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Indian
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Vol. VI, No. 71 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 20 November 1954


Base Plans Officer Departs;

Released to Inactive Duty

Tuesday morning, CDR R. M. Beaugrand, Naval Base Plans Officer left Guantanamo Bay for release from active duty at Key West, Fla. Commander Beaugrand, who has been serving as Plans Officer and Assistant Operations Officer here since January 1953. wili return to his home in Racine, Wisconsin were he will spend the holiday season wiith his wife Elizabeth and daughter, Marsha Jane, before returning to civilian employment.
Commander Beaugrand's departure will leave a temporary vacancy on the Naval Base since his relief, LCDR R. M. Moore will not report aboard until some time in February. LCDR Moore is presently serving as Executive Officer of t he USS ROSS, DD 563
Commander Beaugrand first entered the Naval Service in 1941 as an ensign upon completion of his Naval Reserve Midshipman training at Northwestern University. During the war, he served with the District Intelligence Office in San Francisco, at the Naval Reserve Armony in Los Angeles, on board the SS SANTA CLARA, and at Brooklyn, N.Y. After earning his silver bar for LTJG in Brooklyn, Commander Beaugrand went on to serve on board the USS DEIMOS and the USS AMERICAN LEGION as Communications Officer. Following his duty aboard ship. Commander Beaugrand served with TransDiv Staff as Communication Officer, Operations Officer, and laterafter his promotions to LT and then to LCDR as Chief Staff Officer.
In 1946, at the end of World War II, Commander Beaugrand retired to the Inactive Reserves until the Korean conflict, coming back to serve with ComPhib Group 4 Staff, nis last assignment before reporting to Guantanamo Bay.
Prior to his entry into the Naval Service, Commander Beaugrand received his BA degree at Wisconsin University. Later, he worked as a free-lance writer, working on special assignments for a host of publications. Upon departing from Guantanamo Bay last week, his only plans were for the holiday season, which according to the cominandei, "should develop some endeavor for the future."


Pay Increase Shaped
Details of the proposed pay increases for members of the Armed Forces, which will lay stress upon skill levels and experience, are still being rounded into shape at top echelons in the Pentagon. When the pay pro'is are approved by Carter L. iirgess. Assistant Secretary of Defense, for Maipower and Personnel, the-: will go to Seeretary of Defense Wilson tor presentation to Congress in January.


LT A. Grego Cited

For Outstanding Service

Lieutenant Anthony Grego, USN, after 30 months service in Guantanamo Bay, vas detached from the Naval Station last week with a letter of commendation from Captain W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer.
LT Grego had been in charge of the Commissary Store for the last 22 months. The letter read, in part: "By your outstanding competence, diligence and conscientous application you have successfully managed. at all times to care for the commissary needs of nearly 10,000 persons. . . .
The letter went on to say: "It has been by your ingenuity, resourcefulness and initiative that every possible means of logistic supply has been utilized, and almost ever type of commissary demand nas bmn me.
"In addition to your competent and resourceful management of the Commissary Store you have given unstintingly of your free time to the development in this area of golfing interests and improvement of golfing facilities, far beyond that which might either be normally required or expected."
(LT Grego holds the 1953 ComTen championship, the 1954 Gtimo base enampionship and he tied for top honors in the 1954 First Annual Naval Station Invitational Tournament held here in September. In addition to these local titles he has held championships at nearly all of his preceding duty stations. Wherever there was a golf course "Perpetual" Tony could be counted on to walk off with trophies.)
The letter of commendation concluded: "You have, during this tour of duty, been a credit to the naval service, to the Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and to yourself. Well done."


HONOR MAN Villamar-Bargo Council Swings Into Action


'. a 1 t last week's
Naval Station Personnel inspection was R. L. Jannard, FN of the Ninth Division. This weeks honorman is a native of Battle Creek Mich. He has been in the Navy 10 months and has been stationed here for eight months. He reported to active duty from the 973rd Service Division, Battle Creek reserve unit.



Former Hospital Exec

Selected For Captain


CDR Joseph J. Times, MC, USN, former executive officer of the Naval Hospital here, recently was selected for promotion to the rank of captain.
Commander Timmes is presently serving at the U.S. Naval Hospital, St. Albans, N.Y., where he is a thoracic surgeon.
The Commander has his MS Degree in Surgery from the University of Pennsylvania and is certified by the American Board of Surgeons and Fellow American College of Surgeons.


CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Coinmianding Officer, Naval Station, presents LT Anthony Grego with a better , connieidation for his ouLstant service here in Guantanamo j y. LT Grego departed from thl '0ase after 30 months duty here or his next assignment at Quob oint, R.I.


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J. R. Yost 1st Mayor

The newly elected VillamarBargo Council has already swung into action. Holding their first meeting on Wednesday, 10 November, the Council unanimously elected Mr. J. R. Yost, Civilian as their Mayor. Mr. Yost took over his duties immediately, presiding over and directing the meeting.
After the election and preliminary discussions, CDR V. J. Soballe, Executive Officer, Naval Station, spoke to the Council. In his informal speech, Commander Soballe discussed with the council its foundation. Primarily, the council has been set up to assist in regulating community affairs in Villamar and

Previously, all ruling governing the regulation of community affairs in Villamar and Bargo have been made by the command based on those factors known to the command, but without appreciable reference to the occupants of the housing themselves. According to Commander Soballe, it is in this area that the Council can serve to great advantage for both the command and the individual residents of the area.
As well as advising on official rulings, Commander Soballe discussed projects which the Council could profitably undertake. These prospects should include a monthly or weekly prize for the most attractive lawn in the area, special prizes for specific occasions such as for the most attractive outdoor Christmas display, projects to improve the community recreation programs such as the bingo games and dances, and other special events.
Also discused at the first meeting were methods of making the Villamar-Bargo Council and Association self-sustaining. Although no definite plan was formulated, several worthy ideas were suggested by council members.
Besides awards and finances, other minor projects were discussed. First on the list to be undertaken is a Saturday Matinee for kiddies at the Villamar Lyceum. It was proposed that beginning as soon as darkness permits, a whole hour and a half of comedies will be shown, the show to let out r'1pv enough for the children to return home so that their parents may attend the late movie. Also under consideration for submission to the command are proposals for a lawn mower rental service, offsctreet parking for Villamar, and a monthly public meeting of the council at which time residents of Viliamar and Bargo may submit iheir ideas to their representatives for consideration by the council.
The Council met again Wednesday, 17 Nov., and future meetings will be held on the first and third Wednesday of every month.


