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Indian

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Title:
Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )

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University of Florida
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--_ - ---- - tCGoyecs QTMO Like The Sunshine"


Vol. VI, No. 68


Quick Action on Blood Call

Saves Patient Critical Trouble

Last weekend, at the Naval Hospital here, a patient was saved from critical complications when the combined efforts of the hospital Laboratory, Radio Station WGBY, and several resident- of the Naval Base who responded quickly to the emergency.
It all began when Mrs. Charlene Turner, wife of George Edgar Turner, Jr., AD3, gave birth to a son, George Edgar Turner III. Complications set in after childbirth, however, and Mrs. Turner developed a severe hemorrage and required four pints of type AB blood immediately.
The Hospital Laboratory notified Radio Station WGBY, and within 15 minutes an emergency announcement was broadcast. Then, within another 15 minutes, the laboratory had several calls from residents of the Naval Base volunteering to donate blood.
Several calls were received from persons who were Type "A" or "B" blood, but of the four types of blood, type AB is the rarest. Only 4 percent of the population of the world is of this type blood, and 85 percent of these have Rh positive factors. This makes it extremely difficult to find a doner for anyone with AB negative blood. Fortunately, however, Mrs. Turner was AB positive, eliminating extreme difficulties. *
Of the donors who called, four were selected, and thanks to the donations of Capt. J. J. Swords, USMC, J. C. Collins, ETC, Fleet Training Group, Pfc. Leon N. Lanzellotta, USMC, and Pfc. Richard N. McIver, Mrs. Turner is doing very well.
Little George is also doing fine.


'Toys For Tots' Sales

Begin Here 3 Nov

The "Toys for Tots" drive closed here last week, and the Trading Post has announced that the toys will go on sale for enlisted families only on Wednesday, 3 Nov. in the quonset hut next to the tennis courts in the Fleet Recreation Area.
Prices for the wide variety of toys have been set as low as possible, and all toys have been reconditioned by the Fire Department to a "like-new" condition.
How long the toys will be on sale on the Naval Base has not been decided yet, but as long as the demand indicates that residents of the base wish to purchase the toys, they will remain on sale.
Then, shortly before Christmas, all remaining toys will be distributed to local orphanages in Cuba. All proceeds from the sales on the base will be used to support the community activities of the Trading Post.
(See Pictures on Page 4)


U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba


Trick Or Treat???
What will it be, Mr. & Mrs. Guantanamo Bay? Trick or treat? These two youngsters (really a dancing maiden and a skeleton) like many others of the Naval Base will be out for tricks and treats tonight, and tomorrow. Let's give them a treat for Halloween 1954.


MCB-4 Cited by CoinBhant

As Outstanding Battalion

ComServLant has directed that once during each deployment, ComCBLant and staff will conduct an Administrative Inspection of each MCB. Such was the case for MCB-4 from 16 October through 20 October as every activity of the Battalion was closely examined to determine how well things were going and to offer constructive suggestions where the inspecting party believed improvement could be made.
All hands took part in the formal personnel inspection and camp inpection on October 16. Then starting Monday, Oct. 20, the inspecting party examined in detail every phase of operation in the Administrative Office, Personnel Office, Legal, Public Information, Security, Communication, Post Office, Engineering, the construction projects, transportation, Welfare and Recreation, religious facilities, Supply, Disbursing, Commissary, Medical, Dental, and I & E activities. In addition 20 men were selected at random for confidential interviews.
At the conclusion of the inspection Commodore Short, ComCBLant, pointed out that MCB-4's contract of 129 units was not only an incentive to getting home early but was also a test as to what a battalion could do under pressure construction scheduling such as would be encountered in war time. The Commodore also stated that he believed the inspection results, when finally tabulated, would again show an outstanding battalion doing an outstanding job here in Cuba despite the difficulties and handicaps encountered. Commodore Short believed that if MCB-4 can maintain the pace they were going before Hazel hit he was confident that MCB-4 vuld be home early.


Saturday, 30 October 1954


Legislation Being Prepared For Congress


For 8 Percent Military Pay Raise

Richmond, Va. (AFPS)-Army Secretary Robert T. Stevens says a legislative program is being prepared for Congress which will include an eight percent pay raise for all military personnel.
In a speech to the Jewish War Veterans annual convention here, Naval Station CO Conducts Mr. Stevens gave this as the first
of several items which will be requested when Congress convenes Service Craft Beard Contest in January.
0 t h e r legisaltive proposals which he said would be submitted then include a compreDead line Set for Dec hensive revision of survivor
benefits, more reliable medical care for dependents and allowances for permanent changes of station by service families." In addition to Secretary Stevens' eight percent proposal a report of the Defense Department's special pay study committee is expected to be announced in the latter part of October. The committee was set up about a month ago.
A service career should be made attractive to the highest type of ...young American, said Mr. Stevens.
"Money isn't the only answer but it is part of the problem."
Mr. Stevens pointed out that between 1949, when military pay scales were given their last general overhauling, and the present day, the U. S. Consumer Price Index registered a 13:5 percent gain in the cost of living, but military pay had increased only
5.5 percent.
"At the same time," he added, "military [benefits] such as savings through purchasing at commissaries and post exchanges, The pan behind the "beaver" is medical care for dependents, all D. W. Huyck, BM2, skipper of of which have long been considered
as part of m-ilitary compensation, YSD-21, attached to the Naval have been reduced by both legislaStation. tive enactment and executive policy". This, he said, has materially Recently at the Naval Station reduced the soldier's take-home personnel inspection CAPT W R pay.


, . .
Caruthers was suddenly affronted by a beard. Normally, such things are taboo in the Navy, but Captain Caruthers was very impressed with this one, for it was neat, well trimmed, and very well kept.
Upon further investigation, Captain Caruthers found that D. W. Huyck, BM2, skipper of the service craft, YSD-21, had cultivated the beard since his arrival here in Guantanamo Bay.
Then a n idea struck the captain.
CAPT W. R. Caruthers, as Commanding -officer, Naval Station, is sponsoring a contest extending a challenge to any man attached to and serving on board service craft of the Naval Station to grow a better beard than Huyck's.
As well as sponsoring the contest, CAPT Caruthers will act as one of the judges when all contestants appear with their "beavers" sometime in December. Appropriate awards will be presented to the winners. -I


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Cant. W. E. Kerrigan, Security Guard Officer, presents M/Sgt. uiene hays with a certificate of Good Conduct. The presentation was the fourth Good Conduct award for M/Sgt. Hays.


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Page Two


THE INDIAN


CAd

The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9-615
.Saturday, 30 October 1954
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief ofStaff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William i. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
EioilStaff
LT E. A. Sandnes ----------Officer-Advisor
H. E. Davis, JOC -------------------Editor
H. L. Sisson, JOS---------------- News
F. L. Cannon, JOSN - Photographer D. C. Roberts, JOSN ------------Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is kiven to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Nay photos unless otherwise credited.


VU- 10 Prop Blast
by Bill Graves & Staff

Arriving this past week for duty with Utility Squadron TEN were David D. Creedon, PHAA, from NAS, Pensacola, Fla., Raymond B. Filipowski, ADAA, Charles E. Keeley, ADAA, and Ralph H. Rubrecht, ADAA from NATTC, Memphis, Tenn. Welcome Aboard Mates!
LT Graves, "The man from Texas, but not for Texas"! That expression is made simply because of his two new squadron dependents, Middleton and Stanovich. He sometimes sings "There's a little bit of everything in Texas", with the exception of football. "Them two Hombres and them thar Texas Longhorns have CLEANED me."
Chief Pennel and Chief Pistole were on their way hunting over in Cuba last weekend, when their car got struck. When they finally got the car out, it was discovered that there was more mud on themselves than on the car.
The KDC now has a new "Black Shoe" aboard. Jacobs a real "Sea Hound" relieved Bower, who is now Master-At-Arms of the Enlisted Mens barracks. Things have sure changed since back in '42 when I was aboard the Ticondoroga.
The Base Police have words for people like Mrs. Keating who go off and leave their keys in their car. It plainly states in UTRON
-100076-3-46a that you aren't to leave your keys and husband in the same car at the movie-you loose more husbands that way.
It is understood that Mrs. Turner has been very ill since the birth of her baby boy. Here's wishing her a speedy recovery.

A Tennessee lad home on liberty was asked by a townsman: "What do you think of the sea?"
"Just this much," he replied. "When mny enlistment is over, I'm going to put an oar on my shoulder and start walking inland-and I'm going to keep on walking until someone stops me and asks, "What's that thing you've got over your shoulder?" Then I'm going to settle right down there until I die."


FTG Bulletin
by Jack Engstrom
CAPT Houston, who has been the FTG Gunnery Officer for the past 23 months, will depart Gtmo this weekend for his new command. The CAPT has been ordered as Commanding Officer of the USS ELECTRA AKA-4.
The men of the Gunnery Department presented him with a Gold Railroad Pocket Watch and a Silver Punch Bowl as a token of appreciation.
CAPT Houston, his wife Edith and three sons, Robert, Gary and David will make their new home in Coronado, California. We of FTG wish you and your family the best of luck at your new command and home.

CAPT Owen Blair Murphy, FTG Training Officer, arrived at Gtmo on the 23rd of October, accompanied by his wife, the former Alice L. McGinn of New York, and their two daughters Mary and Margery.
CAPT Murphy, a graduate of the New York State Merchant Marine Academy and New York University, received his commission in the U.S. Navy in 1941. During World War Two he saw action in the battles at Leyte and at a Lingayen Gulf and participated in the invasions of Iwo Jima and Okinawa.
The CAPT has commanded the APD HUMPHREYS, the AKA CORVUS and the GEARING DD710. He has served as Executive Officer aboard the ROCKINGHAM APA-229 and the FREMONT APA-44. CAPT Murphy served with two commands at Newport, R. I., first as an Instructor at the General Line School and later as a student at the Naval War College, graduating in '52'. CAPT Murphy reported aboard this commiiand after a tour of duty on the Staff of ComPhibLant.
Welcome aboard, we hope your tour of duty here at the Training Group in Gtmo will. be an enjoyable one.

