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Indian

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Title:
Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English

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-"&vers qcFM0 Ltke T6 8uYts1iLl._"


Vol. VI, No. 69 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 6 November 1954


GUV F. L Lawlor


New Air Station Exec
by Paul Snyder

On Wednesday, 27 October 1954, Commander Frank L. Lawlor relieved Commander Walter G.
Winslow as executive officer of the Naval Air Station. CDR Lawlor reported to Gtmo from NAS Atlantic City, New Jersey, where he served as Operations Officer. The new executive officer received his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of North Carolina in 1935. He began his naval career when he commenced flight training in 1937.
After receiving his wings and Ensign's commission in 1939, CDR Lawlor joined Fighter Squadron No. 3 aboard the USS SARATOGA. He resigned his commission in 1941 to volunteer as a flight leader with Gen. Claire Chennault's "Flying Tigers".
CDR Lawlor returned to the U.S. after serving 15 months with the Chinese Air Force. He re-entered the Navy as LT Lawlor in November, 1942, and was immediately assigned as a figther instructor at Operational Training Command at Jacksonville, Florida.
In 1944, he was sent to the Pacific as Commanding, Officer of Fighter-Bomber Squadron No. 9 at Barber's Point on the island of Oahu where he become LCDR Lawlor. His squadron boarded the new USS LEXINGTON and participated in the first carrier-based aircraft raids on Tokyo. Later, with
(Continued on Page Three)


Honor Man


Top man at last week's Naval Station inspection was R. P. Hanes, BM1, of Fleet Boat Pool. Hanes. selected as Honorman, is a native of Salem, North Carolina. He has seen 13 years service in the Navy and has been here at Guantanamo six months. Prior to duty here he was aboard the USS CUSHING, DD197 for 18 months.


Seavees Prove 'Can-vo'

During Hazel Emergency

Even hurricane conditions can not stop SeaBee "Can-Do" spirit. This fact was proved here on the Naval Base by the officers and men of Mobile Construction Battalion FOUR during hurricane conditions set in lieu of the onrushing Haz-l last month.
MCB-4, which was not here dureing the hurricane drills last August, lost only one half a day of work on projects underway. First action in the AATC are'. was Monday afternoon when LCDR J.V. Bartlett, Commanding Officei-, personnally instructed officers and men of the battalion as to their duties during the various hurricane


7w



Saturday morning, Admial Carney journeyed across the bay to watch operations at Leeward Point field. Here CAPT R. R. McCracken, Commanding Officer, Naval Air Station (second from left) points out distant jets to the party: left to right, VADM R. P. Briscoe, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations, (Captain McCracken), ADM Robert B. Carney, Chief of Naval Operations, RADM W. J. Marshall. Executive Assistant and Senior Aide to the Chief of Naval Operations, and RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Coinmander, Naval Base.

Chief of Naval Onrationn Visits Naval Rase.


conditions. Immediately after the muster, a drill was held to find out just how long it would take the SeaBees to get to shelter. And all the time two concrete pouring jobs were still in progress.
Monday night, knowing how fast they could get to the shelters, MCB-4 remained in the AATC area while the Naval Base was evacuated to shelter.
Then, on Tuesday morning, although seas were breaking high over the cliffs nearby the AATC area, there were no high winds or rain. In true "Can-Do" fashion, MCB-4 went to work, right on schedule, turning out more housing units while base personnel were still in shelters.


English Royal Marines

Present Ceremony Here

The Royal Marines of the HMS Superb will present a guard and band ceremonial Tattoo on the seaplane ramp at the Naval Air Station by the Movie Lyceum on Friday 12 Nov. for all personnel of the Naval Base. The colorful and impressive ceremony will begin at 1830 and last for about one half an hour. Further details concerning the ceremony will be announced over WGBY and will be published in the Pa-(. -.


RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba greets ADM Robert B. Carney, Chief of Naval Operations upon his arrival here on the Naval Base.


No Injuries In F7 Crash
LTJG Tom Winkler, of VU-10, experienced the kind of luck this week that gives pilots nightmares.
Coining in for a landing from his first solo hop in an F7F, LT Winkler set the plane down on the runway at McCalla Field and applied the brakes. No brakes! The Tiger Cat rolled the length of the runway and slithered over the edge of the cliff behind the Naval Air Station bowling alley.
Mr. Winkler, however, was unhurt and walked away from the wreckage unscathed. -


Last weekend Admiral Robert B. Carney, Chief of Naval Operations, visited the Naval Base Guantanamo Bay.
Admiral Carney, accompanied by Vice Admiral R. R. Briscoe, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations, and Rear Admiral William J. Marshall, Executive Assistant and Senior Aide to the Chief of Naval Operations, arrived late Friday night and remained on the base until Sunday noon.
In the past, a rigid schedule and several unexpected events have postponed Admiral Carney's visits, therefore, he welcomed this opportunity to visit the Naval installation at Guantanamo Bay. He and Vice Admiral Briscoe commented on the fine facilities available to the Atlantic Fleet for use in training programs and logistic support.
Highlighting Admiral Carney's tour of the Naval Base was a visit to Leeward Point where he, Admiral Briscoe and Rear Admiral Marshall watched squadron operations at the Leeward Point Field.
-Besides this, Admiral Carney toured the replacement housing units, presently completed and those still under construction, and was notably impressed by the quality and quantity of production.
The Admiral found it most remarkable that so many improvements and vast expansions have taken place on this Naval reservation within the past five years.
The overall appearance of the base, as well as the general attitude and conduct of personnel with whom he came in contact, impressed Admiral Carney as indicative of a high state of morale.







Page Two


S


Sattiiday, 6 November 1954


THE INDIAN


j)/tdta/t
The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9-615
Saturday, 6 November 1954
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of StaffU. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
__- __ Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sandoess ---------- Officer-Advisor
H. E. Davis, OC ----------------Editor
H. L. Sisson, JO ------- ----------News
F. L. Cannon. JOSN -----Photographer D. C. Roberts, JOSN------------Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.

VU- 10 Prop Blast
by Bill Graves & Staff
Arriving aboard Utility Squadron TEN for duty this week were, Ernest A. Boice, AL3, Earl R. Fauch, AMAA, and Ray A. Swartz, AMAA. All three men came to us from NATTC, Memphis, Tenn. Welcome aboard mates and we hope you enjoy your stay with VU-10
The VU-10 Mallards got the softball season off to a bad start by dropping their first three games. Now that they have practiced enough, they are going after theBase Championship. The main thing lacking is support. So even though you don't play ball, come on out and help us cheer them on
It's amazing to see a plane flying along without a pilot, but did you ever see one fly without a pilot or without another plane controlling it? Well it happened in VU-10 last week, when a drone plane commonly know as a "Red Dog", went out of control and decided to seek "a higher level". "Where sl4 goes, nobody body knows."
If anyone has old clothes that they don't want contact Gardner, AN, he will accept all donations. I don't know who gave him those Tropical Shorts he's wearing unless Ring-A-Ding threw them away.
The squadron is looking for a basketball coach. Anyone desiring this position please contact LT Garves. Men with "All American" awards will hold top priority.
We are very glad to hear that Mrs. Turner is doing better. The best of luck and a speedy recovery is extended from all hands.

Ever hear of the guy who tried to kiss his girl in the rain and mist?

A pedestrian had fallen into a manhole and called for help.
"Dear me," said a gentleman who happened along. "Have you fallen into that manhole ?"
"Not at all," was the caustic reply. "I just happened to be down here when the street was put through and they built the pavement around me.


Base Chaplains Depart Together;


Relieved Simultaneously This Week


Sunday, 7 November 1954


Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630 Confessions: Saturday, 17301800; 1930-2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel
Chanlains at this Activity
CDR J. J. Sullivan
(Catholic)
LCDR K. G. Peterson
(Protestant)


Chaplains W. J. Spinney and M. O. Stephenson (center) are wished the best of luck at their next duty station by their respective reliefs, Chaplain Jerome J. Sullivan and Chaplain Karl G. Peterson. CDR Sullivan assumes duties as senior chaplain of the base.


Chaplain's M. 0. Stephenson and W. J. Spinney have been officially relieved of their duties here at Guantanamo Bay by CDR Jerome J. Sullivan and LCDR Karl G. Peterson. The former chaplains departed Sunday morning via the USNS JOHNSON for their new duty stations. Chaplain Stephenson will report to Jacksonville, Florida, and Father Spinney travels to the West Coast for duty at the Naval Hospital, Oakland, California.
Father Sullivan has assumed the duites as Catholic Chaplain and also Senior Chaplain of the Naval Base while Chaplain Peterson took over as Prostestant Chaplain.
Prior to reporting here, Father Sullivan served two years as Senior Chaplain at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot in San Diego, California. He is a veteran of World War II and the Korean War.
During the Korean conflict he served aboard the USS Iowa and USS Helena, both in Korean waters. Before being recalled to active duty, Father Sullivan was attending the University of San Francisco, where he was a Professor of Sociology and Philosophy.
In World War II, Father Sullivan served aboard the USS Pennsylvania in the Pacific Theatre. While serving aboard the Pennsylvania he was awarded the Commandation Ribbon with a "V" and also the Navy Unit Citation.
Chaplain Sullivan was ordained a Jesuit Priest at St. Marys, Kansas in 1934. In 1939 he received his doctorate in Theology from the Greforian University, Rome, Italy.
LCDR Karl G. Peterson reported to Guantanamo Bay from Service School, Naval Training Center, San Diego, California, where he served as Senior Chaplain for sixteen months. While stationed here, Chaplain Peterson set up a Character Guidance Program at the Naval Training Center.
During his Naval career, Chaplain Peterson has served at various naval establishments. He was at-


90


Chaplain and Mrs. M. 0. Stephenson wave farewell to their many friends here on the Naval Base from the gangplank of the MSTS JOHNSON. A large crowd, including RADM Edmund B. Taylor was on hand to see the Chaplain off.

tached to Naval Air Station, Ancostia, Washington, D.C. where he served one year.
He was then attached to the Second SeeBee Unit stationed in New Guinea. Upon completion of duty there Chaplain Peterson reported to Quonset Point, Rhode Island where he served two years.
Then, hearing his "call to the sea", he reported aboard the USS YELLOW-STONE where he served 28 months in the Mediterranean. Returning to the states, the Protestant Chaplain reported to Naval Training Center, Great Lakes. Following this tour of duty he attended Columbia University for postgraduate work.
Chaplain Peterson is the recipient of the following ribbons: American Theatre, Asiatic, European-Occupation and Korean.


The Chaplain's Corner

One day a delegation came from a distant state in the White House and waited on Abraham Lincoln with a written protest against a certain appointment he had made. In particular the paper they handed the President contained some accusations against the charteter of Senator Baker, an old and beloved friend of Lincoln. After Lincoln read the paper throughly he turned to the group and asked with dignity: "This is my paper which you have given me?"
When they answered that it was,, Lincoln put another question: "May I do with it what I please?" "Certainly Mr. President", they replied.
Deliberately the great Lincoln stooped down to the fire place behind him, laid the paper on the burning coals where it soon vanished in smoke, turned and said: "Good-day, gentlemen."
That is how every one of us should treat those who slander, detract and calumniate others. That is what we should do with the accusations made against the character of another. Throw the charges into the fire. Detraction means revealing without necessity a fault which another has really committed, but which is not known to others. It is unjust, robbing your buddy of the esteem "thers have for him and exposing him to loss in his skill or position.
Calumny means accusing others of faults which they do not have, or greatly exaggerating the faults which they do have. Calumny is more serious than detraction, because it is a lie. We should give everyone a chance to defend himself-when we lie about another' character, we are being cowards.
Determine today with all the vigor of your mind and heart, to avoid all detraction and calumny. Follow the Golden Rule: "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you."
We hope for forgiveness for our own faults. Only by showing concern and respect for others, only by burning up the faults of others, as Lincoln did, can we except to share in divine mercy.
Let respect for others, and their reputation, guide you, and you will avoid such serious faults.
Chaplain Thaddeus J. Tillman
U. S. S. Newport News


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Saturday, 6 November 1954 THE INDIAN


Marines Celebrate


279th Birthday 10 Nov
by Cpl Joe Androvich, USMc
Marines around the world will cut the traditional birthday cake November 10th as the United States Marine Corps celebrate the 279th anniversary of its founding.
Here at Guantanamo Bay Cuba, the Marine have planned a gala birthday celebration commencing at 0930. Track and field events will be held to determine the winner of the traditional Marine Corps Birthday Plaque.
Marines and their dependents are invited witness these events from 0930 to 1130.
The "Sunset Parade" will commence at 1710 and all are invited to witness this glorifying spectacle. At 2030, a cake cutting ceremony will be held at the Officers' Club with RADM Edmund B. Taylor being the guest of honor.
At 2000 there will also be a dance at the Enlisted Mens Beer Garden, with a cake cutting ceremony taking place at 1900.


Little Theatre Speeds


Rehearsal Schedule
Changes in the cast of the Guantanamo Bay Little Theatre's production of "My Three Angels," slated for a November 29th opening, were announced this week by director Allan Wagner.
Replacing Dorothy Murphy in the role of 'Emily' is Evelyn Perdue is no newcomer to the Little Theatre having been active in its 1949 and 1950 productions. She was president of the group at one time during that period. Later, in the Norfolk. Va. Little Theatre group, Mrs. Perdue appeared in "Death of a Salesman" and the English mystery-drama "Home at Seven."
Ralph Jones, Naval Base school teacher, joined the cast in the role of 'Felix," the part formerly held by Neil Murphy.
Ensign Wagner will leave for Pensacola on November 12 for temporary additional duty and expects to return about the 22nd of the month. Consequently the rehearsals have been accelerated between now and his departure. Rehearsals will be held every week night beginning at 7 P.M. During his absence the schedule will drop back to three times weekly.