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The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615 ---Saturday, 20 November 1954
U. S. NAVAL BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADIEdmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Stafr
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sadness_ -__ Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC ------------------Editor
H. L. Sisson, J03 ------------------- News
F. L. Cannon, J03 ----------- Photog rapper
D. C. Roberts, JOSN -------------Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material apperaing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


What's Doin' Stateside

Weekly AFPS Feature
A -joint Congressional Committee predicts that by 1965 the nation's economy will be 50 percent greater than at present. . . . The report prophesied that 10 years from now wages will he higher, the work week shorter, and taxes lower. . . . It estimated the U.S. population in 1965 at 190 millions, compared with the present population of a little less than 160 millions.
Peering ahead in the field of television, one of the nation's leading authorities, David Saroff, has predicted that within a few years television sets will operate without a picture tube. . . He also foresees use of television microscopes, resulting in great advances in the struggle against disease.
The threat that television might destroy the popularity of motion . . . Americans are going to the movies just about as much as ever. . . . According to the Theater Owners of America, a trade organization, the industry's biggest problem at the moment isn't a shortage of customers, but a shortage of films. . . . Hollywood production has been down but is now rising.
One of the nation's most cherished historic landmarks is on a coast-to-coast tour.... The weathervane of Boston's Old North Church is to be exhibited around the country to raise $150,000. . . . The fund will be used to rebuild the church's steeple, blown down last August in a hurricane. . . . It was from the bell tower of the famous church that Paul Revere received the signal which set him off on his famous ride in 1775 to warm that the British were coming.

"Why didn't you deliver that message as instructed ?" a man asked his servant.
"I did th' best I could, sir."
"The best you could Why, if I had known I was going to send a donkey, I Would have gone myself!"


Hospital Notes NSD Supply Line 1


by R. P. Campanozzi HEIRPORT NEWS
Three girls are added to the birth list this past week. This girl majority over boys seems to be routine considering the statistics of the newborns during the past six months. The new little ladies are: Lynn Patricia to BMC and Mrs. Patricia Ellwood; Bobbie Jean born to CDR and Mrs. Doris Rothenberg; and, Monica whose parents are ADI and Mrs. Helen Kowalczk.
ARRIVAL
HM3 James M. Shaw is our only arrival this week as he reports to us from Neuropsychiatry Technicians School at Bethesda, Maryland. His appearance here joins him once again with his old time buddy, SN John J. Hudson. Both men were born and reared in
Keene, New Hampshire. They attended school together, played ball on the same teams and entered the service three weeks apart.
SIDELIGHTS
On the verge of humniliation, Frank Sparks finally bought himself a new pair of slippers. The old ones have not been discarded since they have become acollectors item.
- . . In reviewing the results of the advancement exams, we notice that HM2 Arthur Huber achieved a perfect score. His grand total points amounted to 83.83 and his multiple is a mere 3.83; how about that? . . . HM1 Paul Trievel is still getting those big fish on the tip of his hooks but is a trifle tttnsuccessfLa in bringing them in. At Marine Site, the other day, Paul latched into a beaut but during his struggle with the gigantic dweller of the sea the rod broke in two. Paul did get a hand laceration as the line snapped with the rod; the wound is pretty well healed now. . . . Our recreation
organizer, HM2 John Cuddy, continues with his planning of beach parties and sports activities. John's latest organization is a troupe of corpsmen who attend the bingo games twice weekly. Anyone with ideas to help Cuddy with his program is urged to contact him in X-Ray.


Cake Cutting Ceremony Hi-lites Marine Birthday


Cot, Robert E. Fojt, Commanding oifieso, Marine P-sr'ck' ptesints the fist piece of cake to Pfc. James Hatvany, youngest malt,,tationed at Qie Barracks here. The cake cutting ceremony was just oTthase of a b-isy day's celebration at the Marine Barracks.


THE INDIAN


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Saturday, 20 Novemiber 1954


Thanksgiving Services

On Thursday, November 25, special Thanksgiving services will be held in the Base Chapel. Protestant Services will commence at 9:30 A.M. and Catholic High Mass will be held at 11:00 A.M. During High Mass, the chapel choir will sing "Mass of the Angels".


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Welcome to the following new arrivals at the Depot: Walter E. Winter, DK1 from U.S.N.C.B.C. Davisville, Rhode Island; Robert H. Millar, SK3 from the USS MALABAR (AF-37), and George F. McGowen, SK1 from the USS CAPRICORNUS (AKA 57). The families of these men-Mrs. Winter and son of Providence, Rhode Island; Mrs. Millar of Norfolk, Virginia, and Mrs. Gowen and son of Kansas, Alabama - are all awaiting housing in Gtmo Bay.
In another couple of weeks, Fred Milnikel, SK2, popular NSD storekeeper, softballer, and golfer will be Mr. Fred Milnikel, Esq., collegian loose in Michigan with a brand new Ford Victoria with Chromium "Tiara." Everyone at NSD wishes Fred bon-voyage. We'll miss his many talents.
From all reports, the duck hunting trip last weekend consisting of Chief and Mrs. Johnson Tarrell, Burns, and King was very succesful. Although Chief Johnson was the only "sharp-shooter", getting 2 ducks, Tarrell claims his dificulty was finding the "good" places.
T. R. Kenney is no longer searching for the "lost truck." After he drove around the Base for hours questioning anyone who might have seen the vehicle, Kenney discovered that he was driving it all the time. This could call for an eye exanntation!


Sunday, 21 November 1954

Catholic Masses
Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel
Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship
0930-Sunday School
0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1900Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal J ewish Services
Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel
Christian Science
Sunday: 1000-Station Library


The Chaplain's Corner



In the impossibly beautiful Gospel according to St. Luke, there is recorded a story recounting Jesus' healing of ten lepers (17:11 ff.). These men had undoubtedly suffered many years of both physical and mental torture: physical, because leprosy was a dread disease-invariably terminating in a man's death; and mental, because those who contracted it became social outcasts-such was the people's fear of the pestilence. But, reads the account, of the ten men so delivered, only one returned to give thanks to the Master. We cannot help beliving that the whole group was not overjoyed at what had taken place. But is it not a rather depressing commentary on the fickleness of men that only one returned. "glorifying God"?
The seasons of the year have succeeded one another in God's measured time, and we now prepare ourselves for a day of national thanksgiving. In spite of tension and unrest in many quarters, the world enjoys comparative peace. In our homeland, the crops are harvested-enormous crops that threaten to burst our granaries Our mountains are rich with minerals; our reservoirs overflowing with clean, sparkling water. Our national strength is like a glistening marble pillar rising from a jungle of doubt, cynicism, an: fear. W~e are rich and strong ani healthy with a vitality that penetrates to the very depths of our souls.
God has given us these thmg . In His inscrutable majesty and povrr He has singled out the United States Of Ametrca a; the recigient of wealth and strength that fairly staggers the imagination. Why has our nation been so richly endowed? Perhaps it is because of our leaders' concern and efforts for peace. Possibly it derives from our basic principle of the dignity and sacredness of each individual. We cannot really answer such a question. But we certainly can return thanks to Him who has made it all possible. We can go into our Churches, Casheilrals and Synagues and petition God's continued generosity: we can request His mercy on the millions who endure daily suffering. We can speak God's praise and ". . . come before His precence with singing". And we can humbly bow our heads and express our thanks.
W. \. Pointer
LTJG, CHC, USNR






