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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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"overs CTMO Like The Sunshine"

Vol. VII, No. 5 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 5 February 1955


PTA Hears Committee

Recommendations on School
The Parent-Teachers Association of the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base School held its regular meeting Tuesday night at the open air auditorium with an evaluation of the school facilities by representatives from the Southern Association of College and Secondary School and members from the Bureau of Personnel hi-lighting the program.
Introduced individually by Mr. T. G. Scarborough. School Superintendent, the special committee commended the school on their facilities and made recommendations to the parents and teachers for improvements that could possibly be made in the school.
Principle recommendations concerned the high school group. The only recommendations for the lower grades and the pre-school group was that more attendance and enrollment in the pre-school nursery group should be encouraged.
For the high school, it was noted that although there was a smaller number of students and that the amount of activities was limited, the facilities were very good. However, it was recommended that more pre-vocational guidance and training be offered.
It was noted facilities on the Naval Base could be utilized, such as the hospital for nursing, medical or science training while the Naval Air Station could possibly help with pre-vocational guidance and training in the phases of aviation, Other shops and departments were noted where students could receive
(Continued on Page Three)


New Red Cross Hdqrtrs.

Opened With Reception

Tuesday morning, 1 Feb at 1030, the American Red Cross opened up its new headquarters building here with an informal reception. The new headquarters, combining the field office and living quarters for Mrs. Helen Bowler, Field Director, gives more working room for the Red Cross as well as facilitating faster handling of emergency Red Cross business.
Originally proposed in mid-1955, the idea was carried through for the Red Cross with the aid of CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station. Actual construction was done both by SeaBees of MCB-4, under LCDR J. V. Bartlett, Commanding Officer, and the Naval Base Public Works department. The steel-frame building, one of the new experimental "Hueneme Huts" was framed and completed by the SeaBees in four days while the interior finishing was completed by the Public Works department.
Attending the reception at the official opening was RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, Mrs. E. B. Taylor, Sr. LCDR J.V. Bartlett, Commanding Officer, MCB-4, CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, the Naval Base Chaplains, Chaplain Sullivan and Chaplain Peterson, and the SeaBee Chaplains, Chaplain Poynter and Chaplain Roberts, plus high ranking officers from all commands and departments of the Naval Base.


RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander Naval Base, signs the key that will be hung in Red Cross Headquarters opened here Tuesday morning while others attending the official reception reception await their turn to sign. Left to right. Chaplain K. G. Peterson, Mrs. E. B. Taylor Sr., Mrs. E. B. Taylor, Mrs. Helen Bowler, American Red Cross field director, and Chaplian J. J. Sullivan.


Historic WW-II Carrier Arrives Here For Shakedown

The modernized aircraft carrier, USS TICONDEROGA (CVA 14), fresh from first round underway operation tests on her new launching and arresting gear, will arrive in Guantanamo Bay earlN Tuesday to


USS TICONDEROGA (CVA-14)


Boy Scout Week


Begins Here Monday

The Boy Scouts of America will celebrate its 45th anniversary during the week 6-12 Feb. Employing the theme "Building For A Better Tomorrow" the week of activities will begin with special observation in churches throughout the nation. Demonstrations and exhibits which Oramatizc the purpose and objective of the Boy Scouts and point out the rich heritage the organization has made to the nation will be featured throughout the week.
More than 3,660,000 scouts, including the Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts and Explorer Scouts of Guantanamo Bay and their leaders will participate in the week-long program. On the Naval Base, it planned to have scouts at flag-raising ceremonies along with other special programs.
The week will also mark the completion of the "National Conservation Good Turn"-a program undertaken by the Boy Scouts at the request of the President to arouse "public recognition of the need for adequate protection and wise management of soil, water, mineral, forest, grassland and wildlife resources.


begin eight weeks of shakedown exercises.
It will be the Essex class carrier's first visit to Guantanamo and her first extended cruise since she was mothballed in 1946.
During the recent sea trials, the recommissioned TICONDEROGA had her first carrier landings and launched the first steam catapulted flight of the Navy's new F9F-8 Cougar jet.
Three of the four air squadrons in Carrier Air Group Six, Oceana Naval Air Station, Va., the "Big T's" air arm, will be aboard during the Caribbean cruise.
In all, about sixty planes, including two helicopters, will make the cruise.
Commanded by Captain William A. Schoech, USN, of Blakesburg, Iowa, at the heln of his third carrier, the 33,000 ton ship recently underwent an extensive twenty-one month conversion in the New York Naval Shipyard.
Ten years ago, the TICONDEROGA was aflame in the South Pacific after a pair of Kamikazes had slipped through her anti-aircraft defenses and plunged into her flight deck.
Today her scars have been erased and she has been equipped with the latest advances in carrier construction.
The "Big T" is graced with a new island superstructure, streamlined with the newest equipment in radar, electronics, fire control, and anti-aircraft defense armament.
Future plans include a canted deck.
Perhaps, the single most important change is the installation of a "beefed-up" flight deck and a pair of new steam-driven catapults.


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Saturday, 5 February 1955


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615- - --_ -
Saturday, 5 February 1955
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sadness - Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC------------------Editor
H. L. Sisson, J03-------------------News
F. L. Cannon, J03 ----------Photographer
D. C. Roberts, JOSN ------------ Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.



What's Din' Stateside

(Weekly AFPS Feature)
Within two years, a transatlantic telephone cable will link the U.S. and Europe for the first time . . . It will replace the radio telephone system which has been in commercial operation since 1927 ... Transatlantic phone rates will be unchanged but reception will be greatly improved and static a thing of the past . .. The cable, running from Nova Scotia to Scotland, is to cost $35 million . . . American, British and Canadian telephone corporations will share the expense.

Americans are growing larger. both vertically-and horizontally
A report from the U.S. Office of Education says children nowadays grow faster than they did even as recently as 15 years ago . . . Surveys made in selected cities indicate adolescents of today are coming in sizes as much as three inches taller and 10 pounds heavier than youngsters of the same age back in the late 1930's.
But, at the same time, a leading nutritionist declares that the key to overweight aniong American
adults may lie in their childhood . . . He expressed belief that weight-control programs, starting at the age of 12, may be the answer to preventing that spare tire around the middle later on . . . According to same expert, children from now on are likely to get tribbier because they spend less time exercising, more time riding in cars and watching televisionjust like their elders.

New York City has begun what might be termed an arresting experiment-a compulsory school for traffic violators . . . Offenders are offered the choice of attending a seven-week course in proper driving procedures or paying fines and


FTG Bulletin

by Ron Federman
The number of FTG personnel nominated to participate in the serice-wide competitive examinations for advancement in rate this month are as follows:
Thirteen (13) first-class recommended for chief, twelve (12) secocad class recommended for first class, six (6) third-class recommended for second-class, and five
(5) seamen going up for thirdcliss.
The examination for chief was conducted Tuesday, 1 February, with the usual post-examination viewpoints by the FTG participants: some sharing a pessimistic outlook, and others optimistic about the whole thing. Time will be a governing factor, when the results are produced, and until then we will just have to keep our fingers crossed.
In last weeks Bulletin your writer erroneously stated that CDR Gendreau will relieve CDR King as "Operations Officer". CDR Gendreau will assume the duties as Navigation Officer.
Today the U. S. Navy can count on four additional good years of service from Chief Windland, USNR-R, who will take his oath and sign his shipping over papers. He is attached to the Engineering Department.
During the past week several enlisted men received their orders bringing their tour of duty with FTG to an abrupt close. Cunningham, BM3, packed his bags and said farewell to "dear old FTG" on Tuesday, 1 February. He left for the USS ROANOKE (CL-145).
"Tiny" Brinkman, DC3, and Tolliver, GM3, are also slated for transfer shortly. "Tiny" will report to the USS MACON (CA-132). and the latter will join the airdale ranks aboard the USS CORAL SEA (CVA-43). "Tiny", who tips the scales at 260, should really scoff down the cruiser chow .
Also transferred on the 31st of January was Red Carr, S02, who will experience some of that "tin can duty" aboard the USS THE SULLIVANS (DD 537).
In order to alleviate the existing personnel shortage aboard DESLANT ships undergoing training at Gtmo under the supervision of FTG, COMDESLANT has introduced the following plan, quoted from the 1 January 1955 DESLANT INFORMATION BULLETIN:
"Due to the expected losses of personnel in DESLANT vessels in the near future, a program has been initiated to assure that ships undergoing Refresher Training at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, will continue to receive personnel during that period:
An AD at Newport and Norfolk has been designated "GTMO FFT Tender". Personnel who report too late to sail with ships to which assigned will be assembled in this tender, which, as directed by the Type Commander will transfer personnel to their respective units in GTMO via the next GTMO destroyer providing a period in excess of 15 days will elapse before their ship is scheduled to return to home port."

going to jail . . . When they complete their studies, the "students" are given a written final examination . . How well they do on that determines the severity of their punishment.


Hospital Notes


by R. P. Campanozzi
Heirport News
The year 1954 was a female one in regards ot our birth list. Indications are that this year be a male one. Two boys and one girl were recorded for the past week-. Robert David is the son of BTC and Mrs. Janet Bailiff; and, Robert Joseph to MMC and Mrs. Marie Radberg. The new lady is Casandra Dell to Mrs. Betty Williams and S/Sgt Williams of the Marine Corps.
Optometrist Promoted to
Commander
Dr. R. L. Henry, was promoted to the rank of commander in the Medical Service Corps, effective on 14 January 1955. Commander Henry is an optometrist and obtained his doctors' degree in that field at Penn State College. Among other duties, he is our educational officer and representative to the base athletic counsel.
Two Corpsmen Reenlist
That comfortable chair next to our personnel officer's desk must be very softening and surely effective. Merle Lennox and Jim Platt, both HM2, have taken the oath for another term as each elected to reenlist for six years. Swearing in ceremonies were held in the office of the commanding officer.
HM2 Maddix, Top Scorer
Our hustling five foot, ten inch guard, Bill Maddix, swished the basketball nets for 28 points against the Fleet Training Group quintet.
Bill hails from Kansas City, Mo.; attended high school there and graduated as a four-letter man, and was elected to that city's AllStar Five. He then entered Beloit College in Wisconsin playing varsity basketball for two years. Maddix is assigned to the operating room and here he swishes sponges.
Departures
HMC J. W. Laden and his family departed for the supply depot in Oakland, Calif. for duty. Chief Laden worked in the finance department as medical repairman.



NSD Supply Line

Mrs. Etta Ray Chetlin, wife of LT. Norman D. Chetlin of CHBONE, will arrive in Guantanamo Bay on the 10th. Mrs. Chetlin will be the guest of LT and Mrs. P. D. Larson during her visit.
The Bill Griffin, Jrs. have as their guest, Mrs. Allen Wescott, Mrs. Griffin's mother.
Mrs. Margot Aquila, mother of Mrs. Elmer Nichols departed this week after spending Christmas with the Nichols.
Mr. Roger A. Dannery, formerly clerk typist in the Material Division, has resigned his position and has accepted employment in Venezula. Roger was.recently married to Srta. Carmnen Amacho of Guantanamo City, Cuba and Caracas, Venezula. Roger will be missed by his many friends at NSD.
Frank S. Gac, DK1, anxiously met the JOHNSON. Mrs. Emilia Gac and small son, Richard W. arrived from Lancaster, New York.


4


Sunday, 6 February 1955
Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday. 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. P-otestant Services
Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0930-Sunday School
0050-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Christian Science
Sunday: 1000-Station Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)


The Chaplain's Corner


It
"He is his own worst enemy." These are words which describe a great many of us. It is not lack of knowledge that brings trouble down upon our heads. It is more often lack of self control. Electricity may strike with the destructive force of a bolt of lightening, but it may, under control, furnish light and head for the well-being of all. Our emotions and feelings are like electricity in that, uncontrolled, they may cause you to become your own worst enemy; controlled, they are your friend and will contribute much to your well-being and that of others.
Our feelings or emotions have a tremendous influence upon all of our living. Even those who pride themselves on being rational, and following the dictates of reason, find that in the majority of cases their actions are determined by their emotions. It is through our emotions that we grow, for we develop along the lines of the things we love. Our feelings have a mighty influence upon our reactions to life. Our appreciations in life are enlarged or narrowed by our emotions or feelings.
"Your feelings can light up your soul, or they can burn out your soul." Your emotions can light up your life only as you make them your friends by controlling them. Even hate can become your friend instead of your enemy if directed by Christian moral awareness and controlled by Christian conviction. Man's hatred must be directed against evil issues and causes and not against individuals.
It is in the realm of human passions that this truth is most evident. We are witnessing today one of the gravest breakdowns in the control of human passions in recent history. Some within our midst are contributing to that break. Enslaved by his passions, man becomes his own worst enemy and burns out his soul. True aftetion is destroyed. Noble appreciations become distorted. Future happiness becomes cancerous. Yes! Your emotions can light up your life or they can burn out your life. In Christ there is the inspiration, motivation, and strength to control our emotions that they may light up our lives!