NAS Exec
(Continued from Page One)
his squadron then serving aboard the USS YORKTOWN, CDR Lawlor joined in the invasions of Iwo Jima and Okinawa.
Returning to the U.S. a few weeks before the end of World War II, CDR Lawlor. was assigned as Commanding Officer of FighterBomber Squadron No. 3 at Norfolk, also serving aboard the USS KEARSARGE. He then was sent to Line School for one year at Newport ,Rhode Island. Upon completion of his work there in the summer of 1948, CDR Lawlor poceeded to Pensacola, Florida, as Officer-in-Charge of Basic Training Unit No. 2 at Corry Field. In 1950, and now Commander Lawlor, he became Operations Officer of the USS SIBONEY, followed by a short tour aboard the U S S INTREPID which was enroute from San Francisco to Norfolk for modernization. Upon detachment, CDR Lawlor became Operations


Navy Wives' Club Sponsors,

Haiti Relief Clothing Drive
Beginning Monday morning, the Navy Wives' Club here will begin an "Old Clothes Drive" for the relief of many homeless people in hurricane-stricken Haiti. Starting on Monday, the drive will run through Friday under the direction of the Navy Wives' with assistance from Mrs. Helen Bowler, American Red Cross Field Director, and the Naval Station Special Services department.
The drive, which has been authorized by CAPT G. M. Holley, Naval Base Chief of Staff, offers a great opportunity for personnel of the Naval Base to help in the relief program presently underway in Haiti.
All kinds of clothing for men, women and children will be accepted, and families should begin now to sort through clothing at home for outgrown dresses, old shoes, faded trousers, and any sort of clothing that can possibly be washed and mended and made wearable. Whether the clothing be for men, women, or children, it can be used in Haiti. When "Hazel" swept across Haiti, it left many with only the clothes on their back.
Collections will be made on Friday, 12 Nov from 1 to 4 P.M. and from 6 to 8 P.M. in the evening. If you want your donations picked up in the afternoon, tie a hankie or piece of bright colored cloth on your front door knob. If you prefer to have it done in the evening, please leave your front porch light on.
The Naval Station Special Services Officer, LT E. A. Sandness, has volunteered the use of a truck and a driver to help in the collection of the clothing.
After all collections have been made, the clothing will be sorted as to size and type at the home of Mrs. Lorraine A. Yale, Club President, under the direction of Mrs. Helen Bowler. After the sorting has been completed, all the bundles will be washed and mended and then packed for shipment to Haiti by plane.
Mrs. Helen Bowler will personally deliver the clothing to Dr. Rol, American Red Cross representative in Haiti who will take charge of distribution.
This is your chance to help, just as a small gesture of Christian neighborliness to our friends across Windward Passage-a wonderful Thanksgiving gesture.
If you wish to give your clothes before Friday, you may take them to Mrs. Yale at West Bargo 20-B, or phone 9669 for individual pick up service.



Let's Go to a Picnic

I The annual Veterans' Day I
picnic for all military personnel attached to the Naval Station, and their dependents, will be held at Phillips
Park next Thursday. Com-
mencing at 11 A.M. the picnic will feature such events
as an egg toss, pie eating
contest, tug o' war, softball games, sack races and many
others.


Officer at NAS, Atlantic City.
CDR Lawlor married the former Miss Catherine Eileen McGuire of Boston, Massachusets. They have six children-Susan, Debbie, Robert ,Lindsay, and one-year-old twins, Pen' and Bruce.

9


Resident of Villamar line up to vote in the recent election of Council Members for the Villamar-Bargo Association.


Villamar-Bargo Elects Association Council


Another big step has been taken here on the Naval Base to make Guantanamo Bay a happier and more thriving community. Last weekend, residents of Villamar, Bargo and the Replacement Housing went to the polls and selected their Villamar-Bargo Community Association Council members.
The Villamar-Bargo Community Association was formed under the authority of Commander, Naval Base. The purpose of the associatioi is to advise the Commanding Officer, Naval Station or the Base Commander on all matters pertaining to operation of the VillamarBargo Community.
The council itself consists of seven members elected by the people to represent the people in all matters pertaining to community living.
The following candidates were elected on 30 October: Precinct No. 1, C. E. Swenson, ALl, of VU-10; Precinct No. 2, J. R. Nelson, CM1, of the Fleet Training Group; Precinct No. 3, V. J. Hendley, S02, Fleet Training Group; Precinct No. 4, C. E. Blakeman, Civilian; Precinct No. 5, J. E. Armstrong, Civilian; Precinct No. 6, J. R. Yost, Civilian; and Precinct No. 7, W. J. Sparks, Civilian.
Duties of the Association will be primarily to advise the commanding officer on all pertainant matters in the operation of the Villamar - Bargo Community - except in the matter of housing assignments. Besides this, the Assbciation will oversee the operation of the recreation facilities of the Villamar Lyceum, the establishnient and maintenance of recreational facilities within the Villamar-Bargo Community, and see to the implementation of regulations f6r occupants of public quarters. . In addition to this, the Asociation will establish further rules and regulations governing the beautification and maintenance of quarters and grounds, safety regulations, traffic control, and transportation facilities.
The Association Council will be headed by a member elected by the group as Mayor Council activities are slated to begin next week.

POISE-the ability to continue talking while the other fellow picks up the check. -


First NavSta Personnel


Gu-et New Rates 16 Nov

Last week, men of the Naval Station received word of their advancement in rating. This year the rates are being made effective in three groups. The first group, those listed below, will wear the new crows beginning 16 Nov. The second group is slated for 16 January promotions, and the last group for 16 March. The second and third lists will be published when effective.
16 November 1954
Name To
Doubleday, A. F. ME1
Stagnard, E. R. J. YN1
McKinley, T. A. BM2
Martin, J., Jr. EM2
Bergen, '. J. EN2
Zeyen, A. E. EN2
Schlumberger, D. ET2
Betz, D. S. J. IM2
Kemp, A. E. ML2
Roe, F D. TE2
Wareen L. M. YN2
Housekneght, D. BM3
Bagwell, E. R. CS3
Ketter,D. E. CS3
Roberts, W. M. CS3
Dion, A. A. DC3
Pieper, L. K. EMP3R
Cannon, F. L. J03
Bruning, A. D. MU3
Case, M. W. MU3
Arnold, L. W. PH3
Schuberth, C. J. PI3
Smith, D. P. SHB3
Drury, E. M., Jr. TEM3R
Riley, J. P. TE3
Thomas, D. H. TEM3R
Schmarr, R. H. MML1R

Student: "I wonder if insects can communicate with each other? "
Professor: "Well, moths can certainly chew the rag."

First old maid: "I see by the paper a woman in Omaha has just cremated her fourth husband."
Second old maid: "Isn't that always the way? Some of us can't get a man at all, while others have husbands to burn."


a


Page Three


THE INDIAN






m ur


-.


....... ....
Beaming proudly, and with good reason, is the famed prize-winning triumvirate who took first prize for top poundage of catch. Left to Right: E. H. Cavanaugh, Civ., LTJG J. "Kro" Kropack, and T. P. Ahlberg, Civ. The three took third place in Nationals at Key West late in August.


Denizen Teams Win In Service Underwater Spearfish Meet


Sunday, September 26th, marked another big "win" for the Caribean-famed "Denizens Of The Deep" as they added three more gold cups to their ever-growing collection.
Ramey Air Force Base was the site of the tourney in which 13 teams were represented from such points as Fort Buchanan, P. R., Ramey, Naval Station, San Juan and NOB, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Invitations were extended further north to Key West and West Palm Beach, Florida. The gathering was the first Inter-Service competition held in the Caribbean area and promises to be the cornerstone for many more in the future.


To the first string team, consisting of the famous triumvirate, E. H. Cavanaugh, T. P. Ahlberg and J. A. Kropack, went the first prize for an aggregate total poundage. S. Nevins of the second team of Denizens was awarded first prize for the largest individual fish, and J. D. Elwood, also of the Denizens, took second prize for the second largest, all of which gave the Denizens three of the six prizes for the day. Ramey AFB took second in aggregate, West Palm Beach, third, and San Juan swimmers copped third place individual fish prize.


i
~


E. H. Cavanaugh rounds the edge of a coral mountain in search of elusive prey. Note Aqualung, breathing device which allows a man to remain underwater at depths of 100 feet for over an hour.


by Miriam Hoy
A week ago last Wednesday, October 27, we played 18 holes and the winners weren't established until too late to make the Indian news. So to catch up on some old data the winners were:
1st Flight:
Gross-Jane McElroy
Net-Evelyn Leach 2nd Flight
Gross-Miriam Hoy
Net-Val Evans
3rd Flight
Gross-Teresa Moseley Net-Gladys Hamilton
Last Sunday afternoon was Scotch Foursome Day with 12 couples teeing off. The winners of golf balls were:
1st Low GrossJane Gentry and Tony Grego
2nd Low Gross-The Scotts
3rd Low GrossJane McElroy and CDR King
1st Low Net-The Toczkos
2nd Low Net-(tie)The Mannings and The Kings
Closest to the pin for the men on No. 3 was White and the longest drive on No. 16 was won by LCDR Scott.
Closest to the pin for the women


#I


TEAM STANDINGS


Administration Supply
Boatshed


IN L 7 1 6 2 5 3


VU-10 (Team 1) 4 0
Communications 3 5
Aerology 2 6
VU-10 (Team 3) 2 2
VU-10 Team 2) 1 7
INDIVIDUAL HIGHHamilton 208
HIGH SERIES-Morris 563 HIGH TEAM SINGLEAdmin. 840
HIGH TEAM TRIPLEAdmin. 2469

on No. 14 was Miss Struble and the longest drive on No. 17 was won by Frances Grounds and Miss Struble and Manuele had the best poker hand.
Last Wednesday morning all the ladies entering the Handicap Tournament met in the Snack Shack and all the rules of the game, plus many questions, were thoroughly explained by Tony Grego. The tournament started November 4, and just the best of luck to all the players participating.


THE INDIAN


159;i6 our


^ C


Saturday, 6 November 1954


1954 National Education Week Observed Here

In November of each year. during the week which includes Armistice Day, American Education Week is observed throughout the United States. This year, under the sponsorship of the Naval Base School, the Guantanamo Bay Post No. 1 of the American Legion, and the Local Parent-Teachers Association, a full program of starting tomorrow and ending Saturday, 13 Nov. has been planned.
The basic purpose of American Education Week is to create awareness on the part of every person, of the important role of education in our democracy and of his personal responsibility for maintaining good schools. American Education Week has several specific purposes. Primarily. it was created to increase public understanding and appreciation of education. It explains the modern school with the present day curriculum, current teaching materials, and the newer teaching methods. Besides this, American Education week shows the school needs and problems and strengthens the bonds of cooperation in the all-year program of school-community activities and relationships. Finally the students too have their part, as American Education Week helps to increase their appreciation of their school.
Here on the Naval Base, with the aid of the American Leion, the Parent Teachers Association, and Radio Station WGBY, a full week of events has been planned at the Naval Base School.
American Education Week Schedule of Events Sunday, 7 November
0900 Education Sermon at Catholic Mass by CDR J. J. Sullivan 1100 Education Sermon at Protestant Services by LCDR K. G. Peterson 1815-1830: WGBY Radio Skit-"Miss James Decides to Stay."
Monday, 8 November
1215-1315: 7th & 8th Grade Girls Skating and Tennis Contests
7th & 8th Grade Boys Touch Football Game
1315-1415: 4th Grade Swimming Meet at Fleet Recreation Pool 1415-1515: High School Physical Education Contests 1815-1830: WGBY Radio Skit-"Sally Anderson Grows Up"
Tuesday, 9 November
1000 Primary Grade Play-"Miss Liberty and the Children"
1315-1415: 5th Grade Swimming Meet at Fleet Recreation Pool 1815-1830: WGBY Radio Skit-"Our Greatest National Asset-Our
Youth"
Wednesady, 10 November
1000 4th, 5th, & 6th Grade Play-"School Days"
1315-1415: 6th, 7th, & 8th Grade Swimming Meet at Fleet Recreation
Pool
1415-1515: High School Swimming Meet at Fleet Recreation Pool 1815-1830: WGBY Radio Skit-"Schools and Cooperative Venture"
Thursday, 11 November
1815-1830: WGBY Radio Skit-"Why Not 'Priorities' for Schools"
Friday, 12 November
0915 7th & 8th Grade Dramatic Club Play-"Beachead for
Freedom"
1215J1315: 7th & 8th Grade Physical Education Dancing Classes 1415-1515: High School Dancing Classes
(All dancing classes will be held in the School Auditorium.) 1815-1830: WGBY Radio Skit-"What Are Today's Fundamentals?"
Saturday, 13 November
1815-1830: WGBY Radio Skit-"Mr. Harris Goes To School"
(All physical education contests are in the Fleet Recreation Area)
The plays are being presented in the Naval Base School Auditorium. The Radio skits are being planned and directed by Mrs. J. W. Richmond Jr, PTA, and Mr. G. Ward, American Legion.
A very cordial invitation is extended to all parents and friends to attend any or all of the above events. Also you are invited to visit the classroom anytime during the week and stay as long as you like.


Ladies' Golf Shots NAS-VU-10 Bowling







e
Saturday, 6 November 1954


THE INDIAN


Naval Base Softball Ends Three Wet Weeks;


SeaBees, Leeward Point Tie For First Place


by Hal Davis

The Base Softball League waded into the middle third of the season's schedule and rain ceased to be a factor in the competition as it knocked out only one game during the first part of the week.
Meanwhile, the eight base teams,
under the whip of victory and defeat, began to strech out in the standings and give their followers tialI Statistics
and indication of how the league will run. SOFTBALL STANDINGS
The Pointers from Leeward pull-
ed into an even tie with the Bees (As of Wednesday, 3 Nov. 1954) from MCB-4 Wednesday night as Won Lost G
they edged the Bees, 6 to 5. It MCB-4 5 1
was a see-saw battle with the Leeward Point 5 1
Pointers on top by three runs in Marines 4 1 %
the first inning, the Bees tying it NavalStation 3 2 1-%a
up in the 4th, the Pointers going VU-10 1 4 3-%
ahead, 5 to 3 in the 5th, the Bees NAS 1 4 3-%
tying it up again in the 6th and FTG 1 4 3-%
the Leeward-men pushing across NSD-CHB 1 4 3-%
the winning run in the 7th as Bladies scored after rapping out BATTING AVERAGES
a triple.
The loss was the first for the (10 at bats or more)
Bees who had romped through five G AB R H RBI BA
games undef eated. The closest Wood, Marin, 5 13 5 6 3 .461
margin of victory for the Bees and Wood, J. M. L.P. 6 21 7 9 6 .429 Gibson VU-i0 4 10 1 4 2 .400 possibly an omen of things to come vescovi FTG 5 15 7 6 5 .400
was the previous night's game with Mathews NavSta 4 13 5 5 2 .385 the Fleet Training Group Train- Sutherland NAS 5 16 -5 69 .375
ers. The Trainers had the Bee Burner FTG 4 16 3 6 5 .375
ees Schreck Marines 5 14 4 5 5 .357 shackled until the bottom of the Sanders, D. NSD-CHB 5 17 3 6 4 .353 7th when the 'Can-Do' men surged up and blasted home four runs PITCHING RECORDS
to tie the score at 6 and 6, and then, two extra innings later, pushed 14 innings or more
two more across the plate to take Mandis NAVSTA 3 1 1.46
t ho 8 to 6 Forton Leeward 3 1 1.68
Some, 6. Gibson VU-10 1 3 2.50
Stroupe, of the Bees, used the Lee Marines 4 0 2.84
two games as a stepping stone to Gregory MCB-4 3 1 3.11
the home run leadership of the Haney Leeward 2 0 3.50
league, rapping out two in the Milke1el NSD-CHB. 1 2 4.20
Boyett FTG 0 2 6.11
Trainers game and one more in Davis NAS 1 1 7.00
the Pointer hassle.
The VU-10 Mallards, currently HOME RUN LEADERS
carrying the rest of the league on their shoulders, shocked -the Naval Stroupe MCB-4 3
Station Indians Tuesday night by Wood, J. M. LP 2
a 4-run ninth inning uprising to Collins LP 2
ice their first victory, 5 to 1, and Petinak NAVSTA 2
give Mandy Mandis his first defeat Mandis NAVSTA 2
of the season. Madden and Edgar were the big guns in the Mallard RUNS BATTED IN LEADERS win, each getting two hits apiece while Gibson, Lee and Edgar were Oglesby MCB-4 10
credited with the RBI's. Sutherland NAS 9
On Monday night the Leeward Petinak NAVSTA 8
Pointers added one of their victory Stroupe MCB-4 6
notches by edging the NSD-CHB Race Marines 6
combo, 11 to 10. Meanwhile, on Milkinel NSD-CHB 6
Monday, the Marine Leathernecks, Darmofal NSD-CHB 6
behind the potent poking of Pace and Adams who racked up three apiece, one of them a homer for Adams, jumped on the Naval Air Station Fliers to the discordant tune of 12 to 3. The Fliers used Davis, Harrell and Snyder on the mound in attempt to quench the Marine fire. Davis took the loss for the Fliers while Lee boosted his win-loss record to 4 and nothing.
Other games held during the
week saw the Naval Station Indians beating the NSD-CHB team, 8 to 7, the Bees taking the NSDCHB outfit, 4 to 3; the Indians doubling up on NAS, 10 to 5; the Marines and Leeward taking VU-10 and FTG respectively, 7 to 3 and 11 to 10.
The Big Four, at present, MCB-4,
Leeward Point, Marines and Naval Station hold a decided edge at this stage of the schedule. The Bees, though, will have a rugged row to Milkinel of the NSD-CHB comhoe battling the talent in the bine is the tops in skepticism as Pointer infield and against the he listens to an umpires decision. over-active bats of the Leather- NSD lost the game to the Pointers, necks, while the so-far hot-and- 10 to 11. cold Indians are always a constant threat. the most ominous threat to the
Of the clubs in the lower bracket leaders, the dark horses who could of the standings, this reporter explode at any instant and start picks the Mallards from VU-10 as sprinting toward the top.

