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Indian
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CGovers CTMO Like The Sunshine"


Vol. VII, No. 4


U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba


Saturday, 29 January 1955


Electricians give the new automatic washing machines a final checkover before the opening -of the Navy Exchange Laundromat, scheduled for Tuesday, 1 February. The new laundromat will be open to all base personnel and their dependents.

Navy Exchange Laundromat Opens Tuesday


Another addition will be made to the Navy Exchange facilities on the Naval Base Tuesday morning when Mrs. F. J. Peteler, RADM E. B. Taylor, Commn-ander, Naval Base, CAPT. G. M. Holley, Chief of Staff, CAPT W. R. Caruthers, and LCDR E. H. Beiland, Navy Exchange Officer will officially open the new Navy Exchange Launromat. The new laundry service is the result of a suggestion made by Mrs. Peteler.
Located behind the Navy Exchange Laundry, the Laundromat will be open five and a half days a week for anyone caring to do a laundry. Primarily, the laundromat was designed for use by enlisted personnel who have only a few uniforms to wash and who do not care to pay the monthly charge at the main laundry. However, no restrictions have been placed on the Laundromat and anyone may do their laundry.
The new Laundromat, equipped with 24 coin operated automatic washing machines, one extractor and two driers, will be open from 0900 to 1800 Monday through Friday and from 0800 to 1200 on Saturday mornings. To facilitate faster service and insure that machines will not be overloaded, two attendants will weigh in laundry, issue soap, bleach or detergent at a minimum fee and make change for the coin operated machines. Only Navy Exchange soap will be used, which will eliminate overloading with soap and costly repairs to the machines.
Laundry-15 cents (9 lbs. max).
Soap-5 cents
Bleach-5 cents
Detergent-5 cents Extracting-10 cents
Tumbler Drying-ocents


March Gf Dimes Drive

Closes Next Week
Only three days remaining for the 1955 March of Dimes campaign. Servicemen's support against polio has been overwhelming in the past, and now that scientists and medical men are on the verge of conquering the dread disease, the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis looks forward this year to substantial contributions from American service men.
Admiral J.H. Cassady, commander of U.S. Navy units in the Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean, said, "It is my sincere wish that service men and women the world over will show their warmhearted generosity to the 1955 March of Dimes."
Rear Admiral G.B.H. Hall, Coinmandant, 10th Naval District, adds his support with, "Only through the widest public support can we combat this dreaded disease. The Dines must March if we are to defeat polio."
Collection containers have been placed at the Exchanges and at various other points around the Naval Base. Make your contribution. You can afford ten cents. You can't afford not to!

CONGRESS PROPOSES OVERSEAS PAY HIKE
A bill to increase foreign duty and sea pay for enlisted men to more than three times the present amount has been introducted by Rep. Victor Wickersham (D-Okla). The measure, HR 222 would give the increased pay to EM at sea or on duty any place outside the continential U. S.


Proposed Pay Bill Goes To Congress


Raises Some Officers 25%, EM's 17%

Washington (AFPS)-The Defense Department has sent to Congress legislation which proposes substantial pay increases for members of the Armed Forces.
Provisions of the new bill call Service-Wide PD Exams for increases running as high as
25 percent for some officers and 17 percent for some enlisted men. Slated for February Now in the House Armed Services Subcommittee, the $729.7 milThe next semi-annual service- lion pay bill, known as the Cawide competitive examination for reer Incentive Act of 1955," is advancement in rating will be held aimed at making military careers during the month of February here more attractive to trained peron the Naval Base in Guantanamo sonnel.
Bay. Only those nominated for ad- - Rep. Paul Kilday (D-Tex.) vancement last October by their di- chairman of the subcommittee vision officers, department heads on pay, told Armed Forces Press or officers-in-charge are eligible. Service he was "very optimistic Tho e candidates not qualified for that the military pay increase advance in t upon nomination will will be passed by Congress," and be exempted from participating in that his efforts will be "to exthe examination. pedite the pay bill as much as
The first examination to be held s Ki'lday's group expects to will be for Pay, Grade E-7 (Chief bogm hearings on the bill in the Petty Officer) on Tuesday, Feb- near future. However, any formal ruary 1, 1955. Pay Grade E-4 (P03) action by the full House Armed will be held on Tuesday February Services Committee must wait 8; Pay Grade E-5 (P02) Tuesday, n tnt -P1- tee a a
February 15 and Pay Grade E 6- ' --- -f otn = a
Feouar 1 an Pa Gade~ and new reserve legislation are (PO1) on Wednesday, February 23. resolved. The draft law expires July 1, and is the committee's first order of business.
Villamar-Bargo Council Among enlisted men, a sergeant (E-5) with more than Plan Pinic arkeight years' service would get
the highest percentage raise. His pay would go up 17.35 percent to a total of $179.40 per month. A Pfc. (E-3) with over three years' service would collect $7.80 more bringing his total earnings up to $101.40 per month, and an E-7 with over 12 years' service would realize a hike of 11.61 percent or $28.39, increasing his total earnings to $273.00 monthly.
The largest dollar increase
would go to officers of two-star rank-major generals and rear admirals-with more than 35 years' service. They would get a$145 a month raise for a total . nthly salary of $1,138.80.
Percentagewise ,a second lieutenant with over three years' service rates among the highest. He would be increased 25 percent for a rise of $59.28 per month or a total of $296.40 per month.
In the warrant officer grades a W-1 with over 12 years' service would stand to gain 22.48 percent Mr. J. R. Yost, Mayor of the fo anices-f$61 pe ot
Villamar-Bargo Association, points wit an increase f $56.12 per month out a possible location for one of to $30580.mon y pay amountmg three barbecue pits to CAPT. W. t R. Caruthers, Commanding Offi- The percentage increase for
cer, Naval Station, at the selected captains, majors, lieutenant colsite for a family picnic park. The ny and coloneran the
new park, one of many projects of dyre.pen logv4.
the Villamar-Bargo Council, is lo- , defend ngtonthe Career
cated across from the Little Leag- Compensation Act written into the ue Ball Diamond, adjacent to Gran- new pay bill makes allowance for adillo Point. Plans call for three ''dislocation pay." It says in part barbecue pits, three picnic tables s'' cation ay b I ays in t: a road, and lights to be constructed Secreta y conceanepaoved by th and installed to begi with, and if a uniformed service whose dependthe park proves to be a popular ents move in connection with his spot, more picnic facilities will be added. (Continued on Page Three)


9.






ft


Saturday, 29 January 1955


NAS Crosswinds Hospital Notes


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615
Saturday, 29 January 1955U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G.M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sandness_-- ...Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, SOC ------------------ Editor
H. L. Sisson, J03 ------------------- News
F. L. Cannon, J03----------Photographer
D. C. Roberts, JOSN------------Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may he re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.



What's Din' Stateside
Overseas air mail to Europe and the Far East may eventually be Carried by guided missiles reaching their destinations in three or four hours. . . The annual convention of the U.S. Parcel Post Assn. was told recently in Chicago that a few experiments aiming toward this have already been carried out . . . The mail-carrying missiles would be guided by radio . . . So far, the main stumbling block is cost.
A grant of $20 million has been made by John D. Rockefeller Jr. to "strengthen and develop" Protestant theological education in the U.S. . . . It's believed to be the largest contribution ever made exclusively for religious education.
A Massachusetts manufacturer claims to have taken the guesswork out of fishing . . . He has marketed an electronic "fathometer," telling fisherman where the deep water and the biggest fish are to be found . . . It's a rowboat version of a WWII device used to locate submarines . . . But there's a catch to it, in addition to the fish . . . The civilian model costs nearly $1200.
That old American standby, the family budget, appears to be on its way out . . . According to a recent survey, fewer families keep written budgets nowadays... Intead, they divide the family income in an informal way on the basis of the members' feeling of how it should be spent . . . At the same time, more and more families are, in effect, having their budgets done for them by such means as installment buying, life insurance ownership, and Christmas clubs.
Since 1900, the U.S. standard of living has doubled, says a University of Chicago report... This is true even though inflation has caused the purchasing power of the dollar to shrink . . . One big reason for the improved living standard is the fact that a modern worker is able to produce


by DICK FRIZ
Who's Who at NAS
Melvin H. Davey, AGC, Aerology Department. Chief Davey arrives via Glen View NAS, Illinois, and already has stated an affinity for balmy Caribbean breezes, as opposed to chilly Lake Michigan blasts.
Davey became a chief in '43, ten years after he enlisted in Uncle's club in '32. He has been active in microseismic research (earthquakes to us.) He has assisted in establishing stations of that type in Iwo Jima and other Pacific isles.
Incidentally, Chief Davey once served as scout master over another 'weather-bird', Chief Whittemore. Davey's wife and children hope to join him here soon.
The Eternal Question
As Congress meditates over just how much generosity they will extend to their military nephews, NAS residents contemplate the pros and cons of re-upping. John Page, AC2 has already made up his mind and will make the control tower his permanent point of operation. "Working up there, is the most desirable job I've ever had," says Page.
Meanwhile, Walt Covell pulled a fast one on us. Walt was discharged just in time to see his beloved Giants take the Series, and then join the Air Force! Swaying like a Piper Cub caught in McCalla's famous cross-currents, is Don Emory, YN2 of Personnel. Months ago, Don expressed his desire to enter the wholesale liquor business. Then when advanced in rate, recently, he decided on radio and television repair work. But more advanced chats with Don indicate a long naval career. Perhaps old Horace pin-pointed it back there in 65 B.C. when he said, ". . . each contentedly practice the trade he understands."
Love's Labor Lost
Months of constant perusal in Spanish texts, almost, but not quite, paid off for a local sailor recently. Dressed in a straw hat and dungarees, and wining with a local senorita, he all but had an SP convinced he was Cuban. Que lastima!
The quick thinking of Jim Morley, Leeward Air Controlman, prevented a weels-up landing by one of the squadron jets last week. The pilot was so greatful, he presented Jim with a box of cigars.
Ed Buchwalter, A03, formerly billeted here, and erstwhile hog caller from the fallow lands of central Ohio, had an opportunity to exercise that notorious larynx recently. Taking leave from the Med cruising USS LAKE CHAMPLAIN, Buck tried some alpine yodeling in the alps, with highly profitable results.
Herclues, giant humpbacked bird of the VR-1 squadron out of Pax River, was the last Constellation to pay its respects G'tmo way for awhile. VR-1 is pulling in their Connies for a recheck, following two disastrous accidents in the Atlantic this past few months.
The NAS Flyers and Leeward Point quintette each stand to lose three men from their squads in the next few weeks. NAS xvill lose Dennis Lyons and Bob Sisk through discharge and Charlie Pettigrew becomes the secretary of the bowling league. Chief Shaheen's Pointers will be blunted by losses of Hal Chapman, Brad Hutt, and Bronko Bladies.

as much in 23 minutes as a turnof-the-century worker did in an hour.


p9


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Page iwo


F A


THE INDIAN


Heiport News
Five boys and four girls are added to the Gtmo Birth Parade. The stork introduced to HMC and Mrs. Beauford Davis a Girl, Deborah Alice. The chief is leading P.O. in our X-Ray department. It is a boy, George Jr., to EN2 and Mrs. Beatrice Bergen. Also, Joseph Santos to Mr. Joe and Mrs. Plinia WestSharon Faye to SN and Mrs. Loretta Knapp; Ronald Vincente to SD2 and Mrs. Mattie Williams; Deborah Kay whose parents are YI2 and Mrs. Barbara Horton; Kathleen Marie to ET2 and Mrs. Carole Julian; Michael Baron to RM1 and Mrs. Delores Watts; and Phillip Alan to ABi and Mrs. Layonia Myers.
Arrivals
Welcome to our most recent arrivals, namely: HM1 Bob Hill, an operating room technician, who reports to U.S. from NavHosp, Charleston, S.C.; HM Bob Kessler whose last duty was aboard the USS Whitley; HN Angelo Clements reported from NavHosp, Philadelphia, Pa. "Clem" is a neuropsychiatry technician. Our latest newcomer is malariology tech HM3 Henry Kein who reports to our sanitation department. Kein served at the Naval Communications Station in San Juan prior to his arrival in Cuba.
Departures
HMC T.G. Byrne, for two and a half years a noted figure at Gtmo departed with his wife and daughter via the Goethals to New York. From New York Chief Byrne will motor cross country to his new duty station, Radiological Defense Laboratory, San Francisco, Calif; there he will terminate his naval career when he completes twenty years in 1956. "T.G." played a great role in boosting this commands athletic and recreational programs. Aside from his enthusiasm in golf, he coached our 1954 basketball team, leading them to a winning season. HMC Byrne was supervisor of the medical storeroom here.
Another freshman first class petty officer chooses civilian life. He is HM1 Bob George who flew to Jax for seperation. Bob advanced to the E-6 pay grade in less than four years, but even that couldn't tempt him toward a promising naval career. Bob was also an active golfer. He stroked the white pellet in the low 80's and participated in many of the base tournemants. George intends to transfer his Pharmacy curriculum to a course in furniture manufacturing upon his return to civilian life. His entire cruise at Gtmo was spent in the EENT Clinic.
Two Nurses, Three Doctors,
Promoted to LCDR
The two ladies at the hospital sporting the two-and-a-half strips are LCDR Tekla Gavelek, our chief nurse and LCDR Olive Wilkinson, dependents' service nursing supervisor. Lieutenants Hering, Moschella and Grady, all medical officers, have received their notification of appointment to lieutenant commander and will be donning the gold maple-leaf in the near future.
Sidelights
Several people have been asking when the next staff party will be held since we haven't had one in several months. Plans are underway to request one, and the party will probably be scheduled for February .. .. ....s fine fishing at the fresh water river, just ask Bill Dryer and Bob Edmunds .... Preparations are being made for the coming carnival; let us all help out and contribute towards a vital cause.