THE INDIAN


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Saturday. 5 February 1955


THE INDIAN


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Toasimasters Clubs


Offer Speech Training

The ability of any individual to (.press himself simply and clearly to a group of listeners-to think on his feet before a crowd-is a tremendously valuable asset. It is often spoken of as a "gift", but that is seldom an accurate designation. Much more frequently, it is the result of many hours of practice and training.
The Toastmasters Clubs - to their everlasting credit - have turned this training process into fun. Their members work and like it-they reap rich rewards in improved self-confidence and better diction. Specifically, these club members give themselves training in (1) parliamentary procedures and the conduct of business meetings, (2) impromptu speech-two or three minutes, without provious knowledge of subject, and (3) prepared talks-five to ten minutes, with emphasis on clarity and objective. Each club limits its membership to thirty, so every member is given an opportunity to speak-as well as to listenat every meeting.
What started very modestly as a sort of "self-education" enterprise has now blossomed into an international organization with over 1200 affiliated clubs. They are all devoted to training in the art of public speaking.
Here, indeed, is a club with a purpose-and a worthy one. You may be interested in finding out more about the Toastmasters Club on this Base.
Toastmaster Club No. 92 meets every Thursday evening at 1800 in the Officers' Club Dining Room. Dinner is served to members and guests for $1.50 per person. After dinner comes the business session, and then the four formal six-minute speeches. The meeting is adjourned between 2000 and 2030.
The officers of Toastmasters Club No. 92 are:
John L. Sanborn, PresidentTel. 8501
LCDR R. J. Mathews, First Vice
President-Tel. 8524
D. B. Powers, Second Vice President-Tel. 8412
R. J. Hummel, Sccretary Treasurer-Tel. 8117
LT. H. L. Olsen, Educational
Chairman-Tel. 8727
H. P. McNeal, Deputy Governor
-Tel. 8101
Please contact any one of the above Toastmasters for further information.



Defense Department Asks

For Cadet Pay Credit

The Defense Department again asked Congress for authority to give pay credit for time spent as cadets at the Military, Naval, Coast Guard and Air Force academies. This proposal, which would amend the Career Compensation Act of 1949, would affect both active and retired officers. It would go into effect the first day of the month following Congressional approval.


RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, assists Mrs. F. J. Peteler in cutting the ribbon, officially opening the new Navy Exchange Laundromat. Looking on, some with laundry in hand, left to right: Betty Sentz, Chaplain J. J. Sullivan, Phillys Johnston, LCDR E. H. Beiland, Navy Exchange Officer, Ann Saxe and CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station. The Laundromat is open to all base personnel wishing to do a laundry from 0900 to 1800 Monday through Friday and from 0800 to 1200 on Saturday.


PTA Meeting .
(Continued from Page One)
important and helpful guidance and training.
The committee also recommended that the classes be kept in small groups, facilitating teachers to be able to give more help to students newly transfered here. In regard to students who either graduate here or are transfered back to the States with their parents, the committee recommended a more flexible curriculum. However, on the whole, it was noted that the Naval Base School stands up very well in comparison with schools of the Southern Association of College and Secondary Schools.
The meeting was opened with an invocation by LT T. H. Cushman, followed by the singing of "God Bless America" led by Mrs. E. H.


Beiland. During the short business meeting, LT D. J. Murphy, PTA Carnival Committee chairman, reported that the PTA will sponsor a dart and balloon booth at the forthcoming carnival and that volunteers are needed.
After the business meeting, CAPT J. B. MacGregor showed the second half of the movies taken during his round-the-world trip as medical aide to Vice President Richard M. Nixon.
Climaxing the evening was a presentation of an award made to two students of the Naval Base school. John B. Huddy and Ronnie F. Moseley were given citations from RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander Naval Base, by Mr. A. J. McGowan for their "quick thinking and alert action in reporting a fire at the Naval Base Chapel, avoiding a major conflagration."


Representatives from the Southern Association of College and Secondary Schools and members from the Bureau of Personnel look over the curriculum of the Naval Base School with Mr. T. G. Scarborough, School Superintendent. The special committee was here for a week, reviewing the school in every phase. Left to right: Mr. Zollie Maynard, Dr. Sarah Lou Hammond, CDR T. J. Moriarty, Mr. T. G. Scarborough, Mr. George Wilkins, and Dr. J. M. Leps.


0 9


'Detective Story' Cast

Features Hard Realism

Of Daily Police Work

Part II
(Introducing a new breed of characters among the 32, in "Detcetive Story")
Sophocles once stated, "there is a point where even justice is unjust." Sidney Kingsley, in "Detective Story" says (through Joe Feison) "it takes a God to knowto really know."
Observe closely then, one Jim McLeod (Alan Wagner) in the March 15 edition of the Little Theater drama. Discern a self appointed mediator, one who catagorizes all transgressors, from the lowly pickpocket to the hired killer, as a distinct species-and no penalty is too severe for them.
Charlie Gennini (Ronnie Estafson) and Lewis Abbott (Jim Mello), as polished a pair as ever matriculated in the top reform schools, are chronic offenders, and deadly as the loaded .45's they carry.
The shop-lifter (Evelyn Purdue) the purse-snatcher, Crumb-bum (Bud Sisson) and the embezzler, Arthur Kindred (George Engle) receive the same disdainful 'treatment.' "It's never a first offense," barks McLeod, "It's the first time they get caught."
Equally unpardonable in McLeods black book of hatred, are those who have profited laterally by crime. Endicott Sims (Chuck Dieterle) the criminial lawyer who protects Schneider, Miss Hatch, (Mildred Morgan) who's appearance as a star witness at the lineup, is voided by a mink stole, and Tami Giacoppetti (Joe West) who's shady enterprises are preserved by men in high places, all warrant the detective's contempt.
McLeod's unbridled anger, and revulsion for the riff with which he's had a constant association, reaches an impasse with Dr. Schneider, Jack Tipler, who's guise of gentleman farmer, does not completely conceal the activities of a practicising (and not always successful) abortionist.
Poetic justice, with her lifted se: le provides the calamatous finale to this Little Theater offering, and, as is the case of all good drama, leaves the audience to deliberate as its jury.



Washingtcn's Birthday I

Observed Here 22 Feb,
Tuesday February 22, will be
observed as a national holiday aboard the Naval Base. All ships in commission in the harbor will^ .full dress ship from 8:00 A. M. to sunset. At 12:00 noon the Naavl Station and all saluting ships
in commission in the harbor will fire a national salute of 21 guns.
Units afloat follow motions of
the Naval Station.
All but necessary work, drills !and exercises will be suspended! all day.


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Saturday, 5 February 1955


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SPORTS ROUND-UP

by Joe Celentano, JOl, USN
(AFPS Sports Writer)
-New York's 196-day horse racing season opens on April Fool's Day. That figures . . . Baseball's Grapefruit League starts Mar. 10. Six National League clubs will be based in Florida with the Chicago Cubs and the New York Giants pitching camp in Arizona. All the teams in the American League with the exception of Cleveland will train in Florida. The big, bad Indians hit the rails to Tucson and are slated to do battle with the world champion Giants in 20 exhibition games. How 'bout that? Twenty World Series games.
Dodger "fireman" Jim Hughes topped all NL hurlers in number of appearances last season. The dependable reliefer cracked the Dodger box score 60 times without starting a single game.
One of baseball's greatest active moundsman, Bob Feller, has signed his 17th contract with the Indians. The ace fireballer, who never seems to tire of the national pastime, has a lifetime record of 262 wins, 154 losses. It's good to see guys like Feller remain in baseball. Now wouldn't it be great if Ted Williams decides to stick it out for another year?
Service Highlights
Word from the far north is that the Jet basketball team from the AF radar station at Ramore, Ontario, Canada, is in first place in the Gold Belt League . . . Since taking up skeet shooting four years ago Maj. Frank Knapp of Naha AB, Okinawa, has been a member of 17 championship teams. Last year he blasted 986 birds out of a possible 1000 to rank second highest in the National Skeet Shooting Assn. record books for that year.
Leading scorer for the Comets cage squad at the Brooke Army Medical Center, Tex., is six-foot Jackie Wright, who was a member of the Indiana U. 1952 NCAA championship team.
Honolulu sportswriters voted marine Skippy Dyer most valuable player on the Hawaii All-Star game with the College All-Stars. Dyer was the star halfback for the 1954 Hawaii Marine championship eleven . . . Army skier Brooks Dodge recently placed seventh in the special men's international slalom skiing competition at Garmisch, Germany. The Olympic skier is stationed at the Garmish Detachment.
Six teams representing the Armed Forces will compete in the Olympic bobsled tryouts at Lake Placid, N. Y., Feb. 12-13 ... Want to help support the U.S. Olympic teams? If so, donations may be sent by check to the Olympic Fund, U.S. Olympic Committee, Biltmore Hotel, New York 17, N. Y.
Pfc. Billy Martin, ex-New York Yankee second-baseman., is giving basketball a whirl at Ft. Carson, Colo. The hero of the 1953 World Series expects to join the Bombers after his discharge this summer. Look out Gerry Coleman? ... Soccer (a sport everyone gets a kick out of) has recently been added to the sports program at Ft. Hood, Tex. . . . Twelfth Naval District Hd. in San Francisco, host command for the 1955 All-Navy boxing championships, announces that the finals will be held in the Oakland Auditorium April 12.


SKINDIVERS SNAG GIANT TURTLE


Bill Johnson, PN1 and Frank Morreale, BM2, both of the First Division pose with the large turtle they shot while spearfishing off shore at Phillips Park on January 31. The huge reptile was judged to weigh approximately 100 lbs.


21 Base P01's Take OPO Examinations


Basketball Standings
(Including games of Thursday,
3 Feb.)
NavSta 7 1 .875
MCB-4 6 1 .837
NAS 6 2 .750
Medical 5 3 .625
CHB-1 4 3 .571
VU-10 4 3 .571
Marines 3 4 .429
Leeward Pt. 3 5 .375
High School 1 6 .142
FTG 0 7 .000



Basketball Schedule

Monday, 7 Feb **
High School vs NavSta
Medical vs VU-10 Tuesday, 8 Feb
CHB-1 vs Marines
NAS vs FTG
Wednesday, 9 Feb *
Lwrd Pt vs MCB-4
Medical vs VU-10 Thursday, 10 Feb
High School vs NavSta
NAS vs FTG
Friday, 11 Feb **
Lwrd Pt vs MCB-1 CHB-1 vs Marines


Ladies Golf Shots

by Betty Lou Tipler
On Wednesday the ladies played summer rules which made all scores a little higher. The 1st and 2nd flights played 18 holes while the 3rd and 4th played 9 holes. Winners of golf balls were:
2nd Flight
Low net Joanne Weiland
Low gross Miriam Hoy
Joy Graves


1st 2nd


First class petty officers of the Naval Base buckle down to some serious thought and study as they take the annual examination for advancement in rating to Chief petty officer, pay grade E-7. Twenty-one men from the Naval Base took the exam Tuesday at the Naval Station Enlisted Men's Club along with personnel of the fleet units in Guantanamo Bay. The CPO exams were the first exams of the advancement in rating exams to be held. In the next three weeks, examinations will be held for Pay Grade E-4, E-5, and E-6 in that order.


Ladies Bowling


Standings
TEAM W
Team #1 7
Team #8 6
Team #2 5
Team #10 5
Team #4 4
Team #6 4
Team #7 4
Team #5 3
Team #3 6
Team #9 0
Top Ten Averages E. Griffin
P. Way


L
1
2
3
3
4 4.
4
5
6
8

171
149


M. Hoy F. Grounds S. Wenderlich A. Tagliabue M. Powers V. Schmitt B. Wach
High Games F. Grounds M. Hoy E. Griffin P. Way S. Brooks J. King N. Zaborski M. Green M. Clay B. Serig


145 144 136 135
134 133 132


214 201 192 188 183 183 171 170 171
174


3rd Flight (blind five)
Betty Lou Tipler Theresa Moseley
Dot Brown


4th Flight
(blind five)
1st tie Dee Stadnik
Vivian Soballe 2nd Marie Vanderhoef
Our Ringer Tournament starts this week. Rules and the ringer score card are posted in the golf shack.
Sunday, January 30th was Scotch Foursome Day and here are the results: 1st Low gross The Scotts'
1st Low net tie The Vanderhoefs'
Mrs. Grounds & King 2nd Low net (tie) Mrs. Hamilton & Adams'
The Norths' 3rd Low (net) The Kings'
Mrs. Reynolds' & Brough Mrs. Sandness & Byerlcy 4th Low net Mrs. Aslin & Drace 5th Low net (tie) Mrs. Burke & Lackey
The Sheehans' 6th Low net Mrs Hoy & Monte
Longest drive men
LT Dempsey
Longest drive women
Mrs Scott
Longest putt LT Moseley
Closest to pin on #18
LCDR Scott
Closest to pin on #14
Mrs. McElory
Closest to pin on #8
Chief North
Any of the above winers who have not received their golf balls please contact Gladys Hamilton at CB 52-A.


