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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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SGovers qTMO Like The Sunshine" Vol. VII No. 1 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 8 January 1955



Stage, Screen, Radio Hit Play Detective Story' Slated For eg Next Little Theatre Production


...................Ti... -


Three of the long-distance travelers who made the trip from Excelsior, Minn. to the Naval Base pose for the Indian photographer along with the trusty '54 Plymouth that carried them during the 2,773 mile journey. Seated in the car is Mrs. Baker, Mrs. Elizabeth Zabel stands at her right, and Mr. Baker stands holding the door. Bart Jr. was in school when the picture was taken.


Mnn. Group Travels 2,773 Miles


For Cuban Holiday Vacation

On Thursday night, 23 Dec. a 11
1954 Plymouth cae to a stop in A
front of CB-1B, the home of E. D Surroz, MMC. The driver honked the horn, and four people climbed out of the car-tired, dusty, and travel-worn, but very happy. This was the end of a 2,773 mile trip for Mr. & Mrs. Bart Baker of Excelsior, Minn., accompanied by Bart Junior and Chief Surroz's sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Zabel.
Unofficially, this vacation trip of the Baker group breaks all records for families driving to the Naval Base. Several families have previously driven across Cuba after taking the ferry from Florida, yei a trip from the northern Unite7 States has been previously unheard of.ON
Starting off from their home ir Excelsior on the 15th of December Mr. & Mrs. Baker drove to Kev West in six days, sight-seeing along the way and driving only during the day, From Key West. the Barkers boarded the "City of Key West" ferry to Cardenas, Cuba, an eight hour trip, where they spent the night before continuing their journey to Santiag. ed Cuba.
Original plans for the trip called for leaving the car in Santiago and then continuing by commercial The bearded trio of barber bait a transportation, since they had een contest, which ended last week. To earned that the road from San- certificate went to Jesse W. Sm tine to Guantanamo City would be Craigsville, Va. Second place wit Saurwein, MR3 (right), whose ho (Continued on Page Six) place with a $5 certificate was Dani


The Guantanamo Bay Little Theatre has announced as its next production the 3-act play which, in 1949, slapped blase Broadway in the teeth from the stage of the Hudson Theatre, rocked and shocked the nation as a movie, startled television audiences and sold countless numbers of books-Sidney Kingsley's emotion-shattering "Detective Story."
Carrying a cast of 32 the play 'IB'3 deals with three tense hours in a
detective squad room of a New York precinct police station. The Presents First Show Tonight plot centers around a Detective
McLeod, a rough, tough and square cop who goes strictly by the book, "Slapsie Maxie's Revue," offi- and, when necessary, writes in a cially designated as Christmas few extra chapters for himself. Entertainment Unit GA-2, will McLeod's regulation starched expresent two performances at the istence is suddenly confronted with Naval Station lyceum today and a complete collapse of his most tomorrow. stringent ideals. His reaction
The show is one of several units brings the play to an excitement which has beon touring the over- filled, gun-roaring climax. seas bases providing entertainment During the three acts most of for servicemen stationed abroad, the debris from humanity's tragic,
Included in tonight's perform- crazy, wonderful existence parades ance are: Slapsie Maxie Rosen- through the squad room providing
bloom, one-time light-heavyweight a few chuckles salted with humor
boxing champion of the world and peppered with evil. (1930 to 1934) and a cast of 15. The universal appeal of "DetecThe show will present their two tive Story" is expected to break performaiics here, then proceed to all previous records of attendance Rainey Air Force Base for two at the Little Theatre. It is nmore shows before returning to doubtedly the most serious and
th States. most complicated venture the LitIncluded in the acts are: Bar- tie Theatre has embarked upon yet.
(Continued on Page Eight) Reading try-outs for parts will
be held at the Little Theatre on Marina Point today and tomorrow at 1 P.M. Since it is the largest cast ever esembled on the local stage, Alan Wagner, president of the group and director of the play, has urged that all persons interested in reading for a part be on hand. And because of the large number in the cast, additional help will be needed backstage-makeup personnel, costume makers, stagehands, painters, carpenters, etc. It is hoped that a sufficient number of people will appear at the tryouts today and tomorrow to complete casting with the two readings. "Detective Story" is tentatively scheduled to open about the middIe of March.


are the winners in Ship's Dept. beard p prize of a $20 Navy Exchange gift iley, SN (center) who hails from h a $10 certificate went to C. W.. ne town is Bunker Hill, Ill. In third el Huyck, BM2, of Kansas City, Kans.


Annual 'Dimes' Drive

Open For Contributions

The appeal for funds for the 1955 March of Dimes is already being conducted here on the Naval Base in Guantanamo Bay. The drive, commencing on January 3, and continuing throughout the remainder of the month, needs the help of each and every one on the base to donate to this worthy cause. LCDR K. G. Peterson, Protestant Chaplain, has been appointed chairman of the 1955 polio drive in this area. March of Dimes con(Continued on Page Six)


0





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Pae ~1'wd THE INDIAN Saturday, S Januasy 1955


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615
Saturday, 8 January 1955
U. S. NAVAL BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Stafl
u. 5 NAVAL-STATION
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer

Editorial Staff


LT E. A. Sandness_--H. E. Davis,JOC-----H. L. Sisson, JO3____F. L. Cannon, J03___D. C. Roberts, JOSN_


-Officer-Advisor
----------Editor
--------News
-_Photographer
-------Reporter


THE INDIAN is published weekly at
the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


An Editorial .

Will You Measure Up?


Through the cold, damp Tennessee dawn, they were taking Sam Davis to the gallows.
The young Rebel soldier had been captured behind the Union lines. In his pocket they found detailed drawings of the Federal fortifications. Who had given them to him?
Sam Davis was silent. The plans had been stolen by a Negro boy loyal to the Southern cause. He had given them to Sam Davis to deliver to the Confederate command.
The Union commander halted the march to the gallows.
"Soldier," said the officer in blue, "I'm more interested in discovering the leak in my own camp than in hanging you as a spy. You can have safe passage back to your lines if you'll tell me who gave
you the plans."
Sam Davis broke his silence. He looked the officer square in the eyes.
"Do you suppose that I would betray a friend? No, Sir! I would die a thousand times first!"
Sam Davis was hanged by the neck until dead. Information continued to flow from the Union camp.

The loyalty displayed by Sam Davis is what your nation demands of you, as a member of the Armed Forces.
Such loyalty was displayed by the men in Korean POW camps who did die a thousand deaths but kept their lips sealed through the anguish of brainwashing and torture. They died with their lips sealed rather than betray their friends.
This same loyalty may, some day, be demanded of you. Will you measure up? (AFPS)


MARCH OF DIMES Hospital Notes


JANUARY 3-31


What's Doin' Stateside


(AFPS Wekly Feature)
NINETEEN-FIFTY-FIVE is going to be a good year for American business, according to the U.S. Chamber of Colmerce. Better
than 1954 and maybe even as good as 1953, the most prosperous year in U.S. history. . . . At a innimum, the total national production should reach $360 million, compared to $356 million in 1954.
* *1 ,
One of the things helping to create prosperity is the change which has occurried in the nation's homes during the past couple of decades . . . There are now 54 different kinds of electric home appliances on the market . . . In 1930, there were just 19 . . . One result is the U.S. demand for electric power is doubling every 10 years.
* * *
The research which has stimulated technical and cultural progress in the U.S. continues to find generous sources of finance . . . The Fund for the Advancement of Education, established by the privately endowed Ford Foundation, has announced grants of nearly $26 million since 1951 . . . The money was almost equally divided between public and private colleges and schools.

According to the Bureau of the Census, the nation's population is climbing at a dizzy rate and may reach 221 million by 1975 . . . It's now 163 million . . . Incidentally, women in America live longer than men and are widening the gap in life expectancy between the sexes . . . Women now live to an -average age of 72, men only to 67 . . . Average U.S. males marry at 23 . . . They are nabbed by brides who are an average age of 21.




;WITH ASOLjNE
1 - CLEAN^ AISCLOTHES
AG 1T0 A MA 1,1
SAI'D 4w4Yfd~dd ~


HEIRPORT NEWS
Congratulations to Doctor E. D. Grady and Mrs. Jean Grady upon the arrival of their third child, a boy, Steven Michael. Steven was born on 26 Dec. Carl Thomas, born recently is the son of GM1 and Mrs. Mary Gammon. The last newborn baby of the 1954 year at TISNH Gtmo was Michele Ann to CHELEC and Mrs. Ursula Gmeiner, Michele was born on 31 Dec. The new year was not to be forlorned very long as Richard Allen Holloman made the initial 1955 appearance at 0522 hours on New Years Day. EN1 and Mrs. Mary Holloman are the proud parents.
DEPARTURES
LTJG Lois R. Pin, (NC), USNR departed for NAS, Jacksonville, Fla. on 5 Jan. to be separated front the naval service. While here, the greater part of Miss Pin's nursing duties were performed in the dependents out-patient clinic and ward. LTJG Pin's amiable personality and professional ability will insure a successful career when she returns to civilian life.
Among the enlisted personnel that have left us recently are four First Glass Petty Officers. Ed Harvey HM1 goes to NavHosi, Oakland, Calif for duty. Ed was regarded as the comedian of Hospital Hill; a dull moment was not possible when Harvey was present. Claude Stepp, HM1, flew to Florida and will report to NavSta, Green Cove Springs for duty. Claude was with our master-at-arms and securitv division. Transferred to the AFDL-47 last week was HM1 Bob Schwartz. Bob spent his hours at the Admission Desk.
A very remarkable individual, Glen Hallum, HM1, chose civilian life and went to Jax for separation. Glen advanced to HM1 in less than four years; a feat which surprised no one who was aware of his endless capacities. These capacities were not only of an intellectual nature, but also, of an athletic nature. He was captain of last year's basketball team, being at the same time, high scorer. Hallum won the USNH Golf Tournament Championship in 1954. In 1953 he ranked first place in the Hospital Table Tennis Tourney. At ouri parties Glen could always be counted on the sparkle the affair with his mellow tenor voice. If there was any time to spare from other activities Hallum would amuse himself and others with his tactful strokes of a paint brush. His duties were that of Collection Agent and later worked in the Administrative Office. Upon discharge, he will return to his college studies in Oklahoma.
HN Vin Salvati was granted shore duty while home on emergency leave tiue to his wife's sudden illness. Vin will be stationed in his hometown at Troy, New York where he has distinguished himself in that locality as a promnising welterweight boxer.
OPENNIG GAME
The hospital basketball team plays its opening game on Monday, 10 January against the Leeward Point team. Admission is free and everyone off duty is expected to be there. An improved hospital team is expected to make things pretty bright for us that evening. Let's all cheer 'em on.


by It. P. C.ampanozzi


Page Two


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 8 January 1955


Sunday, 9 January 1955 Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900--Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230--Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1G,45-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1730-1800; 19302015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0930--Sunday School
0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900--Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900--Naval Base Chapel Christian Science
Sunday: 1000-Station Library
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)


The Chaplain's Corner





Among the many temples of ancient Rome were those dedicated to Janus, the porter of heaven who opened the new year, and guardian deity of gates. He was commonly represented with two heads because every door looks two ways, and could therefore see into the future as well as peer into the past. Because of this the events which were to come were as fainiliar as those which had already taken place, so that in a sense he straddled history much as the Colossus the ancient port of Rhodes.
Unfortunately, few of us can hope to equal this degree of omniscience. True enough, we have cur seers and prophets, and we can listen to them if we please. But they are often wrong, and many times misdirect as well as guide us so that their efforts have a tendency to cancel out themselves. We have no positive knowledge of what future events await us, and therefore our forecasts must be based upon occurances drawn from the past.
Hind-sight, it has often been said, is much easier than foresight, and surely no one will dispute the point. We can look back
-sometimes with pleasure, occasionally with regret-and see very clearly the triumphs and mistakes of the time gone by. But what positive guide do we have for the days that lie ahead?
This is the time of year for resolutions-New Year's resolutions-which we hope will steer our living to a higher plane than it has ever before attained. Might I venture a suggestion- Read the Gospel according to St. Matthew, chapters 5 through 7. Don't just skimi throtigh the pages. Read it very carefully. And when finished, turn back to pay particular attention to chapter 6:33. It constitutes a summary for all that is said.
Naturally, you won't be guaranteed a perfect 1955, but you'll be plotting your course in the right direction.

William W. Poynter LTJG, CHC, USNR








Saturday, 8 January 1955


e


THE INDIAN


SecNav Reveals Sharper Plumneting In Navy Re-ups; Blames Lack Of Individual Attraction, Public Apathy


The Secretary of the Navy startled a Navy League audience recently when he revealed that the overall reenlistment rate in the Navy has dropped from 46 percent in October 1953 to only 7 percent in October 1954.