Sunday 30 January 1955
Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800 19002000, and daily before mass. P-otestant Services
Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0930-Sunday School
0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Christian Science
Sunday: 1000-Station Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)


The Chaplain's Corner




On the plaster wall of a cloister in Milan, Italy there is a very wellknown picture. Leonardo da Vinci painted "The Last Supper," a scene where Christ and His twelve disciples were eating together for the last time before Crucifixion.
One legend about this picture tells a lesson difficult to forget. For inany weeks da Vinci worked with a tireless brush until the picture was almost completed. But the face of Christ and Judas were still missing. After a long search da Vinci finally found in Rome a young man with a face which reflected the patience and strength of the Savior.
He quickly sketched the face of Jesus from this model. But the face of Judas was still missing, so for fourteen years da Vinci searched in many cities of Italy for a face which would reflect the deceit and evil of a Judas.
Finally, by the city wall of Florence he found a beggar who bore all the scars of life blasted by sin. Drunkenness, immorality, shame, filth, all left their telling marks. With a few quick strokes of the paint brush the face of Judas became part of the picture. It was then that the beggar asked da Vinci in a low voice: "You do not know me? I am Bendinelli. From
my face you painted the face of Jesus fourteen years ago."
What a pathetic picture of a wasted life, wretched ideals, and a shameful past! What about our lives in the military service? Will they reflect the tragedy of trying to live without God?
We know that a background of a Christian home and God fearing parents will not cover our own neglect and shame. A Christ-like face can quickly be distorted in a most disgusting manner. If only God can heal and forgive, why hesitate to follow His course of direction and guidance ?
J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN









Saturday, 29 January 1955


M


THE INDIAN


Base Dogs Get Rabies Shots


One Dead, Two Hospitalized Little Theatre Preps In Barge Inspection Tragedy For March 15 Opening


I



The pooi pooch in the picture doesn't seem to think much of the idea of getting his rabies shot, but over 60 residents of the housing area turned out at the Villamar Lyceum last week to get their pets innoculated The mass-innoculation was arranged by the Villamar-Bargo Council, and with the response received, it is planned to have the veterinarian, Henry Barnes, on hand periodically for future innoculations.


Air Operations Take

Heavy Accident Toll
by Dick Friz
After a series of three mishaps involving flight operations at Guantanamo Bay in the past week, providence or fate (call it what you may) did reverse itself, on Thursday morning 20 Jan.
At 0825, with the sun still low in the Carribean skies, Ens. Dwyer of VF-22 bailed out of his F2H2 Banshee, approximately 15 miles south of Leeward Point. His wingman, MAJ 102 reported the ejection and notified McCafla that Dwyer entered his raft some 14 minutes later. SAR units were alerted immediately; UR-49 (from the Albany) flown by Chief Charlie Ellis, and the UF-1 (Station 904) piloted by LT's Gene Ordway, and Paul Seiber, joined a HUP from the USS INTREPID in the search and the carrier HUP rescued Dwyer 27 minutes following his high altitude exodus. He was dispatched safely to the carrier. McCalla's control tower commented that MAJ 102's concise, reporting of the emergency, "was one of the best we've ever had. "'
Not so fortunate was CDR. Richard L. Cevoli, Skipper of VF73, a visiting Leeward squadron. CDR Cevoli was taking off from NAS Jacksonville, Tuesday, prior to rejoining his group, when his plane nosed into the ground, exploding in flames, and scattering debris in a one mile wooded area.
At 0825, 12 January, ENS. Horace E. Bryson of VF-73 was engaged in a four plane line tactic near Santiago. Pilot Bryson lost sight of plane three and pulled up beneath it, losing most of his tail section. Pilot Russo, in the other jet, ejected in time, but Bryson went down into the sea. HUP's from the ALBANY and BALTIMORE joined in a fruitless search.
On Saturday, 15 January, Leon R. Tuttle, AM3, of Attack Squadron 45, fell from a tractor outside McCalla Field Hanger, and fractured a vertebrae. He died at Naval Base Hospital at 11:20 that morning.


THE MARCH OF DIMES
This is the final week for voi-I ntary contributions to the Na-I tional Foundation for Infantilej Paralysis. There should be noneed for a heart rending appeal.! Every one of us knows the won- i derful work that has been doneby the Foundation in treating victims of polio and in research to find preventative drugs and Imore effective treatment. I
The records are open to all.] There are those upon this Station who can testify to the won-! deful work of the Foundation.1 It is a disease that is no discern-j er of persons. 17.1 percent of the! cases to date who have received! assistance have been service1 connected personnel. The contribution cans are out. HAVE YOU MADE A CONTRIBUTION?




(Continued from Page One)
permanent change of station is entitled to a dislocation allowance equal to his monthly basic allowance for quarters. However, the member is entitled to only one payment of a dislocation allowance for a PCS."
Another amendment to the Career Compensation Act substantialy changes and raises incentive and hazardous duty pay. Enlisted men would receive $50.00 to $105.00 monthly for hazardously duty depending on longevity and rank. Officers' hazardous duty pay ranges from $100.00 to $245.00 monthly, also depending on longevity and rank. If enacted, the new pay bill
would carry out the general proposals of President Eisenhower in his special message to Congress on Jan. 13. The President said then that it cost $3200 to put a man through basic training and up to $120,000 to train a jet pilot.
The President said both officers and enlisted men should be encouraged to remain in the service so the government could realize something on this costly education.


. Chief Carpenter John R. Platt died and two others were hospitalized as a result of asphyxiation last week during a materiel inspection of an unused barge.
The tragedy ocurred last Saturday morning when Mr. Platt, accompanied by Charles H. Chatfield, ENC, and David K. Holloman, EN1, all assigned to Ships Department, boarded the YFN 309 tied up at anchorage "DD-7" off the Bargo shore for a preliminary check prior to its annual inspection.
Mr. Flatt, intending to make a visual inspection from the ladder, descended into a void in the barge and was overcome from lack of oxygen. Chatfield and Holloman were also overcome when they went to his assistance.
LT Robert E. Peacock, in charge of the inspection party, along with other members of the party arrived at the scene and succeeded in pulling the three men from the void. Artificial respiration was applied immediately, and the Naval Hospital responded to a call for a doctor and oxygen. Chatfield and Holloman were revived and taken to the hospital, but Mr. Platt who had been in the void the longest, did not recover.
Authorities at the hospital ascribe asphyxiation as the cause of death.
Mr. Platt, who will he buried in Arlington National Cemetery in Washington, D. C., is survived by his widow, Dorothy, and one child, Paula Ann, age 15 months.

I
Mrs. John R. Platt wishes
to thank everyone for their
assistance and expressions of
sympathy.


4 4


U.


Pretty girls and a flashy car are the universal ingredients for attracting attention and that's just what was employed here to draw attention to the coming Guantanamo Bay Carnival to be held Feb. 19, 20, 21 and 22. The girls are the cheerleadrs from the Naval Base High School. Left to right: Mary Jane McElroy, Irma Pina, Anita Sierra, Sharon Keenan, Pat Fojt and Pat Wormwood. The wee one in the center is the squad's mascot, Karen Halentic. The car? Oh, yes, it's the feature attraction at the carnival.


S


Page Three


-


Signey Kingsley's recent "Lunatics and Lovers" is reputedly 'not vulgar enough to be funny enough."
Guantanamo theater goers, in the immediate future, will be given the opportunity to examine an earlier Kingsley, one who stood Broadway, and the public on its head with a 'slice of life' drama delving with the local color of night court scenes in a metropolitan precinct.
'Righteousness must not be carried to extremes,' a dominant theme in drama since the earliest of Greek tragedies, is engendered in the role of Detective McLeod, an individual whose ramrod tactics would diminish Mike Hammer to an arch angel.
Without diagraming this forthcoming -(March 15) Little Theatre presentation it can only be added that several readings and blockings indicate a cast capable of presenting its message of realism in "Detective Story."
Actor-director Alan Wagner, who will be remembered as Josef in "My Three Angels, is cast as McLeod. Mrs. Evelyn Leach portrays Mary, wife of McLeod whose past is a pivotal point in the entire plot. Tom Judkins, also from "Angels" is Detective Brody, a far diverse role as a hard boiled but sympathetic cop. Fred Green is Joe Feinson, a reporter busily gleaning the seamy side of the news. Freely interspersed among the lower orders of humanity, who sooner or later appear in the police lineup, are pick-pockets, abortionists, embezzlers, and killers, all conspicuous in the cast of 32.
It is readily surmised that the type of decadence, which McLeod stirs up daily 'like garbage with a stick' is presented in purely documentary style, a means to an end, thus escaping the pratfalls escribed to a more recent Kingsley.








THE INDIAN


Mn


Saturday, 29 January 1955


SPORTS ROUND-UP
by Joe Celentano, JO1, USN
(AFPS Sports Writer)
Attention all service basketball units! Be on the lookout for five notorious sharpshooters who call themselves the Rockets. Descripion: They are dangerous, expert shots, tough on the boards, all over six feet, heavily armed and deadly with a basketball.
Leader of the mnob goes by the name of John "Player-Coach Toomay, who did some time at the College of Pacific. He has also done a stretch or two with some professional outfits. In two years his gang working out of Andrews AFB in Washington, D. C., has blasted its way to a 67-10 record This gang is tough; approach with caution.
Latest report from FEAF Hq. in Tokyo has the Yokato AB in first place in the northern division of the AF Japan Basketball Conference. In the southern division the Nagoya AB Comets are on top ... Parris Island's sports publicists David McHam and Bob Hardin have asked some 40 East Coast service sportswriters to select the 10 top service cage teams in the East each week. They will compile the ballots and publish the results. This is the first of several ideas planned to improve relations between eastern service sportswriters. Nice going' ... Middie second-classman John Hopkins a tackle, will captain the 1955 Navy football charges.
Charley Weber, Cherry Point, N: C., gridder, expects to play pro football with the Cleveland Browns after his discharge from the Marine Corps next September ... 2nd Lt. Steve Eisenhauer, AFPS AllStar, will be assigned to Flight Training at the Pensacola Naval Air Station, Fla., after completing a post-grad course on the fundamentals of Marine Corps administration at Quantico, Va.
The Eastern Division Rifle and Pistol Matches for Marine Corps shooters will be held at Camp Lejeune, N. C., in May. Winners in this competition will vie for honors in the All-Marine Rifle and Pistol tourney at Parris Island, S. C., June 6-11.
Sandy Saddler puts his featherweight title on the line for the first time since his discharge from the Army when he meets topranking Teddy "Red Top" Davis in a 15-rounder at Madison Square Garden in New York, Feb. 25. Look for a new champ to be crowned. . . Cpl. Leonard Deutscher, a 6'4" 240-pounder who played freshman football for Michigan State, was named most valuable player of the 1954 Ft. Lewis, Wash., gridiron team . . . Glad to see ex-sailor Gene Littler take top prize money in the recent Los Angeles Open Golf tourney. This is his first major win since turning pro less than 12 months ago.
LTJG Mario Trafeli, a dentist at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center, Ill., failed to place in .the two-mile (32-lap) Silver Skates Invitation Race of Champions at Maidson Square Garden. The former Olympic team member won the speed skating event in 1952 and 1954. The Silver Skates is a charity affair sponsored by the New York Daily News . . . Pittsburgh Pirate farmhand Paul Smith, who played last year with Havana in the International League, expects to enter the Army late in January... Armed Forces candidates have been training for the Pan-American games swimming team at the Treasure Island Naval Station Calif., since Dec. .


Blackbelts Meet At Judo Class


-F


Basketball Schedule

Monday, 31 Jan **
NAS vs NavSta
USHN-Dental vs MCB-4 Tues, 1 Feb
High School vs MCB-4
Leeward Pt vs VU-10 Wed, 2 Feb '"
CHB-1 vs NavSta
FTG vs Marines Tnurs, :1 Feb
High School vs Lwd Pt
NS vs Hosp-Dent Fri, 4 Feb
VU-10 vs Marines CHB-1 vs MCB-4
(Astericks ** denote games to be played at Marine Site court.)



Basketball Standings
(As of Thursday, 27 Jan.)


.. .. .. .. .


Three top judo men, Jim Boller, MUSN, Blackbelt 1st degree, of the USS WISCONSIN, D. C. Hansen, RDC, Blackbelt 1st degree, of Fleet Training Group, and Federico Guardia, Blackbelt 1st degree, instructor of the Judo Club held at the Naval Station Special Services gymnasium, pose for the Indian photographer. The event of having three Blackbelts present during the club's instruction period was the first time that such a rarity has occurred since the club began.



Ladies Golf Shots Route For Pay Bill


by Betty Lou Tipler
On Wednesday the Lady Golfers played the back nine holes with golf balls being given out for the lowest number of putts. Winners were:
1st Flight-1st-tie
Jane MeElory & Sue Scott
2nd-Edna Edwards 2nd Flight-1st-Joy Graves
2nd-tie
Emma Hutton, Helen King &
Dottie Allen
3rd Flight-Jean Vogel
2nd-tie Cynthia Holley
Terrie Lyons
Wednesday was a red letter day for Theresa Moseley as she had a 49 for the first time. Jane McElroy had a 39 on the back nine this past week of which we are all proud.
Due to the 20 new members we recruited at the luncheon last week we now have a 4th flight. There are also new tee-off times which ladies are urged to observe. They are as follows:
1st Flight 7:45 8:05
2nd Flight 8:05 - 8:25
3rd Flight 8:25 - 8:45
4th Flight 8:45 - 9:05

"MelvinMelvin.
"What Ma?"
"Are you spitting in the fish bowl."
"No, Ma, but I'm coming pretty close."

Helen: The contralto sure had a large repertoire.
Gordon: Yes, and her tight dress made it look even worse.

Student: How do two porcupines make love?"
Prof: "Carefully . . . very carefully.


To Become Law Clarified

Washington (AFPS)-Here is the route the new pay bill must follow to become law:
Bill introduced to Congress on Jan. 20.
House Armed Services Subcommittee studies bill and holds hearings.
Subcommittee reports findings to full House Armed Services Committee.
House Armed Services Committee reports findings to House of Representatives, and submits recommendations.
If passed by House, bill is then sent to Senate floor. If not, it is returned to committee.
When passed by Senate, bill goes to President for signature, thus becoming law.
If passed into law the new pay bill can become effective on one of two dates. First pay increase can be realized either at the beginning of the new fiscal year (July 1, 1955), or the first month after bill is enacted into law.


New York State May Give

Bonus To K-Vets In '57

Albany, N. Y. (AFPS)- A bill has been introduced in the New York State legislature here to grant bonuses up to $250 to Korean War veterans.
But officials of the State Veterans Administration pointed out that even if approved, the bonus pay ments would not be paid before Jan. 1, 1957, at the earliest.

"Anchors Aweigh" was written in 1913 by Bandmaster Charles A. Zimmerman and Midshipman Alfred H. Miles of the Naval Academemy.


WON LOST PCT


Naval Station NAS
MCB-4 CHB-1 VU-10
Hospital-Dental Marines Leeward Point High School FTG


6
4
4
3
3
3
2
2
1
0


0
1
1
2
2
3
3
3
4
5


1.000 .800 .800 .600 .600 .500
.400 .400 .200 .000


Plans Begin For

Armed Forces Day

Washington (AFPS)-Secretary of Defense Charles E. Wilson has instructed all major 'Army, Navy and AF commands in the ZI and overseas to begin drawing up plans for the observance of Armed Forces Day-May 21, 1955.
"Power for Peace" again will be the slogan for the day as it was in 1954. Wherever practicable, installations will be thrown open to the public in order to help create better civilian understanding of the Armed Forces' mission.
A joint command - including the Marine Corps and Coast Guard has been established in each of seven geographical areas in the U.S. to coordinate AF Day activities. Each area is to have a project coordinator and, in addition, project officers will be named for each installation.
Overseas, the Armed Forces will be organized for the observance along similar lines.