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THE INDIAN


Cage Standings Shaky at Half-Way Point;


Indians, SeaBees in Tussle for League Lead

by Hal Davis
Basketball settled down and began to look more like basketball this last week with several enjoyable games on the courts and a few shifts occurring in the standings and "top-ten" scorers.
The Naval Station Indians remained in first place in the standings with a slim 38 percentage point lead over the MCB-4 squad. The Naval Air Station Flyers dropped to third place by virtue of a 49-39 loss to a flashy Hospital-Dental combine on Thursday night. The Medics hold fourth place with a half game lead over the Cargo Handlers who are tied with the VU-10 Mallards for fifth. E-I


Gerhardt, of the Stevedores, took over the high scoring honors from Pirate Heimer with a total of 153 points in seven games. In the Naval Station - Stevedores game Wednesday night Gerhardt scored 35 of the Stevedores' 47 points, but to no avail since the Indians were busy racking up 70 of their own tallies. Heimer, last week's top scorer, dropped to third place behind the Flyers' Snyder.
Flyers Defeat Pointers, Bees
Down Leathernecks
Closing out last week's schedule the Air Station Flyers dropped their brother Pointers from across the Bay with a 43-33 win. Ring led the Flyers with 15 while Harrison dropped in a total of 18 for the Pointers.
In the second game of the evening the SeaBees turned loose a lot of big guns and sank the Marines, 63 to 52. For the Bees, Klinker and Buhay hit for 13 apiece while Glenny and Puppe each dropped in 12. The Marines' Schreck swished 10.
Flyers Edge Indians; Medics
Swamp Trainers
Starting off the new week of the schedule the Naval Air Station Flyers dumped the Naval Station Indians out of their win streak with a shaky 53 to 47 win in what turned out as predicted to be the game of the week. Ring hit for 20 for the Flyers while Doe Daugherty, in his last game for the Indians dropped in 11. The loss was the first of the schedule for the Indians and gave the Flyers a temporary tie for the lead.
In the nightcap, the Medics jumped all over the Trainert with a 73 to 32 victory helped along by a big 28 points from Maddox. The corpsmen unveiled an almost air-tight defense under the FTG basket which kept the Trainers on the outside making long shots most of the game.
Bees Stomp Pirates; Mallards
Edge Pointers
Tuesday night the SeaBees came back to town to go against the High School Pirates who offered little opposition to the big squad from the boondocks. The Bees' points were pretty well spread out with almost everybody on the squad sinking one or two, but Puppe dropped 17 points to head the rest of them. Heiner again took the lead for the Pirates and netted himself 14.
To cap the night the first overtime game so far in the league was played out by the Mallards and the Pointers with the VU-10 squad dropping the winner in the last minute, 52 to 50. The Mallards' Snyder racked up 18 while speedy Howie Woren of the Pointers chalked up 15.


''Get off nmy back-sir"--could well be what this unidentified Flyer is saying as LT Sandness of the Indians loses his balance for a moment during the Flyer-Indian game last week.

Indians Rack Stevedores;
Marines Trim Trainers
Wednesday night the Indians maintained their superiority by rapping the Stevedores, 70 to 47. Manager Jerry Morgan dropped in 23 to aid the Indian cause, but big Gerhardt, the Stevedore coach, set a new league record with 35 of the Handlers' 47 total.
In the finale for the night the Marine Leathernecks got back into the league with a win over the hapless Trainers, 73 to 34. Holmes again took the scoring honors for the Leathernecks with 17 followed by Plante with 16 while Trainers' star Lee notched 15. Pointers Pinpoint Pirates; Medics Ground Flyers; Stevedores Squeeze
By Mallards
Thursday night the fans had a choice of courts as the scheduled games were played at the Naval Station court and a postponed game was played off at Marine Site. In the first game at Naval Station the Leeward Pointers came from a half-time tie of 24 to 24 to beat the Pirates, 65 to 42. Howie Woren again flashed through with 24 for the Pointers while Edgar Heimer netted the usual high for the schoolers- with 14. The Pirate defense fell apart in the second half and the Pointers just about had the court to themselves.
In the second game, the Medical defense again took the spotlight as the Flyers tried hard but couldn't penetrate the iron clad curtain while the corpsmen were notching 49 to the Flyers' 39. Rose took top hoop honors with 11 points for the medical squad with both King and Maddox following with 10 each. Snyder dropped 12 for the Flyers.
At the Marine cage the Cargo Handlers, behind Gerhardt's 23 tallies, had a hard time beating the Mallards, 59 to 53 to wrap up the basketball week for the Indian.
Next week the first half of the schedule comes to a close Wednesday night and the teams start back down the schedule with the Stevedore-Marine game shaping up as the possible game of the week.


Sandness, Nigro and Daugherty of the Naval S auon 11ndians, along with Whitaker of the NAS Flyers, go after a rebound. Nigro made the catch, but the Flyers went on to give the Indians their first defeat of the schedule, 53 to 47 in the "game of the week."


NAVAL STATION INDIANS-1955: Standing, left to right: Al Kruse ,Max Gitlin, Morgan Ferris, John Slewitzke, Frank Walbolt, Jack Nigro, Louis Brown and Jim Solan. Kneeling: Don Byerley, "Doe" Daugherty, Pete Petinak, Don Allen and Jerry Morgan.


TOP TEN SCORERS


PLAYER Gerhardt Snyder Heimer Ring Woren Morgan Daugherty Glenney Houchin Slewitzke


TEAM
CHB-1 NAS
High School NAS
Leeward Point Naval Station Naval Station MCB-4 VU-10
Naval Station


SCORE 153 129 127 116
114 108
94 94 92 82


GAMES
7
8
8
8

8

7
7
8


AVG. 21.8 16.1 15.8
14.5 14.25 13.5 11.75
13.4 13.1 10.25


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Page Five


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Naed six


Saturday, 5 February 1955


Assistant Dental Chief Inspects Gtmo Facilities


/7




Men of Cargo Handling Battalion ONE (conveniently reduced to CHBONE) unload part of their equipment from the ramp of LST 515 at the old sea-plane landing in Gtmo.


CHB ONE Here


For Training

On Friday, January 14th, two hundred-fifty officers and men of Cargo Handling Battalion ONE debarked at Gtmo from the USS GLYNN for a two and one-half months period of training in stevedoring and other battalion functions, under operational control of the CO, Naval Supply Depot. The next day fifty more men arrived in the LST 515, which also brought most of CHB-One's equipment and supplies. The discharging of the LST at Fisherman's Point, NAS, was begun immediately so that offices, storerooms and shop spaces could be set up ready for full scale operations on Monday morning.
This trip has been CHB-ONE's first opportunity to move as a complete unit. In the past, small Detachments only were deployed, while Battalion headquarters remained at Cheatham Annex, Williamsburg, Virginia, the home port.
The battalion commanding officer, CDR S. Y. Walker, SC, USN, has his office in building 850. The general administrative supply and maintenance offices aie also located there and in the adjoining building. The Operations and Stevedoring Office is located on Wharf "Baker", near the NSD Transit Shed.


The OD, touring the galley, halted the recruit who was carrying a soup kettle. "Here, let me taste that," the OD barked. The recruit obediently supplied a ladle.
"Do you call that stuff soup?" he roared, sputtering.
"No, sir," was the meek reply. "That's dish water."

Goliath was very much astonished when David hit him with a stone. Such a thing had never entered his head before.


VU- 10 Prop Blast

by Bill Wright
John Stanovich, ADi, known as just "Stan" by his friends is known as the local "junk-dealer" around the squadron. Stan maintains the squadron Material Issue Store for the Maintenance Department, issuing various parts and materials needed for the upkeep of squadron aircraft. He has a booming business too: Trouble arises when he hunts for the stock number for false teeth and hair though. The teeth can be obtained on open purchase but there's no word on the hair. Besides toe usual headaches toat go with the business, he gets


all sorts of news from the caddies at the golf course, dispatches and telephone messages concerning the transfer he's been sweating out for the past six months. Should you suddenly find yourself short of nuts, bolts and bits of safety wire, see "Stan" the "Junk Man"
Due to the heavy operating schedule during the first quarter of this year stateside flights will be curtailed except for extreme emergencies. (Guantanamo minus cross-country flights no women, little wine and a sad song).
The latest report from the Personnel Office, points out "That they are going out faster than coming in". The squadron transferred


This small but vicious brush fire threatened the SeaBee area last Monday evening, but the prompt response by the Base Fire Department and the aid of several SeaBee volunteers quickly quelled the flames. The danger of the fire was heightened by the inaccessability of the spot-on top of a hill behind the SeaBee compound.


six men this past week with only one arrival. Dick Crain, AD3, reported for duty with VU-10 from NAS, Sanford, Fla. Welcome aboard mate, we're going to need you.
Taking advantage bf the new benefits for career service personnel this week was Richard B. Woods, aviation electrician's mate airman, who was sworn in by CDR D. E. McCoy, commanding officer of Utility Squadron TEN. This was Woods first re-enlistment as he ships over for six years. He walked away with a grin on his face and a "fat" wallet also.


Employer: "Why did you leave your last job."?
Cute Applicant: "Because the boss kept after me too much."

This baby has its father's nose and its mother's eyes.
Yes, and if Grandpa doesn't stop leaning over the crib, its going to have his teeth.

Barber: "You been here before? Your face is familiar."
Customer: "Shouldn't be. Its all healed up now."


THE INDIAN


m


CAPT W. D. F. Stagner, Commanding Officer, Dental Clinic, at right, and CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, greet RADM Daniel W. Ryan, Assistant Chief of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery for Dentistry, upon his arrival on the Naval Base. Admiral Ryan arrived here after visits to Coco Solo, the Canal Zone, Trinidad, British West Indies, and San Juan on the annual inspection of dental facilities in the Caribbean. While on the Naval Base, Admiral Ryan was the house-guest of CAPT and Mrs. W. D. F. Stagner. Admiral Ryan dearted T'uesday to conclude his Caribbean inspection tour in Key


SeaBee Area Grass Fire Causes No Damage






S0


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Saturday, 5 February 1955


THE INDIAN


Teenage Round-up
by Linda Thurston
Out of a raggedy cloud of dust overt'Paul Jones Mountain comes a hearty "Hi-Yo, Silver, Pat Burke rides again." Yes, Saturday night saw the charge of the night brigade up the mountain as "Stanislaus" placed second with Garrett, Shyver, Neil, Dalton and Pete in last. Swarms of kids unloaded from the cars and advanced on the Warren house to devour cookies, cakes and all sorts of goodies. Then, the radio went on full blast and Cavie and Wormie and Dex and Dolorice proceeded to give out with their version of the jitterburg. We'd like to thank Jere and his mother for putting up with us.
Did 'ja' See. . . Blushin' Bobby R and Vicki starting out down the flowery path. . . Pete looking provoked last Saturday nite. . . Pat W, Sylvia and Gary up to their ears in soap suds. . . Sharon and Pat F trudging up to Victory Hill Monday nite. . . Melba (the basketball star) Reffett sinking many points for her team. (She takes after her brother). . . Bobbie J, Edwin, Doug, Kenny, Kathleen B and Ana P reeling up and down the court at the beach last Saturday eve. . . Maryalice and Ralph. . . . Nita and Bobby P, Peggy and Gary, and Pat and Nancy bobbing through the barbed wire out at "Kidney Beach . . . . Jackie Lee's crazy "Haitian Hayride Hat"... Bob W and Pat K a real cute couple. . . . Bobby Parker's duet on the mandolin with Dave Shyver on guitar. . . .



