane Greer
Story of the downfall of a great clown. He tries to stay on the wagon for the sake of his eight year old son but it is a losing battle.
Sunday, 6 March
THE GIRL NEXT DOOR
Dennis Day June Haver
A successful young singer who likes her privacy lives next door to a widower and his young son. The widower falls in love with her but the son's objections cause coimlications to set in.
Monday, 7 March THE JUGGLER
Kirk Douglas Milly Vitale
The story of a German refugee in Isreal in 1949 who just got out of a concentration camp, having lost his wife and children. He had been a famous juggler. Fearing the camp to which he has been assig-ned hie lbreak~s away, attacks a policeman, then begins desperate flight.
Tuesday, 8 March
JIVARO
Fernando Lamas Rhonda Fleming
A young man runs a jungle trading post at a small river settlement near the dangerous Jivaro Indian country on the Amazon. A young girl comes there looking for her sweetheart who has become a drifter and has been killed by the natives. Amid much adveLure the two fall in love.
Wednesday, 9 March
TANGANYIKA
Van Heflin Ruth Roman
While enroute to file a claim for land in British East Africa, a young Englishman saves the life of another man severly wounded. Tribe of natives led by a white man is responsible for the deed.
Thursday, 10 March
WITNESS TO MURDER
Barbara Stanwyck George Sanders
After witnessing a murder through a window a young lady calls the police in. They are unable to find evidence. The killer sets out to prove that she is a mental case and gets her committed to a hospital ward before the case is cleared.


Miss Allison Hayes, of Washington D. C., (Her father was formerly chief engineer of the Navy's Department of Ordnance) is the beauty Jack Palance buffeted about in "Sign of the Pagan," U-I's big Technicolor production. For more of Allison, see her with Tony Curtis in "The Purple Mask."


Friday, 11 March THE COMMAND
Guy Madison Joan Weldon
The captain of a cavalry troop is killed by Indians. The company's Army medical officer is forced to take command and make all the decisions regarding the safe conduct of a civilian wagon train going through Indian terrotory.


Radios 'Tops' of the Week

SATURDAY, 5 MARCH . . . . THEATRE ROYAL . . . . 9:00 P.M.
Sir Ralph Richardson takes the starring role in "The Aspern Papers" supported by an expert cast of dramatic artists of international renown.
SUNDAY, 6 MARCH . . .HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE...
10:00P.M.
An engrossing story of a woman who encounters a murderer while racing frantically to try to save her husbands life is presented with Barbara Stanwick and Barry Sullivan in their original roles. "Jeopardy".
MONDAY, 7 MARCH. . . BEST PLAYS . . . 9:00 P. M.
Faye Emerson stars in this radio dramatization of one of broadway's best. "Another Language" is the story of a woman with in-law trouble.
TUESDAY, 8 MARCH . . . THE GORDON MACRAE SHOW . . . 9:30 P. M.
Gordon MeRae is joined by soprano Elaine Malbin, Carmen Dragon and the Orchestra and the Norman Luboff Choir in Johan Straus' tuneful operetta, "Rosalinda",
WEDNESDAY, 9 MARCH... ARTHUR GODFREY . . . 8:OOP. M.
Entertainment in that easy Godfrey manner is supplied along with the offerings of some lesser-known talent including a brilliant young soprano from Ireland.
THURSDAY, 10 MARCH . . . FAMILY THEATRE . . . 9:00 P. M.
"Danny Dollar Bill" stars Sterling Holloway in an unusual portrayal as a dollar bill who doesn't care as much about what he can buy as what good he can do. Margaret O'Brien is hostess.
FRIDAY, 11 MA RCH . . . HALL OF FANTASY . . . 8:30 P. M.
Science attempts to find oUt if possible if other forms of life can be endowed with homan intelligence and if possoble, coull they live in society. Hall or Fantasy presents "Crawling Things


Two More Broadway


Shows Banned on AFRS


list Grows to Seven

Another ban on popular music has been placed in affect by the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service headquarters in Los Angeles. The newest restriction covers all music from two Broadway musicals, "Silk Stockings" and "Plain and Fancy"
Music included in the ban are such numbers as "Silk Stockings," "All of You" "Paris Loves Lovers" and "Young and Foolish."
The recent banning brings to seven the number of musical productions front which the music cannot be aired over the local AFRS station, WGBY. The others are: "Kismet," "Pajama Game," "Fanny" "Can Can" and "Damn Yankee"
The reason given for the restriction of the music is that the owners of the shows may wish to send a cast on tour overseas and, if so they do not want the music to be old when the musical is presented.

"The train ought to be here any minute now," drawled the old country station master. "I just sighted the conductor's dog coming around the bend."

"To think I had to marry you to find how stupid you are."
"You should have seen that when I proposed."


-BOOK- NOOX
by Francis L. Cannon TRYANNY ON TRIAL
by Whitney R. Haris
This is the full story of the Nurenberg war crimes trials told by a man who was on the staff of Justtce R. A. Jackson, U. S. Chief Counsel at the War Trial. The Author was a daily participant in the proceedings and himself prosecuted the case of a major criminal. Quoted from documents and letters are Nazi's own accounts of human beings exterminated by gas chainhers, gas wagons, medical means, firing squads, overwork and starvation. The testamony, much of it verbatim, is interpeted and evaluated to give a major portion of the story of Hitler's dictatorship.
THE GOODLY SEED
by John Wyllie
A novel telling of four days in the communal life of a Jananese prisoner-of-war camp. The scene is on an island near Singapore. Gathered here are Dutch, British, Americans, Javanese and half-castes with their Japanese overlords. The pris-, oner Camp Commander is an Englishman who weilds authority over the motely group by the force of his upright personality. He is respected, too, by the Japanese. But he is dying of beri-beri for lack of proper drugs. The story centers around the struggle for succesion to his post.
THE ADVENTURERS
by Ernest Haycox
Story of a man who sailed north from San Francisco in 1865 but was shipwrecked off the Oregon coast. He set up a new life there after he landed ashore with a girl and another man, whom he considered too charming to be trusted. (the city slicker) After many attempts at success in love and business he attains a measure of stability. But one is left with the impression that he should've stood in the shipwreck.
FAITH AND FREEDOM
by Barbara Ward
The authoress, writer for the London "Economist" looks at freedom as it slowly emerged through the long centuries of human development. She shows why it was in our Western civilization that freedom became established. She links the expansion of freedom with the traditional faith of the West in a God incarnate and in men owing their duty to two orders of realitity-natural and supernatural.

THE CHARKA MEMORIAL
by Wallace Ware
The Baron Charka was Ambassador to the U. S. A. from a small country in Europe. He was also in a bit of a fix, his country had gone over to the Russians, so he was recalled. This meant that his grandfather's deadly plan for promotin international misunderstanding would be put into effect. This plan is the memorial. He plans to escape and halt the plan.