3


Safe at third during action in the Leeward Point victory over the NSD-CHB team. The pointers took the contest 11 to 10 after being on the short end of a 10 to 0 score in the second inning.


Nation's Unbeaten Gridiron Elevens Vie


For Bowl Games, Unmarred Seasons

by Bud Sisson

Six unbeaten teams will take the field this weekend in the football race across the nation and attempt ot hold their clean records intact. Three teams, Oklahoma, Miami (Fla.) and Arkansas should have "clear sailing" towards a perfect season while the fate of undefeated Ohio State, UCLA, and Cincinnati, however, is a bit more doubtful.
The nation's number one team,
Oklahoma should continue un- Southern California. scatched as they travel north to The schedule for major college
meet Iowa State. Next week the play around the nation is as
Aggies will meet Missouri, and to follows: finish out their season, they face EAST
Nebraska and finally their neigh- Boston U. vs Villanova
hor, klhom AM.Brown vs Springfield
M' i . Colgate vs Bucknell
Meanwhile, Miami should also Cornell vs Syracuse
continue in the win column in their Columbia vs nartmouth
Pennsylvania vs Notre Dame
remaining tilts against Auburn, Penn State vs Holy Cross
Alabama, and Florida. Florida Princeton vs Harvard
should prove their strongest foe. Rutgers vs Lafayette
Arkansas, a darkhorse this year, TYele vs Brandeis
should have no trouble slipping by MIDWEST
their remaining opponents, Rice, Indiana vs Miami (0)
Southern Methodist, and Lousiana Iowa vs Purdue
State U. and finally Houston. Iowa State Vs Oklahoma
Kansas vs Nebraska
Possibilities for a clean sweep Michigan vs Illinois
for the three other major unde- Michigan State vs washington St.
feated teams aren't so bright. In Minnesota vs Oregon St.
. Missouri vs Colorado
the Big Ten, Ohio State will face Ohio State vs Pittsburgh
some of their roughest foes in Oklahoma A&M vs Detroit
coming weeks as they meet Pitt- wichita vs N. Dakota St.
sburgh, Purdue, and Michigan. wisconsin vs Northwestern
Since Wisconsin's upset loss to Aubu-nSOUTH Aubrnvs Miami (Fla.)
Ioiva, the Badgers need wins over Citadel vs Newberry
both Purdue and Michigan to take Clemson vs Furman
the conference title, plus a possible Davison vs Catawba
invitation to the Rose Bowl. Duke vs Navy.
Florida vs Georgia
Cincinnati, which slipped past George Tech. vs Tennessee College of Pacific, 13-7, for its Kentucky vs vanderbilt
LSU vs Chattanooga
seventh straight win last week, Maryland vs N. Carolina St.
goes on to play Arizona State this N. Carolina vs S. Carolina
week. Arizona State has a season's Richmond vs wake Forest
record of five wins and two losses wesaVirginia vs am
Next week the Cincy Bearcats face SOUTHWEST
Wichita (5-1) and round out their Arkansas vs Rice
season against Miami of Ohio (6-0) Baylor vs Texas
the following week. The Bearcats Houston vs Tulsa
are hoping an unsullied record will SMU vs Texas A&M
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
earn them an invitation to the Arizona vs Texas Tech
'Gator Bowl on New Year's Day. Arizona State vs Cincinnati
UCLA, making their bid for the Colorado A&M vs Utah
Rose Bowl and an undefeated sea- Denver vs Brig. Young
Montana State vs N. Dakota
son, stands a fair chance of mak- New Mexico vs Montana
ing both as they have only two Utah State vs wyoming
more foes to down. This week they FAR WEST
face Oregon. Next week they draw Pacific vs San Jose St.
Stanford vs So. California
a rest before their final contest of UCLA vs Oregon
the season against their arch-rival, washington vs California

-9


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Page Five






a


Page Six THE INDIAN


Saturday, 6 November 1954


WGBY Hi-Lites Radio's 'Tops' of the Week Ladies' FRA Holds Benefit


by George Engle

With the impending loss of John Hull and Jerry Lewis this station is due to suffer a serious setback in talent as well as personnel. John, who has been known in the past for his "Requestfully Yours", "Morning Caravan", and currently his excellent "House of Music". will be leaving with a souvenir of sunny Cuba in the person of his lovely wife, Rosa, on November 20th. John will be returning to the States for discharge. Ah, these short-timers.
Jerry, whose dulcet tones have appeared on every one of our studio shows from the "Hillbilly Jamboree" to his most recent role' as Kid Morpheus on your "Sandmnan Show", will be leaving us very soon for another duty station. After 32 months of consistently fine shows, he'll be conspicuous by his absence.
But that brings us to the current problem, the forthcoming shortage of qualified announcers. In order to keep WGBY on the air and operating at it's current efficiency, we'll need your help. If your vocal cords aren't warped, and if you have thn customary hole in the front of your tead, you, too, can be a radio announcer. Just come on in to WGBY at the Fleet Recreation Area with the understanding between you and your Division Officer that you can be released to WGBY on a full time basis if you Qualify. We'll audition you by pting your vocal talents on tape. Anytime between 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M.
Incidentally, Bob and Bev Mairo are the pound parents of a baby boy. Our Congrats.
Consult your daily Papoose for any changes in the schedule of programs presented over WGBY, 1450 on your radio dial:
. . . . Good Listening. . . .


TEENAGE- BOUND P
by Linda Thurston and Judy Yost

With Hallowe'en over and done with we can pack all our trappings away for another year and settle down to everyday run-of-the-mill life again. However, we feel we should give some mention to the Witch's Night escapades The dance last Friday night was a huge success. The band was gr-r-reat, and those costumes! ! . ... Nancy H. as Santa's helper . . . Jim Dalton as Blackbeard... Nancy A winning first prize for her Arabian get-up (Hajii Baba, yet) . . . and Doug walking off with first prize for the boys in his bathing beauty outfit that had all the boys fooled for a while (dig those crazy whistles) . . . Tim R making like an officer . . . Jean C and Sharon K and all the others who turned up as hillbillies . . . Reuben dressed as a girl . . . and the gals all dolled up in glamorous evening dresses and dangly earrings . . . then there was Jeri Warren, a kat to the end, and our gal Patti Wormwood, all decked out as a swabbie . . . Neil and 'Nita were the most to say the least in their French Apache costumes.
Saturday nite found most of us garbed out in costumes again heading for the various parties, dances, etc-witches, goblins and all-the cars bulging with dozens of kids.
DID YA' SEE-Stanley P and the group that was decorating the Assembly Building for the dance . . . Jo soaking in the sun at the pool . . . the three jokers at the


U


MONDAY, November 8. . . . THEATRE GUILD ON THE AIR. - . . 9:00 P.M.
Frederick March and Nina Foch star in "Cass Timberlane". A story by Sinclair Lewis about the marriage of a middle-aged man to a girl in her 20's.
TUESDAY, November 9.. . . ESCAPE. . . . 9:00 P.M.
Two people whose love has failed to stand the test of time look upon the great flocks of restless, uneasy, wheeling birds as harbingers of death. The title, "The Birds".
WEDNESDAY, November 10.... CRIME CLASSICS. . . . 9:00 P.M.
Thomas Hyland tells another tale of violence of three gypsies who keep their oath and bring death to each other for love of a beautiful widow. The title, "Widow Magee and the Three Gypsies: A Vermont Fandango".
THURSDAY, November 11.... FAMILY THEATRE . . . . 9:00 P.M.
Anne Blythe and Raymond Burr co-star in "Night Caller" A girl is trapped in her own home by gangsters who are using it for a hideout.
FRIDAY, November 12. . . . SUSPENSE. . . . 8:30 P.M.
"Destruction" is the presentation on Suspense this week. A man's life is taken without the use of any material weapons.
SATURDAY, November 13.. . . THEATRE ROYAL. . . . 7:00 P.M.
Sir Lawrence Oliver stars as the murderer of a little girl who, in a moment of remorse, sends a letter of confession to a friend, then changes his mind and attempts to retrieve it.
SUNDAY, November 14. . . . HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE. .'.'. 10:00 P.M.
A Nun befriends a girl on her way to prison and sets out to prove the girl's innocence. Claudette Colbert is the nun and Barbara Rush. the accused girl.


FTG Bulletin

by Jack Engstrom
Sixteen men in the Fleet Training Group will be promoted within the next five months. With the new promotion schedule in effect ten men will be advanced on the 16th of November, two men on the 16th of January, and 4 men on the 16th of March.
A good showing was made by the Training Group in this advancement period. Of the 36 men who took the Fleet Wide Competitive Exams last August, 16 or 44% of them will be advanced. Two men passed their exams but will not be advanced due to Quota Limitations. Congratulations and good luck in your new rates.
The following is a list of the men who will be advanced, their new rates and their departments:
To be advanced on 16 November 1954:
JULIAN, ET2, Fleet Training Center
EASTMAN, YN2, Administraiton PITTS, YN2, Reports WATERS, YN2, Damage Control ENGSTROM, YN2, PIO & CIC HAUSSER, CS2, G.S.TU. Culebra BRINKMAN, DC3, Galley FOWLER, BM3, Transportation TOLLIVER, GM3, Transportation KAGER, ENG3, Barracks
To be advanced on 16 January 1954:
BELLAVANCE, YN2,
Administration
BENSON, YN2, Engineering (Disch)
To be advanced on 16 March 1954:
HAWKINS, CS1, G.S.TU.
Culebra (Trans)
CUNNINGHAM, BM2, Operations RAPELLA, YN2, G.S.T.U. Culebra WHITE, EM3, G.S.T.U. Culebra (TAD)
LTJG C. R. ROPE, FTG CIC Department, departed for the states with his wife last Wednesday. He will report to the separation activity at NAS Jacksonville, Florida for release to inactive duty.
LT Pope, a graduate of the University of Florida, will be going back to Gainesville, Florida in February to continue his studies at the University of Florida for his Masters Degree.
Good bye good luck to you in the future.

The Fleet Training Group Pistol


Navy Wives' Club News

The Navy Wives' held their regular monthly luncheon at the C.P.O. Club Thursday afternoon, October 28, at 1:30 P.M. The tables were laid with white damask and decorated with rose hybiscus and foliage. Eevryone enjoyed a delicious three course menu planned around baked ham and topped off wtih ice cream and coffee. Bingo games followed the luncheon.
The Halloween "Trick or Treat" sale Friday, October 29 was a good success and the Club sold a wide variety of Halloween treats.
On Sunday, October 31, a group of volunteers from the Navy Wives' Club met the dependents' transport ship, USNS Johnson. They provided nursery services from the children of parents who were passengers aboard the Johnson so that their parents might be free to enjoy a short time to see the sights on the Naval Base before resuming their trip back to the States.
The third business meeting of the Club was held Thursday, November 4, at 8:00 P.M. in the Family Room at the C.P.O. Club.

A lot of excitement was caused by an announcement that came through the radio in a local police crmser.

Exchange trying on masks and making sure the noise-makers really worked . . . Johnny Mc and his elephant tusk pipe and being able to recognize stray shoes . . . Irma and her fancy figure skating . . . the guy that disguised his radio in a paper bag so he could hear the hillbilly show during, class ... Evelyn and Bobbie horseback riding and regretting it the next day. . . .
All in all I guess we've a pretty exciting week. Now it's time to rest up awhile and take it easy . . . like getting our noses deeper in the books, maybe.
We'd like to thank the Combo for playing for us, also the chaperones and everyone else who helped us make our Hallowe'en Dance possible. It was great!
On the serious side, we'd like to extend the sympathies of the entire gang to Reuben McQuarry on the recent death of his mother.


The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Fleet Reserve Association sponsored a musical program for the patients at the Hospital on Sunday, October 31, with the High School Combo providing the entertainment.
The High School Combo consisted of Betty Dalton on the marimba; Pat Fojt, accordian; Jim Dalton, trumpet; Edgar Heimer, saxophone; David Shiver, guitar: James Detxer, bass fiddle, and Jerry Parker on the drums. They were accompanied by their music teacher Mrs. Lillian Armbruster.
The Ladies' Auxiliary plans to sponsor a program each month and any interested local talent may phone Mrs. J. W. Dexter, Vice President of the Ladies Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association.

Match was held last Saturday afternoon at the Naval Station Range and when the smoke had cleared LCDR Minard, FTG Gunnery Department, had won nine of the 13 awards, including the Grand Aggregate Trophy with a final multiple of 1516.
LCDR Minard's other awards were; .45 aggregate of 731, .22 Aggregate of 785, First in 45 Expert with a 371, First in .22 Expert with a 394, Rapid Fire .45 with a 180, Timed Fire .45 with a 180, Rapid Fire .22 with a 194 and Timed Fire .22 with a 197. That's Expert shooting in anyone's book.
LT Murphy, ASW Department, took two of the remaining awards by firing a 330 for second place in the .45 Expert shoot and taking second place in the .22 Expert event with a 368.
C. Meyer, FT1, Gunnery Department, took third place honors in the .45 Expert event with a 294 and Jim Boyett fired a 363 for third place honors in the .22 Expert event.