Speaking b e f o r e the Navy League of the United States in Detroit, Michigan on 3 December, the Secretary discussed the current problem affecting all services-that of attracting more young men of the country to a career in the service.
He cited the reduction in strength of manpower from the top Korean strength of over 700,000 men to the peace tine authorized strength of 608,000 and compared this figure to the pre-Korean strength of 315.000. Then he said that despite the reduction in manpower there has been very little reduction in committments. "In these perilous days," he said, "we must keep a fleet in the Far East, a division of Marines in Korea and one in Japan. We must keep a fleet in the Mediterranean, a force in the Persian Gulf. While these units are not actively engaged in fighting, they and all our ships must maintain a heavy training schedule in order to insure the instant readiness and vigilance which the world situation has dictated."
It was then that the Secretary noted the 7 percent reenlistment figure and went on to explain that the Navy, at that rate, would lose 60 percent of its total strength within the next two fiscal years.
He remarked especially on the career people of the Navy. He said, " . . . . only 48 percent are signing up for additional service. This 48 percent compares with 90 percent only one year ago."
He went on to point out that the critical part of the situation is that many of the losses are the highly trained technicians and the senior supervisors, those who came into the Navy during the war and became eligible for retirement in just a few years. This, added to the fact that the Navy recruiters have been falling far below their monthly quotas (as much as 4,000 under) results in one of the most serious situations the Navy and the other services have faced in many years.
The Secretary expressed his ominion that accepting 2-year enlistements "is certainly not the total or satisfactory answer." Speaking of the 2-year enlistee he said, "Just as he reaches the point of becoming experienced and valuable, his 2-year draft term is completed, he leaves the service and the process . . . (of training) . . . must start all over again."
"It is for this reason that the Navy cannot survive as a first class fighting service if it becomes a conscript Navy. There must be a base of between 50 to 60 percent career people. To maintain this base, not less than 25 percent of those completing their first enlistment and 75 percent of the career people must reenlist."
The Secretary stressed that to provide this strong base of career people, both in talent and numbers, "there must be two fundamentals: MOTIVATION BY THE INDIVIDTIAL and RECOGNITION BY THE PUBLIC."
For the individual, the Secretary said, "There must be two prime


attractions: the opportunity to do something useful and worthwhile; the opportunity to improve himself and his fortunes."
For the public, he said, "There must be general and genuine recognition of the individual's worth, of his importance, of his tasks, and of his accomplishments."
In answer to the question of vhy the services were finding it so difficult to attract young men for a career, the Secretary pointed out that "military service is not sufficiently attractive, not only in the material sense, but in the sense of duty to country. Presently, the personal advantages of civilian life so outweigh those of present day military service that fewer and fewer men care to make the sacrifice. Furthermore, the material inducements which await him as a civilian veteran ... exceed the material attractions of making the Navy a career."
The Secretary closed his remarks with a summary of what the Navy League could do to help the situation. He suggested a continuing nationwide campaign of public education to inform the American people of the gravity of the problem. He also suggested that the League could initiate a campaign to sell the naval service to patriotic young citizens as a career vital to the security and welfare of the country.
"As part of that campaign," "I think the League should try and sell the American public that if they want a first-class Army, a first-class Navy, a first-class Air Force, and a first-class Marine Corps, they must pay the price for it."



Or. lmburg Main Speaker

At PTA Meeting Tuesday


The Parents-Teachers Association will hold a meeting Tuesday evening January 11, at the Naval Base school open air auditorium, commencing at 7:30 P.M. The main speaker for the evening will be Dr. J. Imburg, Naval Hospital Pediatrician. His topic for the evening's speech will be entitled "Child Hygiene."
Attendance will be taken as before and prizes wil be awarded to the first three winners.
Entertainment for the evening will be provided by CAPT J. B. MacGregor, who will show the first half of a movie he made while on a round the world, good will tour with the vice-president of the United States, Richard Nixon. The first part of the movie that he will show, was taken during the time between Ooctber 6, 1953 and December 14, 1953. While on the tour CAPT MacGregor served as physician and Naval Aide to vicepresident Nixon.


Villamar-Bargo Council

Awards Decoation Prizes


Last week, the Villamar-Bargo Council made its awards for the best out-side Christmas Decorations in the Villamar-Bargo area. The contest, sponsored by the Villamar-Bargo Association, under the supervision of CAPT W. R. Caruthers, was divided into three divisions; Bargo Quonset Housing, Villamar Defense housing, and Replacement Housing.
First prize for the Bargo quonsets went to P. E. Gibson, at CB-5B. First Prize for Replacement Housing was awarded to D. F. Bertagna, BTC, of Fleet Training Group for his home at RH274D. No prize was awarded for the Villamar Defense Housing.
The two winners were awarded a prize of $10.
Judging the contest was CAPT and Mrs. W. R. Caruthers, CAPT and Mrs. R. R. McCracken; and CDR and Mrs. V. J. Soballe.



SeaBee Anniversary

Set Up To 5 March


For the past twelve years the date used for the anniversary of the U.S. Naval Construction Battalions (SeaBees) has been 28 December. In 1954, however, no command observed the annual affair since a recent revision called for the anniversary celebration on 5 March of 1955 and every year.
Originally, 28 Dec. was set as the anniversary date since that was the date in 1941 on which authority was requested by the Bureau of Yards and Docks to recruit enlisted personnel for Naval Construetion Battalions. Yet, the SeaBees, as an active unit, did not begin until their official authorization on
5 March 1942.


24 Base Lieutenants

Selected for Promotion

President Eisenhower has approved the selection of 4,570 lieutenants of the regular Navy and Naval Reserve on active duty for promotion to the rank of lieutenant commander.
Those selected will be promoted throughout the fiscal year 1955.
Twenty-four Navy Guantanamo officers received the good news last week. Fleet Training Group led the list with 12 promotions, Naval Station had seven, three doctors were selected at the Hospital and there was one each from Naval Air Station and Utility Squadron 10. FLEET TRAINING GROUP:
Joseph Catanzarito
Leo D. Christie
Herman A. Graven
Frank M. Jones
William E. Kneiple Francis V. Moseley lrving M. Page, Jr.
George E. Saunders
William H. Shaw
Edgar Stafford
William J. Tipler
J. T. Usey, Jr. NAVAL STATION:
Earl A. Sandness Gordon E. Hoppe
Robert E. Peacock Edward A. Toczko
Roger L. Harris
William D. Brotherton, Jr.
Thomas M. Brown HOSPITAL:
Edgar D. Grady
George V. Hering
Samuel L. Moschella NAVAL AIR STATION:
Everett E. Pierce
UTILITY SQUADRON 10:
George F. Guyer
An additional note of interest to personnel in Guantanamo Bay is that the former Personnel Officer of the Naval Station, Charles E. Kleinert and the former Commissary Officer Anthony Grego were also selected for the promotions. Both officers were transferred recently.


Hospital Commander Promoted To Captain


~


Mrs. Catherine MacGregor proudly clips the silver eagle to her husabnd's collar, CAPT John B. MacGregor (MC) USN, as he accepts his certificate of promotion from CAPT Tilden I. Moe, (MC) USN, Commanding Officer of the Naval Hospital. Ceremony was held in CAPT Moe's offiec recently.


e


Page Three








THE INDIAN


e


Saturday, S January 1955


Saury 81 Januar 1955


SPORTS ROUND-UP

by Joe Celentano, JOl, USN
(AFPS Sports Writer)


The U.S. basketball squad competing in the Mexico City PanAmerican games in Morch will be managed by Maj. Roy P. Johnson, Chief of the Sports Section at Air Force Hq. in Washington, D.C. Maj. Johnson was an all-around athlete at the University of Illinois in 1930. . . . Ft. Belvoir, Va., loses a great athlete in February when Dick Groat gets separated from the service. Groat, a baseball and basketball star for the Engineers, will report to the Pittsburgh Pirates training camp in the spring. . . . The Wheels at Ft. Eustis, Va., are rolling up the points. Sparking the cage team again this season is Larry Hennessey, former Villanova All-American and AFPS AllStar. Hennessey hit the cords for 53 points when the Wheels downed Ft. Belvoir, 107-94, early in the season.
The information services officer at Lockbourne AFB, Ohio, writes that the base's new special services officer, 2nd Lt. Don Boenker, was an ace righthand twirler for the University of Missouri baseball team in 1952. . . . Tennis star Maureen "Little Mo" Connolly and ex-Navy journalist Norman Brinker have decided to wait a year before walking down the aisle.... Jack Thomas, who chalked up a 20-3 record as a pitcher for the Quantico, Va., Marines will be trying for a spot on the Boston Red Sox roster this spring. . . . Herman Heddrick, a 6'5" guard recently discharged from the Army at Carlisle Barracks, Pa., has signed with the professional New York Knickerbockers. He played college ballat Canisius College in Buffalo, N.Y.
The New York Yankees, a sure bet to win the pennant this year, have 115 farmhands in the military service. Of the 115, approximately 64 are expected to be released between now and the start of the training season. . . . Pvt. Lucius Minor, known to the fight world as Luther Rawlings, is currently in training-basic training that is, at Camp Chaff ee, Ark. Rawlings, a tall, lean welterweight, has a 53-12 professional record.
Pvt. Gene Gedman of Ft. Kobbe, C. Z., is one soldier who's feelin' mighty low because the Cleveland Browns scalped the Detroit Lions, 56-10, for the professional football championship. Gedman was a Detroit halfback before entering the Army. . . . AFPS All-Star tackle J. D. Kimmel of Ft. Lee, Va., has been discharged and has signed with the pro Washington Redskins. . . . The pro Chicago Bears expect to lose their fledgling quarterback Zeke Bratkowski to the Air Force soon. The ex-Georgia ace completed 67 passes out of 130 for 1,087 yards and eight touchdowns. . . . Replacing Bratltowski at the quarterback slot for the Bears will probably be ex-Notre Dame star Bob Williams. Williams, an AFPS All-Star while at Bainbridge Naval Training Center, Md., will soon be leaving the Navy. . . . It didn't take tackle Bob Gain of Nagoya AB, Japan, long to get back to the professional gridiron. Gain, a member of the AFPS All-Star second team this year, was recently discharged and played defensive tackle for the Browns in the championship game with the Lions.


90-lb Catch Landed From Gtmo River


Ronald Seagle, BM3, of Naval Station Special Services, displays the 90-pound catch of snook and jack which he and William James, DC3, of Naval Station Boatshed, caught in one afternoon during the holiday season. The catch was made m and around the Guantanamo River.


Ladies Bolt Club Presents Tourney Trophies


At a recent meeting of the Ladies Golf Club of Guantanamo Bay the winners of the Ladies' Handicap Tournament were presented with their prizes. Mrs. Polly Herring, the 1954 Handicap Champion, was presented with a silver tray and Mrs. Jane McElroy, runner-up in the tournament, was given a silver vegetable dish. In the photo above are: Mrs. Evelyn Leach (low score on the front nine), Mrs. Emma Hutton (winner of 1st Flight), Mrs. McElroy, Mrs. Hering, Mrs. Marge Sheehan (runner-up in 1st Flight), Mrs. W. R. Caruthers and Mrs. R. R. McCracken, former chairman of the club.


Marines Drop Carbine

The Marines Corps has eliminated the M-1 carbine from its arsenal of weapons. The basic in the Corps now will be .45-cal automatic pistols for master sergeants and officers and .30-cal rifles for technical sergeants and below.

"Daddy," said little Billy, "a fellow in school told me I looked just like you."
"That's nice," said Dad, "and what did you say?"
"Nothing, he was bigger'n me."


6th Fleet Holds Manuvers

With Spanish Fleet In Med,

The United States Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean has been ordered to hold joint maneuvers with the Spanish Fleet in an effort to develop similar communications and tactical systems.

The drunk staggered td the door and found the milkman waiting.
"Nothing today, pal," he said. "Haven't got a thing to mix it with."


Vai Four


c


SportslFrom Here'n There

Armed Forces track and field stars are assembling at the University of Maryland for training that may possibly lead to the 1955 Pan-American games and the 1956 Olympics. Eventually some 30 candidates will be on temporary duty at the Forest Glen section of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C. Among those training will be Southern California star Jack Davis, a Navy ensign from the USS Yorktown. Davis was the NCAA and AAU naimonal champion in the 120-meter high hurdles in 1952-53-54.

The United States defeated Australia, 3-2, in the Davis Cup challenge round to regain possession of the trophy, emblematic of world amateur supremacy, after four years. This marks the 17th triumph for the United States since the start of Davis Cup competition in 1900. Australia has won the trophy 11 times, Great Britain nine and France six. The 1954 results: exNavy manl Tony Trabert took the first singles match, downing Australia's Lew Hoad, and America's national champ Vic Seixas followed with a win over Ken Rosewall. Trabert and Seixas teamed up to beat the two Aussies again in the doubles.

In Tokyo a Far East Air Force All-Star football team outlasted a Navy All-Star eleven in the annual Torii Bowl football game before 20,000 fans and won 50 to 47. A selected team of Marine AllStars from the Far East downed an Army All-Star squad, 27-13, in the Sukiyaki Bowl football games before a crowd of 30,000.

In Quantico, the Quantico Marines downed Washington and Jefferson College of Washington, Pa., 69-58 to win the Christmas Invitational Basketball tournament, at which the Marines were host to seven collegiate squads.

About 20 service, AAU and collegiate boxers will be invited to try out for the U.S. team which will complete in the Mexico City Pan-American games in March.

The Kaneohe Marine Corps Air Station rifle team won the Territory of Hawaii's big bore rifle championship with an aggregate score of 968 points nad 87 V-ring shots.