I'wHT poe; You G44Rt
A GOY 4AVE T MERS
DT O TO 66r ARE ALL WO2MO0TgP AI.JV.&4/
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A 7


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Page Four


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Saturday, 29 January 1955


e


THE INDIAN


Naval Station Indians Remain Undefeated


After Third And Stormy Basketball Week

by Hal Davis
Full scale warfare erupted all along the basketball front this week, and when the smoke had cleared away, a grinning tribe of Naval Station Indians stood astride the blood soaked courts in full and undisputed possession of the first place claim.
Most of the action during the
week was confined to five-man
patrol skirmishes which went, more
or less, according to the Geneva
Convention with a touch of Marquis of Queensbury thrown in for
spice.
The Indians maintained their
undefeated status by whipping
Leeward Point, the Medical combine and a spirited Mallard squad
in that order during the week.
The Mallard game is under protest
and will have to be decided by the
committee.
Indians over Pointers,
Bees over Medics
Closing out last week, the Indians and the Pointers clashed with
the Indians' Slewitzke and Daugherty leading the Braves to a 55 to.
35 victory with 17 and 12 tallies
respectively. In the nightcap the A
MCB-4 squad squeezed out a 46
to 45 win over the Hospital-Dental Hayes lays one in as the Mallard team much to the dissatisfaction top scorer, Houchin (9) attempts of a predominant Hospital crowd. the block during the High School The 'Bees' Glenney racked up 21 - VU-10 game at Marine Site. The for himself while O'Brien came Mallards swamped the Pirates, 72
through with a top of 13 for the to 43. Edgar Heimer of the Pirates Medics. and the League's top basket maker
Flyers over Stevedores stands by for a possiable rebound.
The Naval Air Station Flyers,
who were still undefeated when the ers, 65 to 58. It was "edge-of-the week opened last Monday ambushed seat" game all the way through the Cargo Handling Stevedores to with the Pirates behind by four the tune of 59 to 34 on Saturday points at the half. Heimer, Ewing in a postponed game. Snyder, Flyer and Reffet broke loose in the last forward, knocked off a great 27 period and racked up the margin points while Gerhardt of the Steve- of victory for the schoolers. Heimer dores, off his usual shooting form netted 24 to give him the top scorer and bottled up by Flyers, managed in the league. Gary Ewing unleashonly 18. ed a dazzling offensive display in
Mallards Drop. Pirates, the last quarter that probably turnStevedores Down Trainers ed the tide and gave the Pirates
Monday night the Mallards got their insurance, and poker-faced off to a good start by mounting up Tim Reffet developed uncanny a 72 to 43 score against a sleepy accuracy in the last half after being squad of High School Pirates. stymied in the first part. Houchin led the Mallards with 20 In the nightcap the Flyers fell
points, but Edgar Heimer topped from their undefeated spot at the him with 22 for the school squad. hands of the Bees, 53 to 46 with
In the second game the Steve- the Bees Glenny again leading with dores outplayed an improved Train- 18 markers. Snyder and Ring of the er squad, 56 to 41 with Gerhardt Flyers both dropped 18 also, but the back in form and racking up 27 combination wasn't enough.
points. INDIANS SQUEEZE MALLARDS
Indians Edge Medics, STEVEDORES EDGE MEDICS
Marines Drop Pointers Thusday night, which is the end
Tuesday night the Naval Station of the road for the Indian sports Indians, the Medics, the referees deadline, the undefeated Naval and the spectators all got together Station Indians were the victors, for an exhibition at the Naval Sta- pending the settlement of a Maltion court, and despite the crowd's lard protest, 55 to 49. Jerry Morgan objections the Indians edged the led his squad to victory with 18 Medics, 57 to 52 with Doc Daugh- and Daugherty followed with 15 in erty leading the Braves with 16 what might be Doc's last game for hoops. O'Brian again topped the the League. He's due to leave any Medics with 14. The refs called it day now, and he can be proud of the way they saw it, which is what his athletic achievements while at they're supposed to do, being right Gtmo. One of most sportsmanlike close to the play, and the stands players on the floor or the field, called it the way they saw it from Daugherty always played to win a distance, and the noise from the and played well. He has been high conflicting opinions was so loud you in the standings in all major athcouldn't hear the cries of the letic events on the base. And in wounded or even the final buzzer. this writer's opinion, we'll hear
The Marines came back in the more of Doc and his sports from
second game and dropped the the stateside papers. Pointers, 61 to 40 with Holmes, big In the second game of the night Marine center dropping in 15 points the Stevedores and the Medics clfor the Leathernecks while Howie ashed in a roaring and bloody Woren, the Pointer flash, netted 17. thriller with wounds on both sides
Pirates Edge Trainers about evened up, and the SteveBees Topple Flyers dores finished in front, 38 to 36.
In what was undoubtedly the best Gerhardt led the Cargo-men with game of the week from both a sani- 13 before he was sidelined with a tary and a thrilling standpoint, the nose injury. Paul King dropped High School Pirates broke into the eight of the Medical tallies before win column by defeating the Train- he was also sidelined with an eye


Stevedores Too Much For FTG


The Trainers' Lee goes up in the air to -sink one despite the efforts of the Stevedores' Weller. But the Cargo Handlers' power and accuracy was too much for the trainers and the Stevedores won it, 56 to 41.



CHB-1 Stevedores


Si




THE CARGO HANDLING BATTALION ONE "STEVEDORES." Guantanamo Bay's newest addition to the Naval Base Basketball League. Standing, left to right: Weller, Cagni, Staurt, Geib, Fox, Chetlin. Kneeling Heflin, Neumeister, Gerhardt (coach), Ruschman, Dopp. Two other members of the squad-Seibert and manager Howard were not present for the photo.


Top Ten. Scorers


PLAYER Heimer Gerhardt Snyder Daugherty Morgan Ring Glenney Houchin Woren Moebus


TEAM High School CHB-1 NAS
Naval Station Naval Station NAS
MCB-4 VU-10
Leeward Point Hospital-Dental


injury. Maddox led the Medics with nine. Moebus, usually high on the scoring list, played a goodly portion of the game on his stomach or under the feet of the Stevedores.


GAMES SCORE AVG.


99 95 92 83 81 78 77 75 67 62


16.5 19.0
18.4 13.8 13.5 15.6
15.4 16.2
13.4 10.3


Monday night at Marine Site the Indians meet the Flyers in what could be the "game of the week" If this is basketball-we'll take spinach.


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THE INDIAN


Saturday, 29 January 1955


SPRINGBOARD' Utilizes

GTMO Naval Base

Operation "Springboard," the Atlantic Fleet's annual winter training excerise, has come to Guantanamo Bay. "Springboard," designed to provide maximum training for combatant ships of the fleet, takes advantage of the long periods of fair weather in the Caribbean Sea and uses Guantanamo Bay as one of its main bases for training operations.
While Fleet Training Group and Utility Squadron 10 bear the biggest brunt in training, other base commands and facilities will share in the yearly training operations. Ships will continually enter and leave the operating area and will operate both independently and in groups on flexible schedules coordinated by Commander, Carribbean Sea Frontier, RADM. G. B. H. Hall.
Among the larger warships taking part in "Springboard" are the anti-submarine aircraft carriers VALLEY FORGE and LEYTE, the battleship WISCONSIN, and the cruisers ROANOKE, NEWPORT NEWS, and the SALEM.
Last week three Flag Commanders arrived here on the Naval Base. RADM George R. Cooper, ComBatDiv TWO, arrived Tuseday afternoon and went on board his flagship, WISCONSIN to carry out "Springboard" operations. Wednesday afternoon RADM E. E. Yoemans, Cm Cru Div FOUR, and RADM B. L. Austin, ComCruDiv TWO arrived on the Naval Base. Admiral Yeomans went on board his flagship, the USS SALEM and Admiral Austin went on board his flagship, the USS ROANOKE. The WISCONSIN, SALEM, and ROANOKE have already undergone training operations here.
A typical week of training for "Springboard" includes underway refueling, aircraft interception, air and surface gunnery, shore bomtbardment and anti -submarine tactics.


State Taxes Affect

Some Service Personnel
Under date of 24 November 1953 the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts with the approval of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, published and distributed to all Navy and Marine Corps activities, a Federal income-tax information pamphlet. This pamphlet was designed primarily for service personnel and detailed their rights and liabilities under Federal incometax laws. In addition to the Federal income-tax, certain states, territories, and possession, of the United States have their own income-tax laws under which many service personnel may have liabilities. It should be noted that members of the Armed Forces are not excused from State and local income taxes simply because they are on active duty unless their particular state laws so provide.
Generally, all persons legally resident or domiciled in a State on the last day of a taxable year are liable to the income-tax laws of such State even though not physically present therein during the year. Furthermore, persons are usually liable for income taxes to the State in which they are living or deriving their income as well as to the State in which they are legally resident or domiciled.
A compendium of the salient features of the State, Territorial, and insular possessions of the United States income-tax laws for the calendar year 1954 is at the Information and Education Office, Bay Hill, Barracks No. 4. It primarily indicates the income requirements for filing of returns by residents of States having income-tax laws, the personal exemptions allowed, due dates for filing returns and paying taxes, the State office from which complete details may be obtained, and special provisions, if any, applicable to service personnel. This list is available from 0830 until 1130 and 1300 to 1600 daily, except Saturday and Sunday, for your information.


NAUTILUS, Atomic Sub, Makes First Run


The world's first atom-powered submarine, the USS Nautilus, plows through the waters off Connecticut on her first run. CDR Eugene P. Wilkinson, captain of the submarine, messaged an escort ship, "Underway on nuclear power," as he guided the sub into the Thames River at New London, Conn. A crew of 11 officers and 85 men, most of them technicians, and about 50 civilian experts were aboard the sub for her first 36-hour cruise. Diving tests will be made later. The Nautilus' keel was laid in June 1952. She was christened by Mrs. Eisenhower in January 1954.


90


Naval Base School Adds New Classroom











> ,0
'4


One of the new classroom additions at the Naval Base School begins to take shape. The new classroom is part of a much-neeeded expansion program at the school.


School Officials Review

NayBase School At

PTA Meeting Tuesday

The Parents-Teachers Association will hold their next meeting on Tuesday evening, February 1, at the Naval Base School open air auditorium, commencing at 7:30
Representatives from the Southern Association of College and Seeondary Schools and also members from the Bureau of Personnel will be on hand to give an evaluation report of the Naval Base School here in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
The members of the southern association attending the meeting are, Dr. J. M. Leps of the University of Florida, Dr. Sarah Lou Hammond and Mr. Zollie Maynard, both from Florida State University. Representatives from the Bureau of Personnel are, Mr. George Wilkins, head of overseas Navy dependent schools and CDR. T. J. Moriarty. The membership committee chairman requests that all ward captains contact as many members and prospective members as possible concerning the coming meeting. Attendance prizes will be as before.
Entertainment for the evening will be provided by CAPT. J. B. MacGregor, who will show the second part of a movie taken on a world cruise with vice-president Richard Nixon.



In honor of Admiral and
Mrs. Jerauld Wright, Commander-in-Chief U. S. Atlantic Fleet, Rear Admiral and Mrs. Taylor will be at home, 1600 to 1800, Sunday, 30 January 1955 in lieu of their regular monthly at home the first Sunday in February. All officers and civilians of equivalent rank and wives are cordially invited to attend. Uniform is
dress white.


4---ooo. ---9o4


Guantanamo Bay has been having its "growing pains." With the new housing project nearing completion and another 100 additional units to be built, the population in the housing area has increased considerably. All of this has had the end result of a larger student population at the Naval Base School, which found itself suddenly lacking in classroom space.
An expansion program, however, has begun to take care of the situation. First move was to move the nursery school and lower grades to converted classrooms on Victory Hill. Four of these classrooms are now in use. Then, to make even more room at the school itself, the SeeBees put up one of the new type Hueneme Huts to serve as an extra classroom. Now another is under construction, this one a permanent addition. Besides the new classrooms, construction is now underway for a physical education dressing room adjacent to the new open-air auditorium.



ew Members Set Record

For Legion Membership

Recently initiation of several new members has brought to 53 the total membership of Guantanano Bay Post No. 1 of the American Legion, a new high in Post manpower.
New members include Claude S. Neely, Cecil D. Creel, John W. Jeffers, and Roy L. Sears, military personnel, and John W. Stone and Earl C. Reed, Navy civilian employees.
At the regular meeting last week, Post Commander N.L. Scoop heard reports on Legion activities which included a Christmas dinner dance, contribution of toys and entertainment to children in the hospital at Guantanamo City, and renewal of subscriptions to the Legion Magazine for the Base, School, and Hospital libraries.
Meetings of Post No.1 are held the third Tuesday of each month at 1930, in the Community Hall. Anyone eligible for membership is invited to visit the Post.


PAe Six


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Saturday, 29 January 1955


THE INDIAN


VU-10 Prop Blast
by Jerry Lewis, J03
If it's the sound of aircraft engines you like, take a morning off and visit McCalla Field any weekday. If you don't end up shouting instead of merely speaking in a normal tone throughout the day, you'll be doing fine!
A check with Operations this morning told us that VU-10 is averaging well over 30 flights per day, sometimes as much as 40 per! Last year, during this same period, there were 47 pilots manning the blue-red-and-yellow birds and there were 15 "tractor" or tow-planes doing the job. This year, the pilots number 29 with only 8 tow planes but the schedule being met is exactly the same as '54's. That's really nose-to-grindstone goings-on!
Business is really spreading out too. There'll be a photo detachment of VU-10's in good ol' San Juan, Puerto Rico during the month of February. Many of the "Old Timers" in the Squadron have a soft spot for that wonderful town and always look forward to the opportunity to return to the "Little America" of the Antilles.
Talking about returning, it looks like the Hoys are leaving sunny Gtmo for points North very soon. LT Andy Hoy, soon to be assigned to a Helicopter Squadron (HU-2) at Lakehurst, New Jersey, is leaving for training in the whirly-bird at Pensacola, Fla.
Already detached is "Silky" Wilson PRAN, headed for Fasron9, NAS, Jax, Fla. Arty Meirotto, R. G. White, K. E. Bedell, Airmen, have been assigned to Fasron-5, NAS, Jax, Fla., too. There must be something in this Jax duty that really draws 'em! Anybody care to divulge the information?
Last in the departure section is D.C. Coleman, A03, headed also for Jax but further assignment to that thing called "civilian life". Lot's of luck from the men in the Squadron "Mr." Coleman! Let us know how things look out there when you don the tweeds.
After-hours sounds of hammers and saws around the hangar mean the time is coming for that annual affair, the 1955 Carnival. Look for some new twists in the VU-10 exhibitions this year.
Everything has its artistic points. A few lucky people watched last Monday morning when Leading Chief Mauldin demonstrated the finer points of deck-buffing with the mechanical monster that turns decks into mirrors-or was he reminiscing?