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---"Govers CTMO Like The Sunshine" _____ Vol. VII, No. 9 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 5 March 1955 MCB-1 Equals MCB-4 Work Middle Cruises Set For June New $1,7O0OOO Destroyer Pier Opened On Per-Man Basis Arrive Here In July One month ago, Mobile Construction Battalion ONE releived Mobile Construction Battalion FOUR here on the Naval Base in the semiannual SeaBee switch. And since that time, MCB-4 has kept up with the record construction mark set by MCB-1 on a production-per-man basis. Actual figures, however show that the number of units completed per week have fallen off by about half-from almost nine family units a week to a little over four. The principal reason for the drop is due to a smaller number of men maintaining the project. The work of the SeaBee crews and individuals is continuing at the same rate as before, but the smaller number of crews has caused the drop in production. Taking over in full on 5 February, MCB-1 went to work on replacement housing in the Nob Hill area where eight families of the Naval Base were already living. Meanwhile other units in the area lacked only final finishing while others stood with the first and second story floors, walls, and ceilings complete ready for interior in Northwest Granadillo Point, the work. Within a week, work began location for 60 of the 100 aditional units. Progress in this area has been steady as can be seen by several first floor walls and foundations completed. In the future, no radical increase in production is expected until more manpower is made available to the battalion. And, as is the policy of ComCBLant, an advanced party from another SeaBee battalion will arrive here about two months prior to ONE's departure date. This boost in manpower of an extra company will increase production considerably. If the present rate of completion is maintained, it is expected that the Nob Hill area will be complete by mid-1955. No delay is expected in this area which will complete the original plan for 300 replacement units. Even the rainy season should cause no setback in production unless rain becomes so heavy that it would be impossible to transport men and materials to the job. This is because of the percent of completion in the area. All housing needs only interior finishing. The biggest task to be done away with yet in the Nob Hill area is utilities and a water main over a mile long. The rainy season, however, will affect work in two areasNorthwest Granadillo Point and Caravella Point. By the time rains come construction will not have gone far enough to facilitate all interior wrok in the Granadillo section. And on Caravella Point where 40 units will be constructed as MOQ for junior officers, preliminary grading has only begun there. At present, the biggest task facing MCB-1 is preliminary grading for the Caravella Point Housing. Estimates set the figure at 47,000 cubic yards of dirt to be moved in preliminary grading. According to an article in the Norfolk Virginian-Pilot, the annual Midshipman Cruises mill begin 5 June and end late in July when practical shipboard training will be climaxed by gunnery exercises off Guantanamo Bay for five days beginning 26 July. Divided into Cruise Able, Baker, and Charlie, the force of 18 cruise ships will sortie from the Norfolk area on June for the two-month cruise to Europe and the Mediterranean. The battleship Iowa and New Jersey will form the nucleus of the armada. Also scheduled for duty are the carrier Siboney and the cruisers Columbus, Des Moines and Northampton. A force of 10 destroyers and two minelayers will round out the training task force. The first movement will be labled "Cruise Able" and will include first and third clasman from the academy and 23 colleges through out the nation. Plans for cruises "Baker" and "Charlie" have not been completed During the period June 20-27, the ships will be in their first ports of call. Seven of the ships, led by the Iowa and the Hampton, will go into port at Barcelona, Spain. Others in the unit will be the Siboney, W.C. Lawe, Power, Glennon, Malaga, Spain will be the port of and Warrington. call for the Des Moines, Severn, Flechteler, Benner, D.J. Buckley, (Continued on Page Three) SeaBees Celebrate 13th Birthday Here Today Joining in with SeaBees throughout the Navy, the officers and men of MCB-1 will observe the thirteenth anniversary of the founding of the Navy's construction forces with an informal party in the enlisted men's mess hall in the AATC SeaBee camp today. Beginning at 1400, coffee and refreshments and desert will be served to the men of the battalion and their official guests. Heading the list of guests is RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, and CAPT G. M. Holley, Chief of Staff, and the commanding and executive officers of the Naval Base commands. Even prior to today, special messages were received, congratulating the SeaBees on their thirteenth birthday and their fine work. The Secretary of the Navy, Charles S. Thomas, stated, "The post war accomplishments of the SeaBees have reaffirmed their exellent reputation. Our Navy's construction forces can look not only into the past with pride but also into the future with confidence. Best wishes to the SeaBees on their thirteenth birthday. DesLant Fiagship Firt Tu iw up Gathering at the new Pier Victor with the first ship to come alongside, the USS WILKINSON, officials participating in the opening ceremony look over the new pier. Left to right; RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander Naval Base, RADM A. A. Burke, ComDesLant, CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, CDR D. G. Dockum, Commanding Officer, USS WILKINSON, CDR W. M. Gordon, Base Civil Engineering, Mr. J. R. Connor, Project Manager of Pier Vitcor for Frederick Snare Corp., CDR W. L. Rowan, Public Works Officer, and LTJG E. 0. Pfrang of the Base Civil Engineering Office. On tuesday, 1 March, one of the largest construction projects undertaken in recent years on the main side of the bay was turned over to the Naval Base when Mr. J. R. Connor, Project Manager for Frederick Snare Corp. turned over the $1,770,000 Pier Victor to CDR W. M. Gordon, CEC, USN, Base Civil Engineer, who in turn presented the pier to CAPT. W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station. Navy Set To Promote 92,000 EMs In May The Navy expects to promote 92,000 enlisted men to higher rates following service-wide examinations in February. The Bureau of, Naval Personel said it plans to advance 2,500 PO1s to CPO an increase of about 1,050 over last year despite the fact that exams in fewer ratings were given this year. Twenty three thousand POls were eligible to take the exams. The largest number of promotions will be to the P03 rate, with 58,000 men scheduled to be advanced out of the 100,000 eligible for the test. New POs will number 24,000 and 7,500 will be advanced to P01. A total of 65,000 were eligible for the P02 rates and 35,000 for PO1. The 89,500 anticipated promotions to grades E-4 through E-6 are about 5,500 less than the advancements made after the August exams However, fewer first class ratings were tested in February. The planned promotions are only tentative, the Bureau explained, because the Navy's budget for the fiscal year 1956 has not been approved by Congress. No sooner had the pier been officially opened than the USS WILKINSON (DL-5), carrying RADM A. A. Burke, ComDesLant, came alongside the 1000 foot pier, earning the dstinction of being the first destroyer type vessel to tie up at the long-awaited pier. Immediately after the ship was mocred to the dock, RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Conmander, Naval Base, was piped on board and informed Admiral Burke that DesLant flapship was the first ship to use the facilities of the new pier companied by CAPT W. R. Caruthers, and CDR D. G. Dockum, Afterwards, Admiral, Taylor, accommanding Officer of the WILK INSON had coffee with Admiral Burke in the wardroom of the ship. Pier Victor, designed for faster handling and maintainence of destroyer type vessels, was originally begun in December 1953, and the pier itself was completed far ahead of the contract completion date. The adjoining target repair facilities will be complete prior to 24 June. Capable of handling 12 destroyer in four nests of three each or three nests of three each and the AFDL-1, the pier is 1010 feet long and 60 feet wide with a deck capacity of 600 pounds per square (Continued on Page Six)