Some Overseas Personnel

May Bet Special Pay


Some military personnel not accompanied by their dependents on a foreign assignment where bachelor quarters are not available may soon receive a special new allowance.
The proposed pay, which is awaiting final approval by the service Secretaries, will amount to $3.40 a day for officers and $1.90 a day for EM. It will be in addition to any station per diem allowance for quarters currently being paid.


a








Saturday, 8 January 1055


W


THE INDIAN


*


Sv~ 01.1$t4


Base Cage Play Begins Monday;



Ton Teams Entered In League



The Naval Base Basketball League gets off to a fast start Monday night on the Marine Site court when the High School Pirates go against the Naval Air Station Fliers in the first game and the Pointers from Leeward clash with the Hospital-Dental combine in the second game.
Ten teams are entered in the league this year. Besides the four above, there are also Cargo Hand- the foul line. Many college games ling Battalion One, Utility Squad- this, year have been won because ron Ten, Fleet Training Group, of the bonus rule.
MCB-4, Marines and Naval Station. Also, in the base league this
The MCB-4 team will be replaced year, emphasis will be placed on
by the MCB-1 squad upon its coaching from the bench and heckarrival. ling from the stands. The referees
Games this year, as usual, will will enforce the already-standing be alternated between the court rule that no coach may go on to
at Marine Site and the Naval Sta- the court to talk to his players tion court in the Recreation Area. even during the quarters and timeThe first game of the nightly twin- outs. The home team will be rebill will begin at 6:30, to be follow- sponsible for the conduct of the ed by the second game about 15 audience and any unnecessary
minutes after completion of the heckling of the players or the offifirst. cials will result in a penalty
W. F. McDonald, RDC, has been against the home team.
named as the head official of the From the fast-paced intra-mural
league and consequently has charge league play before the holidays, of all the officials during a game. it is evident that this year's base
All teams this year have been league will produce a lot of snappy,
hit hard in the manpower depart- fast ball handling right up to the ment and very few of last year's post-season tournament scheduled cogers will take the floor again to begin on March 14th. this year. Paul King, last year's All-Star and league high scorer, is back again this year playing with the Hospital-Dental combine. The Ca eS h d l
High School's star, Edgar Heimer, _
remains with the squad this year to form a nucleous. Heimer was Mon 10 Jan* High School vs NAS
third high scorer in the league last year. The Naval Station Indians' Leeward Pt vs USNH
Bradford is gone, but playing- Tues 11 Jan VU-10 vs MCB-4
manager Jerry Morgan remains FTG vs MCB-4
along with "Doc" Doherty who will the squad for several weeks before Wed 12 Jan* High School vs his transfer. Marines
For the Marine Leathernecks NAS vs CHB-1
five, last year's league champs, two Thurs 13 Jan* Leeward Pt vs FTG regulars remain: Andy Androvich and Bob Gatti, 4th and 5th top MCB-4 vs NavSta
scorers from last year. Fri 14 Jan* USNH vs Marines
The Naval Air Station squad,
last year's runner-up in the league, CHBl vs VU-10
probably has the most number of Asterick (*) denotes games that
regulars held over from last year's will be played on Marine Site court. battles. Ring, Snyder, Moran and Deerr remain with the squad this year.
The Trainers from the Training C Group are the hardest hit of all S"B with no holdovers from last year. ...
A brand new squad will take the /'
court this season.
The combining of the Hospital squad with the Dental squad gives this combine the greatest number of hold-overs. Aside from King, there will be Rose, O'Brien, Maddox, Feiland and Toland returning to the wars. Hospital ended last year's fray in 3rd place.
NEW RULE ADDS INTEREST A change in the foul-shooting rules has been made for this year and has caused considerable favorable comment already in the college games in the States. The rule reverses the "miss-it-try-again" rule of last year. This year if a P
man is awarded a foul shot and "I hod a finle trouble after you hurng up
makes it, he gets a "bonus" shot thereby stressing accuracy from


Norfolk Pro's Show How It's Done


John O'Donnell drives off the tee in an exhibition of professional golf techniques last Sunday at the Guantanamo Bay Golf Club. Harold (Shorty) Oatman stands by for the exhibition match which followed the "clinic" by the two professionals. O'Donnell and Oatman are currently making a tour of the Caribbean bases conducting their well-known golf clinic and playing exhibition matches. Both are professionals from the Norfolk, Va. area.


Ladies Golf Shots


Ladies Bowling


by Miriam Hoy


Team Standings


Wednesday morning the lady golfers played the front nine for low gross and low net scores. Winners of the golf balls were:
1st Flight-GrossJane McElroy
Net-tie-Marion Caruthers
Alma McCracken
2nd Flight-GrossGladys Hamilton
Net-Billie Nelson
After we played, a special business meeting was held in the golf Snack Shack. A representative of the caddies thanked us for the donations made by the Ladies Golf Association towards the caddie's Christmas dinner and gifts. An election of officers was held to serve for the next six month term and the following members were unanimously elected.
President-Polly Hering
Vice-president-Val Evans
Secretary-Betty Lou Tipler Treasurer-Gladys Hamilton
Tournament ChairmanSue Scott
A luncheon will be held on January 19th at the Marine Family Restaurant at 1:00 P.M. Prospective new numbers are urged to attend the luncheon. If interested, contact any member of the Ladies Golf Association.


Team


Team Team Team Team Team Team Team Team Team Team


Eight Ten One Three Five Four Nine Two Six Seven


Won Lost 21 7
17 11 15 13
14 14 14 14 13 15 13 15 13 15 12 16 9 19


High Games F. Grounds E. Griffen S. Wenderlich C. Godbout J. King

High Ten E. Griffen F. Grounds P. Way M. Hoy J. King S. Wenderlich M. Powers A. Forrester C. Godbout J. O'Brien


202 174 171 165 162


172
147 145 142 141 138
134 133 132 130


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THE INDIAN


Saturday, 8 January 1955


Cuban Vacation . . .

(Continued from Page One)
too hard to travel. However, after the trip from Cardenas on the National Highway, which Mr. Baker states as being "very good," they were considering going on in their own car. At their hotel in Santiago, Mr. Baker made inquires about the road ahead and found from a Navy lieutenant who had just made the trip, that even though the roads were rough, it could be done. The following morning, the four travelers again loaded into the car and headed for Guantanamo City and the Naval Base.
According to all members of the party, this was the worst, yet the most interesting part of the trip, in view of both scenery and adventure. Traveling with caution, Mr. Baker forded streams with the Plymouth, bounced over rocky roads, but encountered little trouble except at one stream where they had trouble making it up the opposite bank and had to be towed by a team of oxen.
In regard to advice for anyone who would possibly like to make a similar trip, Mr. Baker quotes the cost of the trip at about $275.00 including the ferry trip to Cardenas, Cuban insurnace, and gas and oil. This trip, the first of its kind for the Bakers, took a total of eight days of traveling, and all without a single dent in the car or engine trouble.
The Bakers left Wednesday morning on their return trip over the same roads.


Lorry Raine is a favorite of disc jockeys the country over. She has a fine style and an exceptional voice and was placed among the top 15 female vocalists on a deejay poll.



New Spanish Class

Begins Monday

A new Spanish Class, sponsored by the Naval Station Information and Education Office, will commence at 1800 in Room No. 9 of the Naval Base Schol on 10 January. All interested persons are invited to attend. The class will deal primarily in conversational Spanish,


AFRS 'Live'

From Garden


New York (AFPS)-For the first time in the history of Armed Forces Radio Service-New York, basketball games have been transmitted "live" from Madison Square Garden direct to servicemen overseas.
Six shortwave transmitters were used to feed 40 stations throughout Europe, Greenland and the Caribbean. Play-by-play was by Navy Chief Journalist Al Spanjer and Gordon Bridge.
The direct broadcasts featured the UCLA-Niagara and St. John'sVillanova games of the Eastern Collegiate A t h 1 e t i c Conference Holiday Festival tourney. Other Holiday Festival games were heard as delayed broadcasts.
Throughout the basketball season AFRS-NY airs basketball from the , Garden to servicemen and women overseas, at an average of six college and professional games a week.



1954 Sets Records

In Air Transportation


The Armed Forces of the United States flew more in 1954 than in any other year, as all records for transporting troops, supplies, and aerial mercy missions fell to the wayside.
Most impressive of the record breaking figures was the work of Military Air Transport Service. According to Lt. Gen. Joseph Smith, MATS Commander in a year-end report, an average of 56 military passengers and five patients were transported every hour during the year. Along with this, MATS made "the longest aerial mercy mission in aviation history" as more than 500 French troops wounded in the battle of Dien Bien Phu in Indochina were flown out to hospitals.
Here in Guantanamo Bay, Fleet Logistics Air Wing had a big year, as air traffic was higher than ever before. According to LT G. H. Leach, Air Transport Officer, the heaviest load of traffic was during the first of 1954 ,from January to July with traffic falling off during the latter half of the year.



March of Dimes ...

(Continued from Page One)
tainers will be placed in various establishments on the Naval Base for individual donations. Funds collected are to be converted to checks or money orders drawn to order on "The Treasurer, National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis", and forwarded to Chaplain Peterson.
The National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis was founded by the late Franklin D. Roosevelt. Its mission is to lead, direct and support every phase of the fight against polio. The 3,095 city and county chapters for the National Foundation care for new and longterm cases and organized emergency hospitalization during epidemic. The foundation conducts research to find means of wiping


Employees Total Service, 162, at Retirement


Five civilian employees of the Naval Station retired on December 31 with a total of 162 years service here on the Naval Base in Guantanamo Bay. CAPT W. R. Caruthers, CO, Naval Station, presented them with letters of retirement. They are, John Gumbs, 32 years service; Zepheniah Thomas, 38 years service; Arthur Godwin, 34 years; Joseph Maynard, 36 years, and Ma Young, 22 years. Also pictured is Mr. H. P. McNeal (left) Industrial Relations Officer.


Committee Reccommends

,Social Security Benefits

For Military Personnel


Washington (A F P S)-Armed Forces personnel soon may enjoy more and better Social Security rights if Congress tavorably considers a recommendation made by a special House committee.
The committee's recommendation asked "that serious consideration" be given to placing military personnel under Social Security "on a contributory basis," with such benefits as would accrue therefrom being in lieu of certain survival benefits now provided free of charge.
The committee, headed by Rep. William H. Bates (R.-Mass.), made the recommendation despite the fact that the government (as an employer), would have to contribute more than $215,000,000 a year. The committee also recommended that the study be continued next year with the ultimate aim of simplifying survivor benefit programs.
At present retired servicemen who receive military retirement benefits are not eligible for Social Security benefits. However, since 1940 all military personnel have received $160 monthly Social Security credit, even though nothing was deducted from their pay.



out the dread disease, but depend upon vountary contributions for its continuing fight against polio and for the rehabilitation of those afflicted.
Since the campaign is heartly endorsed by the President of the United States, the Department of the Defense and Fleet Commanders it should receive generous support from everyone.


Navy EM's Offered

Nav~ad Training
by William A. Johnson, PN1


Have you watched the jets racing across the sky and wondered how it feels? Have you wanted to fly yourself? You can, you know, if you are 18 but less than 25 years of age on the date your application is submitted, and have completed 2 years of college at an accredited college or university, or have the service - accepted equivalent; or have completed 1 year of college at an accredited college or university, or have the service-accepted equivalent, and have attained Basic Test Battery scores of 120 for CCT plus ART and 58 Mechanical. If you can meet these qualifications and are strongly motivated to fly, stop in and see your Information and Education Officer as soon as possible for further details on how to apply for flight training as a Naval Aviation Cadet.




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Saturday, 8 January 1955


Satus day 8 January 1955 THE INDIAN Page Seven


VU-10 Prop Blast

by Bill Graves


With the holiday season a thing of the past, a busy schedule lies ahead for Utility Squadron TEN. The placid bay at our back door will slowly fill with ships, Leeward Point and McCalla fields with planes as units of the Atlantic Fleet arrive for training. VU-10, now equipped with new Cougar jets along with conventional aircraft, hopes to handle the job without support by other Atlantic Fleet Utility Squadrons. In past years, VU-2 and 4 have deployed detachments to Gtmo to help VU-10 meet the heavy winter requirements.
This past week found activity on the local links. Chief J. C. Mauldin, ADC, leading chief of VU-10, shot a 78 to bring a big slice of the handicap prize home to the squadron in the form of the consolation cup. "Good shooting for an old man" he quipped. Dern tootin' old timer! Now let's try for the big trophy!
First hunt! First shot! One deer. Thus the title of Daniel Boone was bestowed upon CDR D. E. McCoy, VU-10's Skipper just before Christmas. As Daniel tells it, "I did just what the game warden told me. I pointed the gun a little ahead, closed both eyes and pulled the trigger!"
We were sorry to hear about Joye Graves spending the holidays in the hospital after being put under the weather with a bad virus infection. We all hope Joye a speedy recovery. Also ace basketball champ "Digger" Lockhart, downed with a broken leg just before Christmas, leaves a weak spot in the Mallards this season. Mend quickly boy!
Chief Reed seems to have found the solution to the parking problem next to the hangar. He rode to work a week ago on a neat twowheeler that Santa left under the tree!



NSD Supply Line


The beginning of a new year brings to a close the joyous holiday season which brought a series of enjoyable parties. The annual NSD Christmas party was a great success due to the efforts of the committee, which furnished both refreshments and entertainment for all hands.
Mr. Joe West spent Christmas in New Orleans, Louisiana, his former home. His father will return to Guantanamo Bay, as his guest.
Leaving on the MSTS JOHNSON on the 1st were three NSD'ers who departed for the Receiving Station, Brooklyn, N.Y. for separation. They were Joe M. King, SK3, Winston W. Glaze, SN, and Homer L. Burruss, SN.
Congratulations to the following who are wearing new stripes as of January 1. George L. Draffan, who made DK2, Richard E. Kidd, who made BM2, Merle E. Padon, who made DK2, Vernon T. Theisen, who made DK1 and Benito Zuniga who made BM3.
Mrs. Irene C. LeBlanc departed on the 1st via the MSTS JOHNSON for a short visit in the States.