The new face in the FTG Operations Office is CDR David M. McIntosh, relief for CDR W. E. Simmons, FTG Operations Officer.
CDR McIntosh, the former Commanding Officer of the BAUER DM-26, reported aboard on the 23rd of October arriving on the JOHNSON accompanied by his wife the former Mary R. Coll of Hallenton, Pennsylvania and their three children Ann, David and Michael.
The Commander, a native of Gulport, Mississippi, and a Graduate of Mississippi State, served as Gunnery Officer aboard the WYOMING and the destroyer TARBELL in the early years of World War II before earning his wings as a lighter than air pilot. He later commanded the LSM-238 and the USS BURDO APD-133.
He served on the Staff at the Naval War College at Newport, R. I. and as Flag Secretary of ComCruLant. Following WW II, he attended the Naval Academy Post Graduate School, graduating in 1946.
The Officers and men of the Fleet Training Group wish to extend their greeting to you and your family and we hope that your stay in Gtmo will be a pleasant one to remember.
* * *
LT Carl W. Plath, formerly of the FTG Navigation Department. departed Gtmo under orders to take command of the USS
LOYAT TY AM-457, which is one of tl ost modern ships of its


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type, at Long Beach, California.
LT Plath is a garduate of the Pennsylvania Maritime Academy and has been with the Training Group since July 1952. He and his wife Janice will spend a short leave in York, Pennsylvania prior to leaving for the West Coast.
We wish you the best of luck at your new command.

The FTG Administration Team in the Officers Bowling League, who have been in first place since the leagues opening match, increased their lead at the expense of the NSD Team No. 3, the second place team, by taking a four point sweep in a match early in the week.
The league leaders now have 24 points in the win column against only 4 points in the loss column.
Not to be out done, the FTG team No. 2 in the enlisted men's bowling league are also holding their own, and at present are in the top spot, with a record of seven and one. Individual high averages for the team are being held down by Don Markham and
Andy Gagliano.
The off-again, on-again softball league which has been hampered by poor weather managed to
squeeze in a few games this dast week. The Trainers, the FTG Club, who won their first game over NSD, dropped a close, well- played game to the Marines Tuesday nite by a score of 6 to 3. After a rocky first inning when the Marines scored half their runs the game settled into a tight affair. The Trainers had a couple of rallies snuffed out in the late innings by some good fielding by the Marines.
With the League just getting underway some moral support is needed and would be greatly apnreciated by the team members. How about turning out for the future contests.

Mike Duncan, DC1 Damage Control Department will depart Sunday for the States and a tour of duty with the USN Minecraft Base, at Charleston, South Carolina.
Frank Benson, YN3, Engineering Department, will also depart Sunday on the JOHNSON for New York, where he will be discharged from the Naval Service.
Good bye and good luck to you in the future.

Reporting aboard the Training Group for duty in the past two weeks was; James Davis, DCC, from the USS PITTSBURGH CA72: John Moore, RD1, from the USS NORTHAMPTON, ECLC-1; Ned Weikel, SKI, from RecSta, Philly; Jesse Costa, RM3, from the USS HAZELWOOD, DD-531; Vaughn Crochett, BMC, from ACB No. 2, at Little Creek, Virginia; Nathan Shuler, DCC, from the USS SIERRA, AD-18; Stanley L o r e n c e, DCC, from the USS DIONYSYS, AR-21 and Alden Armstrong, TMC, from NAS Jacksonville, Florida. Welcome aboard the Fleet Traini Group.


Sunday, 31 October 1954


Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930 - 2015. Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic)


The Chaplain's Corner




WHAT DO YOU BELIEVE?

It is often repeated: "It does not make any difference what a man believes, it is what he does that counts." This is usually accompaied with another trite saying: "Actions speak louder than words". The two, however, are not complimentary. Words and actions are generally the expression of our thoughts. Our thoughts are related very directly to our beliefs. It is the basic statement that needs to e examined.
It does make a great deal of difference what a man believes. Everyone of us has a center of belief around which most of our life revolves. What we believe has a tremendous influence upon what we do. Some are more easily influenced by immediate desires, and thus in time modify their basic beliefs. Most of man's conscious and responsible actions are based upon his beliefs.
This is simply illustrated by an individual approaching a stop sign. If he believes the stop sign is there for his safety and that of others normally he will stop. If he is responding to an emergency message that his child is in the hospital chances are he will not stop. His belief in the urgency of the emergency will supplant his belief in the sign as a protection to his own safety and that of others.
The same is true in regard to the vital beliefs of life. If a man believes he is only an animal, he usually behaves on the animal level. If he believes the purpose of life is to glorify self and satisfy selfish desires, it will be revealed in what he does. If however, he believes he is a creature of God his actions will surely portary his belief. But if he believes he is a son of God, his behaviour must witness to his sonship.
What do you really belief about yourself; your world; your relationship to your fellowmen; your relationship to God?
Karl G. Peterson
LCDR, CHC, USN


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Saturday, 30 October 1954


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Page Three


3y, 80 October 1954 THE INDIAN


Sailors, Marines Await


Approval of 96 Liberty

Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has forwarded for Presidential approval a proposed revision of Navy regulations to authorize longer liberty. The change would permit commanding officers of remote Navy and Marine Corps installations to grant 96-hour liberties.
They would be authorized only at installations which have been officially designated as being remote, probably by action of either the Secretary of the Navy or the Chief of Naval Operations. As yet there is no announcement as to which areas will fall into this category.
As the plan was submitted to the President, the 96-hour liberty pass must include both Saturday and Sunday and the individual must report back in by 6 p.m. of the last day of his liberty.
For example, a person will be able to leave his base anytime after 6 p.m. on a Thursday, spend a long weekend at his destination, and not be required to return until 6 p.m. on Monday.
The reason for the 6 p.m. deadline is the large number of fatal automobile accidents among personnel hurrying back to base in time for Monday morning reveille. It is hoped that the 96hour pass will reduce the high casualty rate.
There are no indications that either of the other services plan to adopt a similar privilege.


PTA MeetsTuesday

The Parent-Teachers Association will hold their next meeting Tuesday evening, November 2, in the open air assembly building at the Naval Base School, commencing at 7:30 P.M.
The main speaker for the evening will be Dr. R. C. Peppin and his topic for the evening will be "Child Dental Hygenie." Preceding the speech by Dr. Peppin, selections will be sung by the Nursery School under the direction of Mrs. J. P. McNeal.
Attendance of parents will be taken by hand count instead of registration as before. Coffee will be served during social time following the meeting.


American - Korean Drive


Funds Sent In

Recently, the drive here for the American-Korean Foundation came to a close as the money that was collected from commands of the Naval Base were forwarded to Foundation headquarters in New York.
The collection of funds, which was carried over for a period of about three weeks totaled $449.82. Commands participating in the drive were the Naval Air Station, VU-10, Naval Supply Depot, Naval Hospital, Dental Clinic, Fleet Camera Party, Naval Station, Marine Barracks, and Fleet Training Group.
The funds will be used by the American-Korean Foundation to aid rehabilitation in Korea.


Commanding Officer, Robert E. Fojt presents Corp oral Joe Androvich with a certificate during 'Meritorious Mast' at which Cpl. Androvich was commended for his achievements as the Barracks Unit Diary Clerk.

Marine Commended As

Unit Diary Clerk

At Meritorious Mast held October 11, Colonel Robert E. Fojt, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks, presented a certificate to Corporal Joe Androvich which commended him for his achievements as the Barracks Unit Diary Clerk. Colonel Fojt stated: "I have read with pleasure a report from your superior officers in which you: Corporal Joe Androvich, USMC, have been commended for your services as unit diary clerk, during the period 1 August to 15 September 1954. The report states in part:
". . . . worked with such zeal, persistance, willingness, and method that his efforts caused the admiration and appreciation of his superior officers. Further, Corporal Androvich w o rk ed voluntarily many hours after working hours to accomplish his task."
The report has been noted with gratification. The fine example set and devotion to duty demonstrated by you was of the highest order and is typical of the high standards set by the U. S. Marine Corps. The commanding officer adds "Well Done."


Marine Stall NCOs Get

Swagger Sticks

Marine Staff Non-commissioned officers are going to carry swagger sticks.
According to Marine Corps Headquarters, the batons are being made an authorized part of the uniform of Staff NCOs who will be able to carry them both on and off duty.
Marines of Guantanamo Bay are generally of the opinion that the new swaggers sticks will add prestige to the uniform. Staff NCOs feel that the new additions will be a mark of distinction at any Marine Ceremony.
Although carrying the sticks will be optional, it is excepted that the practice will be "encouraged." A less expensive version of the stick carried by officers is being decided on by the Uniform Board. The NCOs stick will be tipped with brass and have a miniature gold Marine Corps emblem at the carrying end. It will be 21 inches long.


I


Servicemen Overseas Offered

Gift Shopping Services

The Armed Services Hospitality Service has once again offered its services to military personnel stationed overseas. This extended service, at no extra cost is offered so that men may purchase gifts for Christmas.
To take advantage of this shopping service, personnel should mail their request to the Hospitality Committee stating the type and approximate cost of the desired gift along with a money order and the address to which the gift is to be sent. The committee will purchase the gift, send it to the addressee, and refund any money over and above the cost of the gift.
For faster service, the Hospitality Committee has two main offices of reserving both east and west of the Mississippi River. Personnel desiring to send gifts to persons living east of the Mississippi should address their requests to the Armed Services Hospitality Committee, 1350 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington 4, D. C. For addressees living west of the Mississippi, requests should be sent to the American W o m e n ' s Voluntary Services, Third and El Camino Streets, San Mateo, California.