Navy Wives' Club

by Pat Aldridge
The first regular busines meeting of the Guantanamo Bay Navy Wives Club following the installation of officers was held Thursday evening, February 3, in the School Assembly Hall. Elma Franklin, club president, began her term of office by reading a letter from the National Parliementarian expressing the hope that the Guantanamo chapter, despite it's relatively new beginning, will be able to send a delegate to the Southeast Regional Conference, in Norfolk, Virginia this coming May and to the National Convention, in Washington, D. C.,.the following October. No such delegate has as yet been elected and will not be until it is ascertained whether such attendance is feasible in view of present transportation difficulties.
Plans for our usual Bingo social, Thursday afternoon, F ebruary 10th, at the Villamar Lycuem were announced by Activities Chairman, Pearl Piercey. Members were urged to feel at liberty to bring guests who will also enjoy the fun of surprize prizes and may wish to help swell the growing membership roster.
Betty Koser, recently departed with her husband to a new duty station in California, was bade Godspeed in absentia while Maria Rahberg, taking time out to welcome a small heir in Diaperdom, was marked present in spirit.
A note of thanks has been sent to the Base Nursery expressing gratitude for the loan of potted plants which so added to the beauty of the recent installation and Special Services and Sunday School for tables and chair coverings.
Future activities will include


MA4 misms Educatiowal Services NAS Crosswinds


by Cpl Joe Androvich USMC
DEPARTURE
There was only one departure forthe states this past week in the person of Staff Sergeant Earl R. Timnis who will report to the Marme Corps Reserve Training Center, Orlando, Florida, for duty. Sergeant Timms was attached to the Supply Section. All hands extend their best wishes and best of luck upon his departure. NEW ARRIVAL
Staff Sergeant and Mrs. Betty Williams are the proud parents of a baby girl born at 0016 on the 30th of January, weighing 71/ pounds. "Congratulations to the happy parents and the best of every thing to Casandra Dell from all hands."
TALENT SHOW
A Talent Show and picnic lunch will take place at the movie lyceum on the 25th of this month. All hands are reminded to submit their names to TSgt Schuler of the Security Section if planning to enter the show.
RANGE DETAIL
Approximately 52 Marines will begin "snapping in" for the first of the 1955 rifle requalification firing, which will begin this Monday. Preliminary firing will commence the following Monday with qualification day on Saturday, the 19th of February.
BOWLING
HEADQUARTERS WINS
1st ROUND
Compiling a string of 13 consectutive wins, the Headquarters intra-mural bowling team came from 4th place to capture the first round of a two round playoff championship. Finishing the round in a tie with the Staff NCO's at identical records of 20-8, a 3 game series was rolled off with the Headquarters team winning 2-1 and picking up the final 4th point on pin total. High scores for individual games were by Bushlong, 175, and Rausch, 170. For the Headquarters team high men were Lee, 171 and Androvich 170
Starting off the 2nd round with victories were team #2 over team #1 and #3 over team#4. High individual games for these series were by Rogers, 180; Mason,171; and Frederick, 196. FINAL 1ST ROUND STANDINGS 1. HEADQUARTERS 23 9,"
2. SNCO's 21 11i
3. OFFICERS 19 9
4. Team #1 17 11
5. Team #3 14 14
6. Team #2 13 15
7. Team #4 6 22
8. SUPPLY 5 23
**Includes playoff series


Examining Admiral (to naval candndate): "Now mention three great admirals."
NC: "Drake, Nelson, and I beg your pardon, sir, I did'nt catch your. name."

some all-for-fun parties to which husbands and other guests will be invited. The unusual fetes being planned will come as a delightful surprise to all.


Foreign Language Study
The second of a series of 4 articles
_By William A. JOHNSON, PN1Last week we took up the First Level set. Now we will explain the Language Guide and Phrase Book.
The Language Guide contains in written form everything that is heard on the record. Words and phrases in the foreign language appear twice in the Language Guide - once in a phonetic version as a further aid to pronunciation and again in the conventional spelling - except in the case of languages employing a different al phabet from ours. In addition to the record material each Language Guide contains an introductory section which gives instructions on how to use the pamphlet and hint's on pronunciation and the following supplementary sections: Additional expressions; fill-in sentences; important signs; and alphabetical word lists.
There are always two vocies on the records, one American and the other native. The American voice announces a word or phrase in English; the native voice gives the foreign equivalent of the English followed by a pause to allow the students to repeat what they have heard. Each listener follows in the Language Guide what he hears on the record. Thus he hears and sees the foreign words simultaneously and in association with the Englishmeaning, and in addition is given an immediate opportunity for application, or for "learning by doing" This, any educational psychologist will tell you, is a very satisfactory learning method.
The third member of the First Level set, the Phrase Book, is the same size as the Language Guide and presents a fairly large number of phrases in the same form the Language Guide uses - English, foreign language in phonetic spelling, foreign language in convential spelling (if the alphabet is the same as ours). The Spanish Phrase Book contains 127 pages; it's material is presented under the following main headings: Emergency expressions; general expressions; personal needs; location and terrain; roads and transportation; reconnaissance; landing a plane; numbers; size, time, letters, etc.; additional terms, important signs; international road signs; alphabeticatl word list.
Natives of any foreign country are likely to be irritated by the disinclination of most Americans to make an attempt to learn their language. They are, on the other hand, flattered and pleased when Americans are seen to show an interest in their language and make some attempt to learn, to speak, and to understand it; however limited and imperfect. Langugae study on the part of naval personnel, then even of a very superficial nature, may very well become a material influence toward good foreign relations. It is a truism to say that the United States Navy and the American sailor are diplomatic representatives of their country; and it necessarily follows that anything that improves the impression made by the Navy upon the nationals of a foreign country should be highly. cultivated. For at no time in our history have we needed, as we do now, the respect and friendship of as much of the rest of the world as possible.
(Next week we will explain the Second Level type of materials).
In the mean time, don't forget to see your Information and Education Officer.


Who's Who at NAS
LT Raymond Francis Wall. new Assistant Operation's Officer.
LT Wall replaces LCDR Joe Bedford as Assistant Operations Officer at NAS McCalla. He reported aboard on 16th December from Naval Air Training Center, Memphis, Tenn.
He was born at Solon, Iowa, and later attended Coe College at Cedar Rapids and the University of Florida, majoring in Chemistry. He entered the flight program in '42 and received his wings in '43 at Corpus Christi, Texas. He was assigned to VPB21 in the central Pacific as pilot and maintenance officer, participating in Marshall Islands, Palu, Phillipine, and Okinawa campaigns.
In June '45 he was flight instructor in PBM's at Banana River, Florida. He reentered the Navy in '50 and took a refresher course at NAS Miami. He transferred to Naval Technical Training Center at Jax in '52, and at his last duty station in Memphis, attended the 32 week Aviation Electronics School.
LT Wall is married to the former Margaret Harris of Jacksonville, Fla. and they have four children, Harvey, Marian, Marilyn, and Frances. His hobbies are electronics and photography.
Hogan's Goat
The NAS tower.flowers, perched high above McCalla Field, were tempted to convey their own 'Mayday' message this past week. Five rated men were slated for BuPers summons, leaving one lone watch sander.
Paul Acree, AC1, reports to NAS Glynco, Bob Karnstedt to Barin Field, Ala. and Mel Clements, A01 to Saufley Field, Florida. George Engle, AC2, attached to WGBY was destined for Kingsville, Texas. Bob Sisk, AC2, will check in with CIVLANT (discharge to Elizabeth, New Jersey) leaving only Tom Hogan on duty when John Page goes on leave. Incidentally Sisk's travel pay amounts to subway fare from Brooklyn to his borough.
At the last minute, however, Clemen's orders were cancelled entirely, and Jack Wood of Leeward (who wanted Kingsville in the first place) replaced George Engle. Now George and wife Wally will be able to appear in "Detective Story" anyway, Clemens is happy, Woods is happy, and the 'deferred emergency' has passed.
News Gusts
The bouncin' Blackbirds of VA45 have returned to their roost aboard the USS INTREPID, but will remain in the general operating area. The AD's made both day and night FCLP's.
Sam Fain and Gerry Kirby, who recently finished a 'stretch up the Bay' at Guantanamo, have now adjusted themselves to civilian life. Sam is a butcher in West Virginia and Gerry works nights while attending Ball State Teachers, at Muncie, Indiana. Both clans are expecting new arrivals soon.
Now is the time to enter the NAS Contract Bridge Tournament (exclusive to Hill-top tenents only.) Partners will be juggled and the winner will be judged on an individual basis (total points.) Call Dick Friz-8543.
Hug Kenyon, curerntly with the good housekeeping force of AV50, received some dainty lace curtains back from the laundry last week. Save them Hugh; they may make some belle in the village a nice dress.


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Page Seven







Navy- PP0-1OND-Gtmo.-0745 THE INDIAN Saturday, 5 February 1955


r150 OK NOOK

by Francis L. Cannon, J03
THAT REMINDS ME by Alben W. Barkley
The autobiography of the former Vice President of the United States, told in his own engaging and humorous way. His fund of anecdotes and reminiscences is as endless as it is famous. He was born in a Kentucky log cabin, worked as a janitor to attain his education and started his career in politics when Wilson was in office. Forty years and six presidents later he is still going strong.
SAHARA
by Rene Lecler
The Sahara is roughly the size of the United States and is the hottest, driest and cruelest land area on the earth. This book is the story of explorations into this "sea of sand" and their results. Timbuktu, for example, was unvisited by Europeans for centuries; many died before the first traveler returned to describe that legendary city. That story plus many more as exciting are related here.
SONG OF THE SKY
by Guy Murchie
A book about the freak adventure of our age: flight. More specifically, the air and skies we fly in. The history of the search for knowledge of the skies and its movements form the basis of this book. The author deals with many technical matters of meteorology and aerodynamics but the force of his imagination gives his story meaning for professional flyers and groundlings as well.
THE HOME BOOK OF MUSICAL
KNOWLEDGE by David Ewen
A book designed to give the layman a better understanding of music, the stories of operas and symphonies, plus something of the technical aspects of the orchestra and its instruments. There are, among many other things, biographies of composers, a chronological table of musical periods, the function of the conductor and a glossary of musical terms.
WAR OF WITS
by Ladislas Farago
An authoritative account of the technique of espionage. It acquaints the citizen with the overall picture of intelligence operations and allied subjects: counter intelligence, sabotage and propaganda. The author illustrates his points with incidents taken from actual intelligence operations, both historical and contemporary. The author contends that intelligence has a vital modern role to play in the resolution of international differences without ultimate resort to war.

"Mommy, why is it Daddy doesn't have much hair?"
"He thinks a great deal, dear."
"But, Mommy, then why is it you have so much hair?"
"Finish your breakfast, dear."

Guest (to host in new home): "Well, old boy, how do you find it here."
Host:"Walk right upstairs and its two doors to the left."


::4







A buoy on a beach and girl on a beach with no boy, but it still looks good. Again the lassie must go un-named, un-manned, but not unappreciated.



Radio's 'Tops' of the Week

SATURDAY, 5 February . . . THEATRE ROYAL . . . 9:00 P.M.
Sir Ralph Richardson takes the spot-light as host and star in Somerset Maugham's dramatic story, "The Colonel's Lady".
SUNDAY, 6 February ... HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE . . . 10:00 P.M.
A college faces bankruptcy until a Priest decides to hire a football coach to build up the school team and add to the profits. June Haver and Jack Carson will star in "Trouble Along The Way".
MONDAY, 7 February . . . THEATRE GUILD ON THE AlR - . . 9:00 P.M.
"The Winslow Boy" is a compelling story of a young boy who is done a terrible injustice by a callous government and becomes the nation's symbol of the fight against mis-government. Basil Rathbone stars.
TUESDAY, 8 February . . . THE CHASE . . . 9:00 P.M.
An American reporter in South America follows the directions of a dying native in pursuing a European big-shot. An accident on a falling bridge leaves the reporter holding a water-soaked card bearing the name "Adolph" and . . . a swastika.
WEDNEDAY, 9 February . . . PURSUIT . . . 9:00 P.M.
"The Boy Who Was Late" is the story of the son of a watchmaker who sends a boy of fourteen to deliver a deadly package. The scheme backfires and Inspector Peter Black investigates. THURSDAY, 10 February . . . FAMILY THEATRE . . . 9:00 P.M. Will Rogers Jr. and Marshall Thompson co-star in "Skin-Deep" an exciting under-the-sea adventure of a deep sea diver.


MOVIES

Saturday, 5 February THE NAKED SPUR
Jamest Stewart Robert Ryan
A young man and his guide finally catch up with a murderer who has a price on his head. A young girl and a dishonorably discharged Civil War vet complete the quintet which makes its way across some of natures most treacherous terrain.
Sunday, 6 February EXECUTIVE SUITE
William Holden June Allyson
When a corporation president dies suddenly one of the members of the board of directors tries to sieze the opportunity to make a personal fortune. Five vice presidents plunge into a bitter rivalry for the top job.
Monday, 7 February
TAXI
Dan Daily Constance Smith
A New York cab driver finds his fare is a girl newly-arrived in this country seeking her husband. The driver does everything possible to help her, including a loan on his cab to secure a bond for her release into his custody.
Tuesday, 8 February
YUKON GOLD
Kirby Grant Martha Hyer
A Royal Canadian Mountie investigates the murder of a prospector in the boom town of Port LeBeaux and finds that the mines has been salted with gold to keep the town booming.
Wednesday, 9 February
JOHNNY DARK
Tony Curtis Piper Laurie
A bright young engineer for an independent auto company completes his sports car with the help of the chief engineer and without the knowledge of the company president.
Thursday, 10 February
RED GARTERS
Rose Mary Clooney Jack Carson
A musical western filled with tunes and typical western action. It is mainly a parody on all westerns from time immemorial.