Teenage Round-up
by Linda Thurston
Dust-choked throats and eyes couldn't dampen the spirit or the song from the guys and gals that went on the hayride last evening. With Edwin and Bobbie driving one truck and Pete following in the other, it was a gay party that Mrs. Davis and Mrs. Liveakas had to chaperone. The music was the very best, and the box lunches that Cavvie auctioned off to some frantic guys were real fine specimens. The traditional good time was had by all.
Did ja' see . . . Doris getting dreamy eyed over Dusty . . . . Ed finding it tough to concentrate during English the other A.M. . . . Nita flipping over the autographed pics of one George Walter Reese, III . . . Eunice hobbling around on a bad heel-the result of cavewoman tactics. . . . Neil's Ipana smile . . . Wormie and Phil pass-


Educational Services
Foreign Language Study
by William A. Johnson, PN1
(The first of a series of 4 articles)
The Educational Services Section of the Training Division, Bureau of Naval Personnel, offers probably the finest materials for the acquisition of conversational skill in foregn languages ever developed. Not only are the materials excellent, but also they exist in an extraordinary wide variety of languages-34 of them, in the case of First Level materials. While use of these materials is fairly widespliad in the Navy, it is felt that many people are not well aware of what is available, and that even those who do know is offered would profit by a thorough-going discussion of what the materials are, including the meaning of "First" and "Second" Levels, what they will and will not do, and how to use them to best advantage. Such a discussion is what these articles attempt to provide.
No thinking American needs to be reminded of the importance of a knowledge of foreign languages in these complex times. And certainly no other large group in the United States has more need for languages than the Navy. Since the foreign language equipment of the average American is notoriously slender, the linguistic offerings of the Educational Services Section of the base should be of particular interest to all.
Let's start out with the two different varieties of conversational language materials. What do the expressions "First Level" and "Second Level" indicate? What does each consist of; how should each be used?
FIRST LEVEL
Each First Level set consists of three parts-recordings, Language Guide, and Phrase Book. Except in the case of two or three of the more unusual languages, each set contains two records (four sides) with a total playing time of 16 minutes. It is obvious then, that First Level recordings cannot supply a very profound knowledge of the language in question! For the purposes for which they were intended, however, they are unsurpassed. That purpose is to give the serviceman a quick, accurate knowledge of a very few of the most needed words and phrases of the language of a certain country. The headings of the sections will give an idea of what the record material consists of: Greetings and general phrases; location; direction; numbers; "what's this?"; asking for things; how much; time; and other useful phrases. (Next week we will explain the) (Language Guide and Phrase) (Book, in the meantime if you) (are interested stop in and see) (your Information and Educa-) (tion Officer)

ing notes . . . Pistole, Gary and Howie moving into the Junior homerooms in the mornings . . . The two Lassiters (Barb and Peggy) and their darling little dog at the basketball games. . . . Betty D and Paul S looking happier than most in the past week . . . Dee Dee K having a happy birthday . . . . Dolores R and her handyman, Frank. . . . Jeanne B selling $23 worth of carnival shares last Sunday . . . . Johnny giving out peppermint matches ... Howie seeing strange things on the movie screen . . . Prissy's cute little dog with the big red nose . . . Nancy's pictures. . .


Navy Wives' Club

by Pat Aldridge
The Guantanamo Bay Navy Wives Club, with Chaplin Karl G. Peterson officiating, held their formal installation of officers Thurday evening Jan. 27th in the School Assembly Hall. The solemn candlelight ceremony was attended by many friends of those being installed. An added pleasant note was the unexpected attendance of interested potential members. Although informally attired, the taking of office and full acceptance of each individual responsibility was none the less serious to every new officer. Chaplin Peterson, the club sponsor, seriously charged all who took the oath of office.
Following the ceremony, members and guests adjourned to another part of the Assembly Hall to enjoy a delicious smorgasbord, consisting of a full array of appetit i appealing items prepared by individual members of the Navy Wi\ es Club.
A ,hapte. of the National Navy Wives Ciub, the Guantanamo Bay Navy Wives Club was recently formed

NSD Supply Line

Larry Foote, popular senior civilian supervisor of the Control Division, recently returned from a sixweeks vacation in his homeland, Jamacica.
Joe West, Administrative Assistant, Toastmaster and choir-member has been passing out cigars and flowers in honor of the arrival of Joseph L., III.
Your columnist wishes to extend the Depot's welcome to Mrs. Roger L. Cochran and children, Clara Lee and Roger. We hope you enjoy your stay at Guantanamo Bay.
The transport last week also brought Davis, Devaney, Gheim, Kenney, Nagel, and Wright back from holiday leave in the States. Most prevalent comment on leave in the States - Brrrrrr!
LCDR R. W. Brown has been ordered to duty as Supply and Commissary Officer at the U. S. Naval Retraining Command, Portsmouth, N.H. Together with Mrs. Brown and their children, he will leave via the Johnson on 4 February.



SCUTTLEBUTT



0,0IM. I

















0K


MOSW IGS

by Joe Androvich, USMC
DEPARTURES
Seven members of the Security Section, Marine Barracks, departed for the states this past week for discharge. Those reporting to Norfolk, Virginia, were Cpl Singer, Pfc. Hartley, Pfc. Lanzellotta, Pfc. White, Pvt. McCue. Pvt. Whaley, and Pvt Taylor who also reports to NAS, Jax for discharge.
ARRIVAL
Arriving via FLAW this past Monday was Technical Sergeant Ronald E. Stoneking who joined us from Headquarters Marine Corps, Washington, D. C. TSgt Stoneking is currently attached to the Security Section and all hands wish to exerted a "hearty welcome aboard."
TALENT SHOW
The Talent show originally scheduled for tonight has been cancelled until further notice.
ENLISTED CLUB
A new Board of Governors was recently elected by ballot for the Enlisted Club and the results of the voting are as follows. Members elected were Sgt. McDowell, Cpl. Saunders, Cpl. Plante, Pfc. Drexel, Pfc. Murphy, Pfc. Barone, and Pvt. Glover. Officers who were appointed are TSgt Gradus, president, SSgt. Bushong, Vice-president, and Cpl. Powell, Secretary. All hands are encouraged to submit any recommendations or complaints to their respective representative serving on the board.
BOWLING
The past week produced quite a turmoil in the Marine intra-mural bowling league standings as the Officers, who were idle over the week-end, moved into the number one spot by virtue of a 3 game sweep by the Headquarter team over team #3.
On Monday afternoon team #1 of the Guard Section set a new high 3 game series as they split the pins for a 2225 pin total replacing the previous high of 2178 held by the Officers.
LtCol. Burns moved into the number one spot in the individual averages leading by a slim 1 point margin over Sgt. Amos Rogers with a 155 mark. SSgt. Rausch's 3 game series of 535 still remains intact. The new individual single game high is held by Pfc. Garten at 204.
High individual games during the week were by Don Schreck, 198; Amos Rogers, 189, 182; and Harry Daniels, 194.


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.


STANDINGS
OFFICERS SNCO's HEADQUARTERS Team# 1 Team# 3 Team# 2 Team# 4 Supply
AVERAGES


15 16 16 17
14 10
6
4


BURNS
ROGERS RAUSCH GRADUS
FREDERICKS GARTEN
SWORDS HANDSCHUMACHER


5
8
8
11
14 14 18 16


155
154 153
149 148 147 146 143


: Standings & averages as of Wed. 26 Jan. 55.


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Navy-DPPO--10ND-Gtmo.-0626


THE INDIAN Saturday, 29 January 1955


MOVIES
Saturday, 29 January
PAID TO KILL
Dane Clark Cecil Cheoreau
Clark, a big business man whose business fails, pays someone to "kill" him, later finds out that his wife is trying to murder him and is in love with another man.
Sunday, 30 January ALWAYS A BRIDE
Peggy Cummins Ronald Squire
A drama, mostly in Monte Carlo, of an old swindler and his daughter passing as a young bride for swindling purposes.
Monday, 31 January
BOWERY TO BAGDAD
Leo Gorcey Huntz Hall
The boys find the lost Alladins' magic lamp among the relics in a pawnshop in their neighborhood. The descendants of the original owners are trying to find the lamp; however, the Genii solves the problem.
Tuesday, 1 February KHYBER PATROL
Richard Egan Dawn Addams
Egan, a captain in the British lancers, is relieved of duty and sent by the British civil commissioner to learn the plans of the Agghan prince plotting to capture a shipment of machine guns.
Wednesday, 2 February
KNOCK ON WOOD
Danny Kaye Mai Zeterling
Not knowing two blueprint parts of a new invention that could destroy the world have been stuffed into the heads of his two dummies, an accentric ventriloquist is pursued by spies.
Thursday, 3 February
STARS AND STRIPES FOREVER Clifton Webb Rutth Hussey
Story of John Phillip Sousa and his famous music.


FTG Bulletin
by Ron Federman
On 19 January, Commander Elphege A. Gendreau, USN, rep'rted to FTG, from the USS STEINAKER (DDR 863). CDR. Gendreau was born in Washington, D. C. in 1917. He is the father of five children. CDR. Gendreau attended Danville Military Institute and Fork Union Military Academy in Virginia prior to entering the U. S. Na-v in 1940. During World War II, he served on a fleet oiler and three destroyer escorts, which saw service in the Aleutians, Solomans, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa. The Commander was promoted to his present rank on 1 January 1951. Previously, he commanded the USS FIEBERLING, and the USS OSMOS, both destroyed escorts with the Pacific Fleet. Le also commanded the STIENAKER. He will relieve CDR King as Operations Officer at FTG.
Not only FTG, but the U. S. Navy as a whole suffered a loss on 22 January. J. F. Craven, PMC, and J. B. Meland, ET2, were transferred to NAS, Jacksonville for discharge. The former wa.3 -transferred to Fleet Reserve anil release to inactive duty.
Good luck gentlemeD! If either of you get tired of that "dull" "dismal" civilian life, remember the Navy has a place for experienced men like you. In one of my previous articles, I listed several mei who were advanced in rate, as authorized by a recently published ALNAV. Consequently, I neglected to mention Stewart McKay, who was promoted to YN3 on 1 January. McKay has been assigned to the Operations Department at FTG.
Bowling
The FTG Bowling Team No. 2, leading the league by 1 point, met NSD, the second place team, Monday night. After the pins had cleared, FTG Bowlers have held down first place since the very beginning with a very impressive record of 32 wins and 8 losses. While NSD has proved to be a bitter rival all year, FTG has been just too tough to cope with. Gagliano, EN1, who is one of the top bowlers in the league, was high man for FTG Monday night with a 213. With seven weeks remaining in the schedule, it appears certain that FTG will remain in first place, unless they are besieged by a terrific slump.


Radio's 'Tops' of the Week
SUNDAY, 30 January . . . . HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE . . .
10:00 P.M.
Re-creating her original screen role, Gene Tierney stars in "Laura", the story of a beautiful girl who is believed murdered and thedetective who falls in love with her memory.
MONDAY, 31 January . . . . THEATRE GUILD ON THE AIR . . . . 9:00 P.M.
Rex Harrison and Beatrice Pearson star in "The Beloved Vagabond", A young French architect is blackmailed into leaving his home and his sweetheart and takes to the road to live a Bohemian existence.
TUESDAY, 1 February . . . . THE CHASE . . . . 9:00 P.M.
This new program presents the first in its new series with the tale of a man who is hunted down for a crime he did not commit. Joining in the search, the innocent man helps track the real killer. Replacing ESCAPE. WEDNESDAY, 2 February . . . . PURSUIT . . . . 9:00 P.M. Inspector Peter Black joins in the "Pursuit of the Lonely Heart," the search for the body of the wife of a kindly old man who was accused of murdering her through circumstantial evidence.
THURSDAY, 3 February . . . . FAMILY THEATRE . . . . 9:00 P.M.
George Murphy will be narrator and Jeff Chandler will star in"Clean, Crisp, and Even," a story of a socially ambitious women who wants her daughter to marry a man of wealth until a snow storm gives her a new set of values.
FRIDAY, 4 February . . . . RADIO WORKSHOP . . . . 10:00 P.M. "One Body Too Many" is a murder mystery with a suspenseful twist and a surprise ending. It concerns two people who find that one murder just naturally leads to another.


19


What can you say about a pretty lassie like this when you don't know her name. Of course you could ask for volunteers to go out and solve the mystery. (Just a clue to her whereaboouts-that's a lake behind her, if you can see that far.)


so Air.~


by Francis L. Cannon, J03
REALITIES OF AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY by George F. Kennan
This book is the author's personal philosophy of American foreign policy. He faces the hard facts of Soviet power and expansion, of disunity in the non-communist world, of weaknesses in our own society. He analyzes these conditions and provides a unifying factor which offers a basis for consructive action. The author has gained during his tenure as U. S. Ambassador to the Soviet Union an excellent knowledge of Russia, in 1952.
OUR EVEREST ADVENTURE by Sir John Hunt
A pictoral record of the historic ascent of Mt. Everest in 1953 by the British expedition. The book has great value as an historical document and also as an exciting picture-story. The photographs, of which there are more than 150 depicting the towering peaks and rugged terrain of the Himalayas, are among the best of their kind ever taken. Most of these photographs have not been published before. Included are all the umportant pictures, taken during the final assault and those taken from the summit by Sir Edmund Hillary.
A CLERK OF OXENFORD
by Gilbert Highet
A new collection of essays on literature and life by the author of People, Places and Books. The book is made up of a selection of his radio talks, revised and enlarged upon by the author .He is one of those people who can talk



*9


on a wide range of subjects and cause unflagging interest in the subject at hand. The book is in three main divisions: The Arts of Prose, Poetry and Poets and Imagination and Reality. He talks on many things, from the history of chess to conversations with a philosopher.
THE STORY OF MAN
by Carleton S. Coon
study of the human species and the way it has lived from ape man to atomic age. It reveals to the layman the immense new knowledge of the distant past which scientists have garnered since the war. The story of man begins some 50,000 years ago when his biological evolution virtually halted because cultural evolution-the use of fire and tool-took its place and protected man from the elements of nature. The whole is a fasinating account of how we became what we are.
THE LAUGHTON STORY
by Kurt Singer
In this biography the author sidesteps filmdom gossip to portray one of the greatest actors of our time, Charles Laughton. His theatrical genius is traced from his first appearances on the London stage when he was a student at the Royal Academy. He married Elsa Lanchester, came to America and won wide acclaim for his performances in "Sign of the Cross', "Mutiny on the Bounty" and the "Paradine Case", among many others. The author is convinced that Laughton can revitalize the American theatre with work such as he has been doing with his First Drama Quartet, "Don Juan in Hell", for example.