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Saturday, 20 November 1954


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THE INDIAN


NavSta Character Education

Program Aides Navy's

Over All Efficiency

by William 0. Johnson, PN1
Since the start of the Naval Station's "Protection of Moral Standards Program", several people have inquired as to it's objective and whether or not it is doing any good.
This article is given here merely to point out that the program IS Navy related in many ways, not the least of which is its secondary potentiality for achieving better morale, and improved awareness of the responsibility of the individual to the Navy and to the nation, and to the overall increased efficiency of every ship and station of the United States Navy.
One of the missions of the Information and Education Program is the development and maintenance of a healthy service attitude onmone: naval personnel. Another closely related program has been developed, and that is CHARACTER EDUCATION. It is to assist commanding officers in the protection and strengthening of moral standards within the Navy. This program undertakes to "help effect a mature and secure individual who will live with moral integrity in peace and harmony with himself, his neighbor, and his God". Achieving this objective is a major factor in the development of the service attitude and can have a tremendous impact on both the Navy Community and society at large.
The Chief of Naval Personnel and the Commandant of the Marine Corps have issued instructions in support of the above stated objective and this program is in full effect at all Recruit Training and Service School Commands.
It might appear at first glance that the roadblocks to the implementation of such a program as this would prove insurmountable in that an organized continuing program of group instruction in Character Education is either highly impractical or totally impossible.
There are several answers to this. First, that officers at the highest echelons of responsibility, through recognizing the problem involved, have apparently believed that some means must be employed if we would preserve in the Navy the very principles for which America exists and the safeguarding of which is a prima mission of the Navy. Through the implementing of the BUPERS Instruction, though group instruction i9; not a panacea, much less a "Navy religion", it is considered to be a grave necessity by those primarily i esponsible for the effectiveness of the Navy's mission and for the well-being of naval personnel.
The second is that several commands have submitted reports of improved disciplinary conditions, better morale, lessening of mast and court cases, improved moral "climate" and decrease in flagrant immorality after a period of experimentation with the Character Education program. No attempt has been made to prove that these improvements are a result, direct or indirect, of the group instructions. However, the fact remains that several commands have subS"d such reports, and though the nature of improvement cited is not considered as the prime or direct objective of the Program, it is of course believed that such im-


FTG Bulletin
by Jack Engstrom

YN2 and Mrs. Maurice 0. Vandersteen are happy to announce the birth of a son, Maurice 0., Jr., on the 15th of November at the Gtmo Naval Hospital. He is the Vandersteen's fourth child and second boy. They now have two boys and two girls. Vandersteen is in the FTG Administration Department.

Charles E. Schaub, RM1(SS), FTG Communications Department, got his Xmas wish early. He's going back to the Boats! Chuck has received orders to Submarine Squadron TWO, at New London, Connecticut. He will depart Gtmo Saturday aboard the JOHNSON with his wife and two daughters. Good bye and good luck.

Karon Anne is the new arrival at the home of Mr. and Mrs. John Molloy. She was born in the Gtmo Naval Hospital on the 15th of November, and has a sister. Mary, who will be two in February. Molloy, RM2, is in the FTG Communications Department.

Lieutenant H. W. Loader, FTG Gunnery Department, will depart Gtmo today aboard the JOHNSON. LT Loader has been ordered to the U.S.S. MISSISSIPPI, EAG-128, for duty. Good bye and good luck.
*: : *
Lieutenant and Mrs. Gerard Gebler are the proud parents of a daughter, Kathleen Susan, who was born in the Gtmo Naval Hospital on the 16th of November. The couple have two other children, Michael, nine and Gerard, two. LT Gebler is in the FTG Engineering Department.

Lieutenant (JG) Arthur L. Babine, Jr. reported aboard on 12 November from the Office of the Supervisor of Shipbuilding, USN, and Naval Inspector of Ordnance, Quincy, Massachu-etts. LT Babine relieve LT Pennington in the Engineering Department. Welcome aboard.

Reported . . . on the 12th, S. W. McKay, SN, from NAS Quonset Point, R. I., D. Burchi, SN, from NAS Quonset Point, R. I., both will be in the Administration department. T. R. Stumo, EM2, from the USS SAFE AM-111, Engineering Department, H. T. Frye, FP1, from the USS FULTON AS-11, Damage Control Department, B. H. Carr, RD1, from the USS SALEM, CIC Department and on the 16th, R. K. Wilson, QMC, from CNO, Washington, D. C. Welcome aboard. We hope you will enjoy your tour of duty with FTG.

SHIPARRIVALS
USS Saufley EDDE-465 22 Nov
USS Hood DD-655 22 Nov
SHIP DEPARTURES USS Newport News CA-148 24 Nov
USS Otterstetter DER-224 26 Nov


provements a:4?

USS ENGLISH Rammed During LAITFLEX


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The destroyer USS English cruises slowly into porch at Norfolk, Va., with 25 feet of her bow ripped off. The English collided with the destroyer USS W. L. Lind while making runs on a submerged contact during Operation "Lantflex," the Atlantic USS Norris rammed into the superstructure of the submarine USS Bergall.


What Is ??

A Good Fire Extinguisher

Every extinguisher which carries the label of the Underwriter's Laboratories or the Factory Mutual Laboratories has met the requirements of a safe standard of construction and performance, and has sufficient capacity to deal with test fires of a size representing the sort of fire that may reasonably be anticipated.
An approved extinguisher gives years of dependable service if it is maintained according to the manufacturer's instructions. It is made of materials that are expected to stand up under all sorts of conditions. If it becomes damaged, it should be repaired only by the manufacturer who has the proper equipment and experience for the work.
An extinguisher must, of course, be refilled immediately after use and be regularly cared for and inspected. Although extinguishers do not require a great deal of care, they are no exception to the general rule that mechanical devices have to be serviced from time to time. Don't expect an extinguisher to "stand-by" you unless you give it the attention it requires and deserves.
And, after servicing your extinguishers, put them back in their proper places-locations known to everyone and where you can get at them easily when needed.

"I used to know Mr. Smithers who was with your firm. I understand that he's a tried and trusted employee."
The bank president looked at his questioner coldly. 1
"He was trusted, yes; and he will be tried if we're fortunate enough to catch him!"


In this regard, it is difficult to
improve on the dictum of Admiral Sue: "They tell me she-rniukes
MAHAN: "Tbh Navy is only as people happy wherever she gles."
good as t 'en in it". Joe: "You mean '; whenever. "

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St. Peter challenged the Devil to a game of baseball claiming that all the great baseball players were up in Heaven. "You'll lose," said the Devil, "you won't stand a chance.'
"And why not?" asked St. Peter.
"Well," replied the Devil, "We have all the umpires down here."