Teenage Round-up
by Judy Yost

Everyone had a cool yule with many parties and small groups getting together here and thereJerry Warren's, up on the hill, was buzzin'-Linda opened the doors of her new home and the kats really enjoyed her hospitalityMarise had the gang in for refreshments after the movies-Jack Stafford gave Sah a great big sehd-off party and then saw him off on the plane-Mesdames Yarbro, Dibella and MacMikhael stuffed us all with goodies Li honor of the return of Barbara and Ceorge for the holidays. But 'ajl good things must end, and now both of them are tucked away at &gi 4, ville in college again. . . . Phillips Park was a popular spot during the yuletide season, and we were wondering just how "punchy" 7 guy can get when Stan reported X a lavender fish in the water out there. . . . The other 2 PM Sharon and Phil gave a barbecue in their yard, ala hamburgers and roast pig and despite the wisecracks from Bobby and Cavie, Sharon managed some real fine food. Nancy and Wormie almost flipped over the pigs feet that were served. They like! So, what a wonderful holiday it was . . . and it's amazing to hear some of the New Year's resolutions!
We're happy to say that Eunice has made a real smooth recovery after a bout with the flu and she's up and around again, as is Nancy H.
Next week our basketball team will go out into the court wars with their hearts set on winning, so let's all go down to the games and give them all the support we can-let's put our team right up there on top, what say! ! !
DID YA' SEE: Jackie Lee hanging up his rock at the Club. . . . Gary's early awakening on New Year's Day. . . . Cookie and her famous "basketball step".... Neil playing janitor. . . . Howard and his crase-e-e jitterbuggin'. . . . Jean C and all her phone calls. . . Bobbie and a certain guy making a duet out of "Winter Wontderland". . . . All the gang hangin' around the toy counters on Christmas Eve (Santa Baby?). . . . The good supply of portable radios in the gang now, and the disgusted


Tuesday, December 14th, Captain R. R. McCracken presented sixteen division supervisors with Department of the Navy certificates of commendation for outstanding leadership in their respective departments. Each division had a record of no lost time accidents for the past year and several had records extending over a number of years. The Naval Air Station ended the year with a perfect score, consequently all divisions were represented at the ceremony.
Mr. Ramon Collazo, Quarterman painter, lead the group with an extraordinary record of n i n e straight accident free years for his division. Others with many years
-of accident free supervision were:
Leonard Ford-Leadingman Truck Driver-Eight years
Francisco Martinez-Storekeeper-Seven
years
William J. wilson-Leadingman Roads
and Grounds-Six years
Stanford Young-Leadingman laborerFive years
Selvin . Reid -Storekeeper, NAS supply
-Five years
Captain McCracken also pointed out that the absence of lost time accidents meant many thousands of dollars in extra work accomplished aboard the station, as well as sparing to workers unnecessary injury and the attendant suffering.
The following also received certificates for the safe supervision of their departments:
Migeul Brito - Leadingnan Painter
Four years
Alberto Leguen-Leadingman JoinerFour years
Cyril druks-Leadingman CarpenterThree years
Nestor Speck-Leadingnma GardenerThree years
Oscar Mal lo-Leadingman Auto Mechanic
-Two years
Farl H. Cavanaugh-Chief Quarterman
Transportation-One year
Charles D. Hewitt-Leadingman Auto
Mechanic- One year
Robert E. Saswler-AD3 USN-One year Jose Susavila-Leadingman Joiner-One
year
John Elwood--BMCA-One year

look on faces when the batteries go dead . . . the chick who stood patiently under a bunch of mistletoe, and the guys thinking it was a bunch of weeds and not following through. . . . Nancy Avila holding Doris' car down for her . . . . Peggy P breaking all speed records when she received her mysterious letter. . . . John McGee's crazy suede shoes . . and finally the gal who cried her heart out when she broke the recording of "Shake, Rattle and Roll"


NAS Supervisors Given Leadership Commendations


FTG Bulletin
by Ron Federman
Among our new arrivals at FTG over the holidays was LTJG Waring B. Haselton, Jr. Mr. Haselton reported in on 29 December, from Fleet Training Center, Norfolk, Va. He has been assigned to the Damage C o n t r o 1 Department. Among his notable experiences in the Navy ,we find that he assisted in repairs to the USS KEARNEY; the first naval vessel torpedoed by the Germans immediately prior to the outbreak of World War II. In 1944 Mr. Haselton was appointed to the Warrant Rank of Carpenter. He has served aboard such ships as the USS INDIANA, USS WRIGHT, USS MIDWAY, and the USS ROANOKE.
Other new arrivals over the holidays were Albert Moschner, ENC, who reported to FTG from SubGroup 4, Green Cove Springs, Fla., Christian R. Pankake (no relation to Aunt Jamima), PN1, from U.S. Naval Station, Argentia, Robert M. Heil, YN3, from the U.S. Naval Hospital, Gtmo Bay, and Floyd J. Sedwick, YN3 received from U.S. Naval Technical Training Unit, Philadelphia, Pa. "Sed" attended Slippery Rock State Teachers College in Pa., and graduated with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Education ,prior to enlisting in the U.S. Navy.
The USNS PVT JOHNSON arrived on 24 December, bringing christmas presents for Foster, RM2, and Wynn, RD1. The socalled "presents" were in the person of Mrs. Foster with her two children, and Mrs. Wynn, accompanied by her one-year old daughter.
Another ALNAV was released recently which concerned several enlisted men attached to FTG. As a result, the following men were advanced to Second Class as of 1 January 1955:
Federman-Advanced to YN2.
Ofenito-Advanced to EN2.
Cunningham-Advanced to BM2.
Rapella-Advanced to YN2.
Bellavance-Advanced to YN2.
A word of praise to the members of the "Picnic Committee" for the splendid job they did in organizing the FTG Picnic held at Phillip's Recreation Park on 30 December, A good time was had by all. The Egg-Tossing Contest was won by Frank O'Brien, TMC, who consequently received a very nice gift for his efforts. Sorry to say that the other contestants received nothing but a "splattered egg" for their fine efforts. A Jitterbug Contest was held, which found Timmons, SN, accompanied by a "pretty teen-ager", dancing his way to First Place, as awarded by the judges.
Mrs. Gmeiner, wife of CHELEC K. F. Gmeiner, presented her husband with a baby girl at 1115 P.M., New Years Eve. The baby weighted in at 8 lbs, 6 oz.
Too bad it couldn't have been a New Year's Baby-but think of the money saved on taxes!
Captain Tedder, and all hands attached to FTG, wish to express and offer their deepest condolences to Mr. and Mrs. Mathis, who had the misfortune of losing their child at birth several weeks ago.
Musically, Norm Perron, YNSN, and Joe Russek, RMSN, helped make the CPO New Years Dance a success last Friday Night at the CPO Club. With Norm at the Piano and Joe at the Accordian, the place was really jumping. Russek works in the Communications Department, and Perron has been assigned the job as Engineering Department Yeoman.


THE INDIAN


Page Seven








Navy-DPPO-10ND-Gtmo.-0626


WGBY Hi-Lites Radio's 'Tops' of the Week


5OOKNOOK
by Francis L. Cannon, S03

HAITI, THE BLACK REPUBLIC
by Seldan Rodman.
This book gives a wnolley rounded picture of Haiti, its art, religion, voodoo, luxuriant wilderness, with tropical tips and information on hotels, shopping, tours, etc. There are 48 pages of photographs, a glossary of the Creole language, and information maps. Excellent reading for anyone planning a trip to Haiti.
THE PRIVATE WORLD OF WILLIAM FAULKNER
by Robert Coughlan
This book attempts to present a clear and objective portrait of William Faulkner a man considered to be the greatest figure in modern American literature. Couglan shows the early influences which shaped Faulkner into what he is, not the least of which was his great grandfather, William, a man who wrote novels, commanded soldiers and built an industrial empire. Faulkner was born in Oxford, Mississippi. His books have been peopled with characters from there and the whole area has had a great influence on his life. It is informal, entertaining, yet thoughtful and accurate.
ACTING, THE FIRST SIX
LESSONS
by Richard Boleslavsky
For actors, directors, teachers and playgoers, a book on what acting is all about by a man who, at the time of his death, was a leading Hollywood director. The lessons are in the form of a dialogue between a teacher and student and are far from the dull, prosaic manner in which many things of this type are written. The author was a playwright, actor, director producer and knew what he was talking about. SATCHMO, MY LIFE IN NEW
ORLEANS
by Louis Armstorng
Satchmo is the inspiring story of a man whose passion for music pulled him along the hard road from orphanage to international fame as one of the world's greatest jazz trumpet men and singers. In this book the old New Orleans lives again through his vivid words and through it all shines the personality of Satchmo himself. THE FIVES AND SIXES GO TO
SCHOOL
by Emma D. Sheehy
Although written primarily for teachers of the kindergarten and first grade levels, this book can be of great value to parents of five and six-year olds anxious to launch their children's school careers auspiciously. The authoress explains how the task of introducing children to the school routine can best be accomplished.

OPERATION BLONDE
PAYN
#M V

A ki






J


by George Eagle

Now that the Holiday Season has ground to a halt, we go back to the business of every day living, not without some regret. So "Hi-Lites" resumes normal operation with the first item on the agenda, the business of letting you know that we at WGBY sincerely nope that you and yours had a very pleasant Yuletide season. Next item is to file away all the Christnas music way, way back in the shelves, to gather dust until next year.
Third comes the task of bidding a final fond farewell to Bob Mairo. Don't expect another send-off like the last one, Bob. Look what happend then! Bob leaves for the U.S.S. POCONO, AGC-16 for duty. At the risk of repeating ourselves, we will miss you, Bob. You've become a part of WGBY.
And last, but not least, a few changes in the schedule of programs from AFPS, Los Angeles.
In the 8:30 P.M. spot on Wednesday, the program "The Big Story" will replace "The FBI In Peace and War". This program has been heard at Gtmo before and the contents will be familiar to most of the older Base inhabitants. It features documentaries of the authentic experiences of reporters in pursuit of their top experiences. Norman Hayes narrates these true stories and the program is under the direction of James Hayes.
And at 9:00 P.M. on Wednesday, "Crime Classics" gives way to the new series, "Pursuit", scripted by Antony Ellis, famous for his many contributions to "Escape", under the direction of the incomparable Elliot Lewis and starring noted radio actor Ben Wright in the role of Inspector Peter Black. The programs will dramatize weekly the adventures of England's worldfamous Scotland Yard.
We hope these new programs will add a pleasant bit of variety to your daily listening.
Don't forget to watch the daily program schedule in the Papoose for any changes in programs presented over WGBY, 1450 on your radio dial. Mission accomplished. See you next week.
. . . . Good Listening . . . .


Slapsie Maxie . ..

(Continued from Page One)
bara Jones, Molly, Mulligan, Grant Garrett, Ruth Gillis, Regina Gleason, Agnes Goetz, Judy Marsh, Novella O'Hara, Rima Rudina, Helen' Stanton and Donna Brown. In the combo accompanying the revue are Gershon Kingsley at the piano, Jimmie Haskell on the accordion and Richard Wilgon on the drums.


r FR AT LFAsr NM71 S4Af Tm HEg sAkG


SUNDAY, 9 January. . . . . HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE . . . . 10:00 P.M
Piper Laurie and Rock Hudson costar in their original roles in the radio adaptation of the popular screen hit "Has Anybody Seen My Gal". M ONDAY, 10 January . . . . THEATRE GUILD ON THE AIR . . . . 9:00 P.M.
The story of a man living in a gray world without love or joy, a world which might be all too possible in the future, is told in George Orwell's "Nineteen Eighty-Four". Richard Widmark stars.
TUESDAY, 11 January . . . . ESCAPE . . . . 9:00 P.M.
Escape presents a thrilling drama of a man stranded with a carnival just this side of the Iron Curtain Suddenly a chance to grab a fortune comes his way, but attempt is treacherous. "Carnival in Vienna".
WEDNESDAY, 12 January . . . . THE BIG STORY . .,. . S:30 P.M. The return of this favorite narrates the adventure of Gene Lindsey of the Phoenix, Arizona Gaxette when he gives the police vital assistance in tracking down the killer of a young widow
THURSDAY, 13 January . . . . DRAGNET . . . . 8:30 P.M.
Jack Webb stars as Sgt. Friday. Assigned to robbery detail, he investigates the hold-up of a super-market.
FRIDAY, 14 January . . . . RADIO WORKSHOP . . . . 10:00 P.M
The combined efforts of The Little Theatre and Radio Station WGBY are blended once again to present Norman Corwin's amusing modern Fairy-Tale, "Mary and The Fairy"


Here's a high-powered Allison for you: Universal-International's Allison Hayes. You can see her in "Sign of the Pagan," with sinister Jack Palance.