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e Saturday, 5 March 1955 The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 5 March 1955 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LTJG J. D. Byerley -Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC __---Editor H. L. Sisson, 503----M-----ews F. L. Cannon. J03 ----Photographer D. C. Roberts, JOSNReporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. What's Doin' Stateside Russia is turning out more than twice as many engineers yearly as the U.S.-54,000 to 20,000. .The Soviets have almost overcome our longstanding advantage in technical and scientific manpower. This is the warning that came from a recent Chicago conference of government industrial and scientific authorities. ..Among suggestions offered by the conferees to reverse the trend were pay raises for engineers, particularly those working for the government; greater emphasis on technical training by American educational institutions; and expanded opportunities for women in the engineering professions. The nation's first privately owned atomic power plant is to be built at Peekskill, N.Y., about 35 miles north of New York City. ..Costing $30-to$40 million, the plant will feed atomic generated electricity to New York and nearby Westchetes County. ..At the same time, plans have been anounced for private industry's first atomic pile for research purposes. ..The pile will be a joint project of several large business firms and is expected to be operating by 1956. ..According to present plans, the million dollar pile will be constructed on 250 acres in the New York City area. Welcome news for the foot-sore. Moving sidewalks are on their way One has been installed in the municipal coliseum in Houston. Made of rubber and able to handle 15,000 persons an hour, it's the widest conveyor belt ever used commercially to transport humans. It will be used by an estimated one million coliseum visitors this year. There are fewer daily newspapers in the U.S. than there used to be, but more people are reading them than ever before. ..For the first time in history, daily newspaper ciculation topped 55 million in 1954. ..But there were 20 fewer dailies than in the previous year. Speaking of weather, Americans are saving more for a rainy day than ever before ...According VU-10 Prop Blast by Bill Wright A hearty welcome aboard is extended to Ens Percy L. Smith USNR from all hands. ENS Smith, reported aboard VU-10 this past week from Flight Training at USNAS, Kingsville, Texas. Mr. Smith is a native of Nashville, Tenn. Two men that are going to be missed, among both the officers and enlisted men of VU-10 is the CMAA, J. D. Williams, BMC and the barracks MAA, W. C. Bowers, BM1. The two Boatswain's are leaving soon for further duty with Commander, Air Force Atlantic Fleet. Good luck Boats, we're going to miss having you around to keep us in line. ENS R. M. Greenfield, USNR will be advanced to the rank of LTJG March the 7th. Congratulations are extended from all hands, and don't forget the cigars! The continuous mumble of "Lets have a party", is no longer heard in VU-10's Administration Dept. The department enjoyed an afternoon this past week at Windmill Beach with MUCHO steak and beer for everyone. The highlight of the afternoon was the touch football game, at least they called it TOUCH, but you can't prove it by LT George Guyer, who won't be flying for a few days due to a fractured arm. We are glad to hear that Mrs. Evelyn Anderson is out of the hospital and doing fine. Hospital Notes by D. W. Degon HEIRPORT NEWS The stork is enjoying a well earned rest. The only births were two young gents. They are: Donald William to SN and Mrs. Susan Yale and Stephen Anthony to IM1 and Mrs. Genevieve Cushanick. ARRIVALS Welcome aboard to HM3 Kendall S. Kirtley and HN Daniel J. Sullivan who recently arrived from USNH Philadelphia for duty. BON VOYAGE HM1 Kenneth W. Eder departed via USNS Johnson for separation at Brooklyn Receiving Station. Ken was a leading corpsman in the operating room. One of his most notable achievements was advancing to the pay grade of E-6 in less than four years. Not exactly departures but neverless transfers, the last of the non-hospital rates moved their gear to Naval Station for duty. They are: BM3 Isaac Miller, who preformed his duties in transportation; SN Richard R. Burghert, a hard working member of the hospital commissary; SN Loren E. Hughart, the night duty driver for the past month. SN John J. Hudson, who was assigned to the Medical Storeroom, was also to be transfered, however emergency leave has delayed his departure. REENLISTMENTS HM2 Ronald Miller has taken the oath for a term of six years. The ceremony was held in the office of commanding officer. to the U. S. Savings and Loan League, savings of all types totaled $231,300,000 at the end of 1954-an increase of 255 percent since the start of WWII. Navy Wives' Club by Pat Aldridge The Guantanamo Bay Navy Wires' Club has donned the festive spirit of Spring with many pleasant activities planned for the coming season. Friday evening, March 11, under the able direction of Pearl Piercy, Entertainment Chairman, a "surprise" party, beginning at 8 p. m. at the Marine Family Restuarant, will be held. This festivity, the first evening affair to include members' husbands, has piqued the curosity of all for the motif has been kept a closely guarded secret. All members are urged to attend as failure to do so may result in missing an exceptionally good time. Furthermore, all members are invited to bring another couple as guests. Couples are specified as the hidden motif almost necessitates an even number joining in the fun. Reservations for this affair must be made no later than Wednesday, March 9, by calling Mrs. Piercy at 9338. Don't miss this unique party at which the men in particular will vie with one another in the exercise of imagination. Another fete is in the offing for March 17, again at the Marine Family Resteraunt at 1 p.m. This will be a "Mad Hatter" salad luncheon at which members of the Navy Wives' Club will be judged and awarded prizes for the best "crazy, mixed up" chapeaus of any imaginative design. Further entertainment will be provided by Helen Bowler, local Red Cross representive, who will display and tell the interesting stories behind her collection of fabulous jewlery acquired in many lands around the world. Reservations for this luncheon must be made by calling June Munson at 9352. During the Board of Directors' meeting held at the home of Nancy Jones, Maybelle Clay and June Munson along with Sarah Barco and Larita Clark were appointed to the Activities Committee. Among the principle duties of new committee members will be the selection of bingo prizes for the regular Thursday afternoon Socials held at Villamar Lyceum. Red roses for a little pink bloom were presented last week to Sally Cohanski honoring the arrival of tiny Denise Marcelle, a second daughter for the Cohanski family. ARRIVALS Arriving via the USNS Johnson this past week were Staff Sergeant Harry F. Stadler and Sergeant Morris J. Sheeks. Staff Sergeant Stadler joins us from Camp Lejune, North Carolina and Sergeant Sheeks from Paris Island, South Carolina. Both are attached to the Exchange Section. TALENT SHOW The talent show Friday night proved to be another success. The highlight of the evening was PFC William Cooper's piano playing which won him first place in the talent show. Plenty of beer and chow were on hand and everyone enjoyed themselves. Sunday, 6 March 1955 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Nava: oe Chapel Christian Science Sunday : 1000-Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. .Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner A Minnesota Minister told a of a man who was standing among the sidewalk "superintendents" watching as a great excavation was being made in one of the large cities. Suddenly the work stopped. The power shovels became idle, and the man noticed that a great slide of earth in one corner had buried some of the workmen. He watched now with keener interest, hoping that the men would be released before they suffocated, but he still remained on the sidewalk. Then someone touched his arm and said, "John, did you know that one of the men buried down there is your brother? "At that moment something happened to change that man. He left the sidewalk, hurried down into the excavation and, thowing off his coat, worked harder than anyone else to pull the dirt away from the threatend men. Now what caused this man to change from a passive by-stander to an active rescue worker? Obviously the answer is that one of the men buried was his brother, and because he was his brother, he had a close relationship to him. Consequently he acted from a sense of responsibility, concern, and love. Our Lord was once told that His mother and brothers were waiting to see and talk with Him. Jesus answered and said, "Who is my mother? And who are my brethren? And streaching forth His hand in the direction of those standing around Him He said in effect, "All of these are as much a brother as my blood relations and I have the same responsibility towards them all." "Am I my brother's keeper?" "Most certainly," answered the Lord. In this Lent season, it would be well for us to practice this brotherliness of Jesus. Chaplain Roberts. MCB-1 9 Page Two THE INDIAN e