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Rita Moreno, Cap's recording artist, has ambitions to be a bigtime movie star, and from this corner ,movies should be 'better than ever.'


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THE INDIAN


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Saturday, 20 November 1954


VU- 10 Prop Blast
by Bill Graves & Staff

Added to Utility Squadron TEN's big happy family this past week were: J. P. Brennan, AT2 and E. N. Tatler, AT3 from NAS, Lakehurst, N. J., R. S. Eells, SKSN, from the Newport Naval Base, Newport, R. L, R. D. Lackie, PNASN from the U.S. Naval Receiving Station, Philadelphia, Pa. Glad to have Y'all down south for a cruise.
We hear that all Sebastian needs now is a set of "Gold Wings" he is the only seaman in VU-10 who even came close to a take-off in a drone. Don't think he had tower clearance, either.
Children will be children and you can't make anything else out to them. When they get around a tree it is natural for them to acu like little monkies, and end up sometime or another like. these youngsters. This week little Bobby Zaborski deciidedl to act like Tarzau and fell out of the tree. Luckily it only knocked the lreath out of him, but had his parents worriedl for several hours. Sunny Weiland tried her technique at the same thing, in the same tree, but with more serious results. She was taken to the hospital where several sLiches were required.
These weren't the only casualties around that point. Jeremy Stamm fell off a homemade ship and broke her arm. You just can't dive off a ship in dry dock without getting hurt.
Commander McCoy and his wife Glnny are taking a luxurious cruise in the Caribbean to the islands of Puerto Rico and Trinidad. Many stories might be told by the skipper woen he returns he carried his little "Black Book".
The Parachute Loft personnel must have really nad a Wing-Ding of a party at Windmill Beach on Veterans Day. From the looks of F rank Middleon when he retuned, it seems that he was the Center of Attraction.
The CO of the "Mary Jane", E. R. Price, A03, is taking on more crew members. The only requirements are that you are checked out on how to bail out a boat and swim.


Golly, Gloria-those curves. Here's a triple exposure of Gloria De Haven as she will be seen in the forthcoming U-I technicolor production, "So This Is Paris." Corrine Calvet co-stars in it and we'll have Corrine sitting here next week. Gloria sings "I Can't Give You Anything But Love, Babeeeee" in this particular sequence. Notice the pretty bracelets.


JEST-A-SECOND WGBYHi-Lites


The human brain is a wonderful thing. It starts working when you are born and never stops until you stand up to speak in public.

Two can live as cheaply as one
-if they both have good jobs.

Amateur shows are a means for people with no talent to prove it.
Airman: "I saw a screwy kind of bird in the Aleutians. It lays Sqiuare eggo's and talkl q
Girl: "What (toes it say ?"
Airman: "Ouch."

Farmer: "You're a brave ladcoming down in a parachute in a 100-mile gale like this!"
Soldier: "I didn't come down in a 'chute. I went up in a tent."


If There's A Knock On Your Door


It Could Be




!"The Visitor from Hades"


nPERATON BLONDE











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We bid a fond farewell to Jovial John Hull who leaves on the Johnson today for iiischarge. With him goes his lovely and claiming wife, Rosa. We'll miss them both. John has served on the staff of WGBY for 18 months, in which time he has served as both staff announcer and program director, doing a fine job in both capacities. A little history, John was born in California in 1930. His father, then a struggling young 'adio announcer who has since distinguished himself on his owin network program, "Strike It Ricu," is J. W. Sr., better known as Warren Hull. John entered the Navy in 1951 and served aboard the U.S.S. Vulcan, attended Armed Forces Information School at Fort Slocum, N.Y. and then reported to NavSta, Gtmo for duty. John plans to enter Colombia University at the completion of his enlistmeinit and then try comnmercial radio work. The Hulls will reside in New York City. Best of luck in the future, John, and it's be n nice serving with you.
Another word of caution, watch the program schedule in the Papoose very closely during the next few weeks. More changes may be forthcoming like the removal of the "House of Music" and "Hillbilly Jamboree".
Speaking of the "Hillbilly Jamboree," we'd like to say that it's been a lot of fun doing the show, and Congenial Mountain George thanks yot for the excellent reception you have given the show since he made his first fumbling, hesitant apperearance. You're a good tiudience and "May The Good Lord Bless And Keep You."


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50OK-N0O
by Francis L. Cannon, .1:

FORD: THE TIMES, THE MAN,
THE COMPANY by Alan Nevins
This book sets forth te conditions prevailing in the 1870's as Henry Ford and a dozen others who would become automotive pioneers grew to manhood. It describes tne forces and men that produced the gas engine and first automobile. It tells how Henry Ford as a youth felt impatient with farm drudgery and of his rise from machinist's apprentice to engine expert. He then, by invention and adaptation produced a horseless carriage. Here too is the story of financial success which attended mechanical accomplishment.
THE SATURDAY EVENING POST TREASURY
The editors of the POST havy ransacked thousands of issues to produce this one. The POST has been in business since about 1728, so they had quite a number of issues to choose from. Some of the greats who have appeared in its pages are Edgar Allen Poe, Ben Franklin (the POST'S founder) Jack London, Gilbert Keith Chesterton, Steven Crane, 0. Henry, and William Faulkner, to list just a few. There are 10 reproductions of the its best covers, including many by Norman Rockwell, and a section of ads which have both the nostalgia and huimor of a bygone age.
LAUNCELOT, MY BROTHER by Dorothy James Roberts
A novel of King Arthtur and his times. All is seen through the eyes of King Arthur's man, Bors d' Gaiis. He sees quite a bit; especially the romance between Launcelot and Queen Guenivere. Apparently
King Arthur is quite blind. Nonetheless, this is a Book-of-Month Club selection.
THE ANATOMY OF A CRIME by Joseph F. Dinneen
This is a novel, but most of the events closely parallel the famous Brink's robbery in Boston. Mr. Dinneen is crime reporter for the Boston Globe and was assigned to cover the case from the start. He is thoroughly familiar with all tile known aspects of the crime, one of tie most sensational in the nation's history. Besides being interesting a a story, this is a piece of excellent crime writing.
AMERICAN CAPTAIN
by Edison Marshall
Adventure story by the author of Yanhee Pasha. It's about an American sailor in the early part of the last century and his adventures with a daughter of a Royal Navy captain and, at different titles, Barbary Pirates. In Passing. . . .
Angels and Spaceships, by Frederic Brown-A collection of
fantasy stories for tie unhlntisced.
Case of the Restless Redhead, by Earle Stanly Gardner-A new Perry Mason iyistery.
And for the kiddies tnere are two new Juvenile hooks, Rip Van Wimkle and Loend of Sleepy Hollow by Waslhitii Irving. and Pilgrin's Prog-, by Join lbaayan