MOVIES
Saturday, January 8
THE HUMAN JUNGLE
Gary Merrill Jan Sterling
New police captain causes the death of an innocent bystander when closing in on an underworld hideout. Newspapers blast him, but the captain strives to prove his ability.
Sunday, January 9
SUSAN SLEPT HERE
Debbie Reynolds Dick Powell
Comedy about a teen-age "problem girl" who is dropped in the household of a Hollywood writer, falls in love with hin and reorganizes his home and life.
Monday, January 10
GOG
Herbert Marshall
Constance Dowling
Concerns secret research being conducted by American scientists in a four-tier lab under the New Mexico Desert.
Tuesday, January 11 ANGELS ONE FIVE
Jack Hawkins Michael Denison
Hawkins plays a squadron leader who watches over his men with hawk-like intensity .Picture concerns human relations of handful of men during wartime.
Wednesday, January 12
HIGH AND DRY
Paul Douglas Hubert Gregg
Douglhs, the high pressure chief of an American airline finds his hustling methods no match for the native guile of the crew of Scottish boat to which he has accidently sent an urgent cargo.
Thursday, January 13 OF HUMAN DESIRE
Glenn Ford Gloria Grahame
Railroad engineer becomes involved in a murder rap because of his attraction for the woman whose husband committed the crime. By failing to implicate her he becomes accessory to the crime.


I


Navy-DPPO-1OND--Gtmo.-0626 THE INDIAN Saturday, 5 January 1~i55


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 8 January 1955


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9*4e -----"Govers (TMO Like The Sunskine" Vol. VII No. 1 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 8 January 1955 .Stage, Screen, Radio Hit Play 'Detective Story' Slated For u k, Next Little Theatre Production Three of the long-distance travelers who made the trip from Excelsior, Minn. to the Naval Base pose for the Indian photographer along with the trusty '54 Plymouth that carried them during the 2,773 mile journey. Seated in the car is Mrs. Baker, Mrs. Elizabeth Zabel stands at her right, and Mr. Baker stands holding the door. Bart Jr. was in school when the picture was taken. Minn. Group Travels 2,773 Miles For Cuban Holiday Vacation On Thursday night, 23 Dec. a SHIPS DEPT, BEA 1954 Plymouth came to a stop in front of CB-1B, the home of E. D Surroz, MMC. The driver honked the horn, and four people climbed ::. out of the car-tired, dusty, and travel-worn, but very happy. This was the end of a 2,773 mile trip for Mr. & Mrs. Bart Baiter of Excelsior, Minn., accompanied by Bart Junior and Chief Surroz's sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Zabel. Unofficially, this vacation trip of the Baker group breaks all records for families driving to the Naval Base. Several families have previously driven across Cuba after taking the ferry from Florida, yet a trip from the northern UniteStates has been previously unheard of. Starting off from their home ir Excelsior on the 15th of December Mr. & Mrs. Baker drove to Key West in six days, sight-seeing along the way and driving only during the day, From Key West. the Barkers boarded the "City of Key West" ferry to Cardefnas, Cuba, an eight hour trip, where they spent the night before contining their journey to Santiag ed Cuba. Original plans for the trip called for leaving the car in Santiago and then continuing by commercial te beard ed rio ob e T transportation, since they had been contest, w end ls eek. To warned that the road from SanCrtifiae wen to Jesse wS tiago to Guantanamo City would be Criei, Va. Second place wi Saurwein, MR3 (right), whose ho (Continued oin Page Six) place with a $5 certificate was Dani The Guantanamo Bay Little Theatre has announced as its next production the 3-act play which, in 1949, slapped blase Broadway in the teeth from the stage of the Hudson Theatre, rocked and shocked the nation as a movie, startled television audiences and sold countless numbers of books-Sidney Kingsley's emotion-shattering "Detective Story." Carrying a cast of 32 the play deals with three tense hours in a detective squad room of a New Presnts irs Sho TonghtYork precinct police station. The Presents First Show Tonightplot centers around a Detective McLeod, a rough, tough and square "Slapsie Maxie's Revue," officop who goes strictly by the hook, and, when necessary, writes in a cially designated as Christmas few extra chapters for himself. Entertainment Unit GA-2, will McLeod's regulation starched expresent two performances at the istence is suddenly confronted with Naval Station lyceum today and a complete collapse of his most tomorrow. stringent ideals. His reaction The show is one of several units rings the play to an excitement which has been touring the overfilled, gun-roaring climax. seas bases providing entertainment During the three acts most of for servicemen stationed abroad. the debris from humanity's tragic, Included in tonight's performcrazy, wonderful existence parades ance are: Slapsie Maxie Rosenthrough the squad room providing bloom, one-time light-heavyweight a few chuckles salted with humor boxing champion of the world and peppered with evil. (1930 to 1934) and a cast of 15. The universal appeal of "DetecThe show will present their two tive Story" is expected to break performances here, then proceed to all previous records of attendance Ramey Air Force Base for two at the Little Theatre. It is unmore shows before returning to doubtedly the most serious and th States. most complicated venture the LitIncluded in the acts are: Bartle Theatre has embarked upon yet. (Continued on Page Eight) Reading try-outs for parts will be held at the Little Theatre on CONT ST E DED Marina Point today and tomorrow at 1 PM. Since it is the largest copt whor gesestitlyd by the book, stage, Alan Wagner, president of the group and director of the play, has urged that all persons interested in reading for a part be on hand. And because of the large number in the cast, additional help will be needed backstage-makeup personisel, costume maters, stagehands, painters, carpenters, etc. It is hoped that a sufficient number of people will appear at the tryouts today and tomorrow to coinplete casting with the two readings. "Detective Story" is tentatively scheduled to open about the mid(le of March. are the winners in Ship's Dept. beard p prize of a $20 Navy Exchange gift iley, SN (center) who hails from h a $10 certificate went to C. W. ne town is Bunker Hill, Ill. In third el Huyck, BM2, of Kansas City, Kans. Annual 'Dimes' Drive Open For Contributions The appeal for funds for the 1955 March of Dimes is already being conducted here on the Naval Base in Guantanamo Bay. The drive, commencing on January 3, and continuing throughout the remainder of the month, needs the help of each and every one on the base to donate to this worthy cause. LCDR K. G. Peterson, Protestant Chaplain, has been appointed chairman of the 1955 polio drive in this area. March of Dimes con(Continued on Page Six) R

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Psge 'Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 8 January 1955 The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Oflice, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 8 January 1955 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sandness__. H. E. DavisJOC--H. L. Sissn, 101__ P. L. Canesos, J03___. D. C. Rsoberts, JOSH_ -Officer-Advisor -------------Editor -News -___Pisaturapher -------Reparter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. An Editorial Will You Measure Up? Through the cold, damp Tennessee dawn, they were taking Sam Davis to the gallows. The young Rebel soldier had been captured behind the Union lines. In his pocket they found detailed drawings of the Federal fortifications. Who had given them to him? Sam Davis was silent. The plans had been stolen by a Negro boy loyal to the Southern cause. He had given them to Sam Davis to deliver to the Confederate command. The Union commander halted the march to the gallows. "Soldier," said the officer in blue, "I'm more interested in discovering the leak in my own camp than in hanging you as a spy. You can have safe passage back to your lines if you'll tell me who gave you the plans." Sam Davis broke his silence. He looked the officer square in the eyes. "Do you suppose that I would betray a friend? No, Sir! I would die a thousand times first!" Sam Davis was hanged by the neck until dead. Information continued to flow from the Union camp. The loyalty displayed by Sam Davis is what your nation demands of you, as a member of the Armed Forces. Such loyalty was displayed by the men in Korean POW camps who did die a thousand deaths but kept their lips sealed through the anguish of brainwashing and torture. They died with their lips sealed rather than betray their friends. This same loyalty may, some day, be demanded of you. Will you measure up? (AFPS) Hospital Notes What's Doin' Stateside (AFPS Wekly Feature) NINETEEN-FIFTY-FIVE is going to be a good year for American business, according to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. ...Better than 1954 and maybe even as good as 1953, the most prosperous year in U.S. history. ...At a minimum, the total national production should reach $360 million, compared to $356 million in 1954. One of the things helping to create prosperity is the change which has occurried in the nation's homes during the past couple of decades ...There are now 54 different kinds of electric home appliances on the market ...In 1930, there were just 19 ...One result is the U.S. demand for electric power is doubling every 10 years. The research which has stimulated technical and cultural progress in the U.S. continues to find generous sources of finance The Fund for the Advancement of Education, established by the privately endowed Ford Foundation, has announced grants of nearly $26 million since 1951 The money was almost equally divided between public and private colleges and schools. According to the Bureau of the Census, the nation's population is climbing at a dizzy rate and may reach 221 million by 1975 ...It's now 163 million ...Incidentally, women in America live longer than men and are widening the gap in life expectancy between the sexes ...Women now live to an -average age of 72, men only to 67 ...Average U.S. males marry at 23 ...They are nabbed by brides who are an average age of 21. HEIRPORT NEWS Congratulations to Doctor E. D. Grady and Mrs. Jean Grady upon the arrival of their third child, a boy, Steven Michael. Steven was born on 26 Dec. Carl Thomas, born recently is the son of GM1 and Mrs. Mary Gammon. The last newborn baby of the 1954 year at TTSNH Gtmo was Michele Ann to CHELEC and Mrs. Ursula Gmeiner, Michele was born on 31 Dec. The new year was not to be forlorned very long as Richard Allen Holloman made the initial 1955 appearance at 0522 hours on New Years Day. EN1 and Mrs. Mary Holloman are the proud parents. DEPARTURES LTJG Lois R. Pin, (NC), USNR departed for NAS, Jacksonville, Fla. on 5 Jan. to be separated from the naval service. While here, the greater part of Miss Pin's nursing duties were performed in the dependents out-patient clinic and ward. LTJG Pin's amiable personality and professional ability will insurb a successful career when she returns to civilian life. Among the enlisted personnel that have left us recently are four First Class Petty Officers. Ed Harvey HM1 goes to NavHosp, Oakland, Calif for duty. Ed was regarded as the comedian of Hospital Hill; a dull moment was not possible when Harvey was present. Claude Stepp, HM1, flew to Florida and will report to NavSta, Green Cove Springs for duty. Claude was with our master-at-arms and security division. Transferred to the AFDL-47 last week was HM1 Bob Schwartz. Bob spent his hours at the Admission Desk. A very remarkable individual, Glen Hallum, HM1, chose civilian life and went to Jax for separation. Glen advanced to HM1 in less than four years; a feat which surprised no one who was aware of his endless capacities. These capacities were not only of an intellectual nature, but also, of an athletic nature. He was captain of last year's basketball team, being at the same time, high scorer. Hallum won the USNH Golf Tournament Championship in 1954. In 1953 he ranked first place in the Hospital Table Tennis Tourney. At our parties Glen could always be counted on the sparkle the affair with his mellow tenor voice. If there was any time to spare from other activities Hallum would amuse himself and others with his tactful strokes of a paint brush. His duties were that of Collection Agent and later worked in the Administrative Office. Upon discharge, he will return to his college studies in Oklahoma. HN Vin Salvati was granted shore duty while home on emergency leave due to his wife's sudden illness. Vin will be stationed in his hometown at Troy, New York where he has distinguished himself in that locality as a promnising welterweight boxer. OPENNIG GAME ~WTH &A $O lNE5 The hospital basketball team HAE CLEAN S CLOTHES plays its opening game on Monday, LUGHTS A MATCH 1; T0 January against the Leeward AD 4Point team. Admission is free and Everyone off duty is expected to be there. An improved hospital -team is expected to make things ^ ~pretty bright for us that evening. .4rn-. Let's all cheer 'em on. by Rt. P. Campanozzi iiii Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 8 January 1955 Sunday, 9 January 1955 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900--Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 1230--Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645-Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Confessions: Saturday, 1730-1800: 19302015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930--Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library Chaplains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan, CHC, USN (Catholic) LCDR K. G. Peterson, CHC, USN (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner Among the many temples of ancient Rome were those dedicated to Janus, the porter of heaven who opened the new year, and guardian deity of gates. He was commonly represented with two heads because every door looks two ways, and could therefore see into the future as well as peer into the past. Because of this the events which were to come were as familiar as those which had already taken place, so that in a sense he straddled history much as the Colossus the ancient port of Rhodes. Unfortunately, few of us can hope to equal this degree of omniscience. True enough, we have our seers and prophets, and we can listen to them if we please. But they are often wrong, and many times misdirect as well as guide us so that their efforts have a tendency to cancel out themselves. We have no positive knowledge of what future events await us, and therefore our forecasts must be based upon occurances drawn from the past. Hind-sight, it has often been said, is much easier than foresight, and surely no one will dispute the point. We can look back -sometimes with pleasure, occasionally with regret-and see very clearly the triumphs and mistakes of the time gone by. But what positive guide do we have for the days that lie ahead? This is the time of year for resolutions-New Year's resolutions-which we hope will steer our living to a higher plane than it has ever before attained. Might I venture a suggestionRead the Gospel according to St. Matthew, chapters 5 through 7. Don't just skim through the pages. Read it very carefully. And when finished, turn back to pay particular attention to chapter 6:33. It constitutes a summary for all that is said. Naturally, you won't be guaranteed a perfect 1955, but you'll be plotting your course in the right direction. William W. Poynter LTJG, CHC, USNR