A soldier who lost his rifle was lectured by his captain and told he would have to pay for it..
"Sir," gulped the soldier, "suppose I took a tank? Surely I would not have to pay for that."
"Yes, you would too, If it took you the rest of your Army life."
"Heck," said the soldier, "now I know why a captain goes down with his ship."

"You say your uncle died from falling off a scaffold. What was he doing up there.?"
"Being hanged."


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PAGE 1

m IMONW, s6le, ".? -"_ Govers qTMO Like The Sunsk-ine" Vol. VII, No. 5 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 5 February 1955 PTA Hears Committee Recommendations on School The Parent-Teachers Association of the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base School held its regular meeting Tuesday night at the open air auditorium with an evaluation of the school facilities by representatives from the Southern Association of College and Secondary School and members from the Bureau of Personnel hi-lighting the program. Introduced individually by Mr. T. G. Scarborough. School Superintendent, the special committee commended the school on their facilities and made recommendations to the parents and teachers for improvements that could possibly be made in the school. Principle recommendations concerned the high school group. The only recommendations for the lower grades and the pre-school group was that more attendance and enrollment in the pre-school nursery group should be encouraged. For the high school, it was noted that although there was a smaller number of students and that the amount of activities was limited, the facilities were very good. However, it was recommended that more pre-vocational guidance and training be offered. It was noted facilities on the Naval Base could be utilized, such as the hospital for nursing, medical or science training while the Naval Air Station could possibly help with pre-vocational guidance and training in the phases of aviation, Other shops and departments were noted where students could receive (Continued on Page Three) New Red Cross Hdqrtrs, Opened With Reception Tuesday morning, 1 Feb at 1030, the American Red Cross opened up its new headquarters building here with an informal reception. The new headquarters, combining the field office and living quarters for Mrs. Helen Bowler, Field Director, gives more working room for the Red Cross as well as facilitating faster handling of emergency Red Cross business. Originally proposed in mid-1955, the idea was carried through for the Red Cross with the aid of CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station. Actual construction was done both by SeaBees of MCB-4, under LCDR J. V. Bartlett, Commanding Officer, and the Naval Base Public Works department. The steel-frame building, one of the new experimental "Hueneme Huts" was framed and completed by the SeaBees in four days while the interior finishing was completed by the Public Works department. Attending the reception at the official opening was RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, Mrs. E. B. Taylor, Sr. LCDR J. V. Bartlett, Commanding Officer, MCB-4, CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, the Naval Base Chaplains, Chaplain Sullivan and Chaplain Peterson, and the SeaBee Chaplains, Chaplain Poynter and Chaplain Roberts, plus high ranking officers from all commands and departments of the Naval Base. RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander Naval Base, signs the key that will be hung in Red Cross Headquarters opened here Tuesday morning while others attending the official reception reception await their turn to sign. Left to right. Chaplain K. G. Peterson, Mrs. E. B. Taylor Sr., Mrs. E. B. Taylor, Mrs. Helen Bowler, American Red Cross field director, and Chaplian J. J. Sullivan. Historic WW-II Carrier Arrives Here For Shakedown The modernized aircraft carrier, USS TICONDEROGA (CVA 14), fresh from first round underway operation tests on her new launching and arresting gear, will arrive in Guantanamo Bay early Tuesday to USS TICONDEROGA (CVA-14) Boy Scout Week Begins Here Monday The Boy Scouts of America will celebrate its 45th anniversary during the week 6-12 Feb. Employing the theme "Building For A Better Tomorrow" the week of activities will begin with special observation in churches throughout the nation. Demonstrations and exhibits which dramatize the purpose and objective of the Boy Scouts and point out the rics heritage the organization has made to the nation will be featured throughout the week. More than 3,660,000 scouts, including the Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts and Explorer Scouts of Guantanamo Bay and their leaders will participate in the week-long program. On the Naval Base, it planned to have scouts at flag-raising ceremonies along with other special programs. The week will also mark the completion of the "National Conservation Good Turn"-a program undertaken by the Boy Scouts at the request of the President to arouse "public recognition of the need for adequate protection and wise management of soil, water, mineral, forest, grassland and wildlife resources. begin eight weeks of shakedown exercises. It will be the Essex class carrier's first visit to Guantanamo and her first extended cruise since she was mothballed in 1946. During the recent sea trials, the recommissioned TICONDEROGA had her first carrier landings and launched the first steam catapulted flight of the Navy's new F9F-8 Cougar jet. Three of the four air squadrons in Carrier Air Group Six, Oceana Naval Air Station, Va., the "Big T's" air arm, will be aboard during the Caribbean cruise. In all, about sixty planes, including two helicopters, will make the cruise. Commanded by Captain William A. Schoech, USN, of Blakesburg, Iowa, at the helm of his third carrier, the 33,000 ton ship recently underwent an extensive twenty-one month conversion in the New York Naval Shipyard. Ten years ago, the TICONDEROGA was aflame in the South Pacific after a pair of Kamikazes had slipped through her anti-aircraft defenses and plunged into her flight deck. Today her scars have been erased and she has been equipped with the latest advances in carrier construction. The "Big T" is graced with a new island superstructure, streamlined with the newest equipment in radar, electronics, fire control, and anti-aircraft defense armament. Future plans include a canted deck. Perhaps, the single most important change is the installation of a "beefed-up" flight deck and a pair of new steam-driven catapults. 9 I

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a Pdag Two The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 5 February 1955 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sandness-Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC--------------Editor N. L. Sison, 303---------News F. L. Cannon, 303-F-hotographer 0. C. Roberts, BON ----Repartee THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. What's Doin' Stateside (Weekly AFPS Feature) Within two years, a transatlantic telephone cable will link the U.S. and Europe for the first time ...It will replace the radio telephone system which has been in commercial operation since 1927. Transatlantic phone rates will be unchanged but reception will be greatly improved and static a thing of the past. The cable, running from Nova Scotia to Scotland, is to cost $35 million American, British and Canadian telephone corporations will share the expense. Americans are growing larger. both vertically-and horizontally A report from the U.S. Office of Education says children nowadays grow faster than they did even as recently as 15 years ago Surveys made in selected cities indicate adolescents of today are coming in sizes as much as three inches taller and 10 pounds heavier than youngsters of the same age back in the late 1930's. But, at the same time, a leading nutritionist declares that the key to overweight among American adults may lie in their childhood He expressed belief that weight-control programs, starting at the age of 12, may be the answer to preventing that spare tire around the middle later on ... According to same expert, children from now on are likely to get tubbier because they spend less time exercising, more time riding in cars and watching televisionjust like their elders. New York City has begun what might be termed an arresting experiment-a compulsory school for traffic violators ...Offenders are offered the choice of attending a seven-week course in proper driving procedures or paying fines and FTG Bulletin by Ron Federman The number of FTG personnel nominated to participate in the serice-wide competitive examinations for advancement in rate this month are as follows: Thirteen (13) first-class recommended for chief, twelve (12) seeend class recommended for first class, six (6) third-class recommended for second-class, and five (5) seamen going up for thirdcl.iss. The examination for chief was conducted Tuesday, 1 February, with the usual post-examination viewpoints by the FTG participants: some sharing a pessimistic outlook, and others optimistic about the whole thing. Time will be a governing factor, when the results are produced, and until then we will just have to keep our fingers crossed. In last weeks Bulletin your writer erroneously stated that CDR Gendreau will relieve CDR King as "Operations Officer". CDR Gendreau will assume the duties as Navigation Officer. Today the U. S. Navy can count on four additional good years of service from Chief Windland, USNR-R, who will take his oath and sign his shipping over papers. He is attached to the Engineering Department. During the past week several enlisted men received their orders bringing their tour of duty with FTG to an abrupt close. Cunningham, BM3, packed his bags and said farewell to "dear old FTG" on Tuesday, 1 February. He left for the USS ROANOKE (CL-145). "Tiny" Brinkman, DC3, and Tolliver, GM3, are also slated for transfer shortly. "Tiny" will report to the USS MACON (CA-132). and the latter will join the airdale ranks aboard the USS CORAL SEA (CVA-43). "Tiny", who tips the scales at 260, should really scoff down the cruiser chow Also transferred on the 31st of January was Red Carr, S02, who will experience some of that "tin can duty" aboard the USS THE SULLIVANS (DD 537). In order to alleviate the existing personnel shortage aboard DESLANT ships undergoing training at Gtmo under the supervision of FTG, COMDESLANT has introduced the following plan, quoted from the 1 January 1955 DESLANT INFORMATION BULLETIN: "Due to the expected losses of personnel in DESLANT vessels in the near future, a program has been initiated to assure that ships undergoing Refresher Training at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, will continue to receive personnel during that period: An AD at Newport and Norfolk has been designated "GTMO FFT Tender". Personnel who report too late to sail with ships to which assigned will be assembled in this tender, which, as directed by the Type Commander will transfer personnel to their respective units in GTMO via the next GTMO destroyer providing a period in excess of 15 days will elapse before their ship is scheduled to return to home port." going to jail ...When they complete their studies, the "students" are given a written final examination ...How well they do on that determines the severity of their punishment. Hospital Notes by R. P. Campanozzi Heirport News The year 1954 was a female one in regards ot our birth list. Indications are that this year be a male one. Two boys and one girl were recorded for the past week. Robert David is the son of BTC and Mrs. Janet Bailiff; and, Robert Joseph to MMC and Mrs. Marie Radberg. The new lady is Casandra Dell to Mrs. Betty Williams and S/Sgt Williams of the Marine Corps. Optometrist Promoted to Commander Dr. R. L. Henry, was promoted to the rank of commander in the Medical Service Corps, effective on 14 January 1955. Commander Henry is an optometrist and obtained his doctors' degree in that field at Penn State College. Among other duties, he is our educational officer and representative to the base athletic counsel. Two Corpsmen Reenlist That comfortable chair next to our personnel officer's desk must be very softening and surely effective. Merle Lennox and Jim Platt, both HM2, have taken the oath for another term as each elected to reenlist for six years. Swearing in ceremonies were held in the office of the commanding officer. HM2 Maddix, Top Scorer Our hustling five foot, ten inch guard, Bill Maddix, swished the basketball nets for 28 points against the Fleet Training Group quintet. Bill hails from Kansas City, Mo.; attended high school there and graduated as a four-letter man, and was elected to that city's AllStar Five. He then entered Beloit College in Wisconsin playing varsity basketball for two years. Maddix is assigned to the operating room and here he swishes sponges. Departures HMC J. W. Laden and his family departed for the supply depot in Oakland, Calif. for duty. Chief Laden worked in the finance department as medical repairman. NSD Supply Line Mrs. Etta Ray Chetlin, wife of LT. Norman D. Chetlin of CHBONE, will arrive in Guantanamo Bay on the 10th. Mrs. Chetlin will be the guest of LT and Mrs. P. D. Larson during her visit. The Bill Griffin, Jrs. have as their guest, Mrs. Allen Wescott, Mrs. Griffin's mother. Mrs. Margot Aquila, mother of Mrs. Elmer Nichols departed this week after spending Christmas with the Nichols. Mr. Roger A. Dannery, formerly clerk typist in the Material Division, has resigned his position and has accepted employment in Venezula. Roger was.recently married to Srta. Carmen Amacho of Guantanamo City, Cuba and Caracas, Venezula. Roger will be missed by his many friends at NSD. Frank S. Gac, DK1, anxiously met the JOHNSON. Mrs. Emilia Gac and small son, Richard W. arrived from Lancaster, New York. 4S Sunday, 6 February 1955 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. P-otestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner "He is his own worst enemy." These are words which describe a great many of us. It is not lack of knowledge that brings trouble down upon our heads. It is more often lack of self control. Electricity may strike with the destructive force of a bolt of lightening, but it may, under control, furnish light and head for the well-being of all. Our emotions and feelings are like electricity in that, uncontrolled, they may cause you to become your own worst enemy; controlled, they are your friend and will contribute much to your well-being and that of others. Our feelings or emotions have a tremendous influence upon all of our living. Even those who pride themselves on being rational, and following the dictates of reason, find that in the majority of cases their actions are determined by their emotions. It is through our emotions that we grow, for we develop along the lines of the things we love. Our feelings have a mighty influence upon our reactions to life. Our appreciations in life are enlarged or narrowed by our emotions or feelings. "Your feelings can light up your soul, or they can burn out your soul." Your emotions can light up your life only as you make them your friends by controlling them. Even hate can become your friend instead of your enemy if directed by Christian moral awareness and controlled by Christian conviction. Man's hatred must be directed against evil issues and causes and not against individuals. It is in the realm of human passions that this truth is most evident. We are witnessing today one of the gravest breakdowns in the control of human passions in recent history. Some within our midst are contributing to that break. Enslaved by his passions, man becomes his own worst enemy and burns out his soul. True aftetion is destroyed. Noble appreciations become distorted. Future happiness becomes cancerous. Yes! Your emotions can light up your life or they can burn out your life. In Christ there is the inspiration, motivation, and strength to control our emotions that they may light up our lives! Saturday, 5 February 1955 e0 THE INDIAN