The famed Sherlock Holmes arrived on the scene of a crime and said,"Why-this is more serious than I expected. This window has been broken from both sides."




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---0e -"oes gTMO Like .The Sunski ne" U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Electricians give the new automatic washing machines a final checkover before the opening of the Navy Exchange Laundromat, scheduled for Tuesday, 1 February. The new laundromat will be open to all base personnel and their dependents. Navy Exchange Laundromat Opens Tuesday Another addition will be made to the Navy Exchange facilities on the Naval Base Tuesday morning when Mrs. F. J. Peteler, RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, CAPT. G. M. Holley, Chief of Staff, CAPT W. R. Caruthers, and LCDR E. H. Beiland, Navy Exchange Officer will officially open the new Navy Exchange Launromat. The new laundry service is the result of a suggestion made by Mrs. Peteler. Located behind the Navy Exchange Laundry, the Laundromat will be open five and a half days a week for anyone caring to do a laundry. Primarily, the laundromat was designed for use by enlisted personnel who have only a few uniforms to wash and who do not care to pay the monthly charge at the main laundry. However, no restrictions have been placed on the Laundromat and anyone may do their laundry. The new Laundromat, equipped with 24 coin operated automatic washing machines, one extractor and two driers, will be open from 0900 to 1800 Monday through Friday and from 0800 to 1200 on Saturday mornings. To facilitate faster service and insure that machines will not be overloaded, two attendants will weigh in laundry, issue soap, bleach or detergent at a minimum fee and make change for the coin operated machines. Only Navy Exchange soap will be used, which will eliminate overloading with soap and costly repairs to the machines. Laundry-15 cents (9 lbs. max). Soap-5 cents Bleach-S cents Detergent-5 cents Extracting-10 cents Tumbler Drying-10cents March of Dimes Drive Closes Next Week Only three days remaining for the 1955 March of Dimes campaign. Servicemen's support against polio has been overwhelming in the past, and now that scientists and medical men are on the verge of conquering the dread disease, the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis looks forward this year to substantial contributions from American service men. Admiral J.H. Cassady, commander of U.S. Navy units in the Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean, .said, "It is my sincere wish that service men and women the world over will show their warmhearted generosity to the 1955 March of Dimes." Rear Admiral G.B.H. Hall, Commandant, 10th Naval District, adds his support with, "Only through the widest public support can we combat this dreaded disease. The Dimes must March if we are to defeat polio." Collection containers have been placed at the Exchanges and at various other points around the Naval Base. Make your contribution. You can afford ten cents. You can't afford not to! CONGRESS PROPOSES OVERSEAS PAY HIKE A bill to increase foreign duty and sea pay for enlisted men to more than three times the present amount has been introducted by Rep. Victor Wickersham (D-Okla). The measure, HR 222 would give the increased pay to EM at sea or on duty any place outside the continential U. S. Saturday, 29 January 1955 Proposed Pay Bill Goes To Congress Raises Some Officers 25%, EM's 17% Washington (AFPS)-The Defense Department has sent to Congress legislation which proposes substantial pay increases for members of the Armed Forces. Provisions of the new bill call Service-Wide P Examsas hi as Servce-idePO Eams 251pes centefor lsome officershand Slated17 percent for some enlisted men. Now in the House Armed ServSlatd fo Febuaryices Subcommittee, the $729.7 milThe next semi-annual servicelion pay bill, known as the Cawide competitive examination for reer Incentive Act of 1955," is advancement in rating will be held aimed at making military careers during the month of February here more attractive to trained peron the Naval Base in Guantanamo sonnel. Bay. Only those nominated for adRep. Paul Kilday (D-Tex.) vancement last October by their dichairman of the subcommittee vision officers, department heads 00 pay, told Armed Forces Press or officers-in-charge are eligible. Service he was "very optimistic Tho e candidates not qualified for that the military pay increase advancemei t upon nomination will will be passed by Congress," and be exempted from participating in that his efforts will be "to exthe examination. pedite the pay bill as much as The first examination to be held possible." Rep. Kilday's group expects to will be for Pay Grade E-7 (Chief begin hearings on the bill in the Petty Officer) on Tuesday, Febnear future. However, any formal ruary 1, 1955. Pay Grade E-4 (P03) action by the full House Armed will be held on Tuesday February Services Committee must wait 8; Pay Grade E-5 (P02) Tuesday, until An: t,, draft extension boy February 15 and Pay Grade E-6 and new reserve legislation are (P01) on Wednesday, February 23. resolved. The draft law expires July 1, and is the committee's first Villamar-Bargo Council Among enlisted men, a sergeant (E-5) with more than Plans Picnic Park eight years' service would get the highest percentage raise. His pay would go up 17.35 percent to a total of $179.40 per month. a A Pfc. (E-3) with over three years' service would collect $7.80 more bringing his total earnings up to $101.40 per month, and an siteE-7 with over 12 years' service would realize a hike of 11.61 perecent or $28.39, increasing his total cr earnings to $273.00 monthly. a i. PThe largest dollar increase aroadwould go to officers of twostar rank major generals and rear spt m padmirals-with more than 35 years' service. They would get a $145 a month raise for a total monthly salary of $1,138.80. Percent wise a second lieutenant with over three years' service rates among the highest. e would be increased 25 percent for a rise eof $59.28 per month or a total of lon $296.40 per month. ree In the warrant officer grades a W-1 with over 12 years' service would stand to gain 22.48 percent Mr. J. 1R. Yost, Mayor of the for a increase of $56.12 per month oilatar-posbrgoctofr Association, points with total monthly pay amounting out aServsibleelocatito $305.80. three barbecue pits to CAPT. W.increase R. Caruthers, Commanding Officathens percenag litnrase cfor cer, Naval Station, at the selected captain s, aors, bCngaesnt anlo nel s ndfortnes rangesbeltoe site for a family picnic park. The way from 5.26 percent to 14.04 the Villanoar-Bargo Council, is inAn amendment to the Career caied across from the Little LeagCompensation Act written into the ue Ball Diamond, adjacent to Grannew pay bill makes allowance for adillo Point. Plans call for three fr barbecue pits, three picnic tables a a.I asi at .as may be approved by the Secretary concerned, a member of and installed to begin with, and if a uniformed service whose dependthe park proves to be a popular ents move in connection with his spot, more picnic facilities will be added. (Continued on Page Three) Vol. VII, No. 4 lie 4

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S NAS Crosswinds Hospital Notes The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 29 January 1955 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sandness -Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC ---Editor H. L. Sisson, J3L ---News F. L. Cannon, J3 -Photographer D. C. Roberts, JOSN -Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. What's Doia' Stateside Overseas air mail to Europe and the Far East may eventually be carried by guided missiles reaching their destinations in three or four hours. ..The annual convention of the U.S. Parcel Post Assn. was told recently in Chicago that a few experiments aiming toward this have already been carried out ...The mail-carrying missiles would be guided by radio ...So far, the main stumbling block is cost. A grant of $20 million has been made by John D. Rockefeller Jr. to "strengthen and develop" Protestant theological education in the U.S. ..It's believed to be the largest contribution ever made exclusively for religious education. A Massachusetts manufacturer claims to have taken the guesswork out of fishing ...He has marketed an electronic "fathometer," telling fisherman where the deep water and the biggest fish are to be found ...It's a rowboat version of a WWII device used to locate submarines ...But there's a catch to it, in addition to the fish ...The civilian model costs nearly $1200. That old American standby, the family budget, appears to be on its way out ...According to a recent survey, fewer families keep written budgets nowadays Intead, they divide the family income in an informal way on the basis of the members' feeling of how it should be spent ...At the same time, more and more families are, in effect, having their budgets done for them by such means as installment buying, life insurance ownership, and Christmas clubs. Since 1900, the U.S. standard of living has doubled, says a University of Chicago report This is true even though inflation has caused the purchasing power of the dollar to shrink ...One big reason for the improved living standard is the fact that a modern worker is able to produce by DICK FRIZ Who's Who at NAS Melvin H. Davey, AGC, Aerology Department. Chief Davey arrives via Glen View NAS, Illinois, and already has stated an affinity for balmy Caribbean breezes, as opposed to chilly Lake Michigan blasts. Davey became a chief in '43, ten years after he enlisted in Uncle's club in '33. He has been active in microseismic research (earthquakes to us.) He has assisted in establishing stations of that type in Iwo Jima and other Pacific isles. Incidentally, Chief Davey once served as scout master over another 'weather-bird', Chief Whittemore. Davey's wife and children hope to join him here soon. The Eternal Question As Congress meditates over just how much generosity they will extend to their military nephews, NAS residents contemplate the pros and cons of re-upping. John Page, AC2 has already made up his mind and will make the control tower his permanent point of operation. "Working up there, is the most desirable job I've ever had," says Page. Meanwhile, Walt Covell pulled a fast one on us. Walt was discharged just in time to see his beloved Giants take the Series, and then join the Air Force! Swaying like a Piper Cub caught in McCalla's famous cross-currents, is Don Emory, YN2 of Personnel. Months ago, Don expressed his desire to enter the wholesale liquor business. Then when advanced in rate, recently, he decided on radio and television repair work. But more advanced chats with Don indicate a long naval career. Perhaps old Horace pin-pointed it back there in 65 B.C. when he said, ". ..each contentedly practice the trade he understands." Love's Labor Lost Months of constant perusal in Spanish texts, almost, but not quite, paid off for a local sailor recently. Dressed in a straw hat and dungarees, and wining with a local senorita, he all but had an SP convinced he was Cuban. Que lastima! The quick thinking of Jim Morley, Leeward Air Controlman, prevented a weels-up landing by one of the squadron jets last week. The pilot was so greatful, he presented Jim with a box of cigars. Ed Buchwalter, AO3, formerly billeted here, and erstwhile hog caller from the fallow lands of central Ohio, had an opportunity to exercise that notorious larynx recently. Taking leave from the Med cruising USS LAKE CHAMPLAIN, Buck tried some alpine yodeling in the alps, with highly profitable results. Herclues, giant humpbacked bird of the VR-1 squadron out of Pax River, was the last Constellation to pay its respects G'tmo way for awhile. VR-1 is pulling in their Connies for a recheck, following two disasterous accidents in the Atlantic this past few months. The NAS Flyers and Leeward Point quintette each stand to lose three men from their squads in the next few weeks. NAS will lose Dennis Lyons and Bob Sisk through discharge and Charlie Pettigrew becomes the secretary of the bowling league. Chief Shaheen's Pointers will be blunted by losses of Hal Chapman, Brad Hutt, and Bronko Bladies. as much in 23 minutes as a turnof-the-century worker did in an hour. PAke Two St S Saturday, 29 January 1955 'THE INDIAN Heiport News Five boys and four girls are added to the Gtmo Birth Parade. The stork introduced to HMC and Mrs. Beauford Davis a Girl, Deborah Alice. The chief is leading P.O. in our X-Ray department. It is a boy, George Jr., to EN2 and Mrs. Beatrice Bergen. Also, Joseph Santos to Mr. Joe and Mrs. Plinia West; Sharon Faye to SN and Mrs. Loretta Knapp; Ronald Vincente to SD2 and Mrs. Mattie Williams; Deborah Kay whose parents are Yl2 and Mrs. Barbara Horton; Kathleen Marie to ET2 and Mrs. Carole Julian; Michael Baron to RM1 and Mrs. Delores Watts; and Phillip Alan to AB1 and Mrs. Layonia Myers. Arrivals Welcome to our most recent arrivals, namely: HM1 Bob Hill, an operating room technician, who reports to U.S. from NavHosp, Charleston, S.C.; HM Bob Kessler whose last duty was aboard the USS Whitley; HN Angelo Clements reported from NavHosp, Philadelphia, Pa. "Clem" is a neuropsychiatry technician. Our latest newcomer is malariology tech HM3 Henry Kein who reports to our sanitation department. Kein served at the Naval Communications Station in San Juan prior to his arrival in Cuba. Departures HMC T.G. Byrne, for two and a half years a noted figure at Gtmo departed with his wife and daughter via the Goethals to New York. From New York Chief Byrne will motor cross country to his new duty station, Radiological Defense Laboratory, San Francisco, Calif; there he will terminate his naval career when he completes twenty years in 1956. "T.G." played a great role in boosting this commands athletic and recreational programs. Aside from his enthusiasm in golf, he coached our 1954 basketball team, leading them to a winning season. HMC Byrne was supervisor of the medical storeroom here. Another freshman first class petty officer chooses civilian life. He is HM1 Bob George who flew to Jax for seperation. Bob advanced to the E-6 pay grade in less than four years, but even that couldn't tempt him toward a promising naval career. Bob was also an active golfer. He stroked the white pellet in the low 80's and participated in many of the base tournemants. George intends to transfer his Pharmacy curriculum to a course in furniture manufacturing upon his return to civilian life. His entire cruise at Gtmo was spent in the EENT Clinic. Two Nurses, Three Doctors, Promoted to LCDR The two ladies at the hospital sporting the two-and-a-half strips are LCDR Tekla Gavelek, our chief nurse and LCDR Olive Wilkinson, dependents' service nursing supervisor. Lieutenants Hering, Moschella and Grady, all medical officers, have received their notification of appointment to lieutenant commander and will be donning the gold maple-leaf in the near future. Sidelights Several people have been asking when the next staff party will be held since we haven't had one in several months. Plans are underway to request one, and the party will probably be scheduled for February .....It's fine fishing at the fresh water river, just ask Bill Dryer and Bob Edmunds .Preparations are being made for the coming carnival; let us all help out and contribute towards a vital cause. Sunday 30 January 1955 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday. 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1700-1800; 19002000, and daily before mass. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner On the plaster wall of a cloister in Milan, Italy there is a very wellknown picture. Leonardo da Vinci painted "The Last Supper," a scene where Christ and His twelve disciples were eating together for the last time before Crucifixion. One legend about this picture tells a lesson difficult to forget. For many weeks da Vinci worked with a tireless brush until the picture was almost completed. But the face of Christ and Judas were still missing. After a long search da Vinci finally found in Rome a young man with a face which reflected the patience and strength of the Savior. He quickly sketched the face of Jesus from this model. But the face of Judas was still missing, so for fourteen years da Vinci searched in many cities of Italy for a face which would reflect the deceit and evil of a Judas. Finally, by the city wall of Florence he found a beggar who bore all the scars of life blasted by sin. Drunkenness, immorality, shame, filth, all left their telling marks. With a few quick strokes of the paint brush the face of Judas became part of the picture. It was then that the beggar asked da Vinci in a low voice: "You do not know me? I am Bendinelli. From my face you painted the face of Jesus fourteen years ago." What a pathetic picture of a wasted life, wretched ideals, and a shameful past! What about our lives in the military service? Will they reflect the tragedy of trying to live without God? We know that a background of a Christian home and God fearing parents will not cover our own neglect and shame. A Christ-like face can quickly be distorted in a most disgusting manner. If only God can heal and forgive, why hesitate to follow His course of direction and guidance? J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN

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m Saturlay, 29 January 1955 Base Dogs Get Rabies Shots One Dead, Two Hospitalized Little Theatre Preps In Barge Inspection Tragedy For March 15 Opening The poor pooch in the picture doesn't seem to think much of the idea of getting his rabies shot, but over 60 residents of the housing area turned out at the Villamar Lyceum last week to get their pets innoculated The mass-innoculation was arranged by the Villamar-Bargo Council, and with the response received, it is planned to have the veterinarian, Henry Barnes, on hand periodically for future innoculations. Air Operations Take Heavy Accident Toll by Dick Friz After a series of three mishaps involving flight operations at Guantanamo Bay in the past week, providence or fate (call it what you may) did reverse itself, on Thursday morning 20 Jan. At 0825, with the sun still low in the Carribean skies, Ens. Dwyer of VF-22 bailed out of his F2H2 Banshee, approximately 15 miles south of Leeward Point. His wingman, MAJ 102 reported the ejection and notified McCalla that Dwyer entered his raft some 14 minutes later. SAR units were alerted immediately; UR-49 (from the Albany) flown by Chief Charlie Ellis, and the UF-1 (Station 904) piloted by LT's Gene Ordway, and Paul Seiber, joined a HUP from the USS INTREPID in the search and the carrier HUP rescued Dwyer 27 minutes following his high altitude exodus. He was dispatched safely to the carrier. McCalla's control tower commented that MAJ 102's concise, reporting of the emergency, "was one of the best we've ever had. "' Not so fortunate was CDR. Richard L. Cevoli, Skipper of VF73, a visiting Leeward squadron. CDR Cevoli was taking off from NAS Jacksonville, Tuesday, prior to rejoining his group, when his plane nosed into the ground, exploding in flames, and scattering debris in a one mile wooded area. At 0825, 12 January, ENS. Horace E. Bryson of VF-73 was engaged in a four plane line tactic near Santiago. Pilot Bryson lost sight of plane three and pulled up beneath it, losing most of his tail section. Pilot Russo, in the other jet, ejected in time, but Bryson went down into the sea. HUP's from the ALBANY and BALTIMORE joined in a fruitless search. On Saturday, 15 January, Leon R. Tuttle, AM3, of Attack Squadron 45, fell from a tractor outside McCalla Field Hanger, and fractured a vertebrae. He died at Naval Base Hospital at 11:20 that morning. THE MARCH OF DIMES This is the final week for vol-I untary contributions to the Na-! tional Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. There should be noneed for a heart rending appeal.! Every one of us knows the wonderful work that has been done= by the Foundation in treating! victims of polio and in research to find preventative drugs and more effective treatment. The records are open to all. There are those upon this Station who can testify to the wondeful work of the Foundation. It is a disease that is no discerner of persons. 17.1 percent of the cases to date who have received assistance have been service' connected personnel. The contribution cans are out. HAVE YOU 'MADE A CONTRIBUTION? (Continued from Page One) permanent change of station is entitled to a dislocation allowance equal to his monthly basic allowance for quarters. However, the member is entitled to only one payment of a dislocation allowance for a PCS." Another amendment to the Career Compensation Act substantialy changes and raises incentive and hazardous duty pay. Enlisted men would receive $50.00 to $105.00 monthly for hazardously duty depending on longevity and rank. Officers' hazardous duty pay ranges from $100.00 to $245.00 monthly, also depending on longevity and rank. If enacted, the new pay bill would carry out the general proposals of President Eisenhower in his special message to Congress on Jan. 13. The President said then that it cost $3200 to put a man through basic training and up to $120,000 to train a jet pilot. The President said both officers and enlisted men should be encouraged to remain in the service so the government could realize something on this costly education. Chief Carpenter John R. Platt died and two others were hospitalized as a result of asphyxiation last week during a materiel inspection of an unused barge. The tragedy ocurred last Saturday morning when Mr. Platt, accompanied by Charles H. Chatfield, ENC, and David K. Holloman, EN1, all assigned to Ships Department, boarded the YFN 309 tied up at anchorage "DD-7" off the Bargo shore for a preliminary check prior to its annual inspection. Mr. Flatt, intending to make a visual inspection from the ladder, descended into a void in the barge and was overcome from lack of oxygen. Chatfield and Holloman were also overcome when they went to his assistance. LT Robert E. Peacock, in charge of the inspection party, along with other members of the party arrived at the scene and succeeded in pulling the three men from the void. Artificial respiration was applied immediately, and the Naval Hospital responded to a call for a doctor and oxygen. Chatfield and Holloman were revived and taken to the hospital, but Mr. Platt who had been in the void the longest, did not recover. Authorities at the hospital ascribe asphyxiation as the cause of death. Mr. Platt, who will be buried in Arlington National Cemetery in Washington, D. C., is survived by his widow, Dorothy, and one child, Paula Ann, age 15 months. Mrs. John R. Platt wishes to thank everyone for their assistance and expressions of sympathy. Signey Kingsley's recent "Lunatics and Lovers" is reputedly 'not vulgar enough to be funny enough." Guantanamo theater goers, in the immediate future, will be given the opportunity to examine an earlier Kingsley, one who stood Broadway, and the public on its head with a 'slice of life' drama delving with the local color of night court scenes in a metropolitan precinct. 'Righteousness must not be carried to extremes,' a dominant theme in drama since the earliest of Greek tragedies, is engendered in the role of Detective McLeod, an individual whose ramrod tactics would diminish Mike Hammer to an arch angel. Without diagraming this forthcoming (March 15) Little Theatre presentation it can only be added that several readings and blockings indicate a cast capable of presenting its message of realism in "Detective Story." Actor-director Alan Wagner, who will be remembered as Josef in "My Three Angels, is cast as McLeod. Mrs. Evelyn Leach portrays Mary, wife of McLeod whose past is a pivotal point in the entire plot. Tom Judkins, also from "Angels" is Detective Brody, a far diverse role as a hard boiled but sympathetic cop. Fred Green is Joe Feinson, a reporter busily gleaning the seamy side of the news. Freely intersperced among the lower orders of humanity, who sooner or later appear in the police lineup, are pick-pockets, abortionists, embezzlers, and killers, all conspicuous in the cast of 32. It is readily surmised that the type of decadence, which McLeod stirs up daily 'like garbage with a stick' is presented in purely documentary style, a means to an end, thus escaping the pratfalls escribed to a more recent Kingsley. Pretty girls and a flashy car are the universal ingredients for attracting attention and that's just what was employed here to draw attention to the coming Guantanamo Bay Carnival to be held Feb. 19, 20, 21 and 22. The girls are the cheerleadrs from the Naval Base High School. Left to right: Mary Jane McElroy, Irma Pina, Anita Sierra, Sharon Keenan, Pat Fojt and Pat Wormwood. The wee one in the center is the squad's mascot, Karen Halentic. The car? Oh, yes, it's the feature attraction at the carnival. m M THE INDIAN Page Three

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m Pagd Four Saturday, 29 January 1955 SPORTS ROUND-UP by Joe Celentano, J01, USN (AFPS Sports Writer) Attention all service basketball units! Be on the lookout for five notorious sharpshooters who call themselves the Rockets. Descripion: They are dangerous, expert shots, tough on the boards, all over six feet, heavily armed and deadly with a basketball. Leader of the mob goes by the name of John "Player-Coach Toomay, who did some time at the College of Pacific. He has also done a stretch or two with some professional outfits. In two years his gang working out of Andrews AFB in Washington, D. C., has blasted its way to a 67-10 record This gang is tough; approach with caution. Latest report from FEAF Hq. in Tokyo has the Yokato AB in first place in the northern division of the AF Japan Basketball Conference. In the southern division the Nagoya AB Comets are on top Parris Island's sports publicists David McHam and Bob Hardin have asked some 40 East Coast service sportswriters to select the 10 top service cage teams in the East each week. They will compile the ballots and publish the results. This is the first of several ideas planned to improve relations between eastern service sportswriters. Nice going' .Middie second-classman John Hopkins a tackle, will captain the 1955 Navy football charges. Charley Weber, Cherry Point, N. C., gridder, expects to play pro football with the Cleveland Browns after his discharge from the Marine Corps next September .2nd Lt. Steve Eisenhauer, AFPS AllStar, will be assigned to Flight Training at the Pensacola Naval Air Station, Fla., after completing a post-grad course on the fundamentals of Marine Corps administration at Quantico, Va. The Eastern Division Rifle and Pistol Matches for Marine Corps shooters will be held at Camp Lejeune, N. C., in May. Winners in this competition will vie for honors in the All-Marine Rifle and Pistol tourney at Parris Island, S. C., June 6-11. Sandy Saddler puts his featherweight title on the line for the first time since his discharge from the Army when he meets topranking Teddy "Red Top" Davis in a 15-rounder at Madison Square Garden in New York, Feb. 25. Look for a new champ to be crowned. Cpl. Leonard Deutscher, a 6'4" 240-pounder who played freshman football for Michigan State, was named most valuable player of the 1954 Ft. Lewis, Wash., gridiron team ...Glad to see ex-sailor Gene Littler take top prize money in the recent Los Angeles Open Golf tourney. This is his first major win since turning pro less than 12 months ago. LTJG Mario Trafeli, a dentist at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center, Ill., failed to place in .the two-mile (32-lap) Silver Skates Invitation Race of Champions at Maidson Square Garden. The former Olympic team member won the speed skating event in 1952 and 1954. The Silver Skates is a charity affair sponsored by the New York Daily News ...Pittsburgh Pirate farmhand Paul Smith, who played last year with Havana in the International League, expects to enter the Army late in January. Armed Forces candidates have been training for the Pan-American games swimming team at the Treasure Island Naval Station Calif., since Dec. Blackbelts Meet At Judo Class Basketball Schedule Monday, 31 Jan ** NAS vs NavSta USHN-Dental vs MCB-4 Tues, 1 Feb High School vs MCB-4 Leeward Pt vs VU-10 Wed, 2 Feb CHB-1 vs NavSta FTG vs Marines Thurs, 3 Feb High School vs Lwd Pt NS vs Hosp-Dent Fri, 4 Feb VU-10 vs Marines CHB-1 vs MCB-4 (Astericks **1 denote games to be played at Marine Site court.) Basketball Standings (As of Thursday, 27 Jan.) TEAM Three top judo men, Jim Boller, MUSN, Blackbelt 1st degree, of the USS WISCONSIN, D. C. Hansen, RDC, Blackbelt 1st degree, of Fleet Training Group, and Federico Guardia, Blackbelt 1st degree, instructor of the Judo Club held at the Naval Station Special Services gymnasium, pose for the Indian photographer. The event of having three Blackbelts present during the club's instruction period was the first time that such a rarity has occurred since the club began. Ladies Golf Shots Route For Pay Bill by Betty Lou Tipler On Wednesday the Lady Golfers played the back nine holes with golf balls being given out for the lowest number of putts. Winners were: 1st Flight-1st-tie Jane McElory & Sue Scott 2nd-Edna Edwards 2nd Flight-1st-Joy Graves 2nd-tie Emma Hutton, Helen King & Dottie Allen 3rd Flight-Jean Vogel 2nd-tie Cynthia Holley Terrie Lyons Wednesday was a red letter day for Theresa Moseley as she had a 49 for the first time. Jane McElroy had a 39 on the back nine this past week of which we are all proud. Due to the 20 new members we recruited at the luncheon last week we now have a 4th flight. There are also new tee-off times which ladies are urged to observe. They are as follows: 1st Flight 7:45 8:05 2nd Flight 8:05 -8:25 3rd Flight 8:25 -8:45 4th Flight 8:45 -9:05 "MelvinMelvin. ... "What Ma?" "Are you spitting in the fish bowl." "No, Ma, but I'm coming pretty close." Helen: The contralto sure had a large repertoire. Gordon: Yes, and her tight dress made it look even worse. Student: How do two porcupines make love?" Prof: "Carefully ...very carefully. To Become Law Clarified Washington (AFPS)-Here is the route the new pay bill must follow to become law: Bill introduced to Congress on Jan. 20. House Armed Services Subcommittee studies bill and holds hearings. Subcommittee reports findings to full House Armed Services Committee. House Armed Services Committee reports findings to House of Representatives, and submits recommendations. If passed by House, bill is then sent to Senate floor. If not, it is returned to committee. When passed by Senate, bill goes to President for signature, thus becoming law. If passed into law the new pay bill can become effective on one of two dates. First pay increase can be realized either at the beginning of the new fiscal year (July 1, 1955), or the first month after bill is enacted into law. New York State May Give Bonus To K-Vets In '57 Albany, N. Y. (AFPS)A bill has been introduced in the New York State legislature here to grant bonuses up to $250 to Korean War veterans. But officials of the State Veterans Administration pointed out that even if approved, the bonus pay ments would not be paid before Jan. 1, 1957, at the earliest. "Anchors Aweigh" was written in 1913 by Bandmaster Charles A. Zimmerman and Midshipman Alfred H. Miles of the Naval Academemy. WON LOST PCT Naval Station 6 0 NAS 4 1 MCB-4 4 1 CHB-1 3 2 VU-10 3 2 Hospital-Dental 3 3 Marines 2 3 Leeward Point 2 3 High School 1 4 FTG 0 5 1.000 .800 .800 .600 .600 .500 .400 .400 .200 .000 Plans Begin For Armed Forces Day Washington (AFPS)-Secretary of Defense Charles E. Wilson has instructed all major Army, Navy and AF commands in the ZI and overseas to begin drawing up plans for the observance of Armed Forces Day-May 21, 1955. "Power for Peace" again will be the slogan for the day as it was in 1954. Wherever practicable, installations will be thrown open to the public in order to help create better civilian understanding of the Armed Forces' mission. A joint command -including the Marine Corps and Coast Guard has been established in .each of seven geographical areas in the U.S. to coordinate AF Day activities. Each area is to have a project coordinator and, in addition, project officers will be named for each installation. Overseas, the Armed Forces will be organized for the observance along similar lines. WvHKT POwES You GM4OR7 A GUV HAVE TIMEZ3S DO TOET7 ARE ALL t ( THE INDIAN M