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M Saturday, 8 January 1955 M THE INDIAN m Page Three SecNav Reveals Sharper Plumneting In Navy Re-ups; Blames Lack Of Individual Attraction, Public Apathy The Secretary of the Navy startled a Navy League audience recently when he revealed that the overall reenlistment rate in the Navy has dropped from 46 percent in October 1953 to only 7 percent in October 1954. Speaking b e f o r e the Navy League of the United States in Detroit, Michigan on 3 December, the Secretary discussed the current problem affecting all services-that of attracting more young men of the country to a career in the service. He cited the reduction in strength of manpower from the top Korean strength of over 700,000 men to the peace time authorized strength of 608,000 and compared this figure to the pre-Korean strength of 315.000. Then he said that despite the reduction in manpower there has been very little reduction in committments. "In these perilous days," he said, "we must keep a fleet in the Far East, a division of Marines in Korea and one in Japan. We must keep a fleet in the Mediterranean, a force in the Persian Gulf. While these units are not actively engaged in fighting, they and all our ships must maintain a heavy training schedule in order to insure the instant readiness and vigilance which the world situation has dictated." It was then that the Secretary noted the 7 percent reenlistment figure and went on to explain that the Navy, at that rate, would lose 60 percent of its total strength within the next two fiscal years. He remarked especially on the career people of the Navy. He said, ..only 48 percent are signing up for additional service. This 48 percent compares with 90 percent only one year ago." He went on to point out that the critical part of the situation is that many of the losses are the highly trained technicians and the senior supervisors, those who came into the Navy during the war and became eligible for retirement in just a few years. This, added to the fact that the Navy recruiters have been falling far below their monthly quotas (as much as 4,000 under) results in one of the most serious situations the Navy and the other services have faced in many years. The Secretary expressed his oninion that accepting 2-year enlistements "is certainly not the total or satisfactory answer." Speaking of the 2-year enlistee he said, "Just as he reaches the point of becoming experienced and valuable, his 2-year draft term is completed, he leaves the service and the process ...(of training) ... must start all over again." "It is for this reason that the Navy cannot survive as a first class fighting service if it becomes a conscript Navy. There must be a base of between 50 to 60 percent career people. To maintain this base, not less than 25 percent of those completing their first enlistment and 75 percent of the career people must reenlist." The Secretary stressed that to provide this strong base of career people, both in talent and numbers, "there must be two fundamentals: MOTIVATION BY THE INDIVIDTAL and RECOGNITION BY THE PUBLIC." For the individual, the Secretary said, "There must be two prime attractions: the opportunity to do something useful and worthwhile; the opportunity to improve himself and his fortunes." For the public, he said, "There must be general and genuine recognition of the individual's worth, of his importance, of his tasks, and of his accomplishments." In answer to the question of why the services were finding it so difficult to attract young men for a career, the Secretary pointed out that "military service is not sufficiently attractive, not only in the material sense, but in the sense of duty to country. Presently, the personal advantages of civilian life so outweigh those of present day military service that fewer and fewer men care to make the sacrifice. Furthermore, the material inducements which await him as a civilian veteran ..exceed the material attractions of making the Navy a career." The Secretary closed his remarks with a summary of what the Navy League could do to help the situation. He suggested a continuing nationwide campaign of public education to inform the American people of the gravity of the problem. He also suggested that the League could initiate a campaign to sell the naval service to patriotic young citizens as a career vital to the security and welfare of the country. "As part of that campaign," "I think the League should try and sell the American public that if they want a first-class Army, a first-class Navy, a first-class Air Force, and a first-class Marine Corps, they must pay the price for it." Dr. Imburg Main Speaker At PTA Meeting Tuesday The Parents-Teachers Association will hold a meeting Tuesday evening January 11, at the Naval Base school open air auditorium, commencing at 7:30 P.M. The main speaker for the evening will be Dr. J. Imburg, Naval Hospital Pediatrician. His topic for the evening's speech will be entitled "Child Hygiene." Attendance will be taken as before and prizes wil be awarded to the first three winners. Entertainment for the evening will be provided by CAPT J. B. MacGregor, who will show the first half of a movie he made while on a round the world, good will tour with the vice-president of the United States, Richard Nixon. The first part of the movie that he will show, was taken during the time between Ooctber 6, 1953 and December 14, 1953. While on the tour CAPT MacGregor served as physician and Naval Aide to vicepresident Nixon. Villamar-Bargo Council Awards Decoation Prizes Last week, the Villamar-Bargo Council made its awards for the best out-side Christmas Decorations in the Villamar-Bargo area. The contest, sponsored by the Villamar-Bargo Association, under the supervision of CAPT W. R. Caruthers, was divided into three divisions; Bargo Quonset Housing, Villamar Defense housing, and Replacement Housing. First prize for the Bargo quonsets went to P. E. Gibson, at CB-5B. First Prize for Replacement Housing was awarded to D. F. Bertagna, BTC, of Fleet Training Group for his home at RH274D. No prize was awarded for the Villamar Defense Housing. The two winners were awarded a prize of $10. Judging the contest was CAPT and Mrs. W. R. Caruthers, CAPT and Mrs. R. R. McCracken, and CDR and Mrs. V. J. Soballe. SeaBee Anniversary Set Up To 5 March For the past twelve years the date used for the anniversary of the U.S. Naval Construction Battalions (SeaBees) has been 28 December. In 1954, however, no command observed the annual affair since a recent revision called for the anniversary celebration on 5 March of 1955 and every year. Originally, 28 Dec. was set as the anniversary date since that was the date in 1941 on which authority was requested by the Bureau of Yards and Docks to recruit enlisted personnel for Naval Construction Battalions. Yet, the SeaBees, as an active unit, did not begin until their official authorization on 5 March 1942. 24 Base Lieutenants Selected for Promotion President Eisenhower has approved the selection of 4,570 lieutenants of the regular Navy and Naval Reserve on active duty for promotion to the rank of lieutenant commander. Those selected will be promoted throughout the fiscal year 1955. Twenty-four Navy Guantanamo officers received the good news last week. Fleet Training Group led the list with 12 promotions, Naval Station had seven, three doctors were selected at the Hospital and there was one each from Naval Air Station and Utility Squadron 10. FLEET TRAINING GROUP: Joseph Catanzarito Leo D. Christie Herman A. Graven Frank M. Jones William E. Kneiple Francis W. Moseley Irving M. Page, Jr. George E. Saunders William H. Shaw Edgar Stafford William J. Tipler J. T. Usey, Jr. NAVAL STATION: Earl A. Sadness Gordon E. Hoppe Robert E. Peacock Edward A. Toczko Roger L. Harris William D. Brotherton, Jr. Thomas M. Brown HOSPITAL: Edgar D. Grady George V. Hering Samuel L. Moschella NAVAL AIR STATION: Everett E. Pierce UTILITY SQUADRON 10: George F. Guyer An additional note of interest to personnel in Guantanamo Bay is that the former Personnel Officer of the Naval Station, Charles E. Kleinert and the former Commissary Officer Anthony Grego were also selected for the promotions. Both officers were transferred recently. Hospital Commander Promoted To Captain Mrs. Catherine MacGregor proudly clips the silver eagle to her husabnd's collar, CAPT John B. MacGregor (MC) USN, as he accepts his certificate of promotion from CAPT Tilden I. Moe, (MC) USN, Commanding Officer of the Naval Hospital. Ceremony was held in CAPT Moe's office recently.

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a o Pa& Pour Saturday, 8 January 1953 SPORTS ROUND-UP by Joe Celentano, JO1, USN (AFPS Sports Writer) The U.S. basketball squad competing in the Mexico City PanAmerican games in March will be managed by Maj. Roy P. Johnson, Chief of the Sports Section at Air Force Hq. in Washington, D.C. Maj. Johnson was an all-around athlete at the University of Illinois in 1930. ...Ft. Belvoir, Va., loses a great athlete in February when Dick Groat gets separated from the service. Groat, a baseball and basketball star for the Engineers, will report to the Pittsburgh Pirates training camp in the spring. ...The Wheels at Ft. Eustis, Va., are rolling up the points. Sparking the cage team again this season is Larry Hennessey, former Villanova All-American and AFPS AllStar. Hennessey hit the cords for 53 points when the Wheels downed Ft. Belvoir, 107-94, early in the season. The information services officer at Lockbourne AFB, Ohio, writes that the base's new special services officer, 2nd Lt. Don Boenker, was an ace righthand twirler for the University of Missouri baseball team in 1952. ...Tennis star Maureen "Little Mo" Connolly and ex-Navy journalist Norman Brinker have decided to wait a year before walking down the aisle. Jack Thomas, who chalked up a 20-3 record as a pitcher for the Quantico, Va., Marines will be trying for a spot on the Boston Red Sox roster this spring. Herman Heddrick, a 6'5" guard recently discharged from the Army at Carlisle Barracks, Pa., has signed with the professional New York Knickerbockers. He played college ballat Canisius College in Buffalo, N.Y. The New York Yankees, a sure bet to win the pennant this year, have 115 farmhands in the military service. Of the 115, approximately 64 are expected to be released between now and the start of the training season. ...Pvt. Lucius Minor, known to the fight world as Luther Rawlings, is currently in training-basic training that is, at Camp Chaffee, Ark. Rawlings, a tall, lean welterweight, has a 53-12 professional record. Pvt. Gene Gedman of Ft. Kobbe, C. Z., is one soldier who's feelin' mighty low because the Cleveland Browns scalped the Detroit Lions, 56-10, for the professional football championship. Gedman was a Detroit halfback before entering the Army. ...AFPS All-Star tackle J. D. Kimmel of Ft. Lee, Va., has been discharged and has signed with the pro Washington Redskins. The pro Chicago Bears expect to lose their fledgling quarterback Zeke Bratkowski to the Air Force soon. The ex-Georgia ace completed 67 passes out of 130 for 1,087 yards and eight touchdowns. ... Replacing Bratkowski at the quarterback slot for the Bears will probably be ex-Notre Dame star Bob Williams. Williams, an AFPS All-Star while at Bainbridge Naval Training Center, Md., will soon be leaving the Navy. ..It didn't take tackle Bob Gain of Nagoya AB, Japan, long to get back to the professional gridiron. Gain, a member of the AFPS All-Star second team this year, was recently discharged and played defensive tackle for the Browns in the championship game with the Lions. 90-lb Catch Landed From Gtmo River Ronald Seagle, BM3, of Naval Station Special Services, displays the 90-pound catch of snook and jack which he and William James, DC3, of Naval Station Boatshed, caught in one afternoon during the holiday season. The catch was made in and around the Guantanamo River. Ladies Golf Club Presents Tourney Trophies At a recent meeting of the Ladies Golf Club of Guantanamo Bay the winners of the Ladies' Handicap Tournament were presented with their prizes. Mrs. Polly Herring, the 1954 Handicap Champion, was presented with a silver tray and Mrs. Jane McElroy, runner-up in the tournament, was given a silver vegetable dish. In the photo above are: Mrs. Evelyn Leach (low score on the front nine), Mrs. Emma Hutton (winner of 1st Flight), Mrs. McElroy, Mrs. Hering, Mrs. Marge Sheehan (runner-up i 1st Flight), Mrs. W. R. Caruthers and Mrs. R. R. McCracken, former chairman of the club. Marines Drop Carbine The Marines Corps has eliminated the M-1 carbine from its arsenal of weapons. The basic in the Corps now will be .45-cal automatic pistols for master sergeants and officers and .30-cal rifles for technical sergeants and below. "Daddy," said little Billy, "a fellow in school told me I looked just like you." "That's nice," said Dad, "and what did you say?" "Nothing, he was bigger'n me." 6th Fleet Holds Manuvers With Spanish Fleet In Med. The United States Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean has been ordered to hold joint maneuvers with the Spanish Fleet in an effort to develop similar communications and tactical systems. The drunk staggered to the door and found the milkman waiting. "Nothing today, pal," he said. "Haven't got a thing to mix it with." Sports'From Here'n There Armed Forces track and field stars are assembling at the University of Maryband for training that may possibly lead to the 1955 Pan-American games and the 1956 Olympics. Eventually some 30 candidates will be on temporary duty at the Forest Glen section of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C. Among those training will be Southern California star Jack Davis, a Navy ensign from the USS Yorktown. Davis was the NCAA and AAU national champion in the 120-meter high hurdles in 1952-53-54. The United States defeated Australia, 3-2, in the Davis Cup challenge round to regain possession of the trophy, emblematic of world amateur supremacy, after four years. This marks the 17th triumph for the United States since the start of Davis Cup competition in 1900. Australia has won the trophy 11 times, Great Britain nine and France six. The 1954 results: exNavy man Tony Trabert took the first singles match, downing Australia's Lew Hoead, and America's national champ Vic Seixas followed with a win over Ken Rosewall. Trabert and Seixas teamed up to beat the two Aussies again in the doubles. In Tokyo a Far East Air Force All-Star football team outlasted a Navy All-Star eleven in the annual Torii Bowl football game before 20,000 fans and won 50 to 47. A selected team of Marine AllStars from the Far East downed an Army All-Star squad, 27-13, in the Sukiyaki Bowl football games before a crowd of 30,000. In Quantico, the Quantico Marines downed Washington and Jefferson College of Washington, Pa., 69-58 to win the Christmas Invitational Basketball tournament, at which the Marines were host to seven collegiate squads. About 20 service, AAU and collegiate boxers will be invited to try out for the U.S. team which will complete in the Mexico City Pan-American games in March. The Kaneohe Marine Corps Air Station rifle team won the Territory of Hawaii's big bore rifle championship with an aggregate score of 968 points nad 87 V-ring shots. Some Overseas Personnel May Get Special Pay Some military personnel not accompanied by their dependents on a foreign assignment where bachelor quarters are not available may soon receive a special new allowance. The proposed pay, which is awaiting final approval by the service Secretaries, will amount to $3.40 a day for officers and $1.90 a day for EM. It will be in addition to any station per diem allowance for quarters currently being paid. us Su THE INDIAN Ms