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acuday, 5 March 1955 CORWIN GALWICK New "0" Club Manager Mr. Corwin Gelwick, who comes to Guantanamo Bay from Gainersville, Florida, recently took over as Manager of the Commissioned Officers Mess here, succeeding Mr. John Wingfield, who was manager for the past 39 months. Prior to taking over as manager of the "0" Club here, Mr. Gelwick was the general manager of the Gainersville Golf & Country Club in Florida for six years. Prior to that time, he managed the Myers Park Country Club in Charlotte, North Carolina. During World War II, Mr. Gelwick served with the Navy and returned to the inactive Reserves in 1946 with the permanent rank of LCDR, Mr. Gelwick has long been active in the Club Managers Association work. He served as President of the Florida Club Managers from 1949 to 1952 and is currently a member of the Board of Directors and Chairman of the Education Committee of Club Managers Association of America. Mr Gelwick is unmarried and is a graduate of the University of Illinosis where he was a former athlete and coach. Mr. Wingfield, the former manager, returned to his home in Owensburro, Kentucky where he plans to vacation for a while before carrying out any further plans. Fortune Teller's Fortune Captain W. R. Caruthers, carnival chairman, presents one of the prizes in the recent carnival contest to a smiling Mrs. J. C. Warren. Mrs. Warren, a "fortune-teller" at the 4-day carnival said she had no inkling of her own good fortune. 'Let Freedom Ring' Theme At Annual Cub Blue & Gold Banquet Last Monday night at the Naval Air Station Enlisted Men's' Club, the Cub Scouts of Pack 401, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, held their Annual Blue and Gold Banquet which proved a great success as there was a 100%y, parent attendance for all seven dens. The theme for the month was "Let Freedom Ring" and all the tables were decorated with a center piece and place settings represening something along the line of Liberty or Freedom. Mrs. G. S. Reynolds, as Den Mother for Den 7, took the third place award with a large imitation cake as a centerpiece. The cake was decorated w th the Flags of the United Nations and the place settings were also minature flags from the different nations. Mrs. Minard, Den Mother for Den 1, took the second place award with a large American and Den 1 flag made from sheels as a centerpiece. Her place settings were small cards with the same color American and Den 1 Flags. The first place award was taken by Den 2, Mrs. Jones' Den. Her centerpiece was a large aluminum Liberty Bell with blue and gold pipe cleaner figures holding the name cards. Included were party hats made by the Cubs. Upon completion of the dinner, a cake baked to commorate the 45th Birthday af the Boy Scouts was served. After everone had eaten, W. A. Johnson, the Cubmaster, dresed in Indian blanket, complete with peace pipe and headress, held the Bobcat Induction Ceremony. Those inducted were: Pat Campbell, Steven Kuster, Steven Dougherty, Robert Zaborski, and Larry Kern. Immediately folowing the Bobcat Ceremony, those who had advanced up the Cubbing ladder to the rank of Wolf were presented with their badges. They were: Bobbie Yost, Larry Corliss, Tod Cushman, Duane King and Billy Sutherling. The Bear advancement Ceremony followed, and those who received their badges were: Peter Minard William Shaw, David King, Mike Gebler, and Duncan Tebow. Prior to the Induction and Advancement Ceremonies, the Cub master was presented with an imitation campfire for the Packs use by Larry Corliss, which he had made with some help from his father. Upon completion of the ceremonies, the remaining awards were presented and very successful Pack meeting was closed by a candlelighting ceremony by Den 3. RAOM B. W. Hogan New Surgeon General Washington (AFPS) -RADM Bartholomew W. Hogan has assumed the office of Surgeon General of the Navy. Admiral Hogan took the oath of office Feb. 15 His nomination to the position by President Eisenhower was confirmed by the Senate Feb.8. 'Our Town' Nears Production Deadline When the Stage-manager observes the wedding of George and Emily, in Act II of "Our Town," he says to the audience, "the cottage, the gocart, the Sunday afternoon drives in the Ford, the first rheumatism, the death bed, the reading of the will-once in a thouand times, its interesting." How then does Thornton Wilder elude conformity and by pass the hackneyed cant of the soap operas polluting our daytime ether? ObEVELYN LEACH viously he has something to sell other than canned beer or miracle detergents. His product is life itself or the life in life, and the dialogue pulsates with the fascination and love of it. The formal structure has been compared to a scaffolding of a building in progress of construction, enabling the author to create the type of play to his own specifications. Prepping for a faithful rendition of the Pulitzer prize drama, are some 20 Little Theatre members, who on March 15, will reactivate Grovers Corners on the Marina Point stage. Alan Wagner is both director and stage-manager Evelyn Leach has the feminine lead as Emily Webb, and George Engle is her romantic interest as George Gibbs. Evelyn Purdue and Chuck Dieterle are George's parents, and Mildred Morgan, Betty Lou Tipler, and Tom Judkins form the rest of the Webb clan. Even the dead have their say in Act II, the graveyard scene, as "they wait for the eternal part in them to come out clear." Mrs. Soames' remarks from her plot, "Wasn't life awful ..and wonderful" Is Wilder then, retailing fantasy also? Or could both parts be one and the same, with death giving significance to the living? "Our Town" should remind us to treasure ordinary life just as it is and encourages us to live it to the full before our day is over. GEORGE ENGLE PTA Sees Spanish Play; Inhoo of the Secretary Hears Panel On Teenagers I of theoNavy,fthe Honorable The monthly meeting of the Charles S. Thomas, Rear AdGuantanamo Bay Parent-Teachers miral and Mrs. E. B. Taylor Association was held on Tuesday will be at home 1630 to night, 1 March at the open air 1830, Sunday, 13 March 1955 auditorium of the Naval Base in lieu of their regular mooSchool. thly at home the first SunThe highlight of the evening day of March. All Officers was a skit presented by the 3rd and civilians of equivalent Grade class of Mrs. Savage, assisted by Mrs. Gordon Ward. The rank and wives are cordially skit was written and produced by invited to attend. Uniform the pupils of Mrs Savage and was service dress white. presented entirely in Spanish.a The feature of the evening was a palel discussion on the subject "Teenagers in the Guantanamo Environment". Mr. John Sanborn was moderator and Mrs. Lucille Burke, LT. L. B. Dalton, AD1 J. W. Dexter, Miss Sylvia Cavanaugh and Howard Rogers were members of the panel. The attendance prizes, awarded on a percentage of parents from each classroom, were awarded to: 1st prize -Mrs. Savage (3rd grade) 2nd prize -a tie, Mrs. McNeal nursery) and Mrs. Burke (kindergarten) 3rd prize -Mrs. Usey 3rd Grade) Middie Cruise .. (Continued from Page One) and E.F. Larson. Leading a group into Barcelona, Spain will be the New Jersey. In her party will be the Columbus, R.L. Winson, Basilone, Shannon, and H.F. Bauer. Second ports of call for the various groups will be Portsmouth, Weymouth, Plymouth, Torquay, and Sheerness. All are English ports RADM R. E. Libby, ComBatCruLant will be commander of the cruise. Screen commander will be Capt. D. L. Carlson, ComDesRon. M THE INDIAN m .M Page Three