T h e Administration Officer's team in the Officers Bowling league and the FTG Team No. 2 in the enlisted men's Bowling league continued their good bowling and both teams remained on top at press time.
Although the Admin Team dropped three points to the Naval Station Officer's Team No. 5, their win and loss record of 25 and 7 was still tops in the league.
In the enlisted men's league, FTG Team 2 took three points from Commissary Store Monday nite to raise their record to 10 and 2. Andy Gagliano had a hot game, knocking them down for a 214.
Emerson F. Beman, HMC, of the FTG Medical Department, departed the Training Group last Wednesday for a tour of Shore Duty at the National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland.
Good bye and good luck at your new duty station.

SHIP ARRIVALS
USS Thomaston LSD-28 8 Nov
USS Purdy DD-734 8 Nov
SHIP DEPARTURES
NONE
The BritishNC 1 u i s e r HMS SUPERB which arrived in the Guantanamo Bay area Monday morning, will be here for approximately two weeks. While here in Gtmo, they will be conducting exercises with the Fleet Training Group Gunnery Department, CIC Department and others.
Welcome aboard. We hope your stay in Guantanamo Bay will prove beneficial to your ship and crew and also hope it will be and enjoyable one to remember,


THE INDIAN






e


Saturday, 6 November 1064 TIlE INDIAN Pagti Seven


Local Youths Encounter Poisonous Fish


Base Warned On Danger [or Children

On Saturday afternoon, 30 October 1954, at about 1630, Reggie Morales,
a five and a half year old boy from the Cable Station, received treatment at the U.S. Naval Hospital for a wound inflicted by a tropical fish, which was later identified as a Stone Fish. The boy had been fishing in the vicinity of the Cable Station and caught a strange and horrible fish. While endeavoring to remove the hook from the mouth of the fish he sustained a infectious wound from the fish. Within forty-five (45) minutes thereafter, severe symptoms of local infection developed necessitating immediate treatment.
On Sunday, 31 October 1954, at about 1500, Douglas Dunlap, a boy of about seven years of age, was given medical treatment for a wound inflicted in his right leg while wadding in the shallow water at Kittery Beach. It is presumed that his injury was incurred by a small moray eel, which habitate the holes and crevices of coral and are easily antagonized by intruders.
The following is an excerpt from the publication, "Survival on Land and Sea", NAVAER 13--1501, prepared for the United States Navy by the Ethnogeographic Board and the Staff of the Smithsonian Institution.
FISH WITH POISONOUS FLESH
Most fish are edible, palatable, and wholesome. However, there are a few with flesh that is definitely poisonous and it is important that everyone recognize these.
All of the important fish with poisonous flesh belong to one large group, the plectognathi, of which there are many kinds in the tropics. All these fish lack ordinary scales such as occur on bass, grouper, and sea trout. Instead, these poisonous fish are covered with bristles or spiny scales, strong sharp thorns, or spines, or are encased in a bony box-like covering. Some of them have naked skin, that is, no spines or scales. Never eat' a fish that blows itself up like a balloon.
The different kinds of poisonous fish can be easily recognized by the illustrations herein presented. The usual names given to these poisonous Plectognaths are: swell fish or puffer fish, porcupine fish, burr fish, cowfish, trunk fish, box fish, thorn fish. In addition, the filefish or fool fish and the trigger fish may be looked upon with suspicion for they too have been credited with poisonous flesh, but in certain regions the filefish and trunk fish are regularly eaten. If the natives use them, they are all right. Unless you know, however, leave them alone. The flesh of the puffers, porcupine fish, and the related species is violently poisonous. Cooking does not destroy the poisonous alkaloid in these fish. . 9c QP'OAI FISH
Obviously these known poisonous B. FILE FISH
fish should never be eaten, as C, S7YG
violent sickness and even death may result. G Pa
FISH WITH VENOMOUS OR
POISONOUS SPINES
Certain other fish should be rule they are either yellowish gray avoided for a different reason. They or blackish in color, often having have sharp spines on their heads flecks or patches or red or orange and in their fins. These spines may that give them a mottled appercause a burning or stinging, even ance like the floor of the sea. When an agonizing pain, that is out of wading on a reef you should keep all proportion to the apparent careful watch for such fish. Make severity of the wound. This is the it a rule to carry a long sharp result of venom that is injected Pole.or bamboo stick and poke any when the spines penetrate the flesh. suspicious looking object on the The venom varies greatly in quan- bottom. At the slightest touch each tity and in power. In the most of the projecting spines on these
venomous varieties it is as deadly fish injects venom and causes seas that of the most dangerous vere pain. A full charge of venon
ke from the whole dorsal fin has been
The worst of the venomous fish known to cause death.
are the Scorpaenidae. They are The next most dangerous after
generally known by the following the scorpion fish are the sting rays common names: scorpion fish, These occur in lagoons, shallow warty lumpfish or stonefish, toad- bays, estuaries, and far up many fish, zebra fish or tiger fish, and of the tropical rivers. They usually stinging fish. See illustration. lie on the bottom concealed in th
Stonefish do not swim about to mud or sand. Sting rays are easily any extent. They generally lie recognized when seen. (See illus quietly on the bottom ,which they tration). The tail may be long o exactly resemble in color. As a very short, and is armed with on


it


or two long, sharp-pointed spines with serarted edges. When stepped upon, the ray repeatedly whips its tail upward with great force and fury and may drive the spine clear through one of the bones of the leg or foot as well as through the flesh. The pain is most severe and infection usually results, poke ahead of you with your stick and do not pick your feet up and set them down in the usual manner.
Slide them along in the mud.
Should your feet touch a hidden sting ray it will swim away as fast as anchor it down and give the tail the leverage needed to
drive the spine into you.
Some catfish have poison glands
at the base of the spines on the breast fin. This venom is much like that of bees, causing severe pain, but it is not deadly. Since some of the larger catfish have










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barbed spines, the wound made is jagged and secondary infection may occur.
All wounds made by fish spines should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected at once. HANDLING DANGEROUS FISH
Never attempt to pick up a scorpion fish of any kind with the bare hands. It makes no difference how the fish has been taken, with hook and line, poison or dynamite. If the fish has any life left, a slight movement may drive a spine into your finger, carrying enough venom to cause excruciating agony. Always use a dip net, your spear, or some substitute, such as your machete or bayonet. Never poke your bare hands into holes or crevices in the corals or feel under rocks. To do so invites grave risk of serious wounds. A moray eel or worlf fish may be in such hidding places. Moray eels are brightly colored and may have strongly


-0


PTA Hears Dr, Pepin

On Child Dental Health

The Parent-Teachers Association of Guantanamo Bay met in the open air assembly hall of the Naval Base School Tuesday night. Dr. R.C. Pepin was the principal speaker of the evening, discussing the various aspects of child dental hygiene.
The meeting opened as Mrs. E. H. Beiland led the Association in group singing of "God Bless America" accompanied on the piano by Mrs. Savage.
The Invocation was given by the new Protestant Chaplain Karl G. Peterson.
During the business meeting LT D. J. Murphy reported on the progress of the PTA carnival booth and stated that more members are needed on the PTA's carnival committee.
The rhythm band from the Nursery School under the direction of Mrs. H. P. McNeal presented several musical selections.
In his discussion Dr. Pepin stressed three main points uppermost in the consideration of child dental hygiene: (1) parents should scrutinize carefully the amount of intake of fine sugars by the child;
(2) the child should be taught the proper method of brushing teeth; and (3) the twice-yearly visit to the dentist should not be ignored.
Mrs. McNeal's Nursery School took first place in the percentage of parents present at the meeting and was awarded the winning banner. Mrs. Burke's Kindergarten class was second and Mrs. Dunmire's First Grade class was third.

Passenger: Which end of the car do I get off ?
Motorman: Either one. It stops at both ends.

Says the egg in the monastery: Oh hum-out of the frying pn and into the fiar.
.: * *%
A consultant is an executive who can't find another job.

marked patterns. In the American tropics a common one is greenish black in color and 5 to 6 feet lonr. One form in the Mediterranean is golden fellow in front, purple toward the tail, and is beautifully banded and mottled. It attains a length of 4 feet or more. In the Pacific some of those around the coral reefs grow to the length of 10 feet or more, and commonly have a light-colored background with black spots or a network of black lines. Others have black or brownish over-all color and orange to yellow spots. The morays are always hungry and very savage. Their jaws have strong, knifelike teeth and can easily nip off a finger or two. They have been known to bite through a heavy shoe. Like other eels, however, they are good to eat. Wolf fish are grayfish or brownish in color and have an elonagte body, 4 to 6 feet in length, taperng to a more or less rounded tail. They have strong, sharp teeth and are noted for their ferocity. Natives avoid such dangers almost instinctively. You must learn-but don't learn the hard way. Death may be the result of carelessness.
An additional item of warning on the local fish concerns the barracuda, in addition to being conflesh is often poisonous when used for food. This condition exists more often in the larger barracuda, that is, those weighing over five (5) pounds.


THE INDIAN


Page Seven







Navy=-DPPO-OND-=-Gtmo.-0224


THE INDIAN Saturday, 6 November 1954


MOVIES


Saturday, Nov. 6
BLACK HORSE CANYON
Joel McCrea Mari Blanchard
Lady rancher gets two cowpokes to help her capture her beautiful black stallion. Their efforts are handicapped by a neighboring rancher who also entertains plans for capturing the horse.
Sunday, Nov. 7 SINS OF ROME
Massimo Girotti Ludmilla Teherina
Story of the Roman legion in 68 B. C. who invaded surrounding territories and conquered all people, bringing them back to Rome as slaves.
Monday, Nov. 8
ON THE WATERFRONT
Marlon Brando Eva Marie Saint
A dock worker is pushed from a roof to prevent talking to the crime commission. Brando finds himself caught between loyalty to the mob bossing the workers and his love for the victims sister.
Tuesday, Nov. 9
MEN OF THE FIGHTING LADY Dewey Martin Van Johnson
An author visits a carrier to get its Christmas story. A flash back tells the story of three fights of navy pilots against railroads in North Korea.
Wednesday, Nov. 10
EDDIE CANTOR STORY
Keefe Brasselle Marilyn Erskine
Life story of Eddie Cantor, beginning with his youth on the East Side of New York and his fabulous rise to fame.
Thursday, Nov. 11
MAN ON A TIGHTROPE
Frederic March Terry Moore
A Czech circus behind the Iron Curtain maneuvers an elaborate escape to the American zone.
Friday, Nov. 12 TORCH SONG
Joan Crawford Michael Wilding
Broadway musical star is upset when her pianist and arranger quits. After much misunderstanding and argument they realize they love each other.



01 SCUTTLEBUTT





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LET'S GO TO HOLLYWOOD where passers-by gaze in amazement when lovely lovelies like the one above pose for photographers on Sunset Blvd. Some have trouble seeing through the heavy smog, but others just rub their eyes and gaze on.


PUBLIC WORKS GHIPS
by Vic. Gault

Friends and co-workers of Mike Croft, Chief Quarterman (Maintenance) of the department, gave him a farewell party at the Officers' Club last Friday. Mike resigned his position in the Public Works Department to return to the States to accept a position with a reputable contracting concern there. The party was a great success and there were approximately 125 guests present. We wish Mike and his family all the luck in the world in their new venture.
Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Sheppard are due for congratulations from this column because of the arrival of a "Little Miss". The future "Miss Universe - 1972," who arrived Friday, weighed 6 lbs., 2 oz. and was christened Margarette Cora.
Our deepest and sincere condolence to Mr. Norvall Shoop, Chief Quarterman Painter of the department for the loss of his father, Mr. Harvey Shoop, in Philadelphia on 30 September. He passed away at the age of 87 years. Mr. and Mrs. Shoop were at his bedside at the moment of his demise. MORE ABOUT PUBLIC WORKS
ORGANIZATION
UTILITIES DIVISION-Power
Plants Branch. This branch under the supervision fo Mr. A. L. Broughton, Foreman Power Plants is responsible to the Foreman Utilities. The assigned duties and responsibilities of this branch are to operate and maintain all power generating plants, stationary and stand by units on the Base, including Leeward Point Air Station and Hospital Cay, and the air compressor stations at Coral Point and the Central Power Plant. This


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Armistice Day Observed

In official observance of Armistice Day, recently re-named Veterant's Day, holiday routine will be observed througout the Naval Base Thursday, 11 Nov. All but necessary work, drills ,and exercises will be suspended all day.

branch maintains a complement of personnel for the maintenance and upkeep of all its plant equipment including major overhauls of diesel engines. Any work required on cooling towers and outside piping other than operation, preventive maintenance and inspection, as well as necessary machine work is performed by other shops of the department as may be requested by the Utilities Division, which isssues inter-division work orders for the purpose.
Utilities Records Branch. This
branch is directly under the cogniaznce of the Foreman Utilities and is supervised by Mr. A. A. Campbell, Supervisory Clerk, GS-6. The branch reports daily operation of power, water, and steam plants. It makes annual reports of efficiency of operation, unit cost of power and water, maintains charts of yearly growths of utilities and daily consumption charts of power and water, showing average and peak loads. The branch keeps records in connection with fuel oil consumption by boilers, and maintains records and inventories of machinery, tools and accessory equipment. It also furnishes the Fiscal Department of the Naval Supply Depot with meter readings and other data for building consumers.