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M Saturday, 29 January 1955 M a Page Five Naval Station Indians Remain Undefeated After Third And Stormy Basketball Week by Hal Davis Full scale warfare erupted all along the basketball front this week, and when the smoke had cleared away, a grinning tribe of Naval Station Indians stood astride the blood soaked courts in full and undisputed possession of the first place claim. Most of the action during the week was confined to five-man patrol skirmishes which went, more or less, according to the Geneva Convention with a touch of Marquis of Queensbury thrown in for spice. The Indians maintained their undefeated status by whipping Leeward Point, the Medical combine and a spirited Mallard squad in that order during the week. The Mallard game is under protest and will have to be decided by the committee. Indians over Pointers, M Bees over Medics Closing out last week, the Indians and the Pointers clashed with the Indians' Slewitzke and Daugherty leading the Braves to a 55 to 35 victory with 17 and 12 tallies respectively. In the nightcap the ,,. MCB-4 squad squeezed out a 46 to 45 win over the Hospital-Dental Hayes lays one in as the Mallard team much to the dissatisfaction top scorer, Houchin (9) attempts of a predominant Hospital crowd. the block during the High School The 'Bees' Glenney racked up 21 VU-10 game at Marine Site. The for himself while O'Brien came Mallards swamped the Pirates, 72 through with a top of 13 for the to 43. Edgar Heimer of the Pirates Medics. and the League's top basket maker Flyers over Stevedores stands by for a possible rebound. The Naval Air Station Flyers, who were still undefeated when the ers, 65 to 58. It was "edge-of-the week opened last Monday ambushed seat" game all the way through the Cargo Handling Stevedores to with the Pirates behind by four the tune of 59 to 34 on Saturday points at the half. Heimer, Ewing in a postponed game. Snyder, Flyer and Reffet broke loose in the last forward, knocked off a great 27 period and racked up the margin points while Gerhardt of the Steveof victory for the schooners. Heimer dores, off his usual shooting form netted 24 to give him the top scorer and bottled up by Flyers, managed in the league. Gary Ewing unleashonly 18. ed a dazzling offensive display in Mallards Drop, Pirates, the last quarter that probably turnStevedores Down Trainers ed the tide and gave the Pirates Monday night the Mallards got their insurance, and poker-faced off to a good start by mounting up Tim Reffet developed uncanny a 72 to 43 score against a sleepy accuracy in the last half after being squad of High School Pirates. stymied in the first part. Houchin led the Mallards with 20 in the nightcap the Flyers fell points, but Edgar Heimer topped from their undefeated spot at the him with 22 for the school squad. hands of the Bees, 53 to 46 with In the second game the Stevethe Bees Glenny again leading with dores outplayed an improved Train18 markers. Snyder and Ring of the er squad, 56 to 41 with Gerhardt Flyers both dropped 18 also, hut the back in form and racking up 27 combination wasn't enough. points. INDIANS SQUEEZE MALLARDS Indians Edge Medics, STEVEDORES EDGE MEDICS Marines Drop Pointers Thusday night, which is the end Tuesday night the Naval Station of the road for the Indian sports Indians, the Medics, the referees deadline, the undefeated Naval and the spectators all got together Station Indians were the victors, for an exhibition at the Naval Stapending the settlement of a Maltion court, and despite the crowd's lard protest, 55 to 49. Jerry Morgan objections the Indians edged the -led his squad to victory with 18 Medics, 57 to 52 with Doc Daughand Daugherty followed with 15 in erty leading the Braves with 16 what might be Doc's last game for hoops. O'Brian again topped the the League. He's due to leave any Medics with 14. The refs called it day now, and he can be proud of the way they saw it, which is what his athletic achievements while at they're supposed to do, being right Gtmo. One of most sportsmanlike close to the play, and the stands players on the floor or the field, called it the way they saw it from Daugherty always played to win a distance, and the noise from the and played well. He has been high conflicting opinions was so loud you in the standings in all major athcouldn't hear the cries of the letic events on the base. And in wounded or even the final buzzer. this writer's opinion, we'll hear The Marines came back in the more of Doe and his sports from second game and dropped the the stateside papers. Pointers, 61 to 40 with Holmes, big In the second game of the night Marine center dropping in 15 points the Stevedores and the Medics clfor the Leathernecks while Howie washed in a roaring and bloody Woren, the Pointer flash, netted 17. thriller with wounds on both sides Pirates Edge Trainers about evened up, and the SteveBees Topple Flyers does finished in front, 38 to 36. In what was undoubtedly the best Gerhardt led the Cargo-men with game of the week from both a sani13 before he was sidelined with a tary and a thrilling standpoint, the nose injury. Paul King dropped High School Pirates broke into the eight of the Medical tallies before win column by defeating the Trainhe was also sidelined with an eye to 9crr .ochn()atmt Stevedores Too Much For FTG The Trainers' Lee goes up in the air to sink one despite the efforts of the Stevedores' Weller. But the Cargo Handlers' power and accuracy was too much for the trainers and the Stevedores won it, 56 to 41. CHB-1 Stevedores THE CARGO HANDLING BATTALION ONE "STEVEDORES." Guantanamo Bay's newest addition to the Naval Base Basketball League. Standing, left to right: Weller, Cagni, Staurt, Geib, Fox, Chetlin. Kneeling Heflin, Neumeister, Gerhardt (coach), Ruschman, Dopp. Two other members of the squad-Seibert and manager Howard were not present for the photo. Top Ten. Scorers PLAYER Heimer Gerhardt Snyder Daugherty Morgan Ring Glenney Houchin Woren Moebus TEAM High School CHB-1 NAS Naval Station Naval Station NAS MCB-4 VU-10 Leeward Point Hospital-Dental injury. Maddox led the Medics with nine. Moebus, usually high on the scoring list, played a goodly portion of the game on his stomach or under the feet of the Stevedores. GAMES SCORE 6 5 5 6 6 5 5 4 5 6 99 95 92 83 81 78 77 75 67 62 AVG. 16.5 19.0 18.4 13.8 13.5 15.6 15.4 16.2 13.4 10.3 Monday night at Marine Site the Indians meet the Flyers in what could be the "game of the week" If this is basketball-we'll take spinach. m THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 29 January 1955 SPRINGBOARD' Utilizes State Taxes Affect GTMO Naval Base Some Service Personnel Naval Base School Adds New Classroom Operation "Springboard," the Atlantic Fleet's annual winter training excerise, has come to Guantanamo Bay. "Springboard," designed to provide maximum training for combatant ships of the fleet, takes advantage of the long periods of fair weather in the Caribbean Sea and uses Guantanamo Bay as one of its main bases for training operations. While Fleet Training Group and Utility Squadron 10 bear the biggest brunt in training, other base commands and facilities will share in the yearly training operations. Ships will continually enter and leave the operating area and will operate both independently and in groups on flexible schedules coordinated by Commander, Carribbean Sea Frontier, RADM. G. B. H. Hall. Among the larger warships taking part in "Springboard" are the anti-submarine aircraft carriers VALLEY FORGE and LEYTE, the battleship WISCONSIN, and the cruisers ROANOKE, NEWPORT NEWS, and the SALEM. Last week three Flag Commanders arrived here on the Naval Base. RADM George R. Cooper, ComBatDiv TWO, arrived Tuseday afternoon and went on board his flagship, WISCONSIN to carry out "Springboard" operations. Wednesday afternoon RADM E. E. Yoemans, Con Cru Div FOUR, and RADM B. L. Austin, ComCruDiv TWO arrived on the Naval Base. Admiral Yeomans went on board his flagship, the USS SALEM and Admiral Austin went on board his flagship, the USS ROANOKE. The WISCONSIN, SALEM, and ROANOKE have already undergone training operations here. A typical week of training for "Springboard" includes underway refueling, aircraft interception, air and surface gunnery, shore bombardment and anti-submarine tactics. Under date of 24 November 1953 the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts with the approval of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, published and distributed to all Nary and Marine Corps activities, a Federal income-tax information pamphlet. This pamphlet was designed primarily for service personnel and detailed their rights and liabilities under Federal incometax laws. In addition to the Federal income-tax, certain states, territories, and possession, of the United States have their own income-tax laws under which many service personnel may have liabilities. It should be noted that members of the Armed Forces are not excused from State and local income taxes simply because they are on active duty unless their narticular state laws so provide. Generally, all persons legally resident or domiciled in a State on the last day of a taxable year are liable to the income-tax laws of such State even though not physically present therein during the year. Furthermore, persons are usually liable for income taxes to the State in which they are living or deriving their income as well as to the State in which they are legally resident or domiciled. A compendium of the salient features of the State, Territorial, and insular possessions of the United States income-tax laws for the calendar year 1954 is at the Information and Education Office, Bay Hill, Barracks No. 4. It primarily indicates the income requirements for filing of returns by residents of States having income-tax laws, the personal exemptions allowed, due dates for filing returns and paying taxes, the State office from which complete details may be obtained, and special provisions, if any, applicable to service personnel. This list is available from 0830 until 1130 and 1300 to 1600 daily, except Saturday and Sunday, for your information. NAUTILUS, Atomic Sub, Makes First Run The world's first atom-powered submarine, the USS Nautilus, plows through the waters off Connecticut on her first run. CDR Eugene P. Wilkinson, captain of the submarine, messaged an escort ship, "Underway on nuclear power," as he guided the sub into the Thames River at New London, Conn. A crew of 11 officers and 85 men, most of them technicians, and about 50 civilian experts were aboard the sub for her first 36-hour cruise. Diving tests will be made later. The Nautilus' keel was laid in June 1952. She was christened by Mrs. Eisenhower in January 1954. One of the new classroom additions at the Naval Base School begins to take shape. The new classroom is part of a much-neeeded expansion program at the school. School Officials Review NayBase School At PTA Meeting Tuesday The Parents-Teachers Association will hold their next meeting on Tuesday evening, February 1, at the Naval Base School open air auditorium, commencing at 7:30 Representatives from the Southern Association of College and Secondary Schools and also members from the Bureau of Personnel will be on hand to give an evaluation report of the Naval Base School here in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The members of the southern association attending the meeting are, Dr. J. M. Leps of the University of Florida, Dr. Sarah Lou Hammond and Mr. Zollie Maynard, both from Florida State University. Representatives from the Bureau of Personnel are, Mr. George Wilkins, head of overseas Navy dependent schools and CDR. T. J. Moriarty. The membership committee chairman requests that all ward captains contact as many members and prospective members as possible concerning the coning meeting. Attendance prizes will be as before. Entertainment for the evening will be provided by CAPT. J. B. MacGregor, who will show the second part of a movie taken on a world cruise with vice-president Richard Nixon. In honor of Admiral and Mrs. Jerauld Wright, Coinmander-in-Chief U. S. Atlantic Fleet, Rear Admiral and Mrs. Taylor will be at home, 1600 to 1800, Sunday, 30 January 1955 in lieu of their regular monthly at home the first Sunday in February. All officers and civilians of equivalent rank and wives are cordially invited to attend. Uniform is dress white. Guantanamo Bay has been having its "growing pains." With the new housing project nearing completion and another 100 additional units to be built, the population in the housing area has increased considerably. All of this has had the end result of a larger student population at the Naval Base School, which found itself suddenly lacking in classroom space. An expansion program, however, has begun to take care of the situation. First move was to move the nursery school and lower grades to converted classrooms on Victory Hill. Four of these classrooms are now in use. Then, to make even more room at the school itself, the SeeBees put up one of the new type Hueneme Huts to serve as an extra classroom. Now another is under construction, this one a permanent addition. Besides the new classrooms, construction is now underway for a physical education dressing room adjacent to the new open-air auditorium. New Members Set Record For Legion Membership Recently initiation of several new members has brought to 53 the total membership of Guantanamo Bay Post No. 1 of the American Legion, a new high in Post manpower. New members include Claude S. Neely, Cecil D. Creel, John W. Jeffers, and Roy L. Sears, military personnel, and John W. Stone and Earl C. Reed, Navy civilian employees. At the regular meeting last week, Post Commander N.L. Scoop heard reports on Legion activities which included a Christmas dinner dance, contribution of toys and entertainment to children in the hospital at Guantanamo City, and renewal of subscriptions to the Legion Magazine for the Base, School, and Hospital libraries. Meetings of Post No.1 are held the third Tuesday of each month at 1930, in the Community Hall. Anyone eligible for membership is invited to visit the Post. P'eid Six M THE INDIAN page Six