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Saturday, 8 January 1955 M Page Five ~ Si' or/s Base Cage Play Begins Monday; Ten Teams Entered In League The Naval Base Basketball League gets off to a fast start Monday night on the Marine Site court when the High School Pirates go against the Naval Air Station Fliers in the first game and the Pointers from Leeward clash with the Hospital-Dental combine in the second game. Ten teams are entered in the league this year. Besides the four above, there are also Cargo Handling Battalion One, Utility Squadron Ten, Fleet Training Group, MCB-4, Marines and Naval Station. The MCB-4 team will be replaced by the MCB-1 squad upon its arrival. Games this year, as usual, will be alternated between the court at Marine Site and the Naval Station court in the Recreation Area. The first game of the nightly twinbill will begin at 6:30, to be followed by the second game about 15 minutes after completion of the first. W. F. McDonald, RDC, has been named as the head official of the league and consequently has charge of all the officials during a game. All teams this year have been hit hard in the manpower department and very few of last year's cagers will take the floor again this year. Paul King, last year's All-Star and league high scorer, is back again this year playing with the Hospital-Dental combine. The High School's star, Edgar Heimer, remains with the squad this year to form a nucleous. Heimer was third high scorer in the league last year. The Naval Station Indians' Bradford is gone, but playingmanager Jerry Morgan remains along with "Doc" Doherty who will the squad for several weeks before his transfer. For the Marine Leathernecks five, last year's league champs, two regulars remain: Andy Androvich and Bob Gatti, 4th and 5th top scorers from last year. The Naval Air Station squad, last year's runner-up in the league, probably has the most number of regulars held over from last year's battles. Ring, Snyder, Moran and Deerr remain with the squad this year. The Trainers from the Training Group are the hardest hit of all with no holdovers from last year. A brand new squad will take the court this season. The combining of the Hospital squad with the Dental squad gives this combine the greatest number of hold-overs. Aside from King, there will be Rose, O'Brien, Maddox, Feiland and Toland returning to the wars. Hospital ended last year's fray in 3rd place. NEW RULE ADDS INTEREST A change in the foul-shooting rules has been made for this year and has caused considerable favorable comment already in the college games in the States. The rule reverses the "miss-it-try-again" rule of last year. This year if a man is awarded a foul shot and makes it, he gets a "bonus" shot thereby stressing accuracy from the foul line. Many college games this yedr have been won because of the bonus rule. Also, in the base league this year, emphasis will be placed on coaching from the bench and heckling from the stands. The referees will enforce the already-standing rule that no coach may go on to the court to talk to his players even during the quarters and timeouts. The home team will be responsible for the conduct of the audience and any unnecessary heckling of the players or the officials will result in a penalty against the home team. From the fast-paced intra-mural league play before the holidays, it is evident that this year's base league will produce a lot of snappy, fast ball handling right up to the post-season tournament scheduled to begin on March 14th. Cage Schedule Mon 10 Jan* High School vs NAS Leeward Pt vs USNH Tues 11 Jan VU-10 vs MCB-4 FTG vs MCB-4 Wed 12 Jan' High School vs Marines NAS vs CHB-1 Thurs 13 Jan* Leeward Pt vs FTG MCB-4 vs NavSta Fri 14 Jan* USNH vs Marines CHB-1 vs VU-10 Asterick (*) denotes games that will be played on Marine Site court. SCUTTLEBUTT "I had a Iie tr efi after you ha gup' N. K Norfolk Pro's Show How It's Done John O'Donnell drives off the tee in an exhibition of professional golf techniques last Sunday at the Guantanamo Bay Golf Club. Harold (Shorty) Oatman stands by for the exhibition match which followed the "clinic" by the two professionals. O'Donnell and Oatman are currently making a tour of the Caribbean bases conducting their well-known golf clinic and playing exhibition matches. Norfolk, Va. area. Ladies Golf Shots by Miriam Hoy Wednesday morning the lady golfers played the front nine for low gross and low net scores. Winners of the golf balls were: 1st Flight--GrossJane McElroy Net-tie-Marion Caruthers Alma McCracken 2nd Flight-GrossGladys Hamilton Net-Billie Nelson After we played, a special business meeting was held in the golf Snack Shack. A representative of the caddies thanked us for the donations made by the Ladies Golf Association towards the caddie's Christmas dinner and gifts. An election of officers was held to serve for the next six month term and the following members were unanimously elected. President-Polly Hering Vice-president-Val Evans Secretary-Betty Lou Tipler Treasurer-Gladys Hamilton Tournament ChairmanSue Scott A luncheon will be held on January 19th at the Marine Family Restaurant at 1:00 P.M. Prospective new numbers are urged to attend the luncheon. If interested, contact any member of the Ladies Golf Association. Both are professionals from the Ladies Bowling Team Standings Team Team Team Team Team Team Team Team Team Team Team Eight Ten One Three Five Four Nine Two Six Seven Won Lost 21 7 17 11 15 13 14 14 14 14 13 15 13 15 13 15 12 16 9 19 High Games F. Grounds E. Griffen S. Wenderlich C. Godbout J. King High Ten E. Griffen F. Grounds P. Way M. Hoy J. King S. Wenderlich M. Powers A. Forrester C. Godbout J. O'Brien 202 174 171 165 162 172 147 145 142 141 138 134 133 132 130 W THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 8 January 1955 Cuban Vacation (Continued from Page One) too hard to travel. However, after the trip from Cardenas on the National Highway, which Mr. Baker states as being "very good," they were considering going on in their own car. At their hotel in Santiago, Mr. Baker made inquires about the road ahead and found from a Navy lieutenant who had just made the trip, that even though the roads were rough, it could be done. The following morning, the four travelers again loaded into the car and headed for Guantanamo City and the Naval Base. According to all members of the party, this was the worst, yet the most interesting part of the trip, in view of both scenery and adventure. Traveling with caution, Mr. Baker forded streams with the Plymouth, bounced over rocky roads, but encountered little trouble except at one stream where they had trouble making it up the opposite bank and had to be towed by a team of oxen. In regard to advice for anyone who would possibly like to make a similar trip, Mr. Baiter quotes the cost of the trip at about $275.00 including the ferry trip to Cardenas, Cuban insurnace, and gas and oil. This trip, the first of its kind for the Bakers, took a total of eight days of traveling, and all without a single dent in the car or engine trouble. The Bakers left Wednesday morning on their return trip over the same roads. Lorry Raine is a favorite of disc jockeys the country over. She has a fine style and an exceptional voice and was placed among the top 15 female vocalists on a deejay poll. New Spanish Class Begins Monday A new Spanish Class, sponsored by the Naval Station Information and Education Office, will commence at 1800 in Room No. 9 of the Naval Base Schol on 10 January. All interested persons are invited to attend. The class will deal primarily in conversational Spanish. AFRS 'Live' From Garden New York (AFPS)-For the first time in the history of Armed Forces Radio Service-New York, basketball games have been transmitted "live" from Madison Square Garden direct to servicemen overseas. 1A Six shortwave transmitters were used to feed 40 stations throughout Europe, Greenland and the Caribbean. Play-by-play was by Navy Chief Journalist Al Spanjer and Gordon Bridge. The direct broadcasts featured the UCLA-Niagara and St. John'sVillanova games of the Eastern Collegiate Ath 1 etic Conference Holiday Festival tourney. Other Holiday Festival games were heard as delayed broadcasts. Throughout the basketball season AFRS-NY airs basketball from the .Garden to servicemen and women overseas, at an average of six college and professional games a week. 1954 Sets Records In Air Transportation The Armed Forces of the United States flew more in 1954 than in any other year, as all records for transporting troops, supplies, and aerial mercy missions fell to the wayside. Most impressive of the record breaking figures was the work of Military Air Transport Service. According to Lt. Gen. Joseph Smith, MATS Commander in a year-end report, an average of 56 military passengers and five patients were transported every hour during the year. Along with this, MATS made "the longest aerial mercy mission in aviation history" as more than 500 French troops wounded in the battle of Dien Bien Phu in Indochina were flown out to hospitals. Here in Guantanamo Bay, Fleet Logistics Air Wing had a big year, as air traffic was higher than ever before. According to LT G. H. Leach, Air Transport Officer, the heaviest load of traffic was during the first of 1954 ,from January to July with traffic falling off during the latter half of the year. March of Dimes (Continued from Page One) tainers will be placed in various establishments on the Naval Base for individual donations. Funds collected are to be converted to checks or money orders drawn to order on "The Treasurer, National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis", and forwarded to Chaplain Peterson. The National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis was founded by the late Franklin D. Roosevelt. Its mission is to lead, direct and support every phase of the fight against polio. The 3,095 city and county chapters for the Nationdi Foundation care for new and longterm cases and organized emergency hospitalization during epidemic. The foundation conducts research to find means of wiping Employees Total Service, 162, at Retirement Five civilian employees of the Naval Station retired on December 31 with a total of 162 years service here on the Naval Base in Guantanamo Bay. CAPT W. R. Caruthers, CO, Naval Station, presented them with letters of retirement. They are, John Gumbs, 32 years service; Zepheniah Thomas, 38 years service; Arthur Godwin, 34 years; Joseph Maynard, 36 years, and Ma Young, 22 years. Also pictured is Mr. H. P. McNeal (left) Industrial Relations Officer. Committee Reccommends Social Security Benefits For Military Personnel Washington (A F P S)-Armed Forces personnel soon may enjoy more and better Social Security rights if Congress favorably considers a recommendation made by a special House committee. The committee's recommendation asked "that serious consideration" be given to placing military personnel under Social Security "on a contributory basis," with such benefits as would accrue therefrom being in lieu of certain survival benefits now provided free of charge. The committee, headed by Rep. William H. Bates (R.-Mass.), made the recommendation despite the fact that the government (as an employer), would have to contribute more than $215,000,000 a year. The committee also recommended that the study be continued next year with the ultimate aim of simplifying survivor benefit programs. At present retired servicemen who receive military retirement benefits are not eligible for Social Security benefits. However, since 1940 all military personnel have received $160 monthly Social Security credit, even though nothing was deducted from their pay. out the dread disease, but depend upon vountary contributions for its continuing fight against polio and for the rehabilitation of those afflicted. Since the campaign is heartly endorsed by the President of the United States, the Department of the Defense and Fleet Commanders it should receive generous support from everyone. Navy EM's Offered NavCad Training by William A. Johnson, PN1 Have you watched the jets racing across the sky and wondered how it feels? Have you wanted to fly yourself? You can, you know, if you are 18 but less than 25 years of age on the date your application is submitted, and have completed 2 years of college at an accredited college or university, or have the service -accepted equivalent; or have completed 1 year of college at an accredited college or university, or have the service-accepted equivalent, and have attained Basic Test Battery scores of 120 for GCT plus ARI and 58 Mechanical. If you can meet these qualifications and are strongly motivated to fly, stop in and see your Information and Education Officer as soon as possible for further details on how to apply for flight training as a Naval Aviation Cadet. Page Six M THE INDIAN M