In q o sWIs

by Cpl Joe Androvich, ISMC

Departure
Departing for the states this morning will be SSgt Arvill V. Adwell, who will report to Norfolk, Va. for further transfer to Camp Lejeune, N. C. Sergeant Adwell will spend 30 days leave with his wife in Virginia and Kentucky prior to reporting to Lejeune. While stationed here at Marine Barracks, SSgt Adwell was attached to the Special Services, Headquarters Section and was prominent in the promotion of athletics at the barracks. His departure will be felt by all of us and we all wish him the best of luck and wishes upon his departure from Gtmo.
Staff Club Party
Last Saturday evening the Staff Noncommissioned Officers Club was the scene of a Halloween and Farewell Party for MSgt Litzelman, TSgt Anderson, and SSgt Adwell, who are all scheduled to depart from Gtmo Bay within the coming week. The gala affair was featured with a buffet dinner followed by dancing. Everyone present reported having a wonderful evening.
Promotion
"Congratulations" to William Kent upon his recent promotion to the rank of Staff Sergeant. SSgt. Kent will assume the duties as Brig Warden at the Naval Station Brig, replacing the departing TSgt Anderson.
Intra-Mural Basketball
With the atmosphere still full of softballs and footballs, IntraMural Basketball here at Marine Barracks is about to make its bid onto the local scene. Tentative plans are now in process for a six team league composed from Guard and Headquarters Section. Actual date for the curtain raiser is yet to be determined but the opener is scheduled for this month.
Softball
Possessing a record of 4-1 at this writing, the "Fighting Leathernecks" representing the barracks in the NavBase League, find themselves well in contention for the league championship. Following tradition of Marine teams of the past, the leathernecks have shown considerable hustle and ability to come from behind. The 1954 version of the Marine Softballers is bolstered by such baseball standouts as Jim Pace, Bill Wood, Larry Adans, Hon Plante, Rollie Dowen, Don Schreck, and Chuck Mason, all members of the Base champions during the past baseball season. Determ-ination and the ability to win the close ones is bolstered by the morale given to the team by the spectators, so lets make it a habit to be out there rooting for the main.
Rifle Range
"CEASE FIRE AND SECURE THE BUTTS" Tuesday morning marked the conclusion of the 1954 requalification firing for some 42 Marines. High shooting honors went to Pfc James R. Liggett, who fired a record score of 231. 2dLt., D. L. Bell was close 2nd with a score of 230. For the record, the following shooters fired the following socres:
EXPERT
James R. Liggett 231
Douglas L. Bell 230
Lee G. Haurik 222
Horold Stevenson 221
SHARPSHOOTER
Joseph Bonsignore 216
"D" "C" Foley 216
Theodore Bushong 214
Charles W. Mason 212


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Vol VI Noes TMO Like The SSuCaine" -audy __oebr15 Vol. VI, No. 69 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 6 November 1954 COR F. L. Lawlor New Air Station Exec by Paul Snyder On Wednesday, 27 October 1954, Commander Frank L. Lawlor relieved Commander Walter G. Winslow as executive officer of the Naval Air Station. CDR Lawlor reported to Gtmo from NAS Atlantic City, New Jersey, where he served as Operations Officer. The new executive officer received his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of North Carolina in 1935. He began his naval career when he commenced flight training in 1937. After receiving his wings and Ensign's commission in 1939, CDR Lawlor joined Fighter Squadron No. 3 aboard the USS SARATOGA. He resigned his commission in 1941 to volunteer as a flight leader with Gen. Claire Chennault's "Flying Tigers". CDR Lawlor returned to the U.S. after serving 15 months with the Chinese Air Force. He re-entered the Navy as LT Lawlor in November, 1942, and was immediately assigned as a figther instructor at Operational Training Command at Jacksonville, Florida. In 1944, he was sent to the Pacific as Commanding Officer of Fighter-Bomber Squadron No. 9 at Barber's Point on the island of Oahu where he become LCDR Lawlor. His squadron boarded the new USS LEXINGTON and participated in the first carrier-based aircraft raids on Tokyo. Later, with (Continued on Page Three) Honor Man Top man at last week's Naval Station inspection was R. P. Hanes, BM1, of Fleet Boat Pool. Hanes. selected as Honorman, is a native of Salem, North Carolina. He has seen 13 years service in the Navy and has been here at Guantanamo six months. Prior to duty here he was aboard the USS CUSHING, DD197 for 18 months. SeaBees Prove 'Can-Do' During Hazel Emergency Even hurricane conditions can not stop SeaBee "Can-Do" spirt. This fact was proved here on the Naval Base by the officers and men of Mobile Construction Battalion FOUR during hurricane conditions set in lieu of the onrushing Haz?1 last month. MCB-4, which was not here du,ing the hurricane drills last August, lost only one half a day of work on projects underway. First action in the AATC arewas Monday afternoon when LCDR J. V. Bartlett, Commanding Officer, personally instructed officers and men of the battalion as to their duties during the various hurricane Saturday morning, Admiral Carney journeyed across the bay to watch operations at Leeward Point field. Here CAPT R. R. McCracken, Commanding Officer, Naval Air Station (second from left) points out distant jets to the party: left to right, VADM R. P. Briscoe, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations, (Captain McCracken), ADM Robert B. Carney, Chief of Naval Operations, RADM W. J. Marshall. Executive Assistant and Senior Aide to the Chief of Naval Operations, and RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base. Chief of Naval Operations Visits Naval Base conditions. Immediately after the muster, a drill was held to find out just how long it would take the SeaBees to get to shelter. And all the time two concrete pouring jobs were still in progress. Monday night, knowing how fast they could get to the shelters, MCB-4 remained in the AATC area while the Naval Base was evacuated to shelter. Then, on Tuesday morning, although seas were breaking high over the cliffs nearby the AATC area, there were no high winds or rain. In true "Can-Do" fashion, MCB-4 went to work, right on schedule, turning out more housing units while base personnel were still in shelters. English Royal Marines Present Ceremony Here The Royal Marines of the HMS Superb will present a guard and band ceremonial Tattoo on the seaplane ramp at the Naval Air Station by the Movie Lyceum on Friday 12 Nov. for all personnel of the Naval Base. The colorful and impressive ceremony will begin at 1830 and last for about one half an hour. Further details concerning the ceremony will be announced over WGBY and will be published in the Pango, RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba greets ADM Robert B. Carney, Chief of Naval Operations upon his arrival here on the Naval Base. No Injuries In F7 Crash LTJG Tom Winkler, of VU-10, experienced the kind of luck this week that gives pilots nightmares. Coming in for a landing from his first solo hop in an F7F, LT Winkler set the plane down on the runway at McCalla Field and applied the brakes. No brakes! The Tiger Cat rolled the length of the runway and slithered over the edge of the cliff behind the Naval Air Station bowling alley. Mr. Winkler, however, was unhurt and walked away from the wreckage unscathed. Last weekend Admiral Robert B. Carney, Chief of Naval Operations, visited the Naval Base Guantanamo Bay. Admiral Carney, accompanied by Vice Admiral R. R. Briscoe, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations, and Rear Admiral William J. Marshall, Executive Assistant and Senior Aide to the Chief of Naval Operations, arrived late Friday night and remained on the base until Sunday noon. In the past, a rigid schedule and several unexpected events have postponed Admiral Carney's visits, therefore, he welcomed this opportunity to visit the Naval installation at Guantanamo Bay. He and Vice Admiral Briscoe commented on the fine facilities available to the Atlantic Fleet for use in training programs and logistic support. Highlighting Admiral Carney's tour of the Naval Base was a visit to Leeward Point where he, Admiral Briscoe and Rear Admiral Marshall watched squadron operations at the Leeward Point Field. -Besides this, Admiral Carney toured the replacement housing units, presently completed and those still under construction, and was notably impressed by the quality and quantity of production. The Admiral found it most remarkable that so many improvements and vast expansions have taken place on this Naval reservation within the past five years. The overall appearance of the base, as well as the general attitude and conduct of personnel with whom he came in contact, impressed Admiral Carney as indicative of a high state of morale. //

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0 THE INDIAN qgadianu The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9-615 Saturday, 6 November 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff_ U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. SandnessOfficer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC------------------Editor H. L. Simson, 303---------News F. L. Cannon. JOSH----Photographer D. C. Hoberts, JOSN-a--eporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and APPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. VU-10 Prop Blast by Bill Graves & Staff Arriving aboard Utility Squadron TEN for duty this week were, Ernest A. Boice, AL3, Earl R. Fauch, AMAA, and Ray A. Swartz, AMAA. All three men came to us from NATTC, Memphis, Tenn. Welcome aboard mates and we hope you enjoy your stay with VU-10 The VU-10 Mallards got the softball season off to a bad start by dropping their first three games. Now that they have practiced enough, they are going after the Base Championship. The main thing lacking is support. So even though you don't play ball, come on out and help us cheer them on It's amazing to see a plane flying along without a pilot, but did you ever see one fly without a pilot or without another plane controlling it? Well it happened in VU-10 last week, when a drone plane commonly know as a "Red Dog", went out of control and decided to seek "a higher level". "Where sh goes, nobody body knows." If anyone has old clothes that they don't want contact Gardner, AN, he will accept all donations. I don't know who gave him those Tropical Shorts he's wearing unless Ring-A-Ding threw them away. The squadron is looking for a basketball coach. Anyone desiring this position please contact LT Carves. Men with "All American" awards will hold top priority. We are very glad to hear that Mrs. Turner is doing better. The best of luck and a speedy recovery is extended from all hands. Ever hear of the guy who tried to kiss his girl in the rain and mist? A pedestrian had fallen into a manhole and called for help. "Dear me," said a gentleman who happened along. "Have you fallen into that manhole?" "Not at all," was the caustic reply. "I just happened to be down here when the street was put through and they built the pavement around me. Base Chaplains Depart Together; Relieved Simultaneously This Week Chaplains W. J. Spinney and M. 0. Stephenson (center) are wished the best of luck at their next duty station by their respective reliefs, Chaplain Jerome J. Sullivan and Chaplain Karl G. Peterson. CDR Sullivan assumes duties as senior chaplain of the base. Chaplain's M. 0. Stephenson and W. J. Spinney have been officially relieved of their' duties here at Guantanamo Bay by CDR Jerome J. Sullivan and LCDR Karl G. Peterson. The former chaplains departed Sunday morning via the USNS JOHNSON for their new duty stations. Chaplain Stephenson will report to Jacksonville, Florida, and Father Spinney travels to the West Coast for duty at the Naval Hospital, Oakland, California. Father Sullivan has assumed the duites as Catholic Chaplain and also Senior Chaplain of the Naval Base while Chaplain Peterson took over as Prostestant Chaplain. Prior to reporting here, Father Sullivan served two years as Senior Chaplain at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot in San Diego, California. He is a veteran of World War II and the Korean War. During the Korean conflict he served aboard the USS Iowa and USS Helena, both in Korean waters. Before being recalled to active duty, Father Sullivan was attending the University of San Francisco, where he was a Professor of Sociology and Philosophy. In World War II, Father Sullivan served aboard the USS Pennsylvania in the Pacific Theatre. While serving aboard the Pennsylvania he was awarded the Commandation Ribbon with a "V" and also the Navy Unit Citation. Chaplain Sullivan was ordained a Jesuit Priest at St. Marys, Kansas in 1934. In 1939 he received his doctorate in Theology from the Greforian University, Rome, Italy. LCDR Karl G. Peterson reported to Guantanamo Bay from Service School, Naval Training Center, San Diego, California, where he served as Senior Chaplain for sixteen months. While stationed here, Chaplain Peterson set up a Character Guidance Program at the Naval Training Center. During his Naval career, Chaplain Peterson has served at various naval establishments. He was atChaplain and Mrs. M. 0. Stephenson wave farewell to their many friends here on the Naval Base from the gangplank of the MSTS JOHNSON. A large crowd, including RADM Edmund B. Taylor was on hand to see the Chaplain off. tached to Naval Air Station, Ancostia, Washington, D.C. where he served one year. He was then attached to the Second SeeBee Unit stationed in New Guinea. Upon completion of duty there Chaplain Peterson reported to Quonset Point, Rhode Island where he served two years. Then, hearing his "call to the sea", he reported aboard the USS YELLOW-STONE where he served 28 months in the Mediterranean. Returning to the states, the Protestant Chaplain reported to Naval Training Center, Great Lakes. Following this tour of duty he attended Columbia University for postgraduate work. Chaplain Peterson is the recipient of the following ribbons: American Theatre, Asiatic, European-Occupation and Korean. V Sunday, 7 November 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass osi Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Chanlains at this Activity CDR J. J. Sullivan Catholicc) LCDR K. G. Peterson (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner One (lay a delegation came from a distant state in the White House and waited on Abraham Lincoln with a written protest against a certain appointment he had made. In particular the paper they handed the President contained some accusations against the character of Senator Baker, an old and beloved friend of Lincoln. After Lincoln read the paper throughly he turned to the group and asked with dignity: "This is my paper which you have given me?" When they answered that it was,, Lincoln put another question: "May I do with it what I please?" "Certainly Mr. President", they replied. Deliberately the great Lincoln stooped down to the fire place behind him, laid the paper on the burning coals where it soon vanished in smoke, turned and said: "Good-day, gentlemen." That is how every one of us should treat those who slander, detract and calumniate others. That is what we should do with the accusations made against the character of another. Throw the charges into the fire. Detraction means revealing without necessity a fault which another has really committed, but which is not known to others. It is unjust, robbing your buddy of the esteem -thers have for him and exposing him to loss in his skill or position. Calumny means accusing others of faults which they do not have, or greatly exaggerating the faults which they do have. Calumny is more serious than detraction, because it is a lie. We should give everyone a chance to defend himself-when we lie about anothers' character, we are being cowards. Determine today with all the vigor of your mind and heart, to avoid all detraction and calumny. Follow the Golden Rule: "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." We hope for forgiveness for our own faults. Only by showing concern and respect for others, only by burning up the faults of others, as Lincoln did, can we except to share in divine mercy. Let respect for others, and their reputation, guide you, and you will avoid such serious faults. Chaplain Thaddeus J. Tillman U. S. S. Newport News Page Two Satum'day, 6 November 1954