Mail driver: ''Wi, didn't ' signal w ui ated to do?
,iian driver: "Because theic's no signal for what I wanted to do "




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m m 9Ae m Vol V No--S.ccs Naa MO Liea Them Ba CbLa" Stry20 Vol. VI, No. 71 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 20 November 1954 Base Plans Officer Departs; Released to Inactive Duty Tuesday morning, CDR R. M. Beaugrand, Naval Base Plans Officer left Guantanamo Bay for release from active duty at Key West, Fla. Commander Beaugrand, who has been serving as Plans Officer and Assistant Operations Oficer here since January 1953, will return to his home in Racine, Wisconsin where he will spend the holiday season witii his wife Elizabeth and daughter, Marsha Jane, before returning to civilian eiployient. Commander Beaugrand's departure will leave a temporary vacancy on the Naval Base since his relief, LCDR R. M. Moore will not report aboard until some time in February. LCDR Moore is presently serving as Executive Officer of the USS ROSS, DD 563 Commander Beaugrand first entered the Naval Service in 1941 as an ensign upon completion of his Naval Reserve Midshipman training at Northwestern University. During the war, he served with the District Intelligence Office in San Francisco, at the Naval Reserve Armony in Los Angeles, on board the SS SANTA CLARA, and at Brooklyn, N.Y. After earning his silver bar for LTJG in Brooklyn, Commiander Beaugrand went on to serve on board the USS DEIMOS and the USS AMERICAN LEGION as Communications Officer. Following his duty aboard ship. Commander Beaugrand served with TransDiv Staff as Coiimunication Officer, Operations Officer, and laterafter his promotions to LT and then to LCDR as Chief Staff Officer. In 1946, at the end of World War II, Commander Beaugrand retired to the Inactive Reserves until the Korean conflict, coming back to serve with ComPhib Group 4 Staff, his last assignment before reporting to Guantanamo Bay. Prior to his entry into the Naval Service, Commander Beaugrand received his BA degree at Wisconsin University. Later, lie worked as a free-lance writer, working on special assignments for a host of publications. Upon departing froii Guantanamo Bay last week, his only plans were for the holiday season, which according to the commander, "should develop some endeavor for the future." Pay Increase Shaped Details of the proposed pay increases for members of the Armed Forces, which will lay stress upon skill levels and experience, are still being rounded into shape at top echelons in the Pentagon. When the pay pro1 are approved by Carter L. 11rgess. Assistant Secretary of Defense, for Manpower and Personnel, the; will go to Secretary of Defense Wilson for presentation to Congress in January. LT A. Grego Cited For Outstanding Service Lieutenant Anthony Grego, USN, after 30 months service in Guantanamo Bay, was detached from the Naval Station last week with a letter of commendation from Captain W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer. LT Grego had been in charge of the Commissary Store for the last 22 months. The letter read, in part: "By your outstanding competence, diligence and conscientous application you have successfully managed. at all times to care for the commissary needs of nearly 10,000 persons. ." The letter went on to say: "It has been by your ingenuity, resourcefulness and initiative that every possible means of logistic supply has been utilized, and almost every type of commissary demand has bi sonmt "In addition to your competent and resourceful management of the Co missary Store you have given unstintingly of your free time to the development in this area of golfing interests and improvement of golfing facilities, far beyond that which might either be normally required or expected." (LT Grego holds the 1953 ComTen championship, the 1954 Gtmo base championship and he tied for top honors in the 1954 First Annual Naval Station Invitational Tournament held here in September. In addition to these local titles he has held championships at nearly all of his preceding duty stations. Wherever there was a golf course "Perpetual" Tony could be counted oii to walk off with trophies.) The letter of commendation concluded: "You have, during this tour of duty, been a credit to the naval service, to the Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and to yourself. Well done." HONOR MAN Villamar-Bargo Council Swings Into Action ShaIrput man at last week's Naval Station Personnel inspection was R. L. Jannard, FN of the Ninth Division. This weeks honorman is a native of Battle Creek Mich. He has been in the Navy 10 months and has been stationed here for eight months. He reported to active duty from the 973rd Service Division, Battle Creek reserve unit. Former Hospital Exec Selected For Captain CDR Joseph J. Timmes, MC, USN, former executive officer of the Naval Hospital here, recently was selected for promotion to the rank of captain. Commander Timmes is presently serving at the U.S. Naval Hospital, St. Albans, N.Y., where he is a thoracic surgeon. The Commander has his MS Degree in Surgery from the University of Pennsylvania and is certified by the American Board of Surgeons and Fellow American College of Surgeons. CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, presents LT Anthony Grego with a letter commendation for his outstand -service here in Guantanamo i y. LT Grego departed from thL iase after 30 ionthis duty here his next assignment at Quan', Point, R. I. 4 J. R. Yost 1st Mayor The newly elected VillaiarBargo Council has already swung into action. Holding their first meeting on Wednesday, 10 November, the Council unanimously elected Mr. J. R. Yost, Civilian as their Mayor. Mr. Yost took over his duties immediately, presiding over and directing the meeting. After the election and preliminuary discussions, CDR V. J. Soballe, Executive Officer, Naval Station, spoke to the Council. In his informal speech, Commander Soballe discussed with the council its foundation. Primarily, the council has been set up to assist in regulating community affairs in Villamar and Previously, all ruhng governing the regulation of community affairs in Villamar and Bargo have been made by the command based on those factors known to the coinmand, but without appreciable reference to the occupants of the housing themselves. According to Commander Soballe, it is in this area that the Council can serve to great advantage for both the command and the individual residents of the area. As well as advising on official rulings, Commander Soballe discussed projects which the Council could profitably undertake. These prospects should include a monthly or weekly prize for the most attractive lawn in the area, special prizes for specific occasions such as for the most attractive outdoor Christmas display, projects to improve the community recreation programs such as the bingo games and dances, and other special events. Also discused at the first meeting were methods of making the Villamar-Bargo Council and Association self-sustaining. Although no definite plan was formulated, several worthy ideas were suggested by council members. Besides awards and finances, other minor projects were discussed. First on the list to be undertaken is a Saturday Matinee for kiddies at the Villamar Lyceum. It was proposed that beginning as soon as darkness permits, a whole hour and a half of comedies will be shown, the show to let out ear cly enough for the children to return home so that their parents may attend the late movie. Also under consideration for submission to the command are proposals for a lawn mower rental service, offstreet parking for Villamar, and a monthly public meeting of the council at which time residents of Villaniar and Bargo iay submit their ideas to their representatives for consideration by the council. The Council iet again Wednesday, 17 Nov., and future meetings will be held on the first and third Wednesday of every month.