ALL. RANKS AND)
BRANCRES OF AF
SERVICE &ET EQUAL.
CNGrPEPAMrky4














What does America mean to
you? Enter the 1954 Freedoms Foundation Contest. Send your letter of no more than 500 words to Awards Editor, Armed Forces Radio Service, 1016 N. McCadden Place, Los Angeles LF, Calif. Your letter must bear your name, rank, service number, and organization.
It must be received before received after that date will be considered for the next year's awards. (AFPS)

Customer: "Have you a book called, 'Man, Master of Woman'?"
Salesgirl: "The fiction counter is to your left, sir."


Base Belle Braves Brimey Blue


When Mary Jane McElroy decided to go fading at Windmill Beach last week, she didn't expect a dousing that followed seconds after tne camera caught the scene. PS: Photographer was second in line for the dunking and came away 'all wet."






emt


THE INDIAN


(See Story On Page One)


Mrs. W. R. Caruthers, Mrs. 0. L. Brown, and Mrs. J. A. Strouhal begin arranging the repaired and reconditioned toys for sale starting 3 Nov. The toys will be on sale for enlisted families only.


Santa Sends Big Toy Shipments to Base Toylands


Christmas this year should be a happy event for the kiddies of the Naval Base as seen by the huge shipment of toys from Santa Claus at the local exchange toylands. Above residents of the Naval Base look over the huge variety offered at the Marine Post Exchange while more dependents brouse through the unusual variety at the Naval Air Station Exchange.


A 'S ~~7


Santa's helpers at the Fire Department busy themselves in their spare time reparing toys for the Trading Post. All toys were collected here on the Naval Base.


GTMO Golfers Return


ComTen Tourney Victors


From San Juan


Last week, three local golf teams brought home the bacon to Guantanamo Bay in the form of prizes, trophies, and awards earned at the Tenth Naval District Golf Tourney.
Leading the winners was LT Tony "Perpetual" Grego, who, as a member of the winning team garnered Low Medalist honors. Shooting a low 302 for the 72 hole competition, Grego came in six strokes ahead of the nearest contender, another Guantanamo entrant and a local competitor of LT Grego, Chief Lee Rogers of the Naval Air Station.
Chief Rogers, who tied with LT Grego in the Naval Station Invitational tourney here, shot a 308 for the 72 holes to win runnerup honors.


SAVE FOR YOUR FUTURE WITH U.S. SAVINGS BONDS

Placing first in team honors was Guantanamo Bay Team No. 1 with LT Tony Grego, Chief Lee Rogers, C. Loggins, P. G. Acree. LCDR D. A. Scott, and CHMACH H. Bush bringing home the 1st place trophy to Guantanamo Bay.
Behind the first place Guantanamo Bay team was a team from San Juan and then a team from the Trinidad Naval Station. Fourth place went to Guantanamo Bay Team No. 3 while Gtmo Team No.
2 placed fifth.
Guantanamo Bay Team No. 3 was made up of R. Adams, E. Lachatara, LCDR F. N. Vanderhoef, M. Manuele, D. Brough, and LT E. A. Sandness.
Playing on Team No. 2 was LT J. W. Dempsey, CDR D. L. G. King, J. Owens, T. G. Byrne, J. C. Mauldin, and C. A. Blake.
Tournament play began Friday morning and continued through until Sunday night when a banquet was given for the golfers.
For full details and pictures, be sure and read next week's Indian.



4


At the NAS Exchange an official opening of Toyland was held recently when LCDR E. H. Beiland, Navy Exchange Officer and J. I. Dave, Supervisor at the NAS Exchange watched while CDR W. G. Winslow, Executive Officer, NAS, cut the tape opening Toyland.



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Saturday, 30 October 1954


Page Four







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Saturday, 30 October 1954 THE INDIAN Page Pive


SeaBees Take Top League Spot



In 2nd Week Base Softball

The MCB-4 Basemakers dominated play in the Naval Base Softball League this week as they started off the week with a win over NAS and followed up with another win Thursday night over VU-10 to give them the second-week league leading spot. The proof of their power should come this afternoon as they face the NSD-CHB nine that upset the Mar me Leathernecks applecart.
BASEMAKERS MARINES DEFEAT TRAINERS
SQUEEZE BY NAS With both teams boasting a win
The MCB-4 Basemakers started in their opener, the FTG Trainers
off the second week of play at the and the Marine Leathernecks tangoffa th eony h led in a close contest Tuesday night
Naval Station Field Monday night at Hatuey Field in the only game by squeezing by the NAS Fliers at te iein
7-6 in a tight contest that wasn't of the evening.
in the iaght for yone until the The Marines started out strong "in the bag for anyone with a first inning three run splurNAS started off with a bang as ge that gave them early insurance. they pushed two runs across the From that point on, they were
the puhedtworun acossthe never headed by the Trainers. plate to jump off to an early lead Iowever. FTG came hack with ne in the top of the first inning only run in the top of the second and to have the Basemakers come back rni h o ftescn n
in the bottom of the second to tie two more in the top of the third to come within one run of the hardScoring on grouped hits and hitting Leathernecks.
good play, the Basemakers took In the bottom of the third, the
advantage and pushed four more Marines came back with another
runs across the plate in the third two tallies to add the final margin. inning. The fourth inning was The last four innings were scorescoreless for both teams but the less.
scoeles fr bth eambt h Lee took the win on the mound Fliers came back in the fifth with Le the win gn u
a rally that fell one run short of for the Marines, giving up five ty in the score. hits, striking out one and walking
In the bottom of the fifth, the two. Markham took the loss for the SeaBees once again added insur- Trainers, going the full distance.
ance scoring another run. In the At the plate, Jim Pace was the
sixth, NAS tallied again and MCB decisive factor for the Marines as 4 went scoreless. The Fliers failed he drove in four runs and chalked to rally with the needed runs to tie up a round-tripper. Pace went two orall win th the seeh runs .o t for three at the plate. or win in the seventh inning. FTG 3 5 1
For the Basemakers, Gregory Marines 6 5 1
went the full distance on the
mound, striking out nine men, NSD - CHB UPSETS
walking eight, and giving up five LEATHERNECKS
hits. Losing pitcher Harrel for Wednesday night full activity
NAS went two and a third innings, was resumed on both diamonds, gave up five runs, walked five men, and the Marine Leathernecks were and struck out one before he was shutout by a combined Supply-Derelieved by Davis who finished the pot-Cargo Handler nine. The Marcontest. ines went almost hitless, earning
MCB-4 7 5 1 only one single and a double --NAS 6 5 6 both by relief pitcher Lee.
POINTERS TRAMPLE NSD-CHB got off to a big start
POINTRS TRMPLE as they earned six of their seven
MALLARDS runs in the first inning. Going
Monday night at Hatuey Field, scoreless for two more innings, the
Leeward Point came back into play winners added the final marker in after their initial loss to MCB-4 to the fourth. trample VU-10 in a near shutout Milkinel was the winning pitch9-1, proving their pre-season tri- er, going the full distance alone, umphs. striking out one man walking
The first two innings were fast four, and giving up two hits. Inas both VU-10 and Leeward Point man started for the Marines and
came up with no runs. Only one hit was relieved after two outs in the was earned by the Pointers in the first inning by Lee who held NSDtwo innings. CHB to one run in the remaining
In the top of the third, the Point- innings.
ers pushed their first two runs ac- At the plate, Picola and Sanders ross the plate when Collins step- were the big men for the winners ped up with two men out and one as each went two for four at bat.
man on and slammed a home run. Sanders hit the only home run of
Starting out the fourth, the Mal- the game.
lards went down one, two, three The loss for the Marines dropped
while the boys from across the bay them out of first place. pushed ahead by one more run on Marines 0 2 1
two walks, a stolen base by Griff en NSD-CHB 7 8 1
and a sacrifice by J. H. Wood.
In a scoreless fifth inning, the LEEWARD POINT BLASTS NAS Mallards left two men stranded on Wednesday night at Hatuey
base while Leeward Point went Field, the boys from across the
down in order. bay once again proved their potenIn the sixth inning, the Mallards tialities for the season as they went down, no hits, no runs, and blasted the NAS Fliers to the tune no errors. At this point, the game of a 13-0 shutout. was still in question, but the Point- Starting off with seven runs in ers erased all question marks in the first inning, the Pointers scortheir half of the sixth when they ed almost at will as every frame pushed six big runs across on three was filled other than the fifth and hits, two errors, and a passed ball. seventh innings. The entire contest
The Mallards finally spoiled a was spotted with extra-base blows shutout for Leeward Point when as J. H. Wood and Bladies chalked
they scored their lone run in the up doubles while J. M. Wood and final inning. Kaestler went home with a roundVU-10 1 1 3 tripper each to their credit.
Leeward 9 6 1 Meanwhile, Fe1 held the Fli-


League Standings


(As of Wednesday, 27 Oct.)
W L PCT.
MCB-4 2 0 1000
Leeward Point 2 1 .666
Marines 2 1 .666
FTG 1 1 .500
NSD-CHB 1 1 .500
NAS 1 2 .333
Naval Station 0 1 .000
VU-10 0 2 .000



Next Week's Schedule

Hatuey Filed
Saturday, 30 October NSD-CHB vs MCB-4
NAS vs Naval Station
Monday, 1 November
NAS vs Marines
Tuesday, 2 November
Naval Station vs VU-10 Wednesday, 3 November MCB-4 vs Leeward Point
Thursday, 4 November
NSD-CHB vs FTG Friday, 5 November
Leeward Point vs Naval Station Naval Station Field Monday, 1 November
Leeward Point vs NSD-CHB
Tuesday, 2 November
MCB-4 vs FTG
Wednesday, 3 November Naval Station vs Marines
Thursday, 4 November
NAS vs VU-10
Friday, 5 November
Naval Station vs Leeward Point

ers to four singles, walked four men, but struck out none. Forton was extremely well backed by his infield and was credited with the win. Murray started on the mound for NAS and was relieved after seven runs in the first inning. Davis went the remaining innings and gave up six more runs. Murray was credited with the loss.
Leeward 7 15 4
NAS 0 4 3
INDIANS SHUT OUT FTG
Thursday night at the Naval Station Field, the Naval Station Indians downed Fleet Training Group 7-0 in a one hour and ten minute contest that saw the Indians showing fine form both at bat and in the field.
The Indians first score came in the third inning when Petinak slammed out a home run with one man out and one man on base. The Indians went on to score two more runs in the inning before going back to the field.
In the field, Mandy Mandis was on the mound and was well backed by his team-mates as the Trainers were held to two hits for the entire contest. Mandy chalked up his first win of the season in his first start.
Boyette was the loser, going the full distance and giving up eight hits and seven runs.
NavSta 7 8 1
FTG 0 2 4
SEABEES HAND VU-10
8-5 LOSS
The MCB-4 Basemakers entered play at Hatuey Field Thursday night and handed an 8-5 loss to the VU-10 Mallards and gave the SeeBees a tighter hold on first place.
The Mallards fought hard under the pitching of Gibson to come out of the cellar division, but the sharp infielding of the SeeBees and the smooth pitching of Zarner proved too much for them.
Both pitchers went the full distance.