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M 40 Saturday, 6 November 1954 THE INDIAN Marines Celebrate Navy Wives' Club Sponsors )79th RirtlidI 10 Nnu Haiti Relief Clothing Drive y by Cpl Joe Androvich, USMC Marines around the world will cut the traditional birthday cake November 10th as the United States Marine Corps celebrate the 279th anniversary of its founding. Here at Guantanamo Bay Cuba, the Marine have planned a gala birthday celebration commencing at 0930. Track and field events will be held to determine the winner of the traditional Marine Corps Birthday Plaque. Marines and their dependents are invited witness these events from 0930 to 1130. The "Sunset Parade" will commence at 1710 and all are invited to witness this glorifying spectacle. At 2030, a cake cutting ceremony will be held at the Officers' Club with RADM Edmund B. Taylor being the guest of honor. At 2000 there will also be a dance at the Enlisted Mens Beer Garden, with a cake cutting ceremony taking place at 1900. Little Theatre Speeds Rehearsal Schedule Changes in the cast of the Guantanamo Bay Little Theatre's production of "My Three Angels," slated for a November 29th opening, were announced this week by director Allan Wagner. Replacing Dorothy Murphy in the role of 'Emily' is Evelyn Perdue is no newcomer to the Little Theatre having been active in its 1949 and 1950 productions. She was president of the group at one time during that period. Later, in the Norfolk. Va. Little Theatre group, Mrs. Perdue appeared in "Death of a Salesman" and the English mystery-drama "Home at Seven." Ralph Jones, Naval Base school teacher, joined the cast in the role of 'Felix," the part formerly held by Neil Murphy. Ensign Wagner will leave for Pensacola on November 12 for temporary additional duty and expects to return about the 22nd of the month. Consequently the rehearsals have been accelerated between now and his departure. Rehearsals will be held every week night beginning at 7 P.M. During his absence the schedule will drop back to three times weekly. NAS Exec .. (Continued from Page One) his squadron then serving aboard the USS YORKTOWN, CDR Lawlor joined in the invasions of Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Returning to the U.S. a few weeks before the end of World War II, CDR Lawlor, was assigned as Commanding Officer of FighterBomber Squadron No. 3 at Norfolk, also serving aboard the USS KEARSARGE. He then was sent to Line School for one year at Newport ,Rhode Island. Upon completion of his work there in the summer of 1948, CDR Lawlor poceeded to Pensacola, Florida, as Officer-in-Charge of Basic Training Unit No. 2 at Corry Field. In 1950, and now Commander Lawlor, he became Operations Officer of the USS SIBONEY, followed by a short tour aboard the U S S INTREPID which was enroute fiom San Francisco to Norfolk for modernization. Upon detachment, CDR Lawlor became Operations Beginning Monday morning, the Navy Wives' Club here will begin an "Old Clothes Drive" for the relief of many homeless people.in hurricane-stricken Haiti. Starting on Monday, the drive will. run through Friday under the direction of the Navy Wives' with assistance from Mrs. Helen Bowler, American Red Cross Field Director, and the Naval Station Special Services department. The drive, which has been authorized by CAPT G. M. Holley, Naval Base Chief of Staff, offers a great opportunity for personnel of the Naval Base to help in the relief program presently underway in Haiti. All kinds of clothing for men, women and children will be accepted, and families should begin now to sort through clothing at home for outgrown dresses, old shoes, faded trousers, and any sort of clothing that can possibly be washed and mended and made wearable. Whether the clothing be for men, women, or children, it can be used in Haiti. When "Hazel" swept across Haiti, it left many with only the clothes on their back. Collections will be made on Friday, 12 Nov from 1 to 4 P.M. and from 6 to 8 P.M. in the evening. If you want your donations picked up in the afternoon, tie a hankie or piece of bright colored cloth on your front door knob. If you prefer to have it done in the evening, please leave your front porch light on. The Naval Station Special Services Officer, LT E. A. Sandness, has volunteered the use of a truck and a driver to, help in the collection of the clothing. After all collections have been made, the clothing will be sorted as to size and type at the home of Mrs. Lorraine A. Yale, Club President, under the direction of Mrs. Helen Bowler. After the sorting has been completed, all the bundles will be washed and mended and then packed for shipment to Haiti by plane. Mrs. Helen Bowler will personally deliver the clothing to Dr. Rol, American Red Cross representative in Haiti who will take charge of distribution. This is your chance to help, just as a small gesture of Christian neighborliness to our friends across Windward Passage-a wonderful Thanksgiving gesture. If you wish to give your clothes before Friday, you may take them to Mrs. Yale at West Bargo 20-B, or phone 9669 for individual pick up service. Let's Go to a Picnic The annual Veterans' Day picnic for all military personnel attached to the Naval Station, and their dependents, will be held at Phillips Park next Thursday. Commencing at 11 A.M. the picnic will feature such events -as an egg toss, pie eating contest, tug o' war, softball games, sack races and many others. Officer at NAS, Atlantic City. CDR Lawlor married the former Miss Catherine Eileen McGuire of Boston, Massachusets. They have six children-Susan, Debbie, Robert ,Lindsay, and one-year-old twins, Pe a' and Bruce. Resident of Villamar line up to vote in the recent election of Council Members for the Villamar-Bargo Association. Villamar-Bargo Elects Association Council Another big step has been taken here on the Naval Base to make Guantanamo Bay a happier and more thriving community. Last weekend, residents of Villamar, Bargo and the Replacement Housing went to the polls and selected their Villamar-Bargo Community Association Council members. The Villamar-Bargo Community Association was formed under the authority of Commander, Naval Base. The purpose of the association is to advise the Commanding Officer, Naval Station or the Base Commander on all matters pertaining to operation of the VillamarBargo Community. The council itself consists of seven members elected by the people to represent the people in all matters pertaining to community living. The following candidates were elected on 30 October: Precinct No. 1, C. E. Swenson, ALl, of VU-10; Precinct No. 2, J. R. Nelson, CM1, of the Fleet Training Group; Precinct No. 3, V. J. Hendley, S02, Fleet Training Group; Precinct No. 4, C. E. Blakeman, Civilian; Precinct No. 5, J. E. Armstrong, Civilian; Precinct No. 6, J. R. Yost, Civilian; and Precinct No. 7, W. J. Sparks, Civilian. Duties of the Association will be primarily to advise the commanding officer on all pertainant matters in the operation of the Villamar -Bargo Community -except in the matter of housing assignments. Besides this, the Association will oversee the operation of the recreation facilities of the Villamar Lyceum, the establishnient and maintenance of recreational facilities within the Villamar-Bargo Community, and see to the implementation of regulations fhr occupants of public quarters. In addition to this, the Asociation will establish further rules and regulations governing the beautification and maintenance of quarters and grounds, safety regulations, traffic control, and transportation facilities. The Association Council will be headed by a member elected by the group as Mayor Council activities are slated to begin next week. POISE-the ability to continue talking while the other fellow picks up the check. First NavSta Personnel Get New Rates 16 Nov Last week, men of the Naval Station received word of their advancement in rating. This year the rates are being made effective in three groups. The first group, those listed below, will wear the new crows beginning 16 Nov. The second group is slated for 16 January promotions, and the last group for 16 March. The second and third lists will be published when effective. 16 November 1954 Name To Doubleday, A. F. ME1 Stagnard, E. R. J. YN1 McKinley, T. A. BM2 Martin, J., Jr. EM2 Bergen, G. J. EN2 Zeyen, A. E. EN2 Schlumberger, D. ET2 Betz, D. S. J. IM2 Kemp, A. E. ML2 Roe, F. D. TE2 Wareen, L. M. YN2 Housekneght, D. BM3 Bagwell, E. R. CS3 Ketter,D. E. CS3 Roberts, W. M. CS3 Dion, A. A. DC3 Pieper, L. K. EMP3R Cannon, F. L. JO3 Bruning, A. D. MU3 Case, M. W. MU3 Arnold, L. W. PH3 Schuberth, C. J. PI3 Smith, D. P. SHB3 Drury, E. M., Jr. TEM3R Riley, J. P. TE3 Thomas, D. H. TEM3R Schmarr, R. H. MML1R Student: "I wonder if insects can communicate with each other?" Professor: "Well, moths can certainly chew the rag." First old maid: "I see by the paper a woman in Omaha has just cremated her fourth husband." Second old maid: "Isn't that always the way? Some of us can't get a man at all, while others have husbands to burn." m Page Three

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PmeFor Beaming proudly, and with good reason, is the famed prize-winning triumvirate who took first prize for top poundage of catch. Left to Right: E. H. Cavanaugh, Civ., LTJG J. "Kro" Kropack, and T. P. Ahlberg, Civ. The three took third place in Nationals at Key West late in August. Denizen Teams Win In Service Underwater Spearfish Meet Sunday, September 26th, marked another big "win" for the Caribean-famed "Denizens Of The Deep" as they added three more gold cups to their ever-growing collection. Ramey Air Force Base was the site of the tourney in which 13 teams were represented from such points as Fort Buchanan, P. R., Ramey, Naval Station, San Juan and NOB, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Invitations were extended further north to Key West and West Palm Beach, Florida. The gathering was the first Inter-Service competition held in the Caribbean area and promises to be the cornerstone for many more in the future. To the first string team, consisting of the famous triumvirate, E. H. Cavanaugh, T. P. Ahlberg and J. A. Kropack, went the first prize for an aggregate total poundage. S. Nevins of the second team of Denizens was awarded first prize for the largest individual fish, and J. D. Elwood, also of the Denizens, took second prize for the second largest, all of which gave the Denizens three of the six prizes for the day. Ramey AFB took second in aggregate, West Palm Beach, third, and San Juan swimmers copped third place individual fish prize. 1954 National Education Week Observed Here In November of each year. during the week which includes Armistice Day, American Education Week is observed throughout the United States. This year, under the sponsorship of the Naval Base School, the Guantanamo Bay Post No. 1 of the American Legion, and the Local Parent-Teachers Association, a full program of starting tomorrow and ending Saturday, 13 Nov. has been planned. The basic purpose of American Education Week is to create awareness on the part of every person, of the important role of education in our democracy and of his personal responsibility for maintaining good schools. American Education Week has several specific purposes. Primarily. it was created to increase public understanding and appreciation of education. It explains the modern school with the present day curriculum, current teaching materials, and the newer teaching methods. Besides this, American Education week shows the school needs and problems and strengthens the bonds of cooperation in the all-year program of school-community activities and relationships. Finally the students too have their part, as American Education Week helps to increase their appreciation of their school. Here on the Naval Base, with the aid of the American Lerion, the Parent Teachers Association, and Radio Station WGBY, a full week of events has been planned at the Naval Base School. American Education Week Schedule of Events Sunday, 7 November 0900 Education Sermon at Catholic Mass by CDR J. J. Sullivan 1100 Education Sermon at Protestant Services by LCDR K. G. Peterson 1815-1830: WGBY Radio Skit-"Miss James Decides to Stay." Monday, 8 November 1215-1315: 7th & 8th Grade Girls Skating and Tennis Contests 7th & 8th Grade Boys Touch Football Game 1315-1415: 4th Grade Swimming Meet at Fleet Recreation Pool 1415-1515: High School Physical Education Contests 1815-1830: WGBY Radio Skit-"Sally Anderson Grows Up" Tuesday, 9 November 1000 Primary Grade Play-"Miss Liberty and the Children" 1315-1415: 5th Grade Swimming Meet at Fleet Recreation Pool 1815-1830: WGBY Radio Skit-"Our Greatest National Asset-Our Youth" Wednesady, 10 November 1000 4th, 5th, & 6th Grade Play-"School Days" 1315-1415: 6th, 7th, & 8th Grade Swimming Meet at Fleet Recreation Pool 1415-1515: High School Swimming Meet at Fleet Recreation Pool 1815-1830: WGBY Radio Skit-"Schools and Cooperative Venture" Thursday, 11 November 1815-1830: WGBY Radio Skit---"Why Not 'Priorities' for Schools" Friday, 12 November 0915 7th & 8th Grade Dramatic Club Play-"Beachead for Freedom" 1215J1315: 7th & 8th Grade Physical Education Dancing Classes 1415-1515: High School Dancing Classes (All dancing classes will be held in the School Auditorium.) 1815-1830: WGBY Radio Skit-"What Are Today's Fundamentals?" Saturday, 13 November 1815-1830: WGBY Radio Skit-"Mr. Harris Goes To School" (All physical education contests are in the Fleet Recreation Area) The plays are being presented in the Naval Base School Auditorium. The Radio skits are being planned and directed by Mrs. J. W. Richmond Jr., PTA, and Mr. G. Ward, American Legion. A very cordial invitation is extended to all parents and friends to attend any or all of the above events. Also you are invited to visit the classroom anytime during the week and stay as long as you like. Ladies' Golf Shots NAS -VU-1 0 Bowling E. H. Cavanaugh rounds the edge of a coral mountain in search of elusive prey. Note Aqualung, breathing device which allows a man to remain underwater at depths of 100 feet for over an hour. by Miriam Hoy A week ago last Wednesday, October 27, we played 18 holes and the winners weren't established until too late to make the Indian news. So to catch up on some old data the winners were: 1st Flight: Gross-Jane McElroy Net-Evelyn Leach 2nd Flight Gross-Miriam Hoy Net-Val Evans 3rd Flight Gross-Teresa Moseley Net-Gladys Hamilton Last Sunday afternoon was Scotch Foursome Day with 12 couples teeing off. The winners of golf balls were: 1st Low GrossJane Gentry and Tony Grego 2nd Low Gross-The Scotts 3rd Low GrossJane McElroy and CDR King 1st Low Net-The Toczkos 2nd Low Net-(tie)The Mannings and The Kings Closest to the pin for the men on No. 3 was White and the longest drive on No. 16 was won by LCDR Scott. Closest to the pin for the women TEAM STANDINGS W L Administration 7 1 Supply 6 2 Boatshed 5 3 VU-10 (Team 1) 4 0 Communications 3 5 Aerology 2 6 VU-10 (Team 3) 2 2 VU-10 Team 2) 1 7 INDIVIDUAL HIGHHamilton 208 HIGH SERIES-Morris 563 HIGH TEAM SINGLEAdmin. 840 HIGH TEAM TRIPLFAdmin. 2469 on No. 14 was Miss Struble and the longest drive on No. 17 was won by Frances Grounds and Miss Struble and Manuele had the best poker hand. Last Wednesday morning all the ladies entering the Handicap Tournament met in the Snack Shack and all the rules of the game, plus many questions, were thoroughly explained by Tony Grego. The tournament started November 4, and just the best of luck to all the players participating. Saturday, 6 November 1954 THE INDIAN gaeFu