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Page Two 9 nxdtan. The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 20 November 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADMEdmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sadness -Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC ---Editor H. L. Sisson, JOL--N-News F. L. Cannon, J03Photographer D. C. Roberts, JOSN __---_Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material apperaing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. What's Doin' Stateside Weekly AFPS Feature A joint Congressional Committee predicts that by 1965 the nation's economy will be 50 percent greater than at present. ...The report prophesied that 10 years from now wages will be higher, the work week shorter, and taxes lower. ...It estimated the U.S. population in 1965 at 190 millions, compared with the present population of a little less than 160 millions. Peering ahead in the field of television, one of the nation's leading authorities, David Saroff, has predicted that within a few years television sets will operate without a picture tube. He also foresees use of television microscopes, resulting in great advances in the struggle against disease. The threat that television might destroy the popularity of motion ...Americans are going to the movies just about as much as ever. ...According to the Theater Owners of America, a trade organization, the industry's biggest problem at the moment isn't a shortage of customers, but a shortage of films. ...Hollywood production has been down but is now rising. One of the nation's most cherished historic landmarks is on a coast-to-coast tour. The weathervane of Boston's Old North Church is to be exhibited around the country to raise $150,000. The fund will be used to rebuild the church's steeple, blown tlown last August in a hurricane. It was from the bell tower of the famous church that Paul Revere received the signal which set him off on his famous ride in 1775 to warm that the British were coming. "Why didn't you deliver that message as instructed ?" a man asked his servant. "I did th' best I could, sir." "The best you could! Why, if I had known I was going to send a dloncey, I would have gone myself!" Hospital Notes NSD Supply Line by R. P. Campanozzi HEIRPORT NEWS Three girls are added to the birth list this past week. This girl majority over boys seems to be routine considering the statistics of the newborns during the past six months. The new little ladies are: Lynn Patricia to BMC and Mrs. Patricia Ellwood; Bobbie Jean born to CDR and Mrs. Doris Rothenberg; and, Monica whose parents are AD1 and Mrs. Helen Kowalczk. ARRIVAL HM3 James M. Shaw is our only arrival this week as he reports to us from Neuropsychiatry Technicians School at Bethesda, Maryland. His appearance here joins him once again with his old time buddy, SN John J. Hudson. Both men were born and reared in Keene, New Hampshire. They attended school together, played ball on the same teams and entered the service three weeks apart. SIDELIGHTS On the verge of humiliation, Frank Sparks finally bought himself a new pair of slippers. The old ones have not been discarded since they have become acollectors item. .In reviewing the results of the advancement exams, we notice that HM2 Arthur Huber achieved a perfect score. His grand total points amounted to 83.83 and his multiple is a mere 3.83; how about that? ...HM1 Paul Trievel is still getting those big fish on the tip of his hooks but is a trifle unsuccessful in bringing them in. At Marine Site, the other day, Paul latched into a beaut but during his struggle with the gigantic dweller of the sea the rod broke in two. Paul did get a hand laceration as the line snapped with the rod; the wound is pretty well healed now. ...Our recreation organizer, HM2 John Cuddy, continues with his planning of beach parties and sports activities. John's latest organization is a troupe of corpsmen who attend the bingo games twice weekly. Anyone with ideas to help Cuddy with his program is urged to contact him in X-Ray. Cake Cutting Ceremony Hi-Lites Marine Birthday Col., Robert E. Fojt, Commanding Office,, Marine Barract presents the fiAgst piece of cake to Pfc. James Hatvany, youngest ma stationed at 1te Barracks here. The cake cutting ceremony was just on ohase of a btsy clay's celebration at the Marine Barracks. Saturday, 20 November 1954 THE INDIAN m Welcome to the following new arrivals at the Depot: Walter E. Winter, DK1 from U.S.N.C.B.C. Davisville, Rhode Island; Robert H. Millar, SK3 from the USS MALABAR (AF-37), and George F. McGowen, SK1 from the USS CAPRICORNUS (AKA 57). The families of these men-Mrs. Winter and son of Providence, Rhode Island; Mrs. Millar of Norfolk, Virginia, and Mrs. Gowen and son of Kansas, Alabama -are all awaiting housing in Gtmo Bay. In another couple of weeks, Fred Milnikel, SK2, popular NSD storecceper, softballer, and golfer will be Mr. Fred Milnikel, Esq., collegian loose in Michigan with a brand new Ford Victoria with Chromium "Tiara." Everyone at NSD wishes Fred bon-voyage. We'll miss his many talents. From all reports, the dtuck hunting trip last weekend consisting of Chief and Mrs. Johnson Tarrell, Burns, and King was very succesful. Although Chief Johnson was the only "sharp-shooter", getting 2 ducks, Tarrell claims his difficulty was finding the "good" places. T. R. Kenney is no longer searching for the "lost truck." After he drove around the Base for hours questioning anyone who might have seen the vehicle, Kenney discovered that he was driving it all the time. This could call for an eye examination! Thanksgiving Services On Thursday, November 25, special Thanksgiving services will be held in the Base Chapel. Protestant Services will commence at 9:30 A.M. and Catholic High Mass will be held at 11:00 A.M. During High Mass, the chapel choir will sing "Mass of the Angels". Sunday, 21 November 1954 Catholic Masses Sunday, 0700-Naval Base Chapel Sunday, 0900-Naval Base Chapel Mon. thru Fri. 1645Naval Base Chapel Saturday, 0800-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Services Sunday: 1100-Divine Worship 0930-Sunday School 0930-Adult Bible Class 1930-Fellowship Hour Wednesday: 1900Mid-Week Bible Study Thursday: 1900-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Christian Science Sunday: 1000-Station Library The Chaplain's Corner In the impossibly beautiful Gospel according to St. Luke, there is recorded a story recounting Jesus' healing of ten lepers (17:11 ff.). These men had undoubtedly suffered many years of both physical and mental torture: physical, because leprosy was a dread disease-invariably terminating in a iman's death; and mental, because those who contracted it became social outcasts-such was the people's fear of the pestilence. But, reads the account, of the ten men so delivered, only one returned to give thanks to the Master. We cannot help beliving that the whole group was not overjoyed at what had taken place. But is it not a rather depressing commentary on the fickleness of men that only one returned ."glorifying God"? The seasons of the year have succeeded one another in God's measured tinse, and we now prepare ourselves for a clay of national thanksgiving. In spite of tension and unrest in many quarters, the world enjoys comparative peace. In our homeland, the crops are harvested-enormous crops that threaten to burst our granaries Our mountains are rich with minerals; our reservoirs overflowing with clean, sparkling water. Our national strength is like a glistening marble pillar rising from a jungle of doubt, cynicism, and fear. We are rich and strong and healt-y with a vitality that penetrates to the very depths of our souls. God has given us these thmg. In His inscrutable majesty and poser He has singled out the United States Of America a> the recipient of wealth and strength that fairly staggers the imagination. Why has our nation been so richly endowed? Perhaps it is because of our leaders' concern and efforts for peace. Possibly it derives from our basic principle of the dignity and sacredness of each individual. We cannot really answer such a question. But we certainly can return thanks to Him who has made it all possible. We can go into our Churches, Catsedrals and Synagogues and petition God's continued generosity: we can request His mercy on the millions who endure daily suffering. We can speak God's praise and ". come before His precence with singing". And we can humbly bow our heads ad express our thanks. W. W. Poynter LTJG, CHC, USNR