Gridiron's Top Ten Teams

Battle to Retain Ratings
Halloween activities will take a temporary back seat today as college football enters its seventh week of play. Major action will be in the Mid-West where four teams of the top ten will see action with a fifth big team traveling out. Wisconsin, rated as the number two team across the nation, will face Iowa, and although Iowa has not yet figured in the best in gridiron circuits, they should provide the Badgers with more than plenty of competition.
At Northwestern, Ohio State, rated only two behind Wisconsin, will be out toshold their high rating. As well as the top-ten spot, Ohio State will have a Big Ten standing at stake, so action should be hard, fast, and thrilling.
Seventh place Minnesota will face a fighting band of Spartans from Michigan State in Minneapolis; and Purdue, voted in a threeway tie for tenth spot, will face Illinois in a game where anything could and probably will happen. Meanwhile, Notre Dame, rated second at the first of the season and dropped back to sixth spot since their loss to Purdue, will travel east to Annapolis where they will be the guests of the Naval Academy Midshipmen.
Also in the East Coast, another top tenner, the Army Cadets, will play Virginia.
In the South, two big teams will see action as fifth place Mississippi will battle LSU while West Virginia, another tenth place team, will face Pittsburgh.
In the Southwest, the number eight team, Arkansas will tackle Texas A&M in a game where there is not much the question as to the victor. In the Rocky Mountains, Colorado, the third team voted into the tenth place tie, will play host to number one team, Oklahoma. Although the top team is favored. Colorado has their chances for an upset and will be battling every second of the contest to come out on top.
In Far West play, the only topten rated team, third place UCLA, will face their arch-rivals, California in a contest that will have much to do with the decision for the West-Coast Rose Bowl entrant.
EAST
Boston College vs Xaivier, Ohio Boston U3. vs Bucknell
Columbia vs Cornell
Harvard vs Ohio U.
Lafayette vs Gettyburg
Pennsylvania vs Penn State Princeton vs Colgate
Rutgers vs Temple
Syracuse vs Holy Cross
Yale vs Darmouth
MIDWEST
Cincinnati vs Pacific
Detroit vs Marquette
Iowa State vs Drake
Kansas State VS Kansas Michigan vs Indiana
Tulsa vs Oklahoma A&M
wichita vs Houston
SOUTH
Alabama vs Georgia
Auburn vs Tulane
Duke vs Georgia Tech
Florida vs Mississippi State
Kentucky vs Villanova
North Carolina S. vs Furman South Carolina vs Maryland Tennessee vs North Carolina
VPI vs William & Mary
Wake Forest vs Clemson
SOUTHWEST
Hardin-Simmons vs Arizona State Rice vs Vanderbilt
Texas vs SMU
TCU vs Baylor
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
Arizona vs W. Texas State
Colorado A&M vs Montana Denver vs New Mexico
Montana State vs Idaho State Utah vs Idaho
Utah State vs Bridham Young
FAR WEST
Southern
California vs Oergon State
Stanford vs Washington State
Washington vs Oregon


THE INDIAN


Page Pive






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Maximum Punishments For AWOL Increased World's First A-Powered Ship Joins U.S. Submarine Fleet


(In last week's issue of "The Indian" the increase of maximum punishments of courtmartials were erroronously printed. Following are the correct maximum punishments.)

The president of the United States by Executive Order 10565 amended the Manual for Courts-Martial, United States, 1951 to increase the maximum punishments for the following punishments. Effective 1 November 1954.
Offenses Punishments
Absence without leave:
1. Failing to go to, or going from, Confinement at hard labor not to the appointed place of duty. exceed one month, and forfeiture


2. From unit, organization, or other place of duty.
(a) For not more than 3 days
of absence. ,


(b) For more
not more
absence.

(c) For more
absence.


than 3 days but than 30 days of


than 30 days of


of two-thirds pay per month not to exceed one month.


Confinement at hard labor not to exceed one month, and forfeiture of two-thirds pay per month not to exceed one month. Confinement at hard labor not to exceed six months and forfeiture of two-thirds pay per month not to exceed six months. Dishonorable discharge, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and confinement at hard labor not to exceed one year.


Missing movement of ship, aircraft or unit:
(1) Through design Dishonorable discharge, forfeiture
of all pay and allowances, and confinement at hard labor not to exceed one year.
(3) Through neglect Bad conduct discharge, forfeiture
of all pay and allowances, and confinement at hard labor not to exceed six months.
In addition to the above, if an accused is found guilty of an offense or offenses for none of which dishonorable discharge is authorized, proof of three or more previous convictions during the year next preceding the commission of any offense of which the accused stands convicted will authorize dishonorable discharge and forfeiture of all pay and allowances and, if the confinement otherwise authorized is less than one year, confinement at hard labor for one year.


Veterans' Day 1954




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"we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor."

On Nov. 11 the United States takes time out to remember all the men and women who served in the Armed Forces during WWI, WWII and in the Korean War-the officers and EM, the regulars, reserves and draftees.
All served with the spirit that has been a hallmark of the Armed Forces since the days of the Revolutionary War.
Some did heroic jobs. Others performed the small, seemingly unimportant tasks necessary to keep a huge fighting machine in action.
Nov. 11 was named Armistice Day originally. But it was so named when people hoped that WWI would be the last war in history. Much lead has passed through the air since 1918 and many men and women have worn the uniforms of our nation since then.
And so Armistice Day has become Vete-ans Day to honor them all.


Groton, Conn. (AFPS)-The world's first nuclear-powered ship-the Navy submarine USS Nautilus-has joined the U.S. Fleet in commissioning ceremonies at the General Dynamics Corp. plant here.
Principal speaker at the ceremonies was ADM Jerauld Wright,
New Stateside Ferry USN, Commander-in-Chief, U. S.
Atlantic Fleet, who said, "Today
the Navy turns a channel marker
Begins Service To in the course of history."
The admiral noted that as the
rst true submersible in history
the Nautilus is able to hunt enC arenas, Cuba the
emy ships and subs in their own
waters for weeks, possibly
Recently, in Key West, Fla., a months, without returning to
new ferry was commission. Named base, "and thus will evolve a
"The City of Key West" the ferry new era of strategy and tactics."
has already began a scheduled run ADM Wright also announced
between Key West and Cuba. that "many sister ships" of the
"The City of Key West" is a Nautilus will be produced as
brand new 1,000 ton vessel capable quickly as possible to support the of carrying many cars and pas- new weapon. One sister ship-the
sangers and is able to make the Sea Wolf-is already under conrun between Key West and Car- struction at the Groton shipyards
denas, Cuba in eight hours. here.
The new ferry run is primarily The Nautilus, 300 feet long
for tourists, but personnel vaca- with a beam of 28 feet, has the tioning from the base or returning most powerful submarine enot the States might be able to take gine ever constructed. advantage of the new service. Commanding officer of the new
As far as highways are con- undersea craft is CDR Eugene P.
cerned, the road from Santiago de Wilkinson, USN, who is a veteran Cuba to Cardenas has been report- of submarine operations in the ed as a good road. The main plob- Pacific during WWITI. He is also lem, however, is getting to San- an experienced nuclear physicist tiago. Many personnel of the base an exginea y
have already had experience with and engineer. this road, and it has not been re- fThe Nautilus has a complement ported good by anyone. of 11 officers and 85 EM, all spe"The City of Key West" makes cially trained for this assignment.
three trips a week, leaving Key She is not expected to make her
West at 9 A.M. on Tuesday Thurs- first sea trial run for three months.


day, and Saturday and returning on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 10:00 A.M. Rates are standard as a price of $29.50 has been set for one way cars with one driver. An additional $7.50 is charged for each passenger.
Cardenas, the landing point for "The City of Key West" is about 100 miles this side of Havana on the northern coast of Cuba.

The sailor was relating his hair raising experiences aboard a torpedoed ship. The dear little lady was listening wide-eyed.
"And there I sees a torpedo, lady. heading' straight for us.",
"Oh dear," she gasped, "I do hope it was one of ours."

"My new boy-friend is like the fourth man in the Conga line."
"How?"
"You know, one, tivo, three, jerk."