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m Pag Four Saturday, 5 March 1955 SPORTS ROUND-UP (AFPS) One of the top Army sportswriters, Sgt. Al Thomy of Ft. Jackson, S. C., has been discharged aol e::p-ets to join the sports of the Atlanta Constitution. Know what ring veterans Al Andrews, Henry Davis, Ernie Durando, Ramon Fuentes, Rex Layne and Holly Mims all have in common? The Ring magazine they all started boxing while in the Armed Forces. The 1955 All-Navy Pacific area boxing finals will be held Apr. 5 at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard in California. Former All-Army golf king Billy Maxwell won $3,000 in the pro-am tourney at the Oak Hills Country Club in San Antonio, Tex ... Cpl. Mark Evans of the 21st Station Hospital in Korea claims to have done 1000 push-ups in the remarkable time of 23 minutes 21 seconds. Could be a world record. Olympic diving champ Maj. Sammy Lee is now assigned to the hospital at Ft Carson, Colo. .. Pfc David S. Raleigh of the 2nd Bn., 9th Marines, Third Marine Div., is the grand prize winner in the third annual Leatherneck contest. The Milwaukee Braves have 132 regular and farm players in the Armed Forces. About 80 of these are expected to be discharged during the 1955 season. The Cincinnati Redlegs will meet the Washington Senators in a Grapefruit League game at Camp Gordon, Ga., Mar. 31 ...Billy Martin will play shortstop and double as the manager of the Ft. Carson Mountaineers baseball nine until he gets his discharge in the summer. ..Bob Peterson, a sixfoot five and one half forward, who played 63 basketball games for Ft. Ord, Calif., is the newest rookie on the pro New York Knickerbocker squad. QUOTABLE QUOTES Here's what they're saying about the Armed Forces track team in New York: Jimmy Powers of the Daily News-"Fred Dwyer's win of the Baxter Mile (New York A. C. Games) was the greatest Garden track thrill of all time." Dan Daniel of the World Telegram & Sun-"Our service athletics, including Marine reservist Wes Santee, and invaders from Europe led by Denmarks Gunnar Nielsen, have helped make this indoor track and field season truly spectacular": Dan Ferris, secretary-treasure of the Amateur Athletic Union"They're wonderful." Ferris said its great the way they have been able to train for international cometition. In his final basketball game for Ft. Belvoir, Va., Dick Groat scored 72 points against Bainbridge, Md. The former Duke whiz netted 25 field goals and 22 out of free throws. ..Baltimore Colt grid quarterback Cotton Davidson is now in the Army. Marine Sports by Paul Hoffer BOWLING As the bowling season nears its end, Headquarters it still the number one team. Team#2 is a close second with a 14-6 record. This week should decide the champions of the second round. A play off between the winner of the first half and the winner of the second half wil decide the champions of the league. The climax of the bowling season will be a tournament between the top 16 bowlers of the league. Don Schreck is still the high game bowler with 225 and Robert Rausch the high average with 165 and also the high series with 603. 1. Hdqus. Plt. 17 3 2, Team#2 14 6 3. Team#3 12 8 4. Team#4 10 10 5. Team#1 8 12 6. Staff NCO's 8 12 7. Supply 6 14 8. Officers 5 15 BASEBALL The Naval Base "1954" Baseball Champions will be rounding into shape this week to defend their title. A large turn out is expected. The loss of Joe Androvich, Tom Felak, Jim Pace, Charles Smith, Wayne Straw and Raoul -Santos will be greatly missed. Ret6ing from last years team are Paul Hoffer, Don Schreck, Bob Holmes, Ron Plante, Bill Wood, Larry Adams, Chuck Mason and Bob Clark. The team will be managed by Captain John J. Swords. Ladies Golf Shots by Betty Lou Tipler Our Ringer Tournament has ended after a month of work (or play) on it. The receivers of the nice silver pieces ar as follows: First Flight 1st-Sue Scott 2nd-tie Alma McCracken Jane McElroy Second Flight 1st-tie Frances Grounds Johnnie King 2nd-tie Val Evans Gladys Hamiliton Third Flight 1st-Charlie Murphy 2nd-tie Cynthia Holley Vi Merz Fourth Flight 1st-Doris Lee 2nd-Florence Fortenberry On Wednesday, the First and Second flights played 18 holes for low gross and net while the Third and Fourth Flights played a blind five tournament on the front nine holes. Winners were. First Flight Low Gross-Evelyn Leach Low Net-tie Edna Edwards Marion Caruthers Second Flight Low Gross-Frances Grounds Low Net-Johnnie King Third Flight 1st-tie Cynthia Holley Vi Merz 2nd-tie Vivian Soballe Doris Rothenberg Fourth Flight 1st-Mary McFadden 2nd-tie Chris Guyer Marie D'Amico Intra-Command Golf Swings Into Play The first series of matches in the 1955 Intra -Command Golf Tournament teed off last Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 26 and 27. VU-10, the 1953 & 1954 champions, got off to a flying start by defeating the Naval Air Station team, 18 to 6. The Medical team, composed of members of the hospital and Dental Clinic nosed out the NSD-CHB combine by three points, 13 to 10 .Naval Station edged the 1952 champs, FTG, 13 to 11, MCB-1 drew a bye for the week-end. Today at 1 P.M. the Medics go against FTG and the NSD-CHB team draws Naval Station. Tomorow at 8:15 A.M. VU-10 meets MCB-1. Naval Air Station draws a bye for this week-end. Naval Station Bowling STANDING Team W FTG#2 42 Third Division 41 NSD 39 Fifth Division "M" 38 Security Group 36 FTG#1 35 Fleet Boat Pool 33 Commissary Store 32 MCB-1 30 Fleet Camera Party 27 Fifth Division "R" 26 CHB-1 25 Fifth Division "ET" 23 Second Division 23 Hospital 22 Eleventh Division 15 First Division 9 Sixth Division 8 L 14 15 17 18 20 21 23 24 26 29 30 31 33 33 34 41 47 48 HOT AIR Dity ba I Calling All Uimpires All persons interested in positions as umpires or scorekeepers for the coming baseball season are requested to meet at the Naval Station Special Services office at 7 P. M. on Wednesday, 9 March. We are losing two of ofur favorite golfers this week-Helen King and Emma Hutton. Certainly hate to see them go. Basketball Standings TEAM NavSta NAS MCB-1 Medical Marines CHB-1 VU-10 Lwrd. Pt. HiSchool FTG W L PCT 15 14 12 10 9 6 6 4 2 0 1 2 4 6 7 9 9 12 13 15 .937 .A75 .750 .625 .562 .400 .400 .250 .133 .000 (Standings include games of Thursday, 3 March) Basketball Schedule MONDAY, 7 MARCH** HiSchool vs Lwrd Pt. NAS vs Medical TUESDAY, 8 MARCH CHB-1 vs NavSta FTG vs Marines WEDNESDAY, 9 MARCH** HiSchool vs MCB-1 Lwrd. Pt. vs VU-10 THURSDAY, 10 MARCH NAS vs NavSta Medical vs FTG FRIDAY, 11 MARCH: VU-10 vs Marines CHB-1 vs MCB-1 (Astericks** denote games to be played at Marine Site) This is the end of the regular season schedule. The post-season tournament is scheduled to start on Monday, 14 March. Ladies Bowling Team #1 of the Ladies Bowling League stands as the team to beat as play nears the final wire. Widening their margin, Team#1 holds first place by three games over Team#2. Team#2 recently nosed past Team#8 who had held second spot since the beginning of the second half. In the high averages department, Emily Griffin still stands on top with a 171 average while Betty Sentz, rolling the high game for this week with a 202 stands in second place with a 163 average. STANDINGS Team W L Team#1 17 3 Team#2 14 6 Team#8 12 8 Team#6 10 10 Team#7 10 10 Team#5 9 11 Team#4 8 12 Team#10 8 12 Team#3 7 13 Team#9 5 15 HGH TEN AVERAGES E. Giffin B. Sentz P. Way F. Grounds J. King S. Wenderlich M. Powers A. Tagliabue B. Gardner C. Godbout 171 163 149 145 143 140 139 135 135 133 HIGH GAMES THIS WEEK B. Sentz 202 S. Wenderlich 188 F. Grounds 191 E. Griffin 183 C. Godbout 184 B. Gardner 182 B. Phillips 179 M. Green 178 H. Albright 178 A. Forrester 171 J. King 170 9 THE INDIAN M

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Satuday, 5 March 1955 M THE INDIAN m Page Five Indians, Flyers Race For Title; Meet Thursday On NavSta Court Flyers Face Medics Monday by Hal Davis The Naval Station Indians and the Naval Air Station Flyers, traditioimai rivals on the field of sport, gathered momentum in their headlong dash toward each other during the week. The Indians knocked over the Pointers and Medics and squeezed by a surprising VU-10 Mallard squad, while the Flyers had. 4 free one from the absent -Stingers and walloped the Pointers in their games. The grand collision comes next Thursday night on the Indians' home court when the two big red teams meet head-on in the "game of the season" If we had to pick a winner, we'd say UCLA by two touchdowns. Both the Flyers and the Braves suffered important losses in the last week. The Flyers were hit hard with the transfer of Sherlacker, Bentely and Archibald, but the Indians lost the services of their setter specialist, Jack "Deadpan" Nigro. A win for the Indians will clinch the 1955 title. A win for the Flyers would tie it all up and insure a playoff. There's only one stumbling block on the Flyer runway-the Medics. And we'll have to call this one the "game of the week" when they meet Monday night at the Marine Site court. We give the Flyers a small edge, although the corpsman dumped them the last time out together, because this win is absolutely necessary for the Flyers to stay in the running, and the Ferenchak squad will be playing their best. The Flyer "best" is something to watch. The Indians can almost coast until Thursday for they come up against only a greatly weakened CHB-1 squad which is currently tied for 6th place with the VU-10 Mallards. MEDICS WIN CB FOREFIT INDIANS DUMP POINTERS; Closing out last week's play, the Indians pounced on the Leeward Pointers to the tune of 53 to 20 with coach Jerry Morgan leading the Braves with 16. The Medics won a forefit from the Stingers who are playing in the ServLant tourney in Norfolk. MARINES DOWN POINTERS; INDIANS OVER MEDICS Monday night the Marine Leathernecks jumped on the Pointers for 66 against the 34 of the Leeward-men. Holmes led the Marines with 20 tallies to boost him into 7th place in the "top ten". The Indians maintained their lead by defeating the Medical squad 45 to 35 in the "game of the week". Both teams threw up tight defenses and held them through the tilt, but it was the sharpshooting of Jack Nigro that gave the Indians the edge. Nigro bagged 13, followed by Gitlin with 12 and Slewitzke with 10. Paul King knocked off 11 for the Medics. PIRATES EDGE TRAINERS; FLYERS TAKE CB FORFEIT The High School Pirates cracked the win colum for the second time this season against the hapless Trainers who haven't been able to do the same yet, 49 to45. Reffett hit the hoop for 13, over Hiemer's 11, but the Trainers' Fetterman rapped out 22 for the night. The NAS Flyers were awarded the nightcap in a forfeit over the absent SeaBees. INDIANS SQUEEK BY VU-10; MEDICS WHIP STEVEDORES Wednesday night the league leading Indians came out of a close one with the VU-10 Mallards, 67 to 64. It was the Mallards, behind Houchin's 21 tallies, that had the game until the last 20 seconds of play when the Braves knocked out the extra margin. The Mallards led at half-time with a 2-point edge, but the Indians, in their customary method, didn't really roll until the second half. It was almost too late this time, but with Morgan's 18 and Slewitzke's 15 they managed to hold their top spot in the standings. In the nightcap the Medics pounded the Stevedores, 64 to33 with Paul King breaking into the "top ten" scorers by racking up 26 points. FLYERS DOWN POINTERS In the final game of the week, as far as the Indian deadline is concerned, the NAS Flyers whipped their fellow-airmen from across the Bay, 55 to 20. Ring climbed up to within five points of second place in the top scorers by hitting for 21. THE FINAL WEEK This is the week, coming up, that tells the tale. If the Flyers should drop Monday night's game with the Medics, its all over but the decorations. If they win it, and chances are they will by a narow spread, then the BIG ONE comes Thursday night. With the championship at stake and two big games in the offing, the only thing we can say is heaven have mercy on the referees. Medics on three sides and a photographer on the other provided this basketball ballet sequence during the Naval Station Indian -Medical game last Monday night. In the center, Jerry Morgan, Indian coach, goes up in the air along with O'Brien (17) and Rose (3) of the Medics. Almost hidden behind Morgan is King of the Medics. Indians took it 45 to 35. Getting through a defense was the order of the night during the Indian Medic game last Monday. Here, Jerry Morgan flips a pass to Gitlin as the Indians work the ball toward the Medics forward line, Rose and Maddox. PLAYER Gerhardt Heimer Ring Snyder Houchin Morgan Holmes Gatti Slewitzke King TOP TEN SCORERS TEAM Games Points Avg. CHB-1 12 263 21.9 High School 15 248 16.5 NAS 15 243 16.2 NAS 15 234 15.6 VU-10 14 198 14.1 Naval Station 16 192 12.0 Marines 16 188 11.7 Marines 16 185 11.5 Naval Station 16 .176 11.0 Hospital-Dental 15 170 113 q