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Saturday, 20 November 1954 rn Page Seven NavSta Character Education Program Aides Navy's Over All Efficiency by William 0. Johnson, PNI Since the start of the Naval Station's "Protection of Moral Standards Program", several people have inquired as to it's objective and whether or not it is doing any good. This article is given here merely to point out that the program IS Navy related in many ways, not the least of which is its secondary potentiality for achieving better morale, and improved awareness of the responsibility of the individual to the Navy and to the natio', and to the overall increased efficiency of every ship and station of the United States Navy. One of the missions of the Information and Education Program is the development and maintenance of a healthy service attitude emong naval personnel. Another closely related program has been developed, and that is CHARACTER EDUCATION. It is to assist commanding officers in the protection and strengthening of moral standards within the Navy. This program undertakes to "help effect a mature and secure individual who will live with moral integrity in peace and harmony with himself, his neighbor, and his God". Achieving this objective is a major factor in the development of the service attitude and can have a tremendous impact on both the Navy Community and society at large. The Chief of Naval Personnel and the Commandant of the Marine Corps have issued instructions in support of the above stated objective and this program is in full effect at all Recruit Training and Service School Commands. It might appear at first glance that the roadblocks to the implementation of such a program as this would prove insurmountable in that an organized continuing program of group instruction in Character Education is either highly impractical or totally impossible. There are several answers to this. First, that officers at the highest echelons of responsibility, through recognizing the problem involved, have apparently believed that some means must be employed if we would preserve in the Navy the very principles for which America exists and the safeguarding of which is a prim mission of the Navy. Through the implementing of the BUPERS Instruction, though group instruction is not a panacea, much less a "Navy religion", it is considered to be a grave necessity by those primarily responsible for the effectiveness of the Navy's mission and for the well-being of naval personnel. The second is that several commands have submitted reports of improved disciplinary conditions, better morale, lessening of mast and court cases, improved moral "climate" and decrease in flagrant immorality after a period of experiientation with the Character Education program. No attempt has been made to prove that these improvements are a result, direct or indirect, of the group instructions. However, the fact remains that several coinmands have subd such reports, and though the nature of improvement cited is not considered as the prime or direct objective of the Program, it is of course believed that such imFTG Bulletin by Jack Engstrom YN2 and Mrs. Maurice 0. Vandersteen are happy to announce the birth of a son, Maurice 0., Jr., on the 15th of November at the Gtmo Naval Hospital. He is the Vandersteen's fourth child and second boy. They now have two boys and two girls. Vandersteen is in the FTG Administration Department. Charles E. Schaub, RM1(SS), FTG Communications Department, got his Xmas wish early. He's going back to the Boats! Chuck has received orders to Submarine Squadron TWO, at New London, Connecticut. He will depart Gtmo Saturday aboard the JOHNSON with his wife and two daughters. Good bye and good luck. Karon Anne is the new arrival at the home of Mr. and Mrs. John Molloy. She was born in the Gtmo Naval Hospital on the 15th of November, and has a sister. Mary, who will be two in February. Molloy, RM2, is in the FTG Communications Department. Lieutenant H. W. Loader, FTG Gunnery Department, will depart Gtmo today aboard the JOHNSON. LT Loader has been ordered to the U.S.S. MISSISSIPPI, EAG-128, for duty. Good bye and good luck. Lieutenant and Mrs. Gerard Gebler are the proud parents of a daughter, Kathleen Susan, who was born in the Gtmo Naval Hospital on the 16th of November. The couple have two other children, Michael, nine and Gerard, two. LT Gebler is in the FTG Engineering Department. Lieutenant (JG) Arthur L. Babine, Jr. reported aboard on 12 November from the Office of the Supervisor of Shipbuilding, USN, and Naval Inspector of Ordnance, Quincy, Massachu-etts. LT Babine relieve LT Pennington in the Engineering Department. Welcome aboard. Reported ..on the 12th, S. W. McKay, SN, from NAS Quonset Point, R. I., D. Burchi, SN, from NAS Quonset Point, R. I., both will be in the Administration department. T. R. Stumo, EM2, from the USS SAFE AM-111, Engineering Department, H. T. Frye, FP1, from the USS FULTON AS-11, Damage Control Department, B. H. Carr, RD1, from the USS SALEM, CIC Department and on the 16th, R. K. Wilson, QMC, from CNO, Washington, D. C. Welcome aboard. We hope you will enjoy your tour of duty with FTG. SHIPARRIVALS USS Saufley EDDE-465 22 Nov USS Hood DD-655 22 Nov SHIP DEPARTURES USS Newport News CA-148 24 Nov USS Otterstetter DER-224 26 Nov USS ENGLISH Rammed During LAfTFLEX The destroyer USS English cruises slowly into port at Norfolk, Va., with 25 feet of her bow ripped off. The English collided with the destroyer USS W. L. Lind while making runs on a submerged contact during Operation "Lantflex," the Atlantic USS Norris rammed into the superstructure of the submarine USS Bergall. What Is??? A Good Fire Extinguisher Every extinguisher which carries the label of the Underwriter's Laboratories or the Factory Mutual Laboratories has met the requirements of a safe standard of construction and performance, and has sufficient capacity to deal with test fires of a size representing the sort of fire that may reasonably be anticipated. An approved extinguisher gives years of dependable service if it is maintained according to the manufacturer's instructions. It is made of materials that are expected to stand up under all sorts of conditions. If it becomes damaged, it should be repaired only by the manufacturer who has the proper equipment and experience for the work. An extinguisher must, of course, be refilled immediately after use and be regularly cared for and inspected. Although extinguishers do not require a great deal of care, they are no exception to the general rule that mechanical devices have to be serviced from time to time. Don't expect an extinguisher to "stand-by" you unless you give it the attention it requires and deserves. And, after servicing your extinguishers, put them back in their proper places-locations known to everyone and where you can get at them easily when needed. "I used to know Mr. Smithers who was with your firm. I understand that he's a tried and trusted employee." -{r? h quetinkpier t coldlya pirovements actnot only quite possible but definitely to be sought "He was trusted, yes and he as extremely important, if secondvill be tried if w'e foitunate ary, objectives. enough to catch bins In this regard, it is difficult to improve on the dictum of Admiral Sue: "They tell me she 'r.kes MAHAN: "The Navy is only as people happy wherever she g es good as t n 'e" in it". Joe: "You mean enever' p _lb tididw'efotnt St. Peter challenged the Devil to a game of baseball claiming that all the great baseball players were up in Heaven. "You'll lose," said the Devil, "you won't stand a chance." "And why not?" asked St. Peter. "Well," replied the Devil, "We have all the umpires down here." Rita loreno, Cap's recording artist, has ambitions to be a bigtine movie star, and from this corner ,movies should be 'better than ever.' THE INDIAN