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THE INDIAN


Saturday, 30 Octobe






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Saturday. 30 October 1954


Cooks' TOur
by Dorothy Murphy
Thanksgiving is in the air, and even though Guantanamo climate is not conducive to thoughts of "Frost on the Pumpkin," still husbands and children are yearning for "Turkey and all the fixin's." This week, Mrs. W. R. Caruthers, wife of the Naval Station commanding officer, presents an unusual Turkey recipe for wives aboard who are looking forward to the holiday.
ROAST TURKEY & DRESSING Contents
Seasonings Required -Bay Leaf Mace
Paprika Cloves
Celery Seed Cayanne Pepper
Coriander Tumeric
Preserved Ginger Marjoram Coleman's Mustard Savory Caraway Seed Sage or Thyme Poppy Seed Onion Juice
Oregano
Vegetables Fruit
One can Water One Apple
Chestunits One Orange
Parsley One Can Crushed
Garlic Pineapple
Four Large Onios One Lemon
Miscellaneous
One 25 pound Turkey
Bread Crumbs
% lb. Ground Veal
14 lb. freshly Ground Pork
/ lb. butter
2 eggs
Cider
Method
Rub the bird inside and out with salt and pepper. In a stew pan put the chopped gizzard, neck and and heart; and one bay leaf, one teaspon of paprika, a half teaspoon of coriander, a clove of garlic, four cups of water and salt to taste. Let simmer.
DRESSING: In one bowl, one diced apple, one diced orange, one large can of crushed pineapple, the grated rind of one lemon, one can of drained water chestnuts, three tablespoons of chopped preserved ginger.
In another bowl; Three packages of bread crumbs, 3 pound of ground veal, one quarter pound of ground fresh pork, quarter of a pound of butter, and all the fat from the turkey.
In another bowl: Two teaspoon of Colman's mustard, two teaspoon of Coleman's mustard, two teaspoon of caraway seed, three teaspoons of celery seed, two teaspoon of poppy seed, two and one-half teaspoons of oregano, one wellcrushed large bay leaf, one teaspoon of black pepper, one half teaspoon of mace, four tablespoons of well chopped parsley, four or five finely minced cloves of garlic, four cloves (minus the heads) and well chopped, one-half teaspoon of turmeric, four large well chopped onions, six well chopped stalks of celery, one half teaspoon marjoram, one half teaspoon of savory, one tablespoon of poultry seasoning (sage or thyme.)
Mix well the contents in each bowl. Mix contents of the three bowls together, well. Toss enough so that it isn't a dough mass.
Stuff turkey.
In one cup make a paste as follows: Yoke of two eggs, one teaspoon of Coleman's mustard, one clove of minced garlic, one teaspoon of onion juice (put it through chopper and catch the juice), one half teaspoon of salt, two pinches of cayenne pepper, one teaspoon of lemon juice, and enough sifted flour to make a stiff paste.
Place turkey in red-hot oven and let it brown all over. Remove turkey and turn oven down to 355 degrees .While turkey is sizzling hot, paint it completely,


Hospital Notes TEENAGE-ROUND-UP


by R. P. Campanozzi, HM2

HEIRPORT NEWS
Two boys and two girls were added to the Gtmo birth list this week. The little gents are: Herbert Neal born to QM2 and Mrs. Helen Nelson; and, Howard James Jr. whose parents are AL2 and Mrs. May Kelly. The young ladies are Margaret Mary to TE2 and Mrs. Jean Schuster; and, Margaret Cora to Mr. & Mrs. W. E. Sheppard.
ARRIVALS
LCDR C. R. Hall, (MC), USN reported to us for duty from USNH, Oagland, Calif. Dr. Hall, a graduate of Texas University he is a registered radiologist, is married and has two children. Also arriving a week ago was HN Jack Bennett from USNH, Charleston, South Carolina.
DEPARTURES
There were no departure of any staff personnel this week but they're still talking about the notorious Charley Brewer. Charley's farewell was featured by a brief champagne party and it appeared that he would have liked to stay at Gtmo a while longer. In leaving Brewer asked me to convey his thanks for the gift he received from the crew here. TYPE "AB" BLOOD IS NEEDED
The laboratory is seeking names of persons who posses type "AB" blood. If you have this type blood and are willing to donate, your name will be placed on the Donors Availability List. Should an emergency arise which necessitates the use of your type blood, the lab will notify you. Potential contributors are requested to phone 8659 or appear in person at the hospital laboratory.
SPORTS
The Hospital Ping Pong Tournament Championship match was the most spectacular game of the tourney. "Gypsy" Corradetti finally edged out Walt Jones for the top honors. Jones took an early edged and maintained it up till the final few points, but, Corradetti surged back with tremendous counter-serves and overpowered Jones. Trophies are expected to be presented next week. Incidentally, both the "Gypsy" and Jones hold several ping pong laurels from past tournaments. Corradetti who hails from Chester, Pa., holds two municipal championships of that city. Jones has been very active in service-wide competition.
OUR COACH
Dr. G. V. Hering will be at the helm of the basketball team this year. A graduate of Minnesota U., he is the most vivid sports supporter at this activity. This years squad will display many new faces on Gtmo courts; but veterans of last years first squad, namely: Maddix, O'Brien and Moebus are still on hand for the fighting maroon of USNH.

all over with paste. Plate again in oven and paste will set in few minutes. Take it out again and paint again. Put turkey back in oven and repeat this until paste is all used up.
Add one cup of cider to the gizzard-neck and heart stew. Remove from stove but keep warm and stir occassionally. Baste turkey with this fluid every fifteen minutes. After the bird has cooked for one hour and a half, turn over on its stomach, back in air, and cook in this position until the last fifteen mbnites. Turkey should cook from 'four and one-half to five and one-hai ,ours.


by Judy Yost
This past week found most of us water-logged and having to stay under shelter of some kind
-darting from cars and busses for the nearest doors-trying so hard to miss the big, wet puddles, and ending up with soaking feet and dribbly noses! ! Some nature lovers could be seen walking along in the downpour just as calmly as if "ole Sol" were up there shining down on them! .
All of the high school gang were really swinging their partners and learning to follow the square dance calls during P. E. Come on Kats, let's get with it and maybe we can have a real swingeroo when we learn how to "dooo, si, dooo." (Wonder if there's shoe available on the Base with safety toes? ?
Sunday brought us blue skies and the beaches, pools, tennis courts and corral more loaded with our lively and energetic ones. Yep, never a dull moment. Dave had everyone frantic when his head didn't pop up once in a while he was having himself a nice swim under the water-and Edgar really earning his title of Life Guard as he brought in a little boy who was having trouble-Peggy getting a nasty cut on her leg after swimming out to the raft-that "huge, huge" Barracuda that was licking his chops too near for comfort. . . .
Then, there was Mary Jane, Prissy, Lucile M. and Nicky on the hoss trail-Phil looking over the Chirstmas display at the Air Station-all the gals heading for Pat McGowan's house-Ralph celebrating his birthday with a party
-Evelyn swacking those tennis balls like a pro-(now, if we can only learn to get them inside the court! !)


Little Theatre News

Ensign Dick Helland replaced Dan Nash, recently transferred in the cast of "My Three Angels", Little Theatre Director Alan Wagner, announced this week. ENS Helland is attached to MCB-4 and
was active in the the San Antonio, Texas Little Theatre prior to entry into the service. He appeared in "Kiss Me Kate" and "One Foot In Heaven", in Texas and previously had organized a Drama Club in the local High School.
The cast for the play, a comedy in three acts by Sam and Bella Spewack, includes, in the title roles, E. B. Cope, Ronnie Estefan, and Alan Wagner. Anne Saxe, Lillian Armbruster, Burt Knight, Neil and Dorothy Murphy and Tom Judkins complete the cast.
Rehearsals are intensifying next week and the cast is notified that starting time is now 7:00 P.M. on Mondays, Wednesday and Fridays.
Tickets for the play will be available through members of the cast by November 7th and will go on sale in public areas the week of November 20th. Personnel are urged to obtain tickets early, by Ticket chairman Ethel Beach as a sell-out is indicated.

"Did you vote for the honor system?"
"You bet I did-three times."

Sailor: "I love you, darling; I adore you."
Wave: "Are you going to marry me?"
Sailor: "Don't change the subject."


S


Me0 c NOS1S

by Sgt william J. McDowell Jr., USMC
and cpl J. Androvich, USMC
Arriving aboard the USNS ELDEN H JOHNSON on its last visit to Gtmo were seven new members from the 2nd Marine Division and one new member reporting from the Marine Barracks, Boston, Mass. A hearty welcome aboard is extended to all "new hands" and we hope you enjoy your stay in Gtmo Bay. The new members of Marine Barracks are as follows: Pfe Raymond J. Adomonis, Pfc Robert F. Barnett, Pfc Kenneth R. Carpenter, Ffe Kenneth C. Conlow, Pfc Earl L. Know, Pfc James G. Morissette, Pfc Harold R. Wesp, and Pvt John Coady.
Departing for the states on the 3rd of November are MCgt Henry J. Litzelman, Pfc Leonard H. Lambert, and Cpl William L. Anderson. MSgt Litzelman, Marine Barracks Sergeant Major, will report to the Marine Barracks, Norfolk, Va. for further transfer to Camp Lejeune, N. C. Cpl Anderson and Pfe Lambert will report to the Marine Barracks, Norfolk, Va. for discharge. "Bon Voyage" men and the best of luck to you from all hands at Marine Barracks.
"Ready on the firing line" will be the word at the rifle range this morning as 42 Marines begin firing for record. Each man has been well instructed and has become well acquainted with his rifle so lets "hold em in" and lots of luck to everyone.
NOTICE
There are only 55 days until Christmas so to avoid the Christmas rush at the Post Office, mail your Christmas packages as soon as possible.


NSD Supply Line

Mrs. Mildred DiMascola resigned her position as Captain's Secretary to return to the States with her husband, who has completed a tour of duty here at Gtmo. Before returning to the States on November 20, Mildred is planning to spend some time on the Golf Course in an effort to give her husband some good competition. Upon returning to the States, the DiMascolas will spend some time in Massachusetts on leave before reporting to their new duty station at Norfolk, Virginia. The DiMasdolas were very popular during their tour of duty at Gtmo and will be greatly missed by their many friends.
Mrs. Nell Giggy will be the Captain's new secretary, filling the position left vacant by Mrs. DiMascola's departure. Nell was formerly employed in the Planning Department at NSD.
Merel Sands, SK2 and Mrs. Sands depart next week aboard the USNS JOHNSON for the States. Sands has been transferred to the U. S. Naval Hospital, Charleston, South Carolina. Mrs. Sands was employed in the Fiscal Department at NSD.
James E. Harris, SKSN, whose home town is Dexter, Kentucky, recently reported to the Depot from Storekeeper School at Newport, Rhode Island.
Although J. T. Kenney, SN, lost his Gtmo tan while on leave in the States, he gained a new brode. Kenney was married on 20 September in Waverly, Ohio.