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Sat rday, 5 March ComSecondFlt Here On Annual Tour Last week, VADM Edmund T. Wooldridge, ComSecond Flt, arrived on the Naval Base for his annual tour of the base. The primary purpose of the visit is to look over facilities for the Second Fleet, in planning for the coming fiscal year's activities. Arriving Thursday afternoon at the Naval Air Station by special flight, Admiral Wooldridge was met by RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, CAPT. G. M. Holley, Chief of Staff, and other high ranking officers of Naval Base commands. Accompanying Admiral Wooldridge was his staff, CAPT Raymond P. Hunter, CAPT Robert J. Hardy, CAPT George D. Good, CDR George C. Bullard, LCDR William C. Amick, Jr., LT Chester H. Dorchester, LT Arthur K. Bennett Jr., LTJG Joseph Sweedler, and LTJG John J. Oliver. Base School 8th Grade Visits Refrigeration Plant CHB Sailor Makes Good Use of Spare Time Mr. Figueras explains refrigeration machinery operation to visiting science students from the Naval Base School. Shown being presented with his certificate for satisfactorily completing the High School Level General Educational Development Tests is Ronald J. Drace, BM3 of CHB-1. Drace has made good use of his spare time here and the facilities offered by the Information and Education office by completing two courses in Review Arithmatic, a course in "Criminology" and one in "Prison Work as a Career." He has also completed numerous Navy Correspondence Courses, amoung which are "Builder Third Class," "The Shorepatrolman," and he is presently working on a course in the Uniform Code of Military Justice. "I have a dog that growls," said the spinster, "a parrot that swears, a fireplace that smokes, and a cat hats stays out all night. Why should I want a husband?" Did you see the TV western where the hero had to stop chasing the villian after one block? He'd reached the end of the chord on his electric guitar. DISENROLLMENT POLICY FOR USAFI CLARIFIED by William A. Johnson, PN1 There seems to be some misunderstanding regarding the present policy governing disenrollment from USAFI Courses. Students will be disenrolled from a correspondence course after any six-month period of activity or eighteen months from date of enrollment if the course has not ben completed. Students will be disenrolled from a selfteaching course twelve months form date of enrollment if the course has not been completed. The return of materials does NOT prevent automatic disenrollment from a course at the expiration of the time limits allowed for activity in the course and/or course completion. Automatic disenrollment occurs as a result of failure of the student's record to show appropiate activity in the course (submision of lesons and/or satisfactory completion of the end of course test), and isn't affected in any way by his sending back or retaining his course materials. No provision exists for recording the return of materials for the purpose of future applications for enrollment without the required $2.00 fee after disenrollment has occured. A student is required to return materials only in the event he requests transfer to another course. He is permitted to retain in his possession materials for courses which he completes or from which he has been disenrolled. If student previously failed tc complete or to register activity in a course in accordance with current USAFI instructions, automatic disenrollment takes place and an additional $2.00 fee should accompany the new application. In reference to completion of courses, bear in mind the words of Joseph Addison on Education, "Education is a companion which no misfortune can depress, no crime can destroy, no enemy can alienate, no despotism can enslave. At home a friend, abroad an introduction; in solitude a solace and in society an ornament. It chastens vice, it guides virtue, it gives, at once, grace and govenment to genius." Last week, in connection with their studies of refrigeration, students of the 8th grade general science class at the laval Base School -:de a field trq visit to the Naval Supply Depot sce Manufacturing plant on Sherman Avenue. They observed the cycle of ice manufacture from the pouring of water into the ice cans to the storing of the 300 lb. blocks of ice in the issuing room. Mr. David Figueras, Chief-Quarterman in charge of NSD refrigeration plants, presented a lecture on the theory of refrigerants and the operation of pumps, compressors condensers and other ice manufacturing machinery. Others accompanying the students on their tour were Mr. W. A. McGill, science teacher at the school, and Lt. R.G. Whitman, administration officer at NSD. PIER VICTOR (Continued from Page One) foot. Two Gantry Crane tracks run the length of the pier on both sides and are connected with the present Gantry Crane track on pier Love. Piling for the new pier is cement and concrete type, and the piles, layed end to end, would si i=tch out to a length of over ten miles. For the capacity of 12 destroyers that the pier can handle, which is only a basic figure with a potentiality of handling more, the pier has salt water lines, fresh water lines. telephone lines, compressed air lines, and 110/220 and 440 volt power lines. Plans have been made for the future installation of fuel lines. Also included in the future plans is to move the AFDL-1 from its present birth at Pier Love to a berth at the west side at the head of Pier Victor. Built by the Frederick Snare Corp. under contract NOy72,228C, Mr. J. R. Connor was Project Manager, and CAPT N. J. Drustrup, CEC, USN was the officer in charge of Construction for the 10th Naval District. CDR W. M. Gordon, CEC, USN, was ROINC, Others directly engaged in the project were, LTJG E. O. Pfrang, CEC, USNR, E. E. Dean, Engineer, and Fred E. Knox, Inspector. M Page Six *m THE INDIAN M