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M Saturday. 5 February 1955 Toastmasters Clubs Offer Speech Training The ability of any individual to express himself simply and clearly to a group of listeners-to think on his feet before a crowd-is a tremendously valuable asset. It is often spoken of as a "gift", but that is seldom an accurate designation. Much more frequently, it is the result of many hours of practice and training. The Toastmasters Clubs -to their everlasting credit -have turned this training process into fun. Their members work and like it-they reap rich rewards in improved self-confidence and better diction. Specifically, these club m-mbers give themselves training in (1) parliamentary procedures r nd the conduct of business meetings, (2) impromptu speech-two or three minutes, without provious knowledge of subject, and (3) prepared talks-five to ten minutes, with emphasis on clarity and objective. Each club limits its membership to thirty, so every member is given an opportunity to speak-as well as to listenat every meeting. What started very modestly as a sort of "self-education" enterprise has now blossomed into an international organization with over 1200 affiliated clubs. They are all devoted to training in the art of public speaking. Here, indeed, is a club with a purpose-and a worthy one. You may be interested in finding out more about the Toastmasters Club on this Base. Toastmaster Club No. 92 meets every Thursday evening at 1800 in the Officers' Club Dining Room. Dinner is served to members and guests for $1.50 per person. After dinner comes the business session, and then the four formal six-minute speeches. The meeting is adjourned between 2000 and 2030. The officers of Toastmasters Club No. 92 are: John L. Sanborn, PresidentTel. 8501 LCDR R. J. Mathews, First Vice President-Tel. 8524 D. B. Powers, Second Vice President-Tel. 8412 R. J. Hummel, Secretary Treasurer-Tel. 8117 LT. H. L. Olsen, Educational Chairman-Tel. 8727 H. P. McNeal, Deputy Governor -Tel. 8101 Please contact any one of the above Toastmasters for further information. Defense Department Asks For Cadet Pay Credit The Defense Department again asked Congress for authority to give pay credit for time spent as cadets at the Military, Naval, Coast Guard and Air Force academies. This proposal, which would amend the Career Compensation Act of 1949, would affect both active and retired officers. It would go into effect the first day of the month following Congressional approval. RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, assists Mrs. F. J. Peteler in cutting the ribbon, officially opening the new Navy Exchange Laundromat. Looking on, some with laundry in hand, left to right: Betty Sentz, Chaplain J. J. Sullivan, Phillys Johnston, LCDR E. H. Beiland, Navy Exchange Officer, Ann Saxe and CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station. The Laundromat is open to all base personnel wishing to do a laundry from 0900 to 1800 Monday through Friday and from 0800 to 1200 on Saturday. PTA Meeting .. (Continued from Page One) important and helpful guidance and training. The committee also recommended that the classes be kept in small groups, facilitating teachers to be able to give more help to students newly transferred here. In regard to students who either graduate here or are transfered back to the States with their parents, the committee recommended a more flexible curriculum. However, on the whole, it was noted that the Naval Base School stands up very well in comparison with schools of the Southern Association of College and Secondary Schools. The meeting was opened with an invocation by LT T. H. Cushman, followed by the singing of "God Bless America" led by Mrs. E. H. Beiland. During the short business meeting, LT D. J. Murphy, PTA Carnival Committee chairman, reported that the PTA will sponsor a dart and balloon booth at the forthcoming carnival and that volunteers are needed. After the business meeting, CAPT J. B. MacGregor showed the second half of the movies taken during his round-the-world trip as medical aide to Vice President Richard M. Nixon. Climaxing the evening was a presentation of an award made to two students of the Naval Base school. John B. Huddy and Ronnie F. Moseley were given citations from RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander Naval Base, by Mr. A. J. McGowan for their "quick thinking and alert action in reporting a fire at the Naval Base Chapel, avoiding a major conflagration." Representatives from the Southern Association of College and Secondary Schools and members from the Bureau of Personnel look over the curriculum of the Naval Base School with Mr. T. G. Scarborough, School Superintendent. The special committee was here for a week, reviewing the school in every phase. Left to right: Mr. Zollie Maynard, Dr. Sarah Lou Hammond, CDR T. J. Moriarty, Mr. T. G. Scarborough, Mr. George Wilkins, and Dr. J. M. Leps. 0 46 'Detective Story' Cast Features Hard Realism Of Daily Police Work Part II (Introducing a new breed of characters among the 32, in "Detective Story") Sophocles once stated, "there is a point where even justice is unjust." Sidney Kingsley, in "Detective Story" says (through Joe Feison) "it takes a God to knowto really know." Observe closely then, one Jim McLeod (Alan Wagner) in the March 15 edition of the Little Theater drama. Discern a self appointed mediator, one who catagorizes all transgressors, from the lowly pickpocket to the hired killer, as a distinct species-and no penalty is too severe for them. Charlie Gennini (Ronnie Estafson) and Lewis Abbott (Jim Mello), as polished a pair as ever matriculated in the top reform schools, are chronic offenders, and deadly as the loaded .45's they carry. The shop-lifter (Evelyn Purdue) the purse-snatcher, Crumb-bum (Bud Sisson) and the embezzler, Arthur Kindred (George Engle) receive the same disdainful 'treatment.' "It's never a first offense," barks McLeod, "It's the first time they get caught." Equally unpardonable in McLeods black book of hatred, are those who have profited laterally by crime. Endicott Sims (Chuck Dieterle) the criminal lawyer who protects Schneider, Miss Hatch, (Mildred Morgan) who's appearance as a star witness at the lineup, is voided by a mink stole, and Tami Giacoppetti (Joe West) who's shady enterprises are preserved by men in high places, all warrant the detective's contempt. McLeod's unbridled anger, and revulsion for the riff with which he's had a constant association, reaches an impasse with Dr. Schneider, Jack Tipler, who's guise of gentleman farmer, does not completely conceal the activities of a practicising (and not always successful) abortionist. Poetic justice, with her lifted se ie provides the calamatous finale to this Little Theater offering, and, as is the case of all good drama, leaves the audience to deliberate as its jury. Washington's Birthday Observed Here 22 Feb, Tuesday February 22, will be observed as a national holiday aboard the Naval Base. All ships in commission in the harbor will full dress ship from 8:00 A. M. to sunset. At 12:00 noon the Naavl Station and all saluting ships in commission in the harbor will fire a national salute of 21 guns. Units afloat follow motions of the Naval Station. All but necessary work, drills and exercises will be suspended Iall day. THE INDIAN M M Page Three ,aura 5 eray15

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M our Saturday, 5 February 1955 SPORTS ROUND-UP by Joe Celentano, JO1, USN (AFPS Sports Writer) -New York's 196-day horse racing season opens on April Fool's Day. That figures ...Baseball's Grapefruit League starts Mar. 10. Six National League clubs will be based in Florida with the Chicago Cubs and the New York Giants pitching camp in Arizona. All the teams in the American League with the exception of Cleveland will train in Florida. The big, bad Indians hit the rails to Tucson and are slated to do battle with the world champion Giants in 20 exhibition games. How 'bout that? Twenty World Series games. Dodger "fireman" Jim Hughes topped all NL hurlers in number of appearances last season. The dependable reliefer cracked the Dodger box score 60 times without starting a single game. One of baseball's greatest active moundsman, Bob Feller, has signed his 17th contract with the Indians. The ace fireballer, who never seems to tire of the national pastime, has a lifetime record of 262 wins, 154 losses. It's good to see guys like Feller remain in baseball. Now wouldn't it be great if Ted Williams decides to stick it out for another year? Service Highlights Word from the far north is that the Jet basketball team from the AF radar station at Ramore, Ontario, Canada, is in first place in the Gold Belt League ...Since taking up skeet shooting four years ago Maj. Frank Knapp of Naha AB, Okinawa, has been a member of 17 championship teams. Last year he blasted 986 birds out of a possible 1000 to rank second highest in the National Skeet Shooting Assn. record books for that year. Leading scorer for the Comets cage squad at the Brooke Army Medical Center, Tex., is six-foot Jackie Wright, who was a member of the Indiana U. 1952 NCAA championship team. Honolulu sportswriters voted marine Skippy Dyer most valuable player on the Hawaii All-Star game with the College All-Stars. Dyer was the star halfback for the 1954 Hawaii Marine championship eleven ...Army skier Brooks Dodge recently placed seventh in the special men's international slalom skiing competition at Garmiseb, Germany. The Olympic skier is stationed at the Garmish Detachment. Six teams representing the Armed Forces will compete in the Olympic bobsled tryouts at Lake Placid, N. Y., Feb. 12-13 .Want to help support the U.S. Olympic teams? If so, donations may be sent by check to the Olympic Fund, U.S. Olympic Committee, Biltmore Hotel, New York 17, N. Y. Pfc. Billy Martin, ex-New York Yankee second-baseman, is giving basketball a whirl at Ft. Carson, Colo. The hero of the 1953 World Series expects to join the Bombers after his discharge this summer. Look out Gerry Coleman? .Soccer (a sport everyone gets a kick out of) has recently been added to the sports program at Ft. Hood, Tex. ...Twelfth Naval District Hd. in San Francisco, host command for the 1955 All-Navy boxing championships, announces that the finals will be held in the Oakland Auditorium April 12. SKINDIVERS SNAG GIANT TURTLE Bill Johnson, PN1 and Frank Morreale, BM2, both of the First Division pose with the large turtle they shot while spearfishing off shore at Phillips Park on January 31. The huge reptile was judged to weigh approximately 100 lbs. 21 Base P01's Take CPO Examinations First class petty officers of the Naval Base buckle down to some serious thought and study as they take the annual examination for advancement in rating to Chief petty officer, pay grade E-7. Twenty-one men from the Naval Base took the exam Tuesday at the Naval Station Enlisted Men's Club along with personnel of the fleet units in Guantanamo Bay. The CPO exams were the first exams of the advancement in rating exams to be held. In the next three weeks, examinations will be held for Pay Grade E-4, E-5, and E-6 in that order. Ladies Bowling Standings W 7 6 5 5 4 4 4 3 6 0 TEAM Team #1 Team #8 Team #2 Team #10 Team #4 Team #6 Team #7 Team #5 Team #3 Team #9 Top Ten Averages E. Griffin P. Way L 1 2 33 4 4 5 6 8 171 149 M. Hoy F. Grounds S. Wenderlich A. Tagliabue M. Powers V. Schmitt B. Wach High Games F. Grounds =M Hoy E. Griffin P. Way S. Brooks J. King N. Zaborski M. Green M. Clay B. Serig 145 144 136 135 134 133 132 214 201 192 188 183 183 171 170 171 174 Basketball Standings (Including games of Thursday, 3 Feb.) NavSta 7 1 .875 MCB-4 6 1 .837 NAS 6 2 .750 Medical 5 3 .625 CHB-1 4 3 .571 VU-10 4 3 .571 Marines 3 4 .429 Leeward Pt. 3 5 .375 High School 1 6 .142 FTG 0 7 .000 Basketball Schedule Monday, 7 Feb ** High School vs NavSta Medical vs VU-10 Tuesday, 8 Feb CHB-1 vs Marines NAS vs FTG Wednesday, 9 Feb ** Lwrd Pt vs MCB-4 Medical vs VU-10 Thursday, 10 Feb High School vs NavSta NAS vs FTG Friday, 11 Feb ** Lwrd Pt vs MCB-1 CHB-1 vs Marines Ladies Golf Shots by Betty Lou Tipler On Wednesday the ladies played summer rules which made all scores a little higher. The 1st and 2nd flights played 18 holes while the 3rd and 4th played 9 holes. Winners of golf balls were: 2nd Flight Low net Joanne Weiland Low gross Miriam Hoy Joy Graves 3rd Flight (blind five) 1st Betty Lou Tipler 2nd Theresa Moseley Dot Brown 4th Flight (blind five) 1st tie Dee Stadnik Vivian Soballe 2nd Marie Vanderhoef Our Ringer Tournament starts this week. Rules and the ringer score card are posted in the golf shack. Sunday, January 30th was Scotch Foursome Day and here are the results: 1st Low gross The Scotts' 1st Low net tie The Vanderhoefs' Mrs. Grounds & King 2nd Low net (tie) Mrs. Hamilton & Adams' The Norths' 3rd Low (net) The Kings' Mrs. Reynolds' & Brough Mrs. Sandness & Byerley 4th Low net Mrs. Aslin & Drace 5th Low net (tie) Mrs. Burke & Lackey The Sheehans' 6th Low net Mrs Hoy & Monte Longest drive men LT Dempsey Longest drive women Mrs Scott Longest putt LT Moseley Closest to pin on #18 LCDR Scott Closest to pin on #14 Mrs. McElory Closest to pin on #8 Chief North Any of the above winers who have not received their golf balls please contact Gladys Hamilton at CB 52-A. 9 THE INDIAN