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Naval Base Softball Ends Three Wet Weeks; SeaBees, Leeward Point Tie For First Place Safe at third during action in the Leeward Point victory over the NSD-CHB teamn. The pointers took the contest 11 to 10 after being on the short end of a 10 to 0 score in the second inning. Nation's Unbeaten Gridliron Elevens Vie For Bowl Games, Unmarredl Seasons by Bud Sisson Six unbeaten teams will take the field this weekend in the football race across the nation and attempt ot hold their clean records intact. Three teams, Oklahoma, Miami (Fla.) and Arkansas should have "clear sailing" towards a perfect season while the fate of undefeated Ohio State, UCLA, and Cincinnati, however, is a bit more doubtful. The nation's number one team, Oklahoma should continue unSuhr aiona snatched "as they, travel north to Teshdl o ao olg meet lowa State. Next week the pa rudtento sa Aggies will meet Missouri, and to flos finish out their season, they face ES Nebraska and finally their neighBso .v ilnv bor s, Oklahoma A&M. Bon v pigil Meanwhile, Miami should also Conl vs Srce continue in the win column in their Couba v Drtuh remaining tilts against Auburn, Pn tt s Hl rs Alabama, and Florida. Florida Pictn v avr should prove their strongest foe. Rtes v aaet Arkansas, a darkhorse this year, Tml s Badi should have no trouble slipping byMDWS their remaining opponents, Rice, Idaa v im o Southern Methodist, and Lousiana Iw s Pru State U. and finally Houston. Iw tt s Olhm Possibilities for a clean sweep Mcia s Ilni for the three other major undeMcia tt s Wsigo t feated teams aren't so bright. In Minst vs OeoS. the Big Ten, Ohio State will face Msor s Clrd some of their roughest foes in Olhm &.v eri coming weeks as they meet PittWcia v .Dkt t sburgh, Purdue, and Michigan.Wicnn s Nrhetn Since Wisconsin's upset loss toSOT lowva, the Badgers need wins over Abr s Mai(l. both Purdue and Michigan to take Clmo vs Fra the conference title, plus a possible Dvsn v aab invitation to the Rose Bowl. Dk s Nv Cincinnati, which slipped pastGereTc. v Tnese College of Pacific, 13-7, for its Knuk s Vnebl seventh straight win last weekLUv htaog goes on to play Arizona State this N aoia v .Crln week. Arizona State has a season'sRihod v WaeFrs record of five wins and two losses.Tuae v Albm Next week the Cincy Bearcats faceSOTW T Wichita (5-1) and round out their Akna s Rc season against Miami of Ohio (6-0)Balr v Tes the following week. The Bear-cats Hutn v us are hoping an unsullied record will SUv ea & earn them an invitation to the RCYMUTI 'Gator Bowl on New Year's Day. ArznSte vs Cciai UCLA, making their bid for the Clrd & s Ua Rose Bowl and an undefeated sea-Devr s BigYon son, stands a fair chance of mak-NeMxio v Mnta ing both as they have only two UthSae v Wymn more foes to down. This week they FRWS face Oregon. Next week they draw Paic va SnJsSt a rest before their final contest of Safr s S.Clfri theseaon gaist heiarh-rval Wsuhengn California Thcedl ormjr0olg 1age vV by Hal Davis The Base Softball League waded into the middle third of the season's schedule and rain ceased to be a factor in the competition as it knocked out only one game during the first part of the week. Meanwhile, the eight base teams, under the whip of victory and defeat, began to strech out in the Softbll St8tistics standings and give their followers and indication of how the league will run. SFBL TNIG The Pointers from Leeward pulled into an even tie with the Bees (so ensa,3Nv 94 from MCB-4 Wednesday night asWoLstG they edged the Bees, 6 to 5. ItMC-5 1 was a see-saw battle with the LewrPon 5 1 Pointers on top by three runs in Maie4 1 / the first inning, the Bees tying it Nvltto -/ up in the 4th, the Pointers going VU11 4 3-2 ahead, 5 to 3 in the 5th, the BeesNA1 4 3-2 tying it up again in the 6th and FT1 4 3-/ the Leeward-men pushing acrossNS-H1 4 312 the wining run in the 7th as Bladies scored after rapping out BTIGAEAE a triple. The loss was the first for the (0a aso oe Bees who had romped through five GBRHRIB games undefeated. The closest WoMrn 3563.6 margin of victory for the Bees and WoJ .LP 1796.2 posbyan omen of things to come iboecv FTTG 5411074-.0 was the previous night's game with Mtes Nvt 3552.8 the Fleet Training Group Train-SuhradNS 51-569.7 ers. The Trainers had the BeesBunr FG 46365.7 shackled until the bottom of theSadrDND-H517364.3 7th when the 'Can-Do' men surged up and blasted home four runs PTHN EOD to tie the score at 6 and 6, and then, two extra innings later, pushed 1 nig rmr two more across the plate to take Mni ASA 3 1 14 it home, 8 to 6.Fotn Lead 3 1 .6 Stroupe, of the Bees, used the Le Mrns 4 0 28 two games as a stepping stone to Geoy MB4 3 1 31 the home run leadership of the Hny Lead 2 0 35 league, rapping out two in the MleeNDCB,_1 2 42 Trainers game and one more in Dvs NS 1 1 70 the Pointer hassle. The VU-10 Mallards, currently HM U EDR carrying the rest of the league on their shoulders, shocked the NavalStop MC3 Station Indians Tuesday night by WoJ .L a 4-run ninth inning uprising to Clis L ice their first victory, 5 to 1, and Ptnk NVT give Mandy Mandis his first defeatMads NVT 2 of the season. Madden and Edgar were the big guns in the Mallard RN ATDI EDR win, each getting two hits apiece while Gibson, Lee and Edgar were Olsy MB4 1 credited with the RBI's. Steln A On Monday night the Leeward Ptnk NVT Pointers added one of their victory Stop MC6 notches by edging the NSD-CHB Rc aie combo, 11 to 10. Meanwhile, on Mlie S-H Monday, the Marine Leathernecks, Droa S-H behind the potent poking of Pace and Adams who racked up three apiece, one of them a homer for Adams, jumped on the Naval Air Station Fliers to the discordant tune of 12 to 3. The Fliers used Davis, Harrell and Snyder on the mound in attempt to quench the Marine fire. Davis took the loss for the Fliers while Lee boosted his win-loss record to 4 and nothing. Other games held during the week saw the Naval Station In$ dians beating the NSD-CHB team, 8 to 7, the Bees taking the NSDCHB outfit, 4 to 3; the Indians doubling up on NAS, 10 to 5; the Marines and Leeward taking VU-10 and FTG respectively, 7 to 3 and a 11 to 10. The Big Four, at present, MCB-4, Leeward Point, Marines and Naval Station hold a decided edge at this stage of the schedule. The Bees, though, will have a rugged row to Mlie fteNDCBcm hoe battling the talent in thebiesthtosnskpcsma Pointer infield and against the h itn oa mie eiin over-active bats of the LeatherNDls h aet h ones necks, while the so-far hot-and-10t1. cold Indians are always a constant threat. tems mnu hett h Of the clubs in the lower bracket laes h akhre h ol of the standings, this reporter epoea n ntn n tr picks ~ ~~ SOTBL Sh alrsfo U10a pitn oadtANDINGS 4" Saturday, 6 November 1954 '1HE INDIAN

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Page Six Saturday, 6 November 1954 WGBY Hi-Lites Radio's 'Tops' of the Week Ladies' FRA Holds Benefit by George Engle With the impending loss of John Hull and Jerry Lewis this station is due to suffer a serious setback in talent as well as personnel. John, who has been known in the past for his "Requestfully Yours", "Morning Caravan", and currently his excellent "House of Music". will be leaving with a souvenir of sunny Cuba in the person of his lovely wife, Rosa, on November 20th. John will be returning to the States for discharge. Ah, these short-timers. Jerry, whose dulcet tones have appeared on every one of our studio shows from the "Hillbilly Jamboree" to his most recent role' as Kid Morpheus on your "Sandman Show", will be leaving us very soon for another duty station. After 32 months of consistently fine shows, he'll be conspicuous by his absence. But that brings us to the current problem, the forthcoming shortage of qualified announcers. In order to keep WGBY on the air and operating at it's current efficiency, we'll need your help. If your vocal cords aren't warped, and if you have the customary hole in the front of your /ead, you, too, can be a radio announcer. Just come on in to WGBY at the Fleet Recreation Area with the understanding between you and your Division Officer that you can be released to WGBY on a full time basis if you qualify. We'll audition you by p ting your vocal talents on tape. Anytime between 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Incidentally, Bob and Bev Mairo are the pound parents of a baby boy. Our Congrats. Consult your daily Papoose for any changes in the schedule of programs presented over WGBY, 1450 on your radio dial: ...Good Listening. TEENAGE-ROUND-UP by Linda Thurston and Judy Yost With Hallowe'en over and done with we can pack all our trappings away for another year and settle down to everyday run-of-the-mill life again. However, we feel we should give some mention to the Witch's Night escapades The dance last Friday night was a huge success. The band was gr-r-reat, and those costumes! ... Nancy H. as Santa's helper .. Jim Dalton as Blackbeard. Nancy A winning first prize for her Arabian get-up (Hajii Baba, yet) and Doug walking off with first prize for the boys in his bathing beauty outfit that had all the boys fooled for a while (dig those crazy whistles) ...Tim R making like an officer ...Jean C and Sharon K and all the others who turned up as hillbillies ...Reuben dressed as a girl ...and the gals all dolled up in glamorous evening dresses and dangly earrings ... then there was Jeri Warren, a kat to the end, and our gal Patti Wormwood, all decked out as a swabbie ...Neil and 'Nita were the most to say the least in their French Apache costumes. Saturday nite found most of us garbed out in costumes again heading for the various parties, dances, etc-witches, goblins and all-the cars bulging with dozens of kids. DID YA' SEE-Stanley P and the group that was decorating the Assembly Building for the dance ...Jo soaking in the sun at the pool ...the three jokers at the MONDAY, November 8. .THEATRE GUILD ON THE AIR. 9:00 P.M. Frederick: March and Nina Foch star in "Cass Timberlane". A story by Sinclair Lewis about the marriage of a middle-aged man to a girl in her 20's. TUESDAY, November 9. ESCAPE. .9:00 P.M. Two people whose love has failed to stand the test of time look upon the great flocks of restless, uneasy, wheeling birds as harbingers of death. The title, "The Birds". WEDNESDAY, November 10. .CRIME CLASSICS. 9:00 P.M. Thomas Hyland tells another tale of violence of three gypsies who keep their oath and bring death to each other for love of a beautiful widow. The title, "Widow Magee and the Three Gypsies: A Vermont Fandango". THURSDAY, November 11. ..FAMILY THEATRE ..9:00 P.M. Anne Blythe and Raymond Burr co-star in "Night Caller" A girl is trapped in her own home by gangsters who are using it for a hideout. FRIDAY, November 12. ..SUSPENSE. .8:30 P.M. "Destruction" is the presentation on Suspense this week. A man's life is taken without the use of any material weapons. SATURDAY, November 13. ..THEATRE ROYAL. ...7:00 P.M. Sir Lawrence Oliver stars as the murderer of a little girl who, in a moment of remorse, sends a letter of confession to a friend, then changes his mind and attempts to retrieve it. SUNDAY, November 14. HOLLYWOOD RADIO THEATRE. 10:00 P.M. A Nun befriends a girl on her way to prison and sets out to prove the girl's innocence. Claudette Colbert is the nun and Barbara Rush. the accused girl. Navy Wives' Club News The Navy Wives' held their regular monthly luncheon at the C.P.O. Club Thursday afternoon, October 28, at 1:30 P.M. The tables were laid with white damask and decorated with rose hybiscus and foliage. Eevryone enjoyed a delicious three course menu planned around baked ham and topped off wtih ice cream and coffee. Bingo games followed the luncheon. The Halloween "Trick or Treat" sale Friday, October 29, was a good success and the Club sold a wide variety of Halloween treats. On Sunday, October 31, a group of volunteers from the Navy Wives' Club met the dependents' transport ship, USNS Johnson. They provided nursery services from the children of parents who were passengers aboard the Johnson so that their parents might be free to enjoy a short time to see the sights on the Naval Base before resuming their trip back to the States. The third business meeting of the Club was held Thursday, November 4, at 8:00 P.M. in the Family Room at the C.P.O. Club. A lot of excitement was caused by an announcement that came through the radio in a local police cruiser. Exchange trying on masks and making sure the noise-makers really worked ...Johnny Mc and his elephant tusk pipe and being able to recognize stray shoes Irma and her fancy figure skating ...the guy that disguised his radio in a paper bag so he could hear the hillbilly show during class. Evelyn and Bobbie horseback riding and regretting it the next day. All in all I guess we've a pretty exciting week. Now it's time to rest up awhile and take it easy like getting our noses deeper in the books, maybe. We'd like to thank the Combo for playing for us, also the chaperones and everyone else who helped us make our Hallowe'en Dance possible. It was great! On the serious side, we'd like to extend the sympathies of the entire gang to Reuben McQuarry on the recent death of his mother. FTG Bulletin by Jack Engstrom Sixteen men in the Fleet Training Group will be promoted within the next five months. With the new promotion schedule in effect ten men will be advanced on the 16th of November, two men on the 16th of January, and 4 men on the 16th of March. A good showing was made by the Training Group in this advancement period. Of the 36 men who took the Fleet Wide Competitive Exams last August, 16 or 44% of them will be advanced. Two men passed their exams but will not be advanced due to Quota Limitations. Congratulations and good luck in your new rates. The following is a list of the men who will be advanced, their new rates and their departments: To be advanced on 16 November 1954: JULIAN, ET2, Fleet Training Center EASTMAN, YN2, Administraiton PITTS, YN2, Reports WATERS, YN2, Damage Control ENGSTROM, YN2, PIO & CIC HAUSSER, CS2, G.S.TU. Culebra BRINKMAN, DC3, Galley FOWLER, BM3, Transportation TOLLIVER, GM3, Transportation KAGER, ENG3, Barracks To be advanced on 16 January 1954: BELLAVANCE, YN2, Administration BENSON, YN2, Engineering (Disch) To be advanced on 16 March 1954: HAWKINS, CS1, G.S.TU. Culebra (Trans) CUNNINGHAM, BM2, Operations RAPELLA, YN2, G.S.T.U. Culebra WHITE, EM3, G.S.T.U. Culebra (TAD) LTJG C. R. ROPE, FTG CIC Department, departed for the states with his wife last Wednesday. He will report to the separation activity at NAS Jacksonville, Florida for release to inactive duty. LT Pope, a graduate of the University of Florida, will be going back to Gainesville, Florida in February to continue his studies at the University of Florida for his Masters Degree. Good bye good luck to you in the future. The Fleet Training Group Pistol The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Fleet Reserve Association sponsored a musical program for the patients at the Hospital on Sunday, October 31, with the High School Combo providing the entertainment. The High School Combo consisted of Betty Dalton on the marimba; Pat Fojt, accordian; Jim Dalton, trumpet; Edgar Heimer, saxophone; David Shiver, guitar; James Detxer, bass fiddle, and Jerry Parker on the drums. They were accompanied by their music teacher Mrs. Lillian Armbruster. The Ladies' Auxiliary plans to sponsor a program each month and any interested local talent may phone Mrs. J. W. Dexter, Vice President of the Ladies Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association. Match was held last Saturday afternoon at the Naval Station Range and when the smoke had cleared LCDR Minard, FTG Gunnery Department, had won nine of the 13 awards, including the Grand Aggregate Trophy with a final multiple of 1516. LCDR Minard's other awards were; .45 aggregate of 731, .22 Aggregate of 785, First in .45 Expert with a 371, First in .22 Expert with a 394, Rapid Fire .45 with a 180, Timed Fire .45 with a 180, Rapid Fire .22 with a 194 and Timed Fire .22 with a 197. That's Expert shooting in anyone's book. LT Murphy, ASW Department, took two of the remaining awards by firing a 330 for second place in the .45 Expert shoot and taking second place in the .22 Expert event with a 368. C. Meyer, FT1, Gunnery Department, took third place honors in the .45 Expert event with a 294 and Jim Boyett fired a 363 for third place honors in the .22 Expert event. The Administration Officer's team in the Officers Bowling league and the FTG Team No. 2 in the enlisted men's Bowling league continued their good bowling and both teams remained on top at press time. Although the Admin Team dropped three points to the Naval Station Officer's Team No. 5, their win and loss record of 25 and 7 was still tops in the league. In the enlisted men's league, FTG Team 2 took three points from Commissary Store Monday nite to raise their record to 10 and 2. Andy Gagliano had a hot game, knocking them down for a 214. Emerson F. Beman, HMC, of the FTG Medical Department, departed the Training Group last Wednesday for a tour of Shore Duty at the National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland. Good bye and good luck at your new duty station. SHIP ARRIVALS USS Thomaston LSD-28 8 Nov USS Purdy DD-734 8 Nov SHIP DEPARTURES NONE The British Cruiser HMS SUPERB which arrived in the Guantanamo Bay area Monday morning, will be here for approximately two weeks. While here in Gtmo, they will be conducting exercises with the Fleet Training Group Gunnery Department, CIC Department and others. Welcome aboard. We hope your stay in Guantanamo Bay will prove beneficial to your ship and crew and also hope it will be and enjoyable one to remember. THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 6 November 1964 Tlit~ INDIAN Pagd Seven Local Youths Encounter Poisonous Fish Base Warned On Danger For Children On Saturday afternoon, 30 October 1954, at about 1630, Reggie Morales, a five and a half year old boy from the Cable Station, received treatment at the U.S. Naval Hospital for a wound inflicted by a tropical fish, which was later identified as a Stone Fish. The boy had been fishing in the vicinity of the Cable Station and caught a strange and horrible fish. While endeavoring to remove the hook from the mouth of the fish he sustained a infectious wound from the fish. Within forty-five (45) minutes thereafter, severe symptoms of local infection developed necessitating immediate treatment. On Sunday, 31 October 1954, at about 1500, Douglas Dunlap, a boy of about seven years of age, was given medical treatment for a wound inflicted in his right leg while wadding in the shallow water at Kittery Beach. It is presumed that his injury was incurred by a small moray eel, which habitate the holes and crevices of coral and are easily antagonized by intruders. The following is an excerpt from the publication, "Survival on Land and Sea", NAVAER 13--1501, prepared for the United States Navy by the Ethnogeographic Board and the Staff of the Smithsonian Institution. FISH WITH POISONOUS FLESH Most fish are edible, palatable, and wholesome. However, there are a few with flesh that is definitely poisonous and it is important that everyone recognize these. All of the important fish with poisonous flesh belong to one large group, the plectognathi, of which there are many kinds in the tropics. All these fish lack ordinary scales such as occur on bass, grouper, and sea trout. Instead, these poisonous fish are covered with bristles or spiny scales, strong sharp thorns, or spines, or are encased in a bony box-like covering. Some of them have naked skin, that is, no spines or scales. Never eat a fish that blows itself up like a balloon. The different kinds of poisonous fish can be easily recognized by the illustrations herein presented. The usual names given to these poisonous Plectognaths are: swell fish or puffer fish, porcupine fish, burr fish, cowfish, trunk fish, box fish, thorn fish. In addition, the filefish or fool fish and the trigger fish may be looked upon with suspicion for they too have been credited with poisonous flesh, but in certain regions the filefish and trunk fish are regularly eaten. If the natives use them, they are all right. Unless you know, however, leave them alone. The flesh of the puffers, porcupine fish, and the related species is violently poisonous. Cooking does not destroy the FI poisonous alkaloid in these fish. Obviously these known poisonous fish should never be eaten, as C. STI6 R4y violent sickness and even death may result. FISH WITH VENOMOUS OR POISONOUS SPINES Certain other fish should be y y avoided for a different reason. They or blackish sn color, often having have sharp spines on their heads flecks or patches or red or orange and in their fins. These spines may that give them a mottled appercause a burning or stinging, even dance like the floor of the sea. When an agonizing pain, that is out of wading on a reef you should keep all proportion to the apparent careful watch for such fish. Make severity of the wound. This is the it a rule to carry a long sharp result of venom that is injected pole o bamboo stick and poke any when the spines penetrate the flesh. suspicious looking object on the The venom varies greatly in quanbottom. At the slightest touch each tity and in power. In the most of the projecting spines on these venomous varieties it is as deadly fish injects venom and causes seas that of the most dangerous yore pain. A full charge of venom snakes. from the whole dorsal fin has been The worst of the venomous fish known to cause death. are the Scorpaenidae. They are The next moat dangerous after generally known by the following the scorpion fish are the sting rays. common names: scorpion fish, These occur in lagoons, shallow warty lumpfish or stonefish, toadbays, estuaries, and far up many fish, zebra fish or tiger fish, and of the tropical rivers. They usually stinging fish. See illustration. lie on the bottom concealed in the Stonefish do not swim about to mud or sand. Sting rays are easily any extent. They generally lie recognized when seen. (See illusquietly on the bottom ,which they traction .The tail may be long or exactly resemble in color. As a very short, and is armed with one flcsorpths rrdoroag or two long, sharp-pointed spines with serarted edges. When stepped upon, the ray repeatedly whips its tail upward with great force and fury and may drive the spine clear through one of the bones of the leg or foot as well as through the flesh. The pain is most severe and infection usually results, poke ahead of you with your stick and do not pick your feet up and set them down in the usual manner. Slide them along in the mud. Should your feet touch a hidden sting ray it will swim away as fast as anchor it down and give the tail the leverage needed to drive the spine into you. Some catfish have poison glands at the base of the spines on the breast fin. This venom is much like that of bees, causing severe pain, but it is not deadly. Since some of the larger catfish have barbed spines, the wound made is jagged and secondary infection may occur. All wounds made by fish spines should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected at once. HANDLING DANGEROUS FISH Never attempt to pick up a scorpion fish of any kind with the bare hands. It makes no difference how the fish has been taken, with hook and line, poison or dynamite. If the fish has any life left, a slight movement may drive a spine into your finger, carrying enough venom to cause excruciating agony. Always use a dip net, your spear, or some substitute, such as your machete or bayonet. Never poke your bare hands into holes or crevices in the corals or feel under rocks. To do so invites grave risk of serious wounds. A moray eel or worlf fish may be in such hidding places. Moray eels are brightly colored and may have strongly PTA Hears Or, Pepin On Child Dental Health The Parent-Teachers Association of Guantanamo Bay met in the open air assembly hall of the Naval Base School Tuesday night. Dr. R.C. Pepin was the principal speaker of the evening, discussing the various aspects of child dental hygiene. The meeting opened as Mrs. E. H. Beiland led the Association in group singing of "God Bless America" accompanied on the piano by Mrs. Savage. The Invocation was given by the new Protestant Chaplain Karl G. Peterson. During the business meeting LT D. J. Murphy reported on the progress of the PTA carnival booth and stated that more members are needed on the PTA's carnival committee. The rhythm band from the Nursery School under the direction of Mrs. H. P. McNeal presented several musical selections. In his discussion Dr. Pepin stressed three main points uppermost in the consideration of child dental hygiene: (1) parents should scrutinize carefully the amount of intake of fine sugars by the child; (2) the child should be taught the proper method of brushing teeth; and (3) the twice-yearly visit to the dentist should not be ignored. Mrs. McNeal's Nursery School took first place in the percentage of parents present at the meeting and was awarded the winning banner. Mrs. Burke's Kindergarten class was second and Mrs. Dunmire's First Grade class was third. Passenger: Which end of the car do I get off? Motorman: Either one. It stops at both ends. Says the egg in the monastery: Oh hum-out of the frying pan and into the fiar. A consultant is an executive who can't find another job. marked patterns. In the American tropics a common one is greenish black in color and 5 to 6 feet lone. One form in the Mediterranean is golden fellow in front, purple toward the tail, and is beautifully banded and mottled. It attains a length of 4 feet or more. In the Pacific some of those around the coral reefs grow to the length of 10 feet or more, and commonly have a light-colored background with black spots or a network of black lines. Others have black or brownish over-all color and orange to yellow spots. The morays are always hungry and very savage. Their jaws have strong, knifelike teeth and can easily nip off a finger or two. They have been known to bite through a heavy shoe. Like other eels, however, they are good to eat. Wolf fish are grayfish or brownish in color and have an elonagte body, 4 to 6 feet in length, tapering to a more or less rounded tail. They have strong, sharp teeth and are noted for their ferocity. Natives avoid such dangers almost instinctively. You must learn-but don't learn the hard way. Death may be the result of carelessness. An additional item of warning on the local fish concerns the barracuda, in addition to being conflesh is often poisonous when used for food. This condition exists more often in the larger barracuda, that is, those weighing over five (5) pounds. Saturday, 6 November 1954 Page Seven THE INDIAN