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Saturday, 5 March 1955 ao Page Seven FTG Bulletin by Ron Federman On 23 February, the USNS PVT. JOHNSON brought three new men to the shores of sunny Guantanamo Bay, for duty at FTG. The three additions to our staff are relatively new to the Navy. The newcomers are Jose Acevedo, SA, Joseph Leanzo, SA, and Robert Leno, SA; anll reporting from U.S. Naval Station, Newport, R. I. They received their inital training at Bainbridge, Maryland, prior to a brief tour of duty at Newport. Acevedo and Leno have been assigned to the MAA Force, and Leanzo will perform his duties with the transportation Department. Also joining the ranks at FTG was George Thomas, ETC, who reported on the 28th of February, from the USS ROWE (DD-564). Thomas is married, and has two charming daughters. His wife and children are presently residing in Norfolk, Va. For the benefit of our "playboys" at FTG, it might be appropriate to further comment on Chief Thomas' two daughters Their ages are 14 months, and 3 years old -just a trifle too young. Well, what do you know! It finally happened -LCDR Skadowski is now the proud recipient of another stripe and some "scrambled eggs" for his cap. On 25 February, after returning from ORI aboard the USS INTREPID, he was informed of his promotion, and almost immediately was sworn in by Captain Habecker. That evening Mrs. Skadowski treated her husband to a "thick juicy steak" at the Family Restaurant in celebration of the occasion, but because of the nervous effects produced by the good news, the steak went to waste All in all it was an exciting day for the Commander. A sad farewell to CDR McIntosh, our former Operations Officer, who was released to the Naval Hospital, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, because of a continuous battle with poor health. It appears that the climate here is a hindrance to his full recovery, and apparently he will eventually be transfered to a hospital in the states. Good luck Commander -sorry to see you go! For the benefit of personnel debating whether or not to "ship over", a few suggestions are on hand in the vicinity of the FTG Personnel Office. Mr. Bates, our Personnel Officer, has compiled facts and figures on the many advantages of a naval career, and are illustrated by several unique drawings posted on the bulkhead. Mr. Bates has recently assumed the title of "Recruiting Officer" and will be available and willing to accept all "reenlistments". While you have the opportunity, why not take the advantage of it. The Navigation Department suffered a loss in the person of Mr. Graven, who was transfered to the U. S. Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Center, in Phonix, Arizona. John Lindsay, SO1, who recently joined the holy bonds of matriniony, won't be seen too often around the FTG Barracks; especially since Mrs. Lindsay arrived at Guantanamo Bay last Sunday. BOWLING After vacating firstplace for approximately one week, an inspired and determined FTG Bowling Team (#2) regained their top standing in the league as a result of last NAS Crosswinds Army Corporal Wins by Dick Friz D. W. Parker, AG1, (on leave) and Victor Perez SN, are awaiting orders to depart on the Antartic cruise. Understand the boys are expected to recieve double sea duty pay, plus extra for hazardous duty. Three gents prediction for long cars and buxom blondes may prove to be other than a mere caprice, should a certain mining development bear fruit. The three prospectors, March Norton, AN, Ed Bell, AC3, and Art Manthorne, AOAN, will vacation out Utah way next summer after discharge time. The pitch is for pitch blende. Bob Pace, TD3, who hails from that region, will bide his time a little longer. Personally, our only association with radium was on the dial of a Bulova, but good luck, boys; we hope all gieger counters palpitate generously. Twenty-seven new men arrived last week, but 20 others will leave via the JOHNSON for transfer and discharge. Departing are David Archibald, Glenn Bell Ed Bently, Bob Bonham, Frank Carkart, Art Crump, Ron Griffin, Ken Isakson, Gerd Kaestler, Wm. Kovach, Waren Lampkin, Robert Morris, Jake Pittier, Bob Prunty, Vernon Pyke, Frank Ruggieri, Paul Storer, Bert Swersky, Norm Yingling and Eugene Young. Spelling these men ,for a turn at the wheel, were 13 men. They are Gene Blair,AOAN, Robert Braenner ADAN, Joe Brennan AB3, Ron Hall, ADAA, Lynn Harter, A03, Tom Henderson AOU3, Don Kirk, ADAN, Bill Kygier AN, Jerry Mandel, AN, Ron Manley AT3, Bob Nebeling A03, P. J. Rizzo ABAN, and Bob Springhorn AB3. NAS Brunswick sent Charles Almasi AD3, Micheal Hood AT3, Ad Newbert AKC, Bob Stromwall ATAN, and Jim Tucker AD3. Bob Brister AK3, Hal Goad, AT3, and Fred Gunther AT3 come from NAS So. Weymouth, Mass. From the Intrepid come L. B. Dickson AEC, and D. 0. Mamlad SD2. Tom Burns, AK2 (Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Boson, Mass.) Ray Clement ACI, NAS Chincoteague, Va.) Kieth Fairchild AC1 (NAS Olathe) and Bob Guindon, AKAN (NAS Jax) round out the group. Stan Colarusse TD1, and Marion Keefe TD2, have been accepted in Tradevman (Class B School) at Memphis, Tenn. They will leave G'tmo the end of April. Chief W. B. Robinson (ETC) and wife take pleasure in announcing the arrival at Base Hospital of Skylar Robinson, weight 7 pounds 15 ounces. The boy was born at 11:30, 1 March. "Navy Times" reported last week that Ted Coleman ACC/AP had entered Officers Candidate School at Newport, R. I. Coleman, the future ensign, was formerly a "flying chief" in the SAR Helicopter Unit at McCalla Field. week's play. At this stage of the game, FTG Bowling Team (#2) definitely appears to be the team to beat, and with a few good nights of bowling they can clinch first place once and for all. SHIP'S ARRIVALS Monday, 7 March USS KYNE__ (DE-744) USS SNYDER (DE-745) USS WORCHESTER (CL-4) SHIP'S DEPARTURES Tuesday, 8 March USS SIGOURNEY (DD-643) Freedom Foundation's Annual Essay Contest The $1,000.00 prize winner in the Freedoms Foundation essay contest on "What America Means to Me" was Corporal James R. Odermatt, stationed at Fort Ord, California. Corporal Odermat's letter is reprinted below. What America Means to Me "As an individual, a citizen, and a soldier, America means to me the goodness of Life, the greatness of Liberty, and the granted pursuit of Happiness with the pride and personal dignity of being "master of my fate, captain of my soul." America means the privilege of choice in all things concerning me: the right to vote or not-to work where, when and how I decide-to worship as I believe-to speak and write according to my judgment-plus the other innumerable benefits I receive through God's grace and through my being born in this country. During the learning years of my young life I've gradually come to realize that my personal rights and privileges are only one part of what America really means to me. America means my obligations too: my responsibility to share freedom, for without freedom for others there can be none for me; my responsibility to never use my liberty to lessen another's liberty; my liberty to protest against any violation of the basic rights of men; and my willingness, if necessary, to give up individual rights for the rights of the whole. My obligation is to be tolerant, yet vigilant, for my rights and privileges as an American citizen have not been handed to me dutyfree. America is an ideal that each must win for himself, and having been won she must be sheltered, nourished and protected to keep her a living reality. America means the pursuit of the ideal, like the planning and building of the perfect home. A sturdy foundation has been laid with the strength of concrete determination and held fast by the steel will of God's truth and justice. It is an invincible base that neither time nor tumult can undermine. A good start has been made but the building isn't finished. It will never be entirely completed for remodeling must always be done. Mistakes will be made and corrected-improvements made and retained. New hope and light will come from our churches better education from our schools. Greater world interest will be aroused through our press, radio and television. Better citizens will be developed through our democratic system. Better health and better living for all will result from the efforts of science and industry. America is a nation of builders with a faith to believe in and a hope to work for: a blessed nation building for a pledged future, wellguided by the framework of our pioneered past." Teenage Round-up by Linda Thurston The past week saw the gang working off the extra energy left over from the carnival. Last Saturday a rash of tennis playing broke out and Pat B and Maryalice and Ceaser and Charon Paylow spent the afternoon batting the ball around. Stan H and Penny were seen thundering down the court, leaping gracefully into the air over chairs and landing with a thump on their wrong end. All this activity was due to a rumor that the HiSchool will form an intra-mural track team. Pat Burke is allegedly the coach with Neil, Ed, Phil, etc on the team. "Etc" being future members. Neil is planing to be a second Bob Mathias and go to the Olympics. Good luck Boys. Bobby R had a real wing-ding of a gathering the other "September Song". Everyone had a chance to get acquainted with Pat Carny and also with the fact that Bobby's walls have ears. Hmmm. Nancy's night out with the girls turned out to be a ball. The evening was spent cavorting around the countryside in her car singing the top pops of the platter poll. Did Ya' See ...Anita turning linguist, trying to teach Bobby R how to say "vinegar" ...Wormie camping out the other 3 A.M. ..Peggy P's pretty scarf .. Nancy A's cute new hair-do .. Jere and Pat F these past few nights ..Cavie listening intently to "Ol' Man River" ... (Grandma has a lovely voice) ... 01' Dirty Dan Dalton hamming it up for his role in the Junior assembly play ....DeeDee K's spaghetti ....Cookie asking personal questions ....Sylvia and her hate for mountains ... Mike M and Dave opening a free escort service ....Jackie Lee Stafford resenting the fact that some people persist in calling him Jackie Lee when his name is actually John Jerome Joseph Stafford. JEST -A-SECOND Daffynitions: Rasin-a grape with worries. Goblet-a small sailor. T r o u b 1 e-opportunity in work clothes. Cocktail-a drink that makes you see double and feel single. A good salesman is a guy who can convince his wife she looks fat in a mink coat. A good woman inspires a man; a brilliant woman interests him; a beautiful woman fascinates him; and a sympathetic woman marries him. Some women say they could marry anyone they please, only they can't please anyone. A wife is a woman who sticks with her husband through all the trouble he wouldn't have if he hadn't married her. Four out of five woman-haters are women. Conceit is a form of "I" strain. e0 THE INDIAN