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Saturday, 29 January 1955 VU-10 Prop Blast by Jerry Lewis, J03 If it's the sound of aircraft engines you like, take a morning off and visit McCalla Field any weekday. If you don't end up shouting instead of merely speaking in a normal tone throughout the day, you'll be doing fine! A check with Operations this morning told us that VU-10 is averaging well over 30 flights per day, sometimes as much as 40 per! Last year, during this same period, there were 47 pilots manning the blue-red-and-yellow birds and there were 15 "tractor" or tow-planes doing the job. This year, the pilots number 29 with only 8 tow planes but the schedule being met is exactly the same as '54's. That's really nose-to-grindstone goings-on! Business is really spreading out too. There'll be a photo detachment of VU-10's in good ol San Juan, Puerto Rico during the month of February. Many of the "Old Timers" in the Squadron have a soft spot for that wonderful town and always look forward to the opportunity to return to the "Little America" of the Antilles. Talking about returning, it looks like the Hoys are leaving sunny Gtmo for points North very soon. LT Andy Hoy, soon to be assigned to a Helicopter Squadron (HU-2) at Lakehurst, New Jersey, is leaving for training in the whirly-bird at Pensacola, Fla. Already detached is "Silky" Wilson PRAN, headed for Fasron9, NAS, Jax, Fla. Arty Meirotto, R. G. White, K. E. Bedell, Airmen, have been assigned to Fasron-5, NAS, Jax, Fla., too. There must be something in this Jax duty that really draws 'em! Anybody care to divulge the information? Last in the departure section is D.C. Coleman, AO3, headed also for Jax but further assignment to that thing called "civilian life". Lot's of luck from the men in the Squadron "Mr." Coleman! Let us know how things look out there when you don the tweeds. After-hours sounds of hammers and saws around the hangar mean the time is coming for that annual affair, the 1955 Carnival. Look for some new twists in the VU-10 exhibitions this year. Everything has its artistic points. A few lucky people watched last Monday morning when Leading Chief Mauldin demonstrated the finer points of deck-buffing with the mechanical monster that turns decks into mirrors-or was he reminiscing ? Teenage Round-up by Linda Thurston Dust-choked throats and eyes couldn't dampen the spirit or the song from the guys and gals that went on the hayride last evening. With Edwin and Bobbie driving one truck and Pete following in the other, it was a gay party that Mrs. Davis and Mrs. Liveakas had to chaperone. The music was the very best, and the box lunches that Cavvie auctioned off to some frantic guys were real fine specimens. The traditional good time was had by all. Did ja' see ...Doris getting dreamy eyed over Dusty ....Ed finding it tough to concentrate during English the other A.M. .. Nita flipping over the autographed pics of one George Walter Reese, III ...Eunice hobbling around on a bad heel-the result of cavewoman tactics. ...Neil's Ipana smile ...Wormie and Phil passEducational Services Foreign Language Study by William A. Johnson, PN1 (The first of a series of 4 articles) The Educational Services Section of the Training Division, Bureau of Naval Personnel, offers probably the finest materials for the acquisition of conversational skill in foreign languages ever developed. Not only are the materials excellent, but also they exist in an extraordinary wide variety of languages-34 of them, in the case of First Level materials. While use of these materials is fairly widespi -'ad in the Navy, it is felt that many people are not well aware of what is available, and that even those who do know is offered would profit by a thorough-going discussion of what the materials are, including the meaning of "First" and "Second" Levels, what they will and will not do, and how to use them to best advantage. Such a discussion is what these articles attempt to provide. No thinking American needs to be reminded of the importance of a knowledge of foreign languages in these complex times. And certainly no other large group in the United States has more need for languages than the Navy. Since the foreign language equipment of the average American is notoriously slender, the linguistic offerings of the Educational Services Section of the base should be of particular interest to all. Let's start out with the two different varieties of conversational language materials. What do the expressions "First Level" and "Second Level" indicate? What does each consist of; how should each be used? FIRST LEVEL Each First Level set consists of three parts-recordings, Language Guide, and Phrase Book. Except in the case of two or three of the more unusual languages, each set contains two records (four sides) with a total playing time of 16 minutes. It is obvious then, that First Level recordings cannot supply a very profound knowledge of the language in question! For the purposes for which they were intended, however, they are unsurpassed. That purpose is to give the serviceman a quick, accurate knowledge of a very few of the most needed words and phrases of the language of a certain country. The headings of the sections will give an idea of what the record material consists of: Greetings and general phrases; location; direction; numbers; "what's this ?"; asking for things; how much; time; and other useful phrases. (Next week we will explain the) (Language Guide and Phrase) (Book, in the meantime if you) (are interested stop in and see) (your Information and Educa-) (tion Officer) ing notes ...Pistol, Gary and Howie moving into the Junior homerooms in the mornings The two Lassiters (Barb and Peggy) and their darling little dog at the basketball games. Betty D and Paul S looking happier than most in the past week Dee Dee K having a happy birthday ....Dolores R and her handyman, Frank. ...Jeanne B selling $23 worth of carnival shares last Sunday ....Johnny giving out peppermint matches .Howie seeing strange things on the movie screen ...Prissy's cute little dog with the big red nose ...Nancy's pictures. .. Navy Wives' Club by Pat Aldridge The Guantanamo Bay Navy Wives Club, with Chaplin Karl G. Peterson officiating, held their formal installation of officers Thurday evening Jan. 27th in the School Assembly Hall. The solemn candlelight ceremony was attended by many friends of those being installed. An added pleasant note was the unexpected attendance of interested potential members. Although informally attired, the taking of office and full acceptance of each individual responsibility was none the less serious to every new officer. Chaplin Peterson, the club sponsor, seriously charged all who took the oath of office. Following the ceremony, members and guests adjourned to another part of the Assembly Hall to enjoy a delicious smorgasbord, consisting of a full array of appetit appealing items prepared by individual members of the Navy Wig es Club. A ehapte of the National Navy Wives Club, the Guantanamo Bay Navy Wives Club was recently formed to provide social activity for the Wives of Guantanamo Bay. Aside from its social activities, the membership will offer service and assistance in many quarters. NSD Supply Line Larry Foote, popular senior civilian supervisor of the Control Division, recently returned from a sixweeks vacation in his homeland, Jamacica. Joe West, Administrative Assistant, Toastmaster and choir-member has been passing out cigars and flowers in honor of the arrival of Joseph L., III. Your columnist wishes to extend the Depot's welcome to Mrs. Roger L. Cochran and children, Clara Lee and Roger. We hope you enjoy your stay at Guantanamo Bay. The transport last week also brought Davis, Devaney, Gheim, Kenney, Nagel, and Wright back from holiday leave in the States. Most prevalent comment on leave in the States -Brrrrrr! LCDR R. W. Brown has been ordered to duty as Supply and Commissary Officer at the U. S. Naval Retraining Command, Portsmouth, N.H. Together with Mrs. Brown and their children, he will leave via the Johnson on 4 February. Aqme nosmos by Joe Androvich, USMC DEPARTURES Seven members of the Security Section, Marine Barracks, departed for the states this past week for discharge. Those reporting to Norfolk, Virginia, were Cpl Singer, Pfc. Hartley, Pfc. Lanzellotta, Pfc. White, Pvt. McCue. Pvt. Whaley, and Pvt Taylor who also reports to NAS, Jax for discharge. ARRIVAL Arriving via FLAW this past Monday was Technical Sergeant Ronald E. Stoneking who joined us from Headquarters Marine Corps, Washington, D. C. TSgt Stoneking is currently attached to the Security Section and all hands wish to exerted a "hearty welcome aboard." TALENT SHOW The Talent show originally scheduled for tonight has been cancelled until further notice. ENLISTED CLUB A new Board of Governors was recently elected by ballot for the Enlisted Club and the results of the voting are as follows. Members elected were Sgt. McDowell, Cpl. Saunders, Cpl. Plante, Pfc. Drexel, Pfc. Murphy, Pfc. Barone, and Pvt. Glover. Officers who were appointed are TSgt Gradus, president, SSgt. Bushong, Vice-president, and Cpl. Powell, Secretary. All hands are encouraged to submit any recommendations or complaints to their respective representative serving on the board. BOWLING The past week produced quite a turmoil in the Marine intra-mural bowling league standings as the Officers, who were idle over the week-end, moved into the number one spot by virtue of a 3 game sweep by the Headquarter team over team #3. On Monday afternoon team #1 of the Guard Section set a new high 3 game series as they split the pins for a 2225 pin total replacing the previous high of 2178 held by the Officers. LtCol. Burns moved into the number one spot in the individual averages leading by a slim 1 point margin over Sgt. Amos Rogers with a 155 mark. SSgt. Rausch's 3 game series of 535 still remains intact. The new individual single game high is held by Pfc. Garten at 204. High individual games during the week were by Don Schreck, 198; Amos Rogers, 189, 182; and Harry Daniels, 194. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. STANDINGS OFFICERS SNCO's HEADQUARTERS Team# 1 Team# 3 Team# 2 Team# 4 Supply AVERAGES BURNS ROGERS RAUSCH GRADUS FREDERICKS GARTEN SWORDS HANDSCHUMACHER -Standings & averages Wed. 26 Jan. 55. 15 16 16 17 14 10 6 4 5 8 8 11 14 14 18 16 155 154 153 149 148 147 146 143 as of e M THE INDIAN M Page Seven

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1N MOVIES Saturday, 29 January PAID TO KILL 'Dane Clark Cecil Cheoreau Clark, a big business man whose business fails, pays someone to "kill" him, later finds out that his wife is trying to murder him and is in love with another man. Sunday, 30 January ALWAYS A BRIDE Peggy Cummins Ronald Squire A drama, mostly in Monte Carlo, of an old swindler and his daughter passing as a young bride for swindling purposes. Monday, 31 January BOWERY TO BAGDAD Leo Gorcey Huntz Hall The boys find the lost Alladins' magic lamp among the relics in a pawnshop in their neighborhood. The descendants of the original owners are trying to find the lamp; however, the Genii solves the problem. Tuesday, 1 February KHYBER PATROL Richard Egan Dawn Addams Egan, a captain in the British lancers, is relieved of duty and sent by the British civil commissioner to learn the plans of the Agghan prince plotting to capture a shipment of machine guns. Wednesday, 2 February KNOCK ON WOOD Danny Kaye Mai Zeterling Not knowing two blueprint parts of a new invention that could destroy the world have been stuffed into the heads of his two dummies, an accentric ventriloquist is pursued by spies. Thursday, 3 February STARS AND STRIPES FOREVER Clifton Webb Rutth Hussey Story of John Phillip Sousa and his famous music. FTG Bulein by Ron Federman On 19 January, Commander Elphege A. Gendreau, USN, reported to FTG, from the USS STEINAKER (DDR 863). CDR. Gendreau was born in Washington, D. C. in 1917. He is the father of five children. CDR. Gendreau attended Danville Military Institute and Fork Union Military Academy in Virginia prior to entering the U. S. Na v in 1940. During World War II, he served on a fleet oiler and three destroyer escorts, which saw service in the Aleutians, Solomans, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa. The Commander was promoted to his present rank on 1 January 1951. Previously, he commanded the USS FIEBERLING,;and the USS OSMOS, both destroyer escorts with the Pacific Fleet. Je also commanded the STIENAKER. He will relieve CDR King as Operations Officer at FTG. Not only FTG, but the U. S. Navy as a whole suffered a loss on 22 January. J. F. Craven, PMC, and J. B. Meland, ET2, were transferred to NAS, Jacksonville for discharge. The former wa transferred to Fleet Reserve anil release to inactive duty. Good luck gentlemen i! If either of you get tired of that "dull" "dismal" civilian life, remember the Navy has a place for experienced men like you. In one of my previous articles, I listed several mei who were advanced in rate, as authorized by a recently published ALNAV. Consequently, I neglected to mention Stewart McKay, who was promoted to YN3 on 1 January. McKay has been assigned to the Operations Department at FTG. Bowling The FTG Bowling Team No. 2, leading the league by 1 point, met NSD, the second place team, Monday night. After the pins had cleared, FTG Bowlers have held down first place since the very beginning with a very impressive record of 32 wins and 8 losses. While NSD has proved to be a bitter rival all year, FTG has been just too tough to cope with. Gagliano, EN1, who is one of the top bowlers in the league, was high man for FTG Monday night with a 213. With seven weeks remaining in the schedule, it appears certain that FTG will remain in first place, unless they are besieged by a terrific slump. Radio's 'Tops' of the Week SUNDAY, 30 January ..HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE .. 10:00 P.M. Re-creating her original screen role, Gene Tierney stars in "Laura", the story of a beautiful girl who is believed murdered and the.detective who falls in love with her memory. MONDAY, 31 January. ..THEATRE GUILD ON THE AIR .. 9:00 P.M. Rex Harrison and Beatrice Pearson star in "The Beloved Vagabond", A young French architect is blackmailed into leaving his home and his sweetheart and takes to the road to live a Bohemian existence. TUESDAY, 1 February ..THE CHASE ..9:00 P.M. This new program presents the first in its new series with the tale of a man who is hunted down for a crime he did not commit. Joining in the search, the innocent man helps track the real killer. Replacing ESCAPE. WEDNESDAY, 2 February .PURSUIT .9:00 P.M. Inspector Peter Black joins in the "Pursuit of the Lonely Heart," the search for the body of the wife of a kindly old man who was accused of murdering her through circumstantial evidence. THURSDAY, 3 February .FAMILY THEATRE ...9:00 P.M. George Murphy will be narrator and Jeff Chandler will star in"Clean, Crisp, and Even," a story of a socially ambitious women who wants her daughter to marry a man of wealth until a snow storm gives her a new set of values. FRIDAY, 4 February ..RADIO WORKSHOP ..10:00 P.M. "One Body Too Many" is a murder mystery with a suspenseful twist and a surprise ending. It concerns two people who find that one murder just naturally leads to another. What can you say about a pretty lassie like this when you don't know her name. Of course you could ask for volunteers to go out and solve the mystery. (Just a clue to her whereaboouts-that's a lake behind her, if you can see that far.) s0oK*NOOK by Francis L. Cannon, JO3 REALITIES OF AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY by George F. Kennan This book is the author's personal philosophy of American foreign policy. He faces the hard facts of Soviet power and expansion, of disunity in the non-communist world, of weaknesses in our own society. He analyzes these conditions and provides a unifying factor which offers a basis for consructive action. The author has gained during his tenure as U. S. Ambassador to the Soviet Union an excellent knowledge of Russia, in 1952. OUR EVEREST ADVENTURE by Sir John Hunt A pictoral record of the historic ascent of Mt. Everest in 1953 by the British expedition. The book has great value as an historical document and also as an exciting picture-story. The photographs, of which there are more than 150 depicting the towering peaks and rugged terrain of the Himalayas, are among the best of their kind ever taken. Most of these photographs have not been published before. Included are all the important pictures, taken during the final assault and those taken from the summit by Sir Edmund Hillary. A CLERK OF OXENFORD by Gilbert Highet A new collection of essays on literature and life by the author of People, Places and Books. The book is made up of a selection of his radio talks, revised and enlarged upon by the author .He is one of those people who can talk 09 on a wide range of subjects and cause unflagging interest in the subject at hand. The book is in three main divisions: The Arts of Prose, Poetry and Poets and Imagination and Reality. He talks on many things, from the history of chess to conversations with a philosopher. THE STORY OF MAN by Carleton S. Coon study of the human species and the way it has lived from ape man to atomic age. It reveals to the layman the immense new knowledge of the distant past which scientists have garnered since the war. The story of man begins some 50,000 years ago when his biological evolution virtually halted because cultural evolution-the use of fire and tool-took its place and protected man from the elements of nature. The whole is a fasinating account of how we became what we are. THE LAUGHTON STORY by Kurt Singer In this biography the author sidesteps filmdom gossip to portray one of the greatest actors of our time, Charles Laughton. His theatrical genius is traced from his first appearances on the London stage when he was a student at the Royal Academy. He married Elsa Lanchester, came to America and won wide acclaim for his performances in "Sign of the Cross', "Mutiny on the Bounty" and the "Paradine Case", among many others. The author is convinced that Laughton can revitalize the American theatre with work such as he has been doing with his First Drama Quartet, "Don Juan in Hell", for example. The famed Sherlock Holmes arrived on the scene of a crime and said,"Why-this is more serious than I expected. This window has been broken from both sides." Saturday. 29 January 1955 THE INDIAN Naii 'aDPPO-10ND-Gtmo -0626 THE INDIAN 4