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Na ui -eniNoND--Gmo.-m2 m em THE INDIAN m Saturday, 20 November 1954 VU-10 Prop Blast by Bill Graves & Staff Added to Utility Squadron TEN's big happy family this past week were: J. P. Brennan, AT2 and E. N. Tatler, AT3 from NAS, Lakehurst, N. J., R. S. Eells, SKSN, from the Newport Naval Base, Newport, R. I., R. D. Lackie, PNASN from the U.S. Naval Receiving Station, Philadelphia, Pa. Glad to have Y'all down south for a cruise. We hear that all Sebastian needs now is a set of "Gold Wings" he is the only seaman in VU-10 who even came close to a take-off in a drone. Don't think he had tower clearance, either. Children will be children and you can't make anything else out to them. When they get around a tree it is natiiral for them to act like little nonkies and end up sometime or another like. these youngsters. This week little Bobby Zaborski decided to act like Tarzan and fell out of the tree. Luckily it only knocked the breath out of hiss, but had his parents worried for several hours. Sunny Weiland tried her technique at the same thing, in the same tree, but with more serious results. She was taken to the hospital where several stiches were required. These weren't the only casualties around that point. Jeremy Stamm fell off a homemade ship and broke her arm. You just can't dive off a ship in dry dock without getting hurt. Commander McCoy and his wife Ginny are taking a luxurious cruise in the Caribbean to the islands of Puerto Rico and Trinidad. Many stories might be told by the skipper when he returns ie carried his little "Black Book". The Parachute Loft personnel must have really had a Wing-Ding of a party at Windmill Beach on Veterans Day. From the looks of Frank Middleton when he returned, it seems that he was the Center of Attraction. The CO of the "Mary Jane", E. R. Price, A03, is taking on more crew members. The only requirements are that you are checked out on how to bail out a boat and swim. x' S k ( s S Golly, Gloria-those curves. Here's a triple exposure of Gloria De Haven as she will be seen in the forthcoming U-I technicolor production, "So This Is Paris." Corrine Calvet co-stars in it and we'll have Corrine sitting here next week. Gloria sings "I Can't Give You Anything But Love, Babeeeee" in this particular sequence. Notice the pretty bracelets. JEST-A-SECOND WGBY Hi-Lites The human brain is a wonderful thing. It starts working when you are born and never stops until you stand up to speak in public. Two can live as cheaply as one -if they both have good jobs. Amateur shows are a means for people with no talent to prove it. Airman: "I saw a screwy kind of bird in the Aleutians. It lays square eggs and talks. Girl: "What does it say?" Airman: "Ouch." Farmer: "You're a brave ladcoming down in a parachute in a 100-mile gale like this!" Soldier: "I didn't come down in a 'chute. I went up in a tent." If There's A Knock On Your Door It Could Be "The Visitor from Hades" We bid a fond farewell to Jovial John Hull who leaves on the Johnson today for discharge. With him goes his lovely and elarsing wife, Rosa. We'll miss them both. John has served on the staff of WGBY for 18 months, in which time he has served as both staff announcer and program director, doing a fine job in both capacities. A little history, John was born in California in 1930. His father, then a struggling young radio announcer who has since distinguished himself on his own network program, "Strike It Rich," is J. W. Sr., better known as Warren Hull. John entered the Navy in 1951 and served aboard the U.S.S. Vulcan, attended Armed Forces Information School at Fort Slocum, N.Y. and then reported to NavSta, Gtomo for duty. John plans to enter Colombia University at the completion of his enlistment and then try commercial radio work. The Hulls will reside in New York City. Best of luck in the future, John, and it's been nice serving with you. Another word of caution, watch the prograin schedule in the Papoose very closely during the next few weeks. More changes may be forthcoming like the removal of the "House of Music" and "Hillbilly Jamboree". Speaking of the "Hillbilly Jamboree," we'd like to say that it's been a lot of fun doing the show, and Congenial Mountain George thanks you for the excellent reception you have given the show since lie made his first fumbling, hesitant apperearance. You're a good audience and "May The Good Lord Bless And Keep You." 2 0 I B 1 BO0K-NOM by Francis L. Cannon, .JO FORD: THE TIMES, THE MAN, THE COMPANY by Alan Nevins This book sets forth tie conditions prevailing in the 1870's as Henry Ford and a dozen others who would become automotive pioneers grew to manhood. It describes the forces and men that produced the gas engine and first automobile. It tells how Henry Ford as a youth felt impatient with farm drudgery and of his rise from machinist's apprentice to engine expert. He then, by invention and adaptation produced a horseless carriage. Here too is the story of financial success which attended mechanical accomplishment. THE SA'T'URDAY EVENING POST TREASURY The editors of the POST have ransacked thousands of issues to produce this one. The POST has been in business since about 1728, so they had quite a number of issues to choose from. Some of the greats who have appeared in its pages are Edgar Allen Poe, Ben Franklin (the POST'S founder) Jack London, Gilbert Keith Chesterton, Steven Crane, 0. Henry, and William Faulkner, to list just a few. There are 70 reproductions of the its best covers, including many by Norman Rockwell, and a section of ads which have both the nostalgia and humor of a bygone age. LAUNCELOT, MY BROTHER by Dorothy James Roberts A novel of King Arthur and his times. All is seen through the eyes of King Arthur's mans, Bors d' Ganis. He sees quite a bit; especially the romance between Launcelot and Queen Guenivere. Apparently King Arthur is quite blind. Nonetheless, this is a Book-of-Month Club selection. THE ANATOMY OF A CRIME by Joseph F. Dinneen This is a novel, but most of the events closely parallel the famous Brink's robbery in Boston. Mr. Dinneen is crime reporter for the Boston Globe and was assigned to cover the case from the start. He is thoroughly familiar with all the known aspects of the crime, one of the most sensational in the nation's history. Besides being interesting a a story, this is a piece of excellent crime writing. AMERICAN CAPTAIN by Edison Marshall Adventure story by the author of Yankee Pasha. It's about an American sailor in the early part of the last century and his adventures with a daughter of a Royal Navy captain and, at different times, Barbary Pirates. In Passing. Angels and Spaceships, by Frederic Brown-A collecdon of fantasy stories for the usha nced. Case of the Restless Redhead, by Earle Staniy Gardner-A new Perry Mason mystery. And for the kiddies there are two new juvenile books, Rip Van Winkle and Lengend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving, and Pilgrins's Progress bey Johsia BiNyan. Mas driver: "Wh didn't ou signal what you wanted to do?" WVomian driver: "Because there's no signal for what I wated to do."


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