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Na ro-10Nt-ctmo.-o145 gm THE INDIAN Saturday, 5 March 55 MOVIES Saturday, 5 March THE CLOWN Red Skelton Jane Greer Story of the downfall of a great clown. He tries to stay on the wagon for the salke of his eight year old son but it isa losing battle. Sunday, 6 March THE GIRL NEXT DOOR Dennis Day June Haver A successful young singer who likes her privacy lives next door to a widower and his young son. The widower falls in love with her but the son's objections cause comlications to set in. Monday, 7 March THE JUGGLER Kirk Douglas Milly Vitale The story of a German refugee in Isreal in 1949 who just got out of a concentration camp, having 1ost his wife and children. He had been a famous juggler. Fearing the camp to which he has been assigned he breaks away, attacks a policeman, then begins desperate flight. Tuesday, 8 March JIVARO Fernando Lamas Rhonda Fleming A young man runs a jungle trading post at a small river settlement near the dangerous Jivaro Indian country on the Amazon. A young girl comes there looking for her sweetheart who has become a drifter and has been killed by the natives. Amid much adventure the two fall in love. Wednesday, 9 March TANGANYIKA Van Heflin Ruth Roman While enroute to file a claim for land in British East Africa, a young Englishman saves the life of another man severly wounded. Tribe of natives led by a white man is responsible for the deed. Thursday, 10 March WITNESS TO MURDER Barbara Stanwyck George Sanders After witnessing a murder through a window a young lady calls the police in. They are unable to find evidence. The killer sets out to prove that she is a mental case and gets her committed to a hospital ward before the case is cleared. Miss Allison Hayes, of Washington D. C., (Her father was formerly chief engineer of the Navy's Department of Ordnance) is the beauty Jack Palance buffeted about in "Sign of the Pagan," U-I's big Technicolor production. For more of Allison, see her with Tony Curtis in "The Purple Mask." Friday, 11 March THE COMMAND Guy Madison Joan Weldon The captain of a cavalry troop is killed by Indians. The company's Army medical officer is forced to take command and make all the decisions regarding the safe conduct of a civilian wagon train going through Indian terrotory. Radio's 'Tops' of the Week SATURDAY, 5 MARCH ..THEATRE ROYAL ..9:00 P.M. Sir Ralph Richardson takes the starring role in "The Aspern Papers" supported by an expert cast of dramatic artists of international renown. SUNDAY, 6 MARCH ...HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE. 10:00P.M. An engrossing story of a woman who encounters a murderer while racing frantically to try to save her husbands life is presented with Barbara Stanwick and Barry Sullivan in their original roles. "Jeopardy". MONDAY, 7 MARCH. BEST PLAYS ..9:00 P. M. Faye Emerson stars in this radio dramatization of one of broadway's best. "Another Language" is the story of a woman with in-law trouble. TUESDAY, 8 MARCH .THE GORDON MACRAE SHOW .. 9:30 P. M. Gordon McRae is joined by soprano Elaine Malbin, Carmen Dragon and the Orchestra and the Norman Luboff Choir in Johan Straus' tuneful operetta, "Rosalinda", WEDNESDAY, 9 MARCH. ARTHUR GODFREY .8:00P. M. Entertainment in that easy Godfrey manner is supplied along with the offerings of some lesser-known talent including a brilliant young soprano from Ireland. THURSDAY, 10 MARCH .FAMILY THEATRE .9:00 P. M. "Danny Dollar Bill" stars Sterling Holloway in an unusual portrayal as a dollar bill who doesn't care as much about what he can buy as what good he can do. Margaret O'Brien is hostess. FRIDAY, 11 MARCH ..HALL OF FANTASY ...8:30 P. M. Science attempts to find out if possible if other forms of life can be endowed with human intelligence and if possoble, could they live in society. Hall of Fantasy presents "Crawling Things Two More Broadway Shows Banned on AFRS List Grows to Seven Another ban on popular music has been placed in affect by the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service headquarters in Los Angeles. The newest restriction covers all music from two Broadway musicals, "Silk Stockings" and "Plain and Fancy" Music included in the ban are such numbers as "Silk Stockings," "All of You" "Paris Loves Lovers" and "Young and Foolish." The recent banning brings to seven the number of musical productions from which the music cannot be aired over the local AFRS station, WGBY. The others are: "Kismet," "Pajama Game," "Fanny" "Can Can" and "Damn Yankee" The reason given for the restriction of the music is that the owners of the shows may wish to send a cast on tour overseas and, if so they do not want the music to be old when the musical is presented. "The train ought to be here any minute now," drawled the old country station master. "I just sighted the conductor's dog coming around the bend." "To think I had to marry you to find how stupid you are." "You should have seen that when I proposed." *BO OK* NOOK by Francis L. Cannon TRYANNY ON TRIAL by Whitney R. Haris This is the full story of the Nurenberg war crimes trials told by a man who was on the staff of Justice R. A. Jackson, U. S. Chief Counsel at the War Trial. The Author was a daily participant in the proceedings and himself prosecuted the case of a major criminal. Quoted from documents and letters are Nazi's 'own accounts of human beings exterminated by gas chambers, gas wagons, medical means, firing squads, overwork and starvation. The testamony, much of it verbatim, is interested and evaluated to give a major portion of the story of Hitler's dictatorship. THE GOODLY SEED by John Wyllie A novel telling of four days in the communal life of a Jananese prisoner-of-war camp. The scene is on an island near Singapore. Gathered here are Dutch, British, Americans, Javanese and half-castes with their Japanese overlords. The pris-, oner Camp Commander is an Englishman who weilds authority over the motely group by the force of his upright personality. He is respected, too, by the Japanese. But he is dying of beri-beri for lack of proper drugs. The story centers around the struggle for succesion to his post. THE ADVENTURERS by Ernest Haycox Story of a man who sailed north from San Francisco in 1865 but was shipwrecked off the Oregon coast. He set up a new life there after he landed ashore with a girl and another man, whom he considered too charming to be trusted. (the city slicker) After many attempts at success in love and business he attains a measure of stability. But one is left with the impression that he should've stood in the shipwreck. FAITH AND FREEDOM by Barbara Ward The authoress, writer for the London "Economist" looks at freedom as it slowly emerged through the long centuries of human development. She shows why it was in our Western civilization that freedom became established. She links the expansion of freedom with the traditional faith of the West in a God incarnate and in men owing their duty to two orders of realitity-natural and supernatural. THE CHARKA MEMORIAL by Wallace Ware The Baron Charka was Ambassador to the U. S. A. from a small country in Europe. He was also in a bit of a fix, his country had gone over to the Russians, so he was recalled. This meant that his grandfather's deadly plan for promotin international misunderstanding would be put into effect. This plan is the memorial. He plans to escape and halt the plan. 9


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