YN1: " You say that Chief is conceited?"
Wave: "Yeah, he joined the Navy to let the world see him."


Page Seven


THE INDIAN






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Navy)DPPO-10ND-Gtmo.-0224


Saturday, 20 October 1954


THE INDIAN


MOV I ES


Saturday, Oct. 30
HONDO
John Wayne Geraldine Page
A U.S. Cavalryman in the Southwest in 1874 tries to persuade a young woman and her small son to leave their ranch because of Indian danger. He attempts to escort them to safety and becomes involved in battles with Indians.

Sunday, Oct. 31
GLENN MILLER STORY
James Stuart June Allyson
Story of the famous band leader who lost his life during WWII. It tells of his struggle to make the grade and of his faithful wife's aid in accomplishing this.

Monday, Nov. 1
IT SHOULD HAPPEN TO YOU Judy Holliday Peter Lawford
A young girl comes to New York seeking fame and fortune. Finding neither she rents a huge signboard over Columbus Circle and has her name emblazoned on it. But her boyfriend convinces her that she must earn her fame.

Tuesday, Nov. 2
CAPTAIN'S PARADISE
Alec Guiness Yvonne DeCarlo
Story if a ship captain plying between Gibralter and North Africa and his loves in both ports; a loving, solid wife in Gibralter and an exotic dnace rin North Africa.

Wednesday, Nov. 3
BREAKING THE SOUND
BARRIER
Ralph Richardson Ann Todd
A plane tycoon lets nothing stand in the way of his main goal-a supersonic plane. His daughter develops a hate for him when both her husband and brother are killed testing experimental craft.

Thursday, Nov. 4
BLACKBEARD THE PIRATE Robert Newton Linda Darnell
Takes place in the 17th century and deals with the conflict between the pirate and a famous buccaneer. There are bloody battles much intrigue and a dash of romance.


PINCH ME, QUICK! - Actress Ann Robinson, sineway red-headed beauty, was selected by Jack Webb for the policewoman role in Warner Bros. ' feature-length production "Dragnet," which Webb stars in and directed in WarnerColor. From this angle it's obvious that Ann gets her man.


WGBY HI-Lites
by George Engle

You can just about plan on finding the same programs when you dial 1450 this coming week that were there last week. Thru' some marvelous stroke of fate -no changes this week. Normally there is at least one change to report but it seems that the current favorites are holding fast to their popularity. Who says the public is fickle
The dramatic shows are producing some fine entertainment this week and have come up with some all-star casts.
An example is George Bernard Shaw's comedy, "Man and Superman", Which Theatre Guild On The Air will present this Monday at 9:00 P.M. It will star Maurice Evans in the role which has done so much to cinch his claim to fame as one of our finest contemporary actors, that of Jack Tanner appointed guardian of Anne, wealthy young heiress. Deborah Kerr will portray Anne, whose big ambition in life is to marry her guardian.


The chase from England to the continent where Jack is finally caught provides comedy entertainment at it's very best. On Hollywood Radio Theatre Sunday night at 10:00 P.M. a radio adaptation of the motion picture "Because of You" will be presented with Jeff Chandler recreating his original role and elfinlike June Allyson as his co-star. June portrays the country girl who becomes innocently involved with a dope smuggler and serves a term in prison. Jeff will play the part of the young Air Force officer with whom she eventually finds happiness.
Jean and James Cagney will sostar on Family Theatre's presentation of "Mental Blocks." The story of a professional gambler and his sister, a student of psychology. How she attempts to cure him of his gambling mania thru mental suggestion and mental control over a pair of dice makes for an unusual and entertaining story.
Consult your daily Papoose for any changes in the schedule of programs to be presented over WGBY, 1450 on your radio dial.
. . . . Good Listening. . . .


OPERATION BLONDE \t


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ooK- N0K
by Francis L. Cannon, JOSN
For Your Information . . .
ABRAHAM LINCOLN
by Carl Sandburg
This is the one volume edition, taken from Sandburg's monumental six-volume work. Sandburg undertook this work forty years ago, to reproduce Lincoln's life as it was lived, giving the reader the feeling that he himself was living in the times. As a boy, Sandburg grew up in Lincoln country and knew men who remembered Lincoln. In his travels he sought out kin of people who knew Lincoln well. His research has been exhaustive. The result has given literature and biography a great work.
EUROPEAN-A JOURNEY WITH
PICTURES
by Anne Fremantle and Bryan Holme
This takes the reader on a romantic tour of the Old World. The wonders of western Europe, visited by thousands of Americans yearly are here illustrated. The journey includes castles and palaces, ancient festivals, natives in picturesque costumes. The text is an excellent combination of travel, history, pertinent quotations, unusual sidelights and fascinating stories.
THE ART OF EATING
by M. F. K. Fisher
The idea of this book is well summed up by a quotation from Thackeray: "Next to eating good dinners, a healthy man with a benevolent turn of mind, must like, I think, to read about them." A vise and witty cook-book is this. But it's much more than a cookbook, it's a guide to the highest delights in eating, spiced with stories, humor and how-to-do-it.
AN ENGLISH YEAR
by Nan Fairbrother
Like the sixthteenth - century house in which it was written, this book is mellow and sturdy. It is the reflections of an English mother and the daily rhythm of life as she lived during one wartime year with her two young sons in and old Buckinghamshire farmhouse. From there she contemplates the country seasons, her childhood, the books she has read, the music she has listened to. It is rich with insights into life. For Your Entertainment . .
SMALL TOWN D.A.
by Robert Traver
A unique picture of life of a Michigan country as seen through the eyes of the District Attorney. The D.A. usually sees the seamier side of life, but rarely is it depicted with such humerous highlights as here.
LADY OF BEAUTY
by Kikou Yamata
Against the background of Japan during WWT, this book depicts the lonliness, decline and death of the too beautiful too richly endowed Nobuka. Aloof and cultivated, she symbolized the plight of the spirit of old Japan in wartime. MOST LIKELY TO SUCCEED
by John Dos Fassos
Jed Morris' college class voted him "the most likely to succeed." He was talented, brilliant, had driving idealistic ambition that the Twenties considered essential for every young American. And he did succeed, but throughout his climb to succees he clung to the destructive philosiphy that cut humanityout of his soul. He could find no true values in Greenwich Village, or Hollywood. This is the story of an incomplete man, mocked by his own standards, warped by his own selfishness.




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m64 Ge_ s (TMO Lilce The Sunshine" Vol. VI, No. 68 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 30 October 1954 Quick Action on Blood Call Saves Patient Critical Trouble Last weekend, at the Naval Hospital here, a patient was saved from critical complications when the combined efforts of the hospital Laboratory, Radio Station WGBY, and several resident of the Naval Base who responded quickly to the emergency. It all began when Mrs. Charlene Turner, wife of George Edgar Turner, Jr., AD3, gave birth to a son, George Edgar Turner III. Complications set in after childbirth, however, and Mrs. Turner developed a severe hemorrage and required four pints of type AB blood immediately. The Hospital Laboratory notified Radio Station WGBY, and within 15 minutes an emergency announcement was broadcast. Then, within another 15 minutes, the laboratory had several calls from residents of the Naval Base volunteering to donate blood. Several calls were received from persons who were Type "A" or "B" blood, but of the four types of blood, type AB is the rarest. Only 4 percent of the population of the world is of this type blood, and 85 percent of these have Rh positive factors. This makes it extremely difficult to find a doner for anyone with AB negative blood. Fortunately, however, Mrs. Turner was AB positive, eliminating extreme difficulties. Of the donors who called, four were selected, and thanks to the donations of Capt. J. J. Swords, USMC, J. C. Collins, ETC, Fleet Training Group, Pfc. Leon N. Lanzellotta, USMC, and Pfc. Richard N. Melver, Mrs. Turner is doing very well. Little George is also doing fine. 'Toys For Tots' Sales Begin Here 3 Nov The "Toys for Tots" drive closed here last week, and the Trading Post has announced that the toys will go on sale for enlisted families only on Wednesday, 3 Nov. in the quonset hut next to the tennis courts in the Fleet Recreation Area. Prices for the wide variety of toys have been set as low as possible, and all toys have been reconditioned by the Fire Department to a "like-new" condition. How long the toys will be on sale on the Naval Base has not been decided yet, but as long as the demand indicates that residents of the base wish to purchase the toys, they will remain on sale. Then, shortly before Christmas, all remaining toys will be distributed to local orphanages in Cuba. All proceeds from the sales on the base will be used to support the community activities of the Trading Post. (See Pictures on Page 4) Trick Or Treat ? ? ? What will it be, Mr. & Mrs. Guantanamo Bay? Trick or treat? These two youngsters (really a dancing maiden and a skeleton) like many others of the Naval Base will be out for tricks and treats tonight, and tomorrow. Let's give them a treat for Halloween 1954. MCB-4 Cited by ComCBLant As Outstanding Battalion ComServLant has directed that once during each deployment, ComCBLant and staff will conduct an Administrative Inspection of each MCB. Such was the case for MCB-4 from 16 October through 20 October as every activity of the Battalion was closely examined to determine how well things were going and to offer constructive suggestions where the inspecting party believed improvement could be made. All hands took part in the formal personnel inspection and camp inpection on October 16. Then starting Monday, Oct. 20, the inspecting party examined in detail every phase of operation in the Administrative Office, Personnel Office, Legal, Public Information, Security, Communication, Post Office, Engineering, the construction projects, transportation, Welfare and Recreation, religious facilities, Supply, Disbursing, Commissary, Medical, Dental, and I & E activities. In addition 20 men were selected at random for confidential interviews. At the conclusion of the inspection Commodore Short, ComCBLant, pointed out that MCB-4's contract of 129 units was not only an incentive to getting home early but was also a test as to what a battalion could do under pressure construction scheduling such as would be encountered in war time. The Commodore also stated that he believed the inspection results, when finally tabulated, would again show an outstanding battalion doing an outstanding job here in Cuba despite the difficulties and handicaps encountered. Commodore Short believed that if MCB-4 can maintain the pace they were going before Hazel hit he was confident that MCB-4 Tould be home early. Legislation Being Prepared For Congress For 8 Percent Military Pay Raise Richmond, Va. (AFPS)-Army Secretary Robert T. Stevens says a legislative program is being prepared for Congress which will include an eight percent pay raise for all military personnel. In a speech to the Jewish War Veterans annual convention here, Naval Station CO Conducts Mr. Stevens gave this as the first of several items which will be Service Craft Beard Contest in January 0 t h e r legisaltive proposals which he said would be submitted then include a compreDeadline Set for Dec hensive revision of survivor benefits, more reliable medical care for dependents and allowances for permanent changes of station by service families." In addition to Secretary Stevens eight percent proposal a report of the Defense Department s special pay study cmmt tee is expected to be announced in Other ratte part of October. The committee was set up about a :'aa><:month ago. A service career should be made attractive to the highest type of young American said Mr. Stevens. "Money isn't the only answer but it is part of the problem." Mr Stevens pointed out that between 1949, when military pay scales were given their last general overhauling, and the present day the U. S. Consumer Price Index registered a 13:5 percent gain in the cost of living, but military pay had increased only 5 5 percent. rAt the same time," he added, military [benefits] such as savings though purchasing at commissaries and post exchanges, The ipan behind the "beaver" is medical care for dependents, all D. W. Huyck, BM2, skipper of of which have long been considered as part of military compensation, YSD-21, attached to the Naval have been reduced by both legislaStation. tive enactment and executive policy". This, he said, has materially Recently at the Naval Station reduced the soldier's take-home pbetwen 1i949 wnAmiT W l pay. Caruthers was suddenly affronted by a beard. Normally, such things are taboo in the Navy, but Captain Caruthers was very impressed with this one, for it was neat, well trimmed, and very well kept. Upon further investigation, Captain Caruthers found that D. W. Huyck, BM2, skipper of the service craft, YSD-21, had cultivated the beard since his arrival here in Guantanamo Bay. Then an idea struck the captain. CAPT W. R. Caruthers, as Commanding *officer, Naval Station, is sponsoring a contest extending a challenge to any man attached to and serving on board service craft of the Naval Station to grow a better beard than Huyck's. As well as sponsoring the contest, CAPT Caruthers will act as one of the judges when all contestants appear with their "beavers" sometime in December. Appropriate awards will be presented to the winners. -A Cant. W. E. Kerrigan, Security Guard Officer, presents M/Sgt. viene hays with a certificate of Good Conduct. The presentation was the fourth Good Conduct award for M/Sgt. Hays.