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Saturday, 8 January 1955 Satu lay 8 Jan asy 1955 THE INDIAN Page Seven VU-10 Prop Blast by Bill Graves With the holiday season a thing of the past, a busy schedule lies ahead for Utility Squadron TEN. The placid bay at our back door will slowly fill with ships, Leeward Point and McCalla fields with planes as units of the Atlantic Fleet arrive for training. VU-10, now equipped with new Cougar jets along with conventional aircraft, hopes to handle the job without support by other Atlantic Fleet Utility Squadrons. In past years, VU-2 and 4 have deployed detachments to Gtmo to help VU-10 meet the heavy winter requirements. This past week found activity on the local links. Chief J. C. Mauldin, ADC, leading chief of VU-10, shot a 78 to bring a big slice of the handicap prize home to the squadron in the form of the consolation cup. "Good shooting for an old man" he quipped. Dern tootin' old timer! Now let's try for the big trophy! First hunt! First shot! One deer. Thus the title of Daniel Boone was bestowed upon CDR D. E. McCoy, VU-10's Skipper just before Christmas. As Daniel tells it, "I did just what the game warden told me. I pointed the gun a little ahead, closed both eyes and pulled the trigger!" We were sorry to hear about Joye Graves spending the holidays in the hospital after being put under the weather with a bad virus infection. We all hope Joye a speedy recovery. Also ace basketball champ "Digger" Lockhart, downed with a broken leg just before Christmas, leaves a weak spot in the Mallards this season. Mend quickly boy! Chief Reed seems to have found the solution to the parking problem next to the hangar. He rode to work a week ago on a neat twowheeler that Santa left under the tree! NSD Supply Line The beginning of a new year brings to a close the joyous holiday season which brought a series of enjoyable parties. The annual NSD Christmas party was a great success due to the efforts of the committee, which furnished both refreshments and entertainment for all hands. Mr. Joe West spent Christmas in New Orleans, Louisiana, his former home. His father will return to Guantanamo Bay, as his guest. Leaving on the MSTS JOHNSON on the 1st were three NSD'ers who departed for the Receiving Station, Brooklyn, N.Y. for separation. They were Joe M. King, SK3, Winston W. Glaze, SN, and Homer L. Burruss, SN. Congratulations to the following who are wearing new stripes as of January 1. George L. Draffan, who made DK2, Richard E. Kidd, who made BM2, Merle E. Padon, who made DK2, Vernon T. Theisen, who made DK1 and Benito Zuniga who made BM3. Mrs. Irene C. LeBlanc departed on the 1st via the MSTS JOHNSON for a short visit in the States. Teenage Round-up by Judy Yost Everyone had a cool yule with many parties and small groups getting together here and thereJerry Warren's, up on the hill, was buzzin'-Linda opened the doors of her new home and the kats really enjoyed her hospitalityMarise had the gang in for refreshments after the movies-Jack Stafford gave Sah a great big sehd-off party and then saw him off on the plane-Mesdames Yarbro, Dibella and MacMichael stuffed us all with goodies ia honor of the return of Barbara and George for the holidays. But %J1 good things must end, and now 'both of them are tucked away at Ginrsville in college again. ...Phillips Park was a popular spot during the yuletide season, and we Wd -wondering just how "punchy" guy can get when Stan reported a lavender fish in the water out there. ...The other 2 PM Sharon and Phil gave a barbecue in their yard, ala hamburgers and roast pig and despite the wisecracks from Bobby and Cavie, Sharon managed some real fine food. Nancy and Wormie almost flipped over the pigs feet that were served. They like! So, what a wonderful holiday it was .and it's anmazing to hear some of the New Year's resolutions! We're happy to say that Eunice has made a real smooth recovery after a bout with the flu and she's up and around again, as is Nancy H. Next week our basketball team will go out into the court wars with their hearts set on winning, so let's all go down to the games and give them all the support we can-let's put our team right up there on top, what say! ! DID YA' SEE: Jackie Lee hanging up his rock at the Club. Gary's early awakening on New Year's Day. ...Cookie and her famous "basketball step". .Neil playing janitor. ...Howard and his erase-e-e jitterbuggin'. Jean C and all her phone calls. ... Bobbie and a certain guy making a duet out of "Winter Woniderland". .All the gang hangin' around the toy counters on Christmas Eve (Santa Baby?). ...The good supply of portable radios in the gang now, and the disgusted Tuesday, December 14th, Captain R. R. McCracken presented sixteen division supervisors with Department of the Navy certificates of commendation for outstanding leadership in their respective departments. Each division had a record of no lost time accidents for the past year and several had records extending over a number of years. The Naval Air Station ended the year with a perfect score, consequently all divisions were represented at the ceremony. Mr. Ramon Collazo, Quarterman painter, lead the group with an extraordinary record of n i n e straight accident free years for his division. Others with many years of accident free supervision were: Leonard Ford-Leadingman Truck Driver-Eight years Francisco Martinez-Storekeeper-Seven WiGiar J. Wilso--Leadingman Roads and1 Grsonds-Six years Stanford Young-Leadingman laborerFiseyer Sein E. Reid-Storekeeper, NAS supply -Five yeas Captain McCracken also pointed out that the absence of lost time accidents meant many thousands of dollars in extra work accomplished aboard the station, as well as sparing to workers unnecessary injury and the attendant suffering. The following also received certificates for the safe supervision of their departments: Migeu B'its -Leadingman Painter Alberto Leguen-Leadingman JoinerFour years Cyril Broks-Leadingman CarpenterThree years Nestor Speek-Leadingman GardenerThree years Oscar Mallo-Leadingman Auto Mechanic -Two years Earl H. Cavanaugh-Chief Quarterman Transportation-One year Charles D. Hewitt-Leadingman Auto Mechanie-One year Robert E. Sawler-AD3 USN-One year Jose Susavila-Leadingman Joiner-One John Elwood-BMCA-One year look on faces when the batteries go dead ...the chick who stood patiently under a bunch of mistletoe, and the guys thinking it was a bunch of weeds and not following through. ...Nancy Avila holding Doris' car down for her ....Peggy P breaking all speed records when she received her mysterious letter. ..John McGee's crazy suede shoes ..and finally the gal who cried her heart out when she broke the recording of "Shake, Rattle and Roll" NAS Supervisors Given Leadership Commendations FTG Bulletin by Ron Federman Among our new arrivals at FTG over the holidays was LTJG Waring B. Haselton, Jr. Mr. Haselton reported in on 29 December, from Fleet Training Center, Norfolk, Va. He has been assigned to the Damage C o n t r o 1 Department. Among his notable experiences in the Navy ,we find that he assisted in repairs to the USS KEARNEY; the first naval vessel torpedoed by the Germans immediately prior to the outbreak of World War II. In 1944 Mr. Haselton was appointed to the Warrant Rank of Carpenter. He has served aboard such ships as the USS INDIANA, USS WRIGHT, USS MIDWAY, and the USS ROANOKE. Other new arrivals over the holidays were Albert Moschner, ENC, who reported to FTG from SubGroup 4, Green Cove Springs, Fla., Christian R. Pankake (no relation to Aunt Jamima), PN1, from U.S. Naval Station, Argentia, Robert M. Heil, YN3, from the U.S. Naval Hospital, Gtmo Bay, and Floyd J. Sedwick, YN3 received from U.S. Naval Technical Training Unit, Philadelphia, Pa. "Sed" attended Slippery Rock State Teachers College in Pa., and graduated with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Education ,prior to enlisting in the U.S. Navy. The USNS PVT JOHNSON arrived on 24 December, bringing christmas presents for Foster, RM2, and Wynn, RD1. The socalled "presents" were in the person of Mrs. Foster with her two children, and Mrs. Wynn, accompanied by her one-year old daughter. Another ALNAV was released recently which concerned several enlisted men attached to FTG. As a result, the following men were advanced to Second Class as of 1 January 1955: Federman-Advanced to YN2. Ofenito-Advanced to EN2. Cunningham-Advanced to BM2. Rapella-Advanced to YN2. Bellavance-Advanced to YN2. A word of praise to the members of the "Picnic Committee" for the splendid job they did in organizing the FTG Picnic held at Phillip's Recreation Park on 30 December, A good time was had by all. The Egg-Tossing Contest was won by Frank O'Brien, TMC, who consequently received a very nice gift for his efforts. Sorry to say that the other contestants received nothing but a "splattered egg" for their fine efforts. A Jitterbug Contest was held, which found Timmons, SN, accompanied by a "pretty teen-ager", dancing his way to First Place, as awarded by the judges. Mrs. Gmeiner, wife of CHELEC K. F. Gmeiner, presented her husband with a baby girl at 1115 P.M., New Years Eve. The baby weighted in at 8 lbs, 6 oz. Too bad it couldn't have been a New Year's Baby-but think of the money saved on taxes! Captain Tedder, and all hands attached to FTG, wish to express and offer their deepest condolences to Mr. and Mrs. Mathis, who had the misfortune of losing their child at birth several weeks ago. Musically, Norm Perron, YNSN, and Joe Russek, RMSN, helped make the CPO New Years Dance a success last Friday Night at the CPO Club. With Norm at the Piano and Joe at the Accordian, the place was really jumping. Russek works in the Communications Department, and Perron has been assigned the job as Engineering Department Yeoman. THE INDIAN Page Seven

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Navy-DPPO-1OND---Gtnio.-0626 THE INDIAN Sato day S Ja asy 1J55 WGBY Hi-Lites Radio's 'Tops' of the Week *O OK NOOK by Francis L. Cannon, S03 HAITI, THE BLACK REPUBLIC by Seldan Rodman This book gives a wholley rounded picture of Haiti, its art, religion, voodoo, luxuriant wilderness, with tropical tips and information on hotels, shopping, tours, etc. There are 48 pages of photographs, a glossary of the Creole language, and information maps. Excellent reading for anyone planning a trip to Haiti. THE PRIVATE WORLD OF WILLIAM FAULKNER by Robert Coughlan This book attempts to present a clear and objective portrait of William Faulkner, a man considered to be the greatest figure in modern American literature. Couglan shows the early influences which shaped Faulkner into what he is, not the least of which was his great grandfather, William, a man who wrote novels, commanded soldiers and built an industrial empire. Faulkner was born in Oxford, Mississippi. His books have been peopled with characters from there and the whole area has had a great influence on his life. It is informal, entertaining, yet thoughtful and accurate. ACTING, THE FIRST SIX LESSONS by Richard Boleslavsky For actors, directors, teachers and playgoers, a book on what acting is all about by a man who, at the time of his death, was a leading Hollywood director. The lessons are in the form of a dialogue between a teacher and student and are far from the dull, prosaic manner in which many things of this type are written. The author was a playwright, actor, director producer and knew what he was talking about. SATCHMO, MY LIFE IN NEW ORLEANS by Louis Armstorng Satchmo is the inspiring story of a man whose passion for music pulled him along the hard road from orphanage to international fame as one of the world's greatest jazz trumpet men and singers. In this book the old New Orleans lives again through his vivid words and through it all shines the personality of Satchmo himself. THE FIVES AND SIXES GO TO SCHOOL by Emma D. Sheehy Although written primarily for teachers of the kindergarten and first grade levels, this book can be of great value to parents of five and six-year olds anxious to launch their children's school careers auspiciously. The authoress explains how the task of introducing children to the school routine can best be accomplished. by George Engle Now that the Holiday Season has ground to a halt, we go back to the business of every day living, not without some regret. So "Hi-Lites" resumes normal operation with the first item on the agenda, the business of letting you know that we at WGBY sincerely hope that you and yours had a very pleasant Yuletide season. Next item is to file away all the Christmas music way, way back in the shelves, to gather dust until next year. Third comes the task of bidding a final fond farewell to Bob Mairo. Don't expect another send-off like the last one, Bob. Look what happend then! Bob leaves for the U.S.S. POCONO, AGC-16 for duty. At the risk of repeating ourselves, we will miss you, Bob. You've become a part of WGBY. And last, but not least, a few changes in the schedule of programs from AFPS, Los Angeles. In the 8:30 P.M. spot on Wednesday, the program "The Big Story" will replace "The FBI In Peace and War". This program has been heard at Gtmo before and the contents will be familiar to most of the older Base inhabitants. It features documentaries of the authentic experiences of reporters in pursuit of their top experiences. Norman Hayes narrates these true stories and the program is under the direction of James Hayes. And at 9:00 P.M. on Wednesday, "Crime Classics" gives way to the new series, "Pursuit", scripted by Antony Ellis, famous for his many contributions to "Escape", under the direction of the incomparable Elliot Lewis and starring noted radio actor Ben Wright in the role of Inspector Peter Black. The programs will dramatize weekly the, adventures of England's worldfamous Scotland Yard. We hope these new programs will add a pleasant bit of variety to your daily listening. Don't forget to watch the daily program schedule in the Papoose for any changes in programs presented over WGBY, 1450 on your radio dial. Mission accomplished. See you next week. ....Good Listening .. Slapsie Maxie .. (Continued from Page One) bara Jones, Molly, Mulligan, Grant Garrett, Ruth Gillis, Regina Gleason, Agnes Goetz, Judy Marsh, Novella O'Hara, Rima Rudina, Helen, Stanton and Donna Brown. In the combo accompanying the revue are Gershon Kingsley at the piano, Jimmie Haskell on the accordion and Richard Wilion on the drums. SUNDAY, 9 January. HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE 10:00 P.M Piper Laurie and Rock Hudson costar in their original roles in the radio adaptation of the popular screen hit "Has Anybody Seen My Gal". MONDAY, 10 January .THEATRE GUILD ON THE AIR ... 9:00 P.M. The story of a man living in a gray world without love or joy, a world which might be all too possible in the future, is told in George Orwell's "Nineteen Eighty-Four". Richard Widmark stars. TUESDAY, 11 January ...ESCAPE .9:00 P.M. Escape presents a thrilling drama of a man stranded with a carnival just this side of the Iron Curtain Suddenly a chance to grab a fortune comes his way, but attempt is treacherous. "Carnival in Vienna". WEDNESDAY, 12 January. ..THE BIG STORY ., 8:30 P.M. The return of this favorite narrates the adventure of Gene Lindsey of the Phoenix, Arizona Gaxette when he gives the police vital assistance in tracking down the killer of a young widow THURSDAY, 13 January .DRAGNET .8:30 P.M. Jack Webb stars as Sgt. Friday. Assigned to robbery detail, he investigates the hold-up of a super-market. FRIDAY, 14 January ....RADIO WORKSHOP .10:00 P.M The combined efforts of The Little Theatre and Radio Station WGBY are blended once again to present Norman Corwin's amusing modern Fairy-Tale, "Mary and The Fairy" Here's a high-powered Allison for you: Universal-International's Allison Hayes. You can see her in "Sign of the Pagan," with sinister Jack Palance. MOVIES Saturday, January 8 THE HUMAN JUNGLE Gary Merrill Jan Sterling New police captain causes the death of an innocent bystander when closing in on an underworld hideout. Newspapers blast him, but the captain strives to prove his ability. Sunday, January 9 SUSAN SLEPT HERE Debbie Reynolds Dick Powell Comedy about a teen-age "problem girl" who is dropped in the household of a Hollywood writer, falls in love with him and reorganizes his home and life. Monday, January 10 GOG Herbert Marshall Constance Dowling Concerns secret research being conducted by American scientists in a four-tier lab under the New Mexico Desert. Tuesday, January 11 ANGELS ONE FIVE Jack Hawkins Michael Denison Hawkins plays a squadron leader who watches over his men with hawk-like intensity Picture concerns human relations of handful of men during wartime. Wednesday, January 12 HIGH AND DRY Paul Douglas Hubert Gregg Dougls, the high pressure chief of an American airline finds his bustling methods no match for the native guile of the crew of Scottish boat to which he has accidently sent an urgent cargo. Thursday, January 13 OF HUMAN DESIRE Glenn Ford Gloria Grahame Railroad engineer becomes involved in a murder rap because of his attraction for the woman whose husband committed the crime. By failing to implicate her he becomes accessory to the crime. Navy-DP PO-10 ND-Gtmno.-0626 THE INDIAN Saturday, 8 January 1955