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Saturday 5 February 1955 m M THE INDIAN m Page Five Cage Standings Shaky at Half-Way Point; Indians, SeaBees in Tussle for League Lead by Hal Davis Basketball settled down and began to look more like basketball this last week with several enjoyable games on the courts and a few shifts occurring in the standings and "top-ten" scorers. The Naval Station Indians remained in first place in the standings with a slim 38 percentage point lead over the MCB-4 squad. The Naval Air Station Flyers dropped to third place by virtue of a 49-39 loss to a flashy Hospital-Dental combine on Thursday night. The Medics hold fourth place with a half game lead over the Cargo Handlers who are tied with the VU-10 Mallards for fifth. Gerhardt, of the Stevedores, took over the high scoring honors from Pirate Heimer with a total of 153 points in seven games. In the Naval Station -Stevedores game Wednesday night Gerhardt scored 35 of the Stevedores' 47 points, but to no avail since the Indians were busy racking up 70 of their own tallies. Heimer, last week's top scorer, dropped to third place behind the Flyers' Snyder. Flyers Defeat Pointers, Bees Down Leathernecks Closing out last week's schedule the Air Station Flyers dropped their brother Pointers from across the Bay with a 43-33 win. Ring led the Flyers with 15 while Harrison dropped in a total of 18 for the Pointers. In the second game of the evening the SeaBees turned loose a lot of big guns and sank the Marines, 63 to 52. For the Bees, Klinker and Buhay hit for 13 apiece while Glenny and Puppe each dropped in 12. The Marines' Schreck swished 10. Flyers Edge Indians; Medics Swamp Trainers Starting off the new week of the schedule the Naval Air Station Flyers dumped the Naval Station Indians out of their win streak with a shaky 53 to 47 win in what turned out as predicted to be the game of the week. Ring hit for 20 for the Flyers while Doc Daugherty, in his last game for the Indians dropped in 11. The loss was the first of the schedule for the Indians and gave the Flyers a temporary tie for the lead. In the nightcap, the Medics jumped all over the Trainers with a 73 to 32 victory helped along by a big 28 points from Maddox. The corpsmen unveiled an almost air-tight defense under the FTG basket which kept the Trainers on the outside making long shots most of the game. Bees Stomp Pirates; Mallards Edge Pointers Tuesday night the SeaBees came back to town to go against the High School Pirates who offered little opposition to the big squad from the boondocks. The Bees' points were pretty well spread out with almost everybody on the squad sinking one or two, but Puppe dropped 17 points to head the rest of them. Heimer again took the lead for the Pirates and netted himself 14. To cap the night the first overtime game so far in the league was played out by the Mallards and the Pointers with the VU-10 squad dropping the winner in the last minute, 52 to 50. The Mallards' Snyder racked up 18 while 'speedy Howie Woren of the Pointers chalked up 15. "Get off my back-sir"-could well be what this unidentified Flyer is saying as LT Sandness of the Indians loses his balance for a moment during the Flyer-Indian game last week. Indians Rack Stevedores; Marines Trim Trainers Wednesday night the Indians maintained their superiority by rapping the Stevedores, 70 to 47. Manager Jerry Morgan dropped in 23 to aid the Indian cause, but big Gerhardt, the Stevedore coach, set a new league record with 35 of the Handlers' 47 total. In the finale for the night the Marine Leathernecks got back into the league with a win over the hapless Trainers, 73 to 34. Holmes again took the scoring honors for the Leathernecks with 17 followed by Plante with 16 while Trainers' star Lee notched 15. Pointers Pinpoint Pirates; Medics Ground Flyers; Stevedores Squeeze By Mallards Thursday night the fans had a choice of courts as the scheduled games were played at the Naval Station court and a postponed game was played off at Marine Site. In the first game at Naval Station the Leeward Pointers came from a half-time tie of 24 to 24 to beat the Pirates, 65 to 42. Howie Woren again flashed through with 24 for the Pointers while Edgar Heimer netted the usual high for the schoolers with 14. The Pirate defense fell apart in the second half and the Pointers just about had the court to themselves. In the second game, the Medical defense again took the spotlight as the Flyers tried hard but couldn't penetrate the iron clad curtain while the corpsmen were notching 49 to the Flyers' 39. Rose took top hoop honors with 11 points for the medical squad with both King and Maddox following with 10 each. Snyder dropped 12 for the Flyers. At the Marine cage the Cargo Handlers, behind Gerhardt's 23 tallies, had a hard time beating the Mallards, 59 to 53 to wrap up the basketball week for the Indian. Next week the first half of the schedule comes to a close Wednesday night and the teams start back down the schedule with the Stevedore-Marine game shaping up as the possible game of the week. Sandness, Nigro and Daugherty of the Naval Station Indians, along with Whitaker of the NAS Flyers, go after a rebound. Nigro made the catch, but the Flyers went on to give the Indians their first defeat of the schedule, 53 to 47 in the "game of the week." NAVAL STATION INDIANS-1955: Standing, left to right: Al Kruse Max Gitlin, Morgan Ferris, John Slewitzke, Frank Walbolt, Jack Nigro, Louis Brown and Jim Solan. Kneeling: Don Byerley, "Doc" Daugherty, Pete Petinak, Don Allen and Jerry Morgan. TOP TEN SCORERS PLAYER Gerhardt Snyder Heimer Ring Woren Morgan Daugherty Glenney Houchin Slewitzke TEAM CHB-1 NAS High School NAS Leeward Point Naval Station Naval Station MCB-4 VU-10 Naval Station SCORE GAMES AVG. 153 129 127 116 114 108 94 94 92 82 7 8 8 8 8 8 8 7 7 8 21.8 16.1 15.8 14.5 14.25 13.5 11.75 13.4 13.1 10.25