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Navit-DPPO-1OND---GtmO.-0224 THE INDIAN Saturday, 6 November 1954 MOVIES Saturday, Nov. 6 BLACK HORSE CANYON Joel McCrea Mari Blanchard Lady rancher gets two cowpokes to help her capture her beautiful black stallion. Their efforts are handicapped by a neighboring rancher who also entertains plans for capturing the horse. Sunday, Nov. 7 SINS OF ROME Massimo Girotti Ludmilla Teherina Story of the Roman legion in 68 B. C. who invaded surrounding territories and conquered all people, bringing them back to Rome as slaves. Monday, Nov. 8 ON THE WATERFRONT Marlon Brando Eva Marie Saint A dock worker is pushed from a roof to prevent talking to the crime commission. Brando finds himself caught between loyalty to the mob bossing the workers and his love for the victims sister. Tuesday, Nov. 9 MEN OF THE FIGHTING LADY Dewey Martin Van Johnson An author visits a carrier to get its Christmas story. A fiash back tells the story of three fights of navy pilots against railroads in North Korea. Wednesday, Nov. 10 EDDIE CANTOR STORY Keefe Brasselle Marilyn Erskine Life story of Eddie Cantor, beginning with his youth on the East Side of New York and his fabulous rise to fame. Thursday, Nov. 11 MAN ON A TIGHTROPE Frederic March Terry Moore A Czech circus behind the Iron Curtain maneuvers an elaborate escape to the American zone. Friday, Nov. 12 TORCH SONG Joan Crawford Michael Wilding Broadway musical star is upset when her pianist and arranger quits. After much misunderstanding and argument they realize they love each other. LET'S GO TO HOLLYWOOD where passers-by gaze in amazement when lovely lovelies like the one above pose for photographers on Sunset Blvd. Some have trouble seeing through the heavy smog, but others just rub their eyes and gaze on. PUBLIC WORKS CHIPS by Vic. Gault Friends and co-workers of Mike Croft, Chief Quarterman (Maintenance) of the department, gave him a farewell party at the Officers' Club last Friday. Mike resigned his position in the Public Works Department to return to the States to accept a position with a reputable contracting concern there. The party was a great success and there were approximately 125 guests present. We wish Mike and his family all the luck in the world in their new venture. Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Sheppard are due for congratulations from this column because of the arrival of a "Little Miss". The future "Miss Universe -1972," who arrived Friday, weighed 6 lbs., 2 oz. and was christened Margarette Cora. Our deepest and sincere condolence to Mr. Norvall Shoop, Chief Quarterman Painter of the department for the loss of his father, Mr. Harvey Shoop, in Philadelphia on 30 September. He passed away at the age of 87 years. Mr. and Mrs. Shoop were at his bedside at the moment of his demise. MORE ABOUT PUBLIC WORKS ORGANIZATION UTILITIES DIVISION-Power Plants Branch. This branch under the supervision fo Mr. A. L. Broughton, Foreman Power Plants is responsible to the Foreman Utilities. The assigned duties and responsibilities of this branch are to operate and maintain all power generating plants, stationary and stand by units on the Base, including Leeward Point Air Station and Hospital Cay, and the air compressor stations at Coral Point and the Central Power Plant. This 0 Armistice Day Observed In official observance of Armistice Day, recently re-named Veterant's Day, holiday routine will be observed throughout the Naval Base Thursday, 11 Nov. All but necessary work, drills ,and exercises will be suspended all day. branch maintains a complement of personnel for the maintenance and upkeep of all its plant equipment including major overhauls of diesel engines. Any work required on cooling towers and outside piping other than operation, preventive maintenance and inspection, as well as necessary machine work is performed by other shops of the department as may be requested by the Utilities Division, which isssues inter-division work orders for the purpose. Utilities Records Branch. This branch is directly under the cogniaznce of the Foreman Utilities and is supervised by Mr. A. A. Campbell, Supervisory Clerk, GS-6. The branch reports daily operation of power, water, and steam plants. It makes annual reports of efficiency of operation, unit cost of power and water, maintains charts of yearly growths of utilities and daily consumption charts of power and water, showing average and peak loads. The branch keeps records in connection with fuel oil consumption by boilers, and maintains records and inventories of machinery, tools and accessory equipment. It also furnishes the Fiscal Department of the Naval Supply Depot with meter readings and other data for building consumers. I In~q(oc c~oes by Cpl Joe Androvich, USMC Departure Departing for the states this morning will be SSgt Arvill V. Adwell, who will report to Norfolk, Va. for further transfer to Camp Lejeune, N. C. Sergeant Adwell will spend 30 days leave with his wife in Virginia and Kentucky prior to reporting to Lejeune. While stationed here at Marine Barracks, SSgt Adwell was attached to the Special Services, Headquarters Section and was prominent in the promotion of athletics at the barracks. His departure will be felt by all of us and we all wish him the best of luck and wishes upon his departure from Gtmo. Staff Club Party Last Saturday evening the Staff Noncommissioned Officers Club was the scene of a Halloween and Farewell Party for MSgt Litzelman, TSgt Anderson, and SSgt Adwell, who are all scheduled to depart from Gtmo Bay within the coming week. The gala affair was featured with a buffet dinner followed by dancing. Everyone present reported having a wonderful evening. Promotion "Congratulations" to William Kent upon his recent promotion to the rank of Staff Sergeant. SSgt. Kent will assume the duties as Brig Warden at the Naval Station Brig, replacing the departing TSgt Anderson. Intra-Mural Basketball With the atmosphere still full of softballs and footballs, IntraMural Basketball here at Marine Barracks is about to make its bid onto the local scene. Tentative plans are now in process for a six team league composed from Guard and Headquarters Section. Actual date for the curtain raiser is yet to be determined but the opener is scheduled for this month. Softball Possessing a record of 4-1 at this writing, the "Fighting Leathernecks" representing the barracks in the NavBase League, find themselves well in contention for the league championship. Following tradition of Marine teams of the past, the leathernecks have shown considerable hustle and ability to come from behind. The 1954 version of the Marine Softballers is bolstered by such baseball standouts as Jim Pace, Bill Wood, Larry Adams, Ron Plante, Rollie Dowen, Don Schreck, and Chuck Mason, all members of the Base champions during the past baseball season. Determination and the ability to win the close ones is bolstered by the morale given to the team by the spectators, so lets make it a habit to be out there rooting for the main. Rifle Range "CEASE FIRE AND SECURE THE BUTTS" Tuesday morning marked the conclusion of the 1954 requalification firing for some 42 Marines. High shooting honors went to Pfe James R. Liggett, who fired a record score of 231. 2dLt., D. L. Bell was close 2nd with a score of 230. For the record, the following shooters fired the following socres: EXPERT James R. Liggett 231 Douglas L. Bell 230 Lee G. Haurik 222 H/rold Stevenson 221 SHARPSHOOTER Joseph Bonsignore 216 "D" "C" Foley 216 Theodore Bushong 214 Charles W. Mason 212 Navy-DPPO-10OND-Gtmo.-0224 THE INDIAN Saturday, 6 November 1954


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