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m Page Two THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9-15 .Saturday, 30 October 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. SandnessOfficer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC ---Editor H. L. Sioson, JO3-----------News F. L. Cannon, JOSN----Photographer D. C. Roberts, JOSNReporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is kiven to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Na photos unless otherwise credited. VU-10 Prop Blast by Bill Graves & Staff Arriving this past week for duty with Utility Squadron TEN were David D. Creedon, PHAA, from NAS, Pensacola, Fla., Raymond B. Filipowski, ADAA, Charles E. Keeley, ADAA, and Ralph H. Rubrecht, ADAA from NATTC, Memphis, Tenn. Welcome Aboard Mates! LT Graves, "The man from Texas, but not for Texas"! That expression is made simply because of his two new squadron dependents, Middleton and Stanovich. He sometimes sings "There's a little bit of everything in Texas", with the exception of football. "Them two Hombres and them thar Texas Longhorns have CLEANED me." Chief Pennel and Chief Pistole were on their way hunting over in Cuba last weekend, when their car got struck. When they finally got the car out, it was discovered that there was more mud on themselves than on the car. The KDC now has a new "Black Shoe" aboard. Jacobs a real "Sea Hound" relieved Bower, who is now Master-At-Arms of the Enlisted Mens barracks. Things have sure changed since back in '42 when I was aboard the Ticondoroga. The Base Police have words for people like Mrs. Keating who go off and leave their keys in their car. It plainly states in UTRON -100076-3-46a that you aren't to leave your keys and husband in the same car at the movie-you loose more husbands that way. It is understood that Mrs. Turner has been very ill since the birth of her baby boy. Here's wishing her a speedy recovery. A Tennessee lad home on liberty was asked by a townsman: "What do you think of the sea?" "Just this much," he replied. "When my enlistment is over, I'm going to put an oar on my shoulder and start walking inland-and I'm going to keep on walking until someone stops me and asks, "What's that thing you've got over your shoulder?" Then I'm going to settle right down there until I die." FTG Bulletin by Jack Engstrom CAPT Houston, who has boen the FTG Gunnery Officer for the past 23 months, will depart Gtmo this weekend for his new command. The CAPT has been ordered as Commanding Officer of the USS ELECTRA AKA-4. The men of the Gunnery Department presented him with a Gold Railroad Pocket Watch and a Silver Punch Bowl as a token of appreciation. CAPT Houston, his wife Edith and three sons, Robert, Gary and David will make their new home in Coronado, California. We of FTG wish you and your family the best of luck at your new command and home. CAPT Owen Blair Murphy, FTG Training Officer, arrived at Gtmo on the 23rd of October, accompanied by his wife, the former Alice L. McGinn of New York, and their two daughters Mary and Margery. CAPT Murphy, a graduate of the New York State Merchant Marine Academy and New York University, received his commission in the U.S. Navy in 1941. During World War Two he saw action in the battles at Leyte and at a Lingayen Gulf and participated in the invasions of Iwo Jima and Okinawa. The CAPT has commanded the APD HUMPHREYS, the AKA CORVUS and the GEARING DD710. He has served as Executive Officer aboard the ROCKINGHAM APA-229 and the FREMONT APA-44. CAPT Murphy served with two comniands at Newport, R. I., first as an Instructor at the General Line School and later as a student at the Naval War College, graduating in '52'. CAPT Murphy reported aboard this command after a tour of duty on the Staff of ComPhibLant. Welcome aboard, we hope your tour of duty here at the Training Group in Gtmo will, be an enjoyable one. The new face in the FTG Operations Office is CDR David M. McIntosh, relief for CDR W. E. Simmons, FTG Operations Officer. CDR McIntosh, the former Commanding Officer of the BAUER DM-26, reported aboard on the 23rd of October arriving on the JOHNSON accompanied by his wife the former Mary R. Coll of Hallenton, Pennsylvania and their three children Ann, David and Michael. The Commander, a native of Gulport, Mississippi, and a Graduate of Mississippi State, served as Gunnery Officer aboard the WYOMING and the destroyer TARBELL in the early years of World War II before earning his wings as a lighter than air pilot. He later commanded the LSM-238 and the USS BURDO APD-133. He served on the Staff at the Naval War College at Newport, R. I. and as Flag Secretary of ComCruLant. Following WW II, he attended the Naval Academy Post Graduate School, graduating in 1946. The Officers and men of the Fleet Training Group wish to extend their greeting to you and your family and we hope that your stay in Gtmo will be a pleasant one to remember. LT Carl W. Plath, formerly of the FTG Navigation Department. departed Gtmo under orders to take command of the USS LOYAT TY AM-457, which is one of tl ost modern ships of its F-P WHILE DRlvIN&r youw 7 oPrtMlSc YOU MICTelyD YOURSELF A STA~isTIC type, at Long Beach, California. LT Plath is a garduate of the Pennsylvania Maritime Academy and has been with the Training Group since July 1952. He and his wife Janice will spend a short leave in York, Pennsylvania prior to leaving for the West Coast. We wish you the best of luck at your new command. *## The FTG Administration Team in the Officers Bowling League, who have been in first place since the leagues opening match, increased their lead at the expense of the NSD Team No. 3, the second place team, by taking a four point sweep in a match early in the week. The league leaders now have 24 points in the win column against only 4 points in the loss column. Not to be out done, the FTG team No. 2 in the enlisted men's bowling league are also holding their own, and at present are in the top spot, with a record of seven and one. Individual high averages for the team are being held down by Don Markham and Andy Gagliano. The off-again, on-again softball league which has been hampered by poor weather managed to squeeze in a few games this Dast week. The Trainers, the FTG Club, who won their first game over NSD, dropped a close, wellplayed game to the Marines Tuesday nite by a score of 6 to 3. After a rocky first inning when the Marines scored half their runs the game settled into a tight affair. The Trainers had a couple of rallies snuffed out in the late innings by some good fielding by the Marines. With the League just getting underway some moral support is needed and would be greatly apneeiated by the team members. How about turning out for the future contests. Mike Duncan, DC1 Damage Control Department will depart Sunday for the States and a tour of duty with the USN Minecraft Base, at Charleston, South Carolina. Frank Benson, YN3, Engineering Department, will also depart Sunday on the JOHNSON for New York, where he will be discharged from the Naval Service. Good bye and good luck to you in the future. Reporting aboard the Training Group for duty in the past two weeks was; James Davis, DCC, from the USS PITTSBURGH CA72: John Moore, RD1, from the USS NORTHAMPTON, ECLC-1; Ned Weikel, SK1, from ReeSta, Philly; Jesse Costa, RM3, from the USS HAZELWOOD, DD-531; Vaughn Crochett, BMC, from ACB No. 2, at Little Creek, Virginia; Nathan Shuler, DCC, from the USS SIERRA, AD-18; Stanley L o r enc e, DCC, from the USS DIONYSYS, AR-21 and Alden Armstrong, TMC, from NAS Jacksonville, Florida. Welcome aboard the Fleet Traini6Group. Sunday, 31 October 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) The Chaplain's Corner WHAT DO YOU BELIEVE? It is often repeated: "It does not make any difference what a man believes, it is what he does that counts." This is usually accompanied with another trite saying: "Actions speak louder than words". The two, however, are not complimentary. Words and actions are generally the expression of our thoughts. Our thoughts are related very directly to our beliefs. It is the basic statement that needs to De examined. It does make a great deal of difference what a man believes. Everyone of us has a center of belief around which most of our life revolves. What we believe has a tremendous influence upon what we do. Some are more easily influenced by immediate desires, and thus in time modify their basic beliefs. Most of man's conscious and responsible actions are based upon his beliefs. This is simply illustrated by an individual approaching a stop sign. If he believes the stop sign is there for his safety and that of others normally he will stop. If he is responding to an emergency message that his child is in the hospital chances are he will not stop. His belief in the urgency of the emergency will supplant his belief in the sign as a protection to his own safety and that of others. The same is true in regard to the vital beliefs of life. If a man believes he is only an animal, he usually behaves on the animal level. If he believes the purpose of life is to glorify self and satisfy selfish desires, it will be revealed in what he does. If however, he believes he is a creature of God his actions will surely portary his belief. But if he believes he is a son of God, his behaviour must witness to his sonship. What do you really belief about yourself; your world; your relationship to your fellowmen; your relationship to God? Karl G. Peterson LCDR, CHC, USN m M Saturday, 30 October 1954

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Saturday, m0 October 1954 Saturday, 50 October 1954 THE INDIAN Sailors, Marines Await Approval of 96 liberty Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has forwarded for Presidential approval a proposed revision of Navy regulations to authorize longer liberty. The change would permit commanding officers of remote Navy and Marine Corps installations to grant 96-hour liberties. They would be authorized only at installations which have been officially designated as being remote, probably by action of either the Secretary of the Navy or the Chief of Naval Operations. As yet there is no announcement as to which areas will fall into this category. As the plan was submitted to the President, the 96-hour liberty pass must include both Saturday and Sunday and the individual must report back in by 6 p.m. of the last day of his liberty. For example, a person will be able to leave his base anytime after 6 p.m. on a Thursday, spend a long weekend at his destination, and not be required to return until 6 p.m. on Monday. The reason for the 6 p.m. deadline is the large number of fatal automobile accidents among personnel hurrying back to base in time for Monday morning reveille. It is hoped that the 96hour pass will reduce the high casualty rate. There are no indications that either of the other services plan to adopt a similar privilege. PTA Meets Tuesday The Parent-Teachers Association will hold their next meeting Tuesday evening, November 2, in the open air assembly building at the Naval Base School, commencing at 7:30 P.M. The main speaker for the evening will be Dr. R. C. Peppin and his topic for the evening will be "Child Dental Hygenie." Preceding the speech by Dr. Peppin, selections will be sung by the Nursery School under the direction of Mrs. J. P. McNeal. Attendance of parents will be taken by hand count instead of registration as before. Coffee will be served during social time following the meeting. American -Korean Drive Funds Sent In Recently, the drive here for the American-Korean Foundation came to a close as the money that was collected from commands of the Naval Base were forwarded to Foundation headquarters in New York. The collection of funds, which was carried over for a period of about three weeks totaled $449.82. Commands participating in the drive were the Naval Air Station, VU-10, Naval Supply Depot, Naval Hospital, Dental Clinic, Fleet Camera Party, Naval Station, Marine Barracks, and Fleet Training Group. The funds will be used by the American-Korean Foundation to aid rehabilitation in Korea. Commanding Officer, Robert E. Fojt presents Corporal Joe Androvich with a certificate during 'Meritorious Mast' at which Cpl. Androvich was commended for his achievements as the Barracks Unit Diary Clerk. Marine Commended As Unit Diary Clerk At Meritorious Mast held October 11, Colonel Robert E. Fojt, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks, presented a certificate to Corporal Joe Androvich which commended him for his achievements as the Barracks Unit Diary Clerk. Colonel Fojt stated: "I have read with pleasure a report from your superior officers in which you: Corporal Joe Androvich, USMC, have been commended for your services as unit diary clerk, during the period 1 August to 15 September 1954. The report states in part: .worked with such zeal, persistence, willingness, and method that his efforts caused the admiration and appreciation of his superior officers. Further, Corporal Androvich work ed voluntarily many hours after working hours to accomplish his task." The report has been noted with gratification. The fine example set and devotion to duty demonstrated by you was of the highest order and is typical of the high standards set by the U. S. Marine Corps. The commanding officer adds "Well Done." Marine Staff NCOs Get Swagger Sticks Marine Staff Non-commissioned officers are going to carry swagger sticks. According to Marine Corps Headquarters, the batons are being made an authorized part of the uniform of Staff NCOs who will be able to carry them both on and off duty. Marines of Guantanamo Bay are generally of the opinion that the new swaggers sticks will add prestige to the uniform. Staff NCOs feel that the new additions will be a mark of distinction at any Marine Ceremony. Although carrying the sticks will be optional, it is excepted that the practice will be "encouraged." A less expensive version of the stick carried by officers is being decided on by the Uniform Board. The NCOs stick will be tipped with brass and have a miniature gold Marine Corps emblem at the carrying end. It will be 21 inches long. Servicemen Overseas Offered Gift Shopping Services The Armed Services Hospitality Service has once again offered its services to military personnel stationed overseas. This extended service, at no extra cost is offered so that men may purchase gifts for Christmas. To take advantage of this shopping service, personnel should mail their request to the Hospitality Committee stating the type and approximate cost of the desired gift along with a money order and the address to which the gift is to be sent. The committee will purchase the gift, send it to the addressee, and refund any money over and above the cost of the gift. For faster service, the Hospitality Committee has two main offices of reserving both east and west of the Mississippi River. Personnel desiring to send gifts to persons living east of the Mississippi should address their requests to the Armed Services Hospitality Committee, 1350 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington 4, D. C. For addressees living west of the Mississippi, requests should be sent to the American W o m e a' s Voluntary Services, Third and El Camino Streets, San Mateo, California. What does America mean to you? Enter the 1954 Freedoms Foundation Contest. Send your letter of no more than 500 words to Awards Editor, Armed Forces Radio Service, 1016 N. McCadden Place, Los Angeles US, Calif. Your letter must bear your name, rank, service number, and organization. It must be received before received after that date will be considered for the next year's awards. (AFPS) Customer: "Have you a book called, 'Man, Master of Woman'?" Salesgirl: "The fiction counter is to your left, sir." Base Belle Braves Brimey Blue When Mary Jane McElroy decided to go wading at Windmill Beach last week, she didn't expect a dousing that followed seconds after the camera caught the scene. PS: Photographer was second in line for the dunking and came away 'all wet." am Page 'Three THE INDIAN

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PAge Four THE INDIAN (See Story On Page One) Mrs. W. R. Caruthers, Mrs. 0. L. Brown, and Mrs. J. A. Strouhal begin arranging the repaired and reconditioned toys for sale starting 3 Nov. The toys will be on sale for enlisted families only. Santa Sends Big Toy Shipments to Base Toylands Christmas this year should be a happy event for the kiddies of the Naval Base as seen by the huge shipment of toys from Santa Claus at the local exchange toylands. Above residents of the Naval Base look over the huge variety offered at the Marine Post Exchange while more dependents browse through the unusual variety at the Naval Air Station Exchange. Santa's helpers at the Fire Department busy themselves in their spare time repairing toys for the Trading Post. All toys were collected here on the Naval Base. GTMO Golfers Return ComTen Tourney Victors From San Juan Last week, three local golf teams brought home the bacon to Guantanamo Bay in the form of prizes, trophies, and awards earned at the Tenth Naval District Golf Tourney. Leading the winners was LT Tony "Perpetual" Grego, who, as a member of the winning team garnered Low Medalist honors. Shooting a low 302 for the 72 hole competition, Grego came in six strokes ahead of the nearest contender, another Guantanamo entrant and a local competitor of LT Grego, Chief Lee Rogers of the Naval Air Station. Chief Rogers, who tied with LT Grego in the Naval Station Invitational tourney here, shot a 308 for the 72 holes to win runnerup honors. SAVE FOR YOUR FUTURE WITH U.S. SAVINGS BONDS Placing first in team honors was Guantanamo Bay Team No. 1 with LT Tony Grego, Chief Lee Rogers, C. Loggins, P. G. Acree. LCDR D. A. Scott, and CHMACH H. Bush bringing home the 1st place trophy to Guantanamo Bay. Behind the first place Guantanamo Bay team was a team from San Juan and then a team from the Trinidad Naval Station. Fourth place went to Guantanamo Bay Team No. 3 while Gtmo Team No. 2 placed fifth. Guantanamo Bay Team No. 3 was made up of R. Adams, E. Lachatara, LCDR F. N. Vanderhoef, M. Manuele, D. Brough, and LT E. A. Sadness. Playing on Team No. 2 was LT J. W. Dempsey, CDR D. L. G. King, J. Owens, T. G. Byrne, J. C. Mauldin, and C. A. Blake. Tournament play began Friday morning and continued through until Sunday night when a banquet was given for the golfers. For full details and pictures, be sure and read next week's Indian. At the NAS Exchange an official opening of Toyland was held recently when LCDR E. H. Beiland, Navy Exchange Officer and J. I. Dave, Supervisor at the NAS Exchange watched while CDR W. G. Winslow, Executive Officer, NAS, cut the tape opening Toyland. a em Saturday, 30 October 1954

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Saturday, 30 October 1954 THE INDIAN Rage Five SeaBees Take Top League Spot In 2nd Week Base Softball The MCB-4 Basemakers dominated play in the Naval Base Softball League this week as they started off the week with a win over NAS and followed up with another win Thursday night over VU-10 to give them the second-week league leading spot. The proof of their power should come this afternoon as they face the NSD-CHB nine that upset the Mar ine Leathernecks applecart. BASEMAKERS MARINES DEFEAT TRAINERS SQUEEZE BY NAS With both teams boasting a win The MCB-4 Basemakers started in their opener, the FTG Trainers off the second week of play at the and the Marine Leathernecks tangNaval Station Field Monday night led