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M lN&~ Six Assistant Dental Chief Inspects Gtmo Facilities Men of Cargo Handling Battalion ONE (conveniently reduced to CHBONE) unload part of their equipment from the ramp of LST 515 at the old sea-plane landing in Gtmo. CHB ONE Here For Training On Friday, January 14th, two hundred-fifty officers and men of Cargo Handling Battalion ONE debarked at Gtmo from the USS GLYNN for a two and one-half months period of training in stevedoring and other battalion functions, under operational control of the CO, Naval Supply Depot. The next day fifty more men arrived in the LST 515, which also brought most of CHB-One's equipment and supplies. The discharging of the LST at Fisherman's Point, NAS, was begun immediately so that offices, storerooms and shop spaces could be set up ready for full scale operations on Monday morning. This trip has been CHB-ONE's first opportunity to move as a complete unit. In the past, small Detachments only were deployed, while Battalion headquarters remained at Cheatham Annex, Williamsburg, Virginia, the home port. The battalion commanding officer, CDR S. Y. Walker, SC, USN, has his office in building 850. The general administrative supply and maintenance offices are also located there and in the adjoining building. The Operations and Stevedoring Office is located on Wharf "Baker", near the NSD Transit Shed. The OD, touring the galley, halted the recruit who was carrying a soup kettle. "Here, let me taste that," the OD barked. The recruit obediently supplied a ladle. "Do you call that stuff soup?" he roared, sputtering. "No, sir," was the meek reply. "That's dish water." Goliath was very much astonished when David hit him with a stone. Such a thing had never entered his head before. VU-10 Prop Blast by Bill Wright John Stanovich, AD1, known as just "Stan" by his friends is known as the local "junk-dealer" around the squadron. Stan maintains the squadron Material Issue Store for the Maintenance Department, issuing various parts and materials needed for the upkeep of squadron aircraft. He has a booming business too: Trouble arises when he hunts for the stock number for false teeth and hair though. The teeth can be obtained on open purchase but there's no word on the hair. Besides the usual headaches that go with the business, he gets all sorts of news from the caddies at the golf course, dispatches and telephone messages concerning the transfer he's been sweating out for the past six months. Should you suddenly find yourself short of nuts, bolts and bits of safety wire, see "Stan" the "Junk Man" Due to the heavy operating schedule during the first quarter of this year stateside flights will be curtailed except for extreme emergencies. (Guantanamo minus cross-country flights no women, little wine and a sad song). The latest report from the Personnel Office, points out "That they are going out faster than coming in". The squadron transferred CAPT W. D. F. Stagner, Commanding Officer, Dental Clinic, at right, and CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, greet RADM Daniel W. Ryan, Assistant Chief of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery for Dentistry, upon his arrival on the Naval Base. Admiral Ryan arrived here after visits to Coco Solo, the Canal Zone, Trinidad, British West Indies, and San Juan on the annual inspection of dental facilities in the Caribbean. While on the Naval Base, Admiral Ryan was the house-guest of CAPT and Mrs. W. D. F. Stagner. Admiral Ryan departed Tuesday to conclude his Caribbean inspection tour in Key West, Fla. SeaBee Area Grass Fire Causes No Damage This small but vicious brush fire threatened the SeaBee area last Monday evening, but the prompt response by the Base Fire Department and the aid of several SeaBee volunteers quickly quelled the flames. The danger of the fire was heightened by the inaccessability of the spot-on top of a hill behind the SeaBee compound. six men this past week with only one arrival. Dick Crain, AD3, reported for duty with VU-10 from NAS, Sanford, Fla. Welcome aboard mate, we're going to need you. Taking advantage of the new benefits for career service personnel this week was Richard B. Woods, aviation electrician's mate airman, who was sworn in by CDR D. E. McCoy, commanding officer of Utility Squadron TEN. This was Woods first re-enlistment as he ships over for six years. He walked away with a grin on his face and a "fat" wallet also. Employer: "Why did you leave your last job."? Cute Applicant: "Because the boss kept after me too much." This baby has its father's nose and its mother's eyes. Yes, and if Grandpa doesn't stop leaning over the crib, its going to have his teeth. Barber: "You been here before? Your face is familiar." Customer: "Shouldn't be. Its all healed up now." Saturday, 5 February 1955 m M THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 5 February 1955 Teenage Round-up by Linda Thurston Out of a raggedy cloud of dust over 'Paul Jones Mountain comes a hearty "Hi-Yo, Silver, Pat Burke rides again." Yes, Saturday night saw the charge of the night brigade up the mountain as "Stanislaus" placed second with Garrett, Shyver, Neil, Dalton and Pete in last. Swarms of kids unloaded from the cars and advanced on the Warren house to devour cookies, cakes and all sorts of goodies. Then, the radio went on full blast and Cavie and Wormie and Dex and Dolorice proceeded to give out with their version of the jitterburg. We'd like to thank Jere and his mother for putting up with us. Did 'ja' See. ..Blushin' Bobby R and Vicki starting out down the flowery path. ..Pete looking provoked last Saturday nite. ..Pat W, Sylvia and Gary up to their ears in soap suds. ..Sharon and Pat F trudging up to Victory Hill Monday nite. ..Melba (the basketball star) Reffett sinking many points for her team. (She takes after her brother). ..Bobbie J, Edwin, Doug, Kenny, Kathleen B and Ana P reeling up and down the court at the beach last Saturday eve. ..Maryalice and Ralph. Nita and Bobby P, Peggy and Gary, and Pat and Nancy bobbing through the barbed wire out at "Kidney Beach". .Jackie Lee's crazy "Haitian Hayride Hat". Bob W and Pat K a real cute couple. ...Bobby Parker's duet on the mandolin with Dave Shyver on guitar. Navy Wives' Club by Pat Aldridge The first regular business meeting of the Guantanamo Bay Navy Wives Club following the installation of officers was held Thursday evening, February 3, in the School Assembly Hall. Elma Franklin, club president, began her term of office by reading a letter from the National Parliementarian expressing the hope that the Guantanamo chapter, despite it's relatively new beginning, will be able to send a delegate to the Southeast Regional Conference, in Norfolk, Virginia this coming May and to the National Convention, in Washington, D. C., the following October. No such delegate has as yet been elected and will not be until it is ascertained whether such attendance is feasible in view of present transportation difficulties. Plans for our usual Bingo social, Thursday afternoon, February 10th, at the Villamar Lycuem were announced by Activities Chairman, Pearl Piercey. Members were urged to feel at liberty to bring guests who will also enjoy the fun of surprize prizes and may wish to help swell the growing membership roster. Betty Koser, recently departed with her husband to a new duty station in California, was bade Godspeed in absentia while Maria Rahberg, taking time out to welcome a small heir in Diaperdom, was marked present in spirit. A note of thanks has been sent to the Base Nursery expressing gratitude for the loan of potted plants which so added to the beauty of the recent installation and Special Services and Sunday School for tables and chair coverings. Future activities will include MAqm oses Educational Services NAS Crosswinds NA Croswind by Cpl Joe Androvich USMC DEPARTURE There was only one departure for the states this past week in the person of Staff Sergeant Earl R. Timnis who will report to the Marine Corps Reserve Training Center, Orlando, Florida, for duty. Sergeant Timms was attached to the Supply Section. All hands extend their best wishes and best of luck upon his departure. NEW ARRIVAL Staff Sergeant and Mrs. Betty Williams are the proud parents of a baby girl born at 0016 on the 30th of January, weighing 7/2 pounds. "Congratulations to the happy parents and the best of every thing to Casandra Dell from all hands." TALENT SHOW A Talent Show and picnic lunch will take place at the movie lyceum on the 25th of this month. All hands are reminded to submit their names to TSgt Schuler of the Security Section if planning to enter the show. RANGE DETAIL Approximately 52 Marines will begin "snapping in" for the first of the 1955 rifle requalification firing, which will begin this Monday. Preliminary firing will commence the following Monday with qualification day on Saturday, the 19th of February. BOWLING HEADQUARTERS WINS 1st ROUND Compiling a string of 13 consectutive wins, the Headquarters intra-mural bowling team came from 4th place to capture the first round of a two round playoff championship. Finishing the round in a tie with the Staff NCO's at identical records of 20-8, a 3 game series was rolled off with the Headquarters team winning 2-1 and picking up the final 4th point on pin total. High scores for individual games were by Bushlong, 175, and Hausch, 170. For the Headquarters team high men were Lee, 171 and Androvich 170 Starting off the 2nd round with victories were team #2 over team #1 and #3 over team#4. High individual games for these series were by Rogers, 180; Mason,171; and Frederick, 196. FINAL 1ST ROUND STANDINGS Foreign Language Study The second of a series of 4 articles By William A. JOHNSON, PNL Last week we took up the First Level set. Now we will explain the Language Guide and Phrase Book. The Language Guide contains in written form everything that is heard on the record. Words and phrases in the foreign language appear twice in the Language Guide -once in a phonetic version as a further aid to pronunciation and again in the conventional spelling -except in the case of languages employing a different al phabet from ours. In addition to the record material each Language Guide contains an introductory section which gives instructions on how to use the pamphlet and hints on pronunciation and the following supplementary sections: Additional expressions; fill-in sentences; impqrtant signs; and alphabetical word lists. There are always two vocies on the records, one American and the other native. The American voice announces a word or phrase in English; the native voice gives the foreign equivalent of the English followed by a pause to allow the students to repeat what they have heard. Each listener follows in the Language Guide what he hears on the record. Thus he hears and sees the foreign words simultaneously and in association with the Englishmeaning, and in addition is given an immediate opportunity for application, or for "learning by doing" This, any educational psychologist will tell you, is a very satisfactory learning method. The third member of the First Level set, the Phrase Book, is the same size as the Language Guide and presents a fairly large number of phrases in the same form the Language Guide uses -English, foreign language in phonetic spelling, foreign language in convential spelling (if the alphabet is the same as ours). The Spanish Phrase Book contains 127 pages; it's material is presented under the following main headings: Emergency expressions; general expressions; personal needs; location and terrain; roads and transportation; reconnaissance; landing a plane; numbers; size, time, letters, etc.; additional terms, important signs; international road signs; alphabeticatl word list. Natives of any foreign country are likely to be irritated by the disinclination of most Americans to make an attempt to learn their language. They are, on the other hand, flattered and pleased when Americans are seen to show an interest in their language and make some attempt to learn, to speak, and to understand it; however limited and imperfect. Langugae study on the part of naval personnel, then even of a very superficial nature, may very well become a material influence toward good foreign relations. It is a truism to say that the United States Navy and the American sailor are diplomatic representatives of their country; and it necessarily follows that anything that improves the impression made by the Navy upon the nationals of a foreign country should be highly, cultivated. For at no time in our history have we needed, as we do now, the respect and friendship of as much of the rest of the world as possible. (Next week we will explain the Second Level type of materials). In the mean time, don't forget to see your Information and Education Officer. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. HEADQUARTERS SNCO's OFFICERS Team #1 Team #3 Team #2 Team #4 SUPPLY **Includes playoff series 23 21 19 17 14 13 6 5 9*' 11* 9 11 14 15 22 23 Examining Admiral (to naval candndate): "Now mention three great admirals." NC: "Drake, Nelson, and I beg your pardon, sir, I did'nt catch your. name." some all-for-fun parties to which husbands and other guests will be invited. The unusual fetes being planned will come as a delightful surprise to all. y cs rz Who's Who at NAS LT Raymond Francis Wall. new Assistant Operation's Officer. LT Wall replaces LCDR Joe Bedford as Assistant Operations Officer at NAS McCalla. He reported aboard on 16th December from Naval Air Training Center, Memphis, Tenn. He was born at Solon, Iowa, and later attended Coe College at Cedar Rapids and the University of Florida, majoring in Chemistry. He entered the flight program in '42 and received his wings in '43 at Corpus Christi, Texas. He was assigned to VPB21 in the central Pacific as pilot and maintenance officer, participating in Marshall Islands, Palu, Phillipine, and Okinawa campaigns. In June '45 he was flight instructor in PBM's at Banana River, Florida. He reentered the Navy in '50 and took a refresher course at NAS Miami. He transferred to Naval Technical Training Center at Jax in '52, and at his last duty station in Memphis, attended the 32 week Aviation Electronics School. LT Wall is married to the former Margaret Harris of Jacksonville, Fla. and they have four children, Harvey, Marian, Marilyn, and Frances. His hobbies are electronics and photography. Hogan's Goat The NAS tower-flowers, perched high above McCalla Field, were tempted to convey their own 'Mayday' message this past week. Five rated men were slated for BuPers summons, leaving one lone watch stander. Paul Acree, AC1, reports to NAS Glynco, Bob Karnstedt to Barin Field, Ala. and Mel Clements, AO1 to Saufley Field, Florida. George Engle, AC2, attached to WGBY was destined for Kingsville, Texas. Bob Sisk, AC2, will check in with CIVLANT (discharge to Elizabeth, New Jersey) leaving only Tom Hogan on duty when John Page goes on leave. Incidentally Sisk's travel pay amounts to subway fare from Brooklyn to his borough. At the last minute, however, Clemen's orders were cancelled entirely, and Jack Wood of Leeward (who wanted Kingsville in the first place) replaced George Engle. Now George and wife Wally will be able to appear in "Detective Story" anyway, Clemens is happy, Woods is happy, and the 'deferred emergency' has passed. News Gusts The bouncin' Blackbirds of VA45 have returned to their roost aboard the USS INTREPID, but will remain in the general operating area. The AD's made both day and night FCLP's. Sam Fain and Gerry Kirby, who recently finished a 'stretch up the Bay' at Guantanamo, have now adjusted themselves to civilian life. Sam is a butcher in West Virginia and Gerry works nights while attending Ball State Teachers, at Muncie, Indiana. Both clans are expecting new arrivals soon. Now is the time to enter the NAS Contract Bridge Tournament (exclusive to Hill-top tenents only.) Partners will be juggled and the winner will be judged on an individual basis (total points.) Call Dick Friz-8543. Hug Kenyon, curerntly with the good housekeeping force of AV50, received some dainty lace curtains back from the laundry last week. Save them Hugh; they may make some belle in the village a nice dress. m m THE INDIAN M Page Seven

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Niv y-i PPo-1 OND-atmo.-o745 M THE INDIAN Saturday, 5 February 1955 150 OK. NOOK by Francis L. Cannon, JO3 THAT REMINDS ME by Alben W. Barkley The autobiography of the former Vice President of the United States, told in his own engaging and humorous way. His fund of anecdotes and reminiscences is as endless as it is famous. He was born in a Kentucky log cabin, worked as a janitor to attain his education and started his career in politics when Wilson was in office. Forty years and six presidents later he is still going strong. SAHARA by Rene Lecler The Sahara is roughly the size of the United States and is the hottest, driest and cruelest land area on the earth. This book is the story of explorations into this "sea of sand" and their results. Timbuktu, for example, was unvisited by Europeans for centuries; many died before the first traveler returned to describe that legendary city. That story plus many more as exciting are related here. SONG OF THE SKY by Guy Murchie A book about the freak adventure of our age: flight. More specifically, the air and skies we fly in. The history of the search for knowledge of the skies and its movements form the basis of this book. The author deals with many technical matters of meteorology and aerodynamics but the force of his imagination gives his story meaning for professional flyers and groundlings as well. THE HOME BOOK OF MUSICAL KNOWLEDGE by David Ewen A book designed to give the layman a better understanding of music, the stories of operas and symphonies, plus something of the technical aspects of the orchestra and its instruments. There are, among many other things, biographies of composers, a chronological table of musical periods, the function of the conductor and a glossary of musical terms. WAR OF WITS by Ladislas Farago An authoritative account of the technique of espionage. It acquaints the citizen with the overall picture of intelligence operations and allied subjects: counter intelligence, sabotage and propaganda. The author illustrates his points with incidents taken from actual intelligence operations, both historical and contemporary. The author contends that intelligence has a vital modern role to play in the resolution of international differences without ultimate resort to war. "Mommy, why is it Daddy doesn't have much hair?" "He thinks a great deal, dear." "But, Mommy, then why is it you have so much hair?" "Finish your breakfast, dear." Guest (to host in new home): "Well, old boy, how do you find it here." Host:"Walk right upstairs and its two doors to the left." A buoy on a beach and girl on a beach with no boy, but it still looks good. Again the lassie must go un-named, un-manned, but not unappreciated. Radio's 'Tops' of the Week SATURDAY, 5 February ...THEATRE ROYAL .9:00 P.M. Sir Ralph Richardson takes the spot-light as host and star in Somerset Maugham's dramatic story, "The Colonel's Lady". SUNDAY, 6 February .HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE .. 10:00 P.M. A college faces bankruptcy until a Priest decides to hire a football coach to build up the school team and add to the profits. June Haver and Jack Carson will star in "Trouble Along The Way". MONDAY, 7 February ...THEATRE GUILD ON THE AIR .. 9:00 P.M. "The Winslow Boy" is a compelling story of a young boy who is done a terrible injustice by a callous government and becomes the nation's symbol of the fight against mis-government. Basil Rathbone stars. TUESDAY, 8 February .THE CHASE ...9:00 P.M. An American reporter in South America follows the directions of a dying native in pursuing a European big-shot. An accident on a falling bridge leaves the reporter holding a water-soaked card bearing the name "Adolph" and ...a swastika. WEDNEDAY, 9 February .PURSUIT .9:00 P.M. "The Boy Who Was Late" is the story of the son of a watchmaker who sends a boy of fourteen to deliver a deadly package. The scheme backfires and Inspector Peter Black investigates. THURSDAY, 10 February ..FAMILY THEATRE ..9:00 P.M. Will Rogers Jr. and Marshall Thompson co-star in "Skin-Deep" an exciting under-the-sea adventure of a deep sea diver. MOVIES Saturday, 5 February THE NAKED SPUR Jamest Stewart Robert Ryan A young man and his guide finally catch up with a murderer who has a price on his head. A young girl and a dishonorably discharged Civil War vet complete the quintet which makes its way across some of natures most treacherous terrain. Sunday, 6 February EXECUTIVE SUITE William Holden June Allyson When a corporation president dies suddenly one of the members of the board of directors tries to sieze the opportunity to make a personal fortune. Five vice presidents plunge into a bitter rivalry for the top job. Monday, 7 February TAXI Dan Daily Constance Smith A New York cab driver finds his fare is a girl newly-arrived in this country seeking her husband. The driver does everything possible to help her, including a loan on his cab to secure a bond for her release into his custody. Tuesday, 8 February YUKON GOLD Kirby Grant Martha Hyer A Royal Canadian Mountie investigates the murder of a prospector in the boom town of Port LeBeaux and finds that the mines has been salted with gold to keep the town booming. Wednesday, 9 February JOHNNY DARK Tony Curtis Piper Laurie A bright young engineer for an independent auto company completes his sports car with the help of the chief engineer and without the knowledge of the company president. Thursday, 10 February RED GARTERS Rose Mary Clooney Jack Carson A musical western filled with tunes and typical western action. It is mainly a parody on all westerns from time immemorial. A soldier who lost his rifle was lectured by his captain and told he would have to pay for it. "Sir," gulped the soldier, "suppose I took a tank? Surely I would not have to pay for that." "Yes, you would too, If it took you the rest of your Army life." "Heck," said the soldier, "now I know why a captain goes down with his ship." "You say your uncle died from falling off a scaffold. What was he doing up there.?" "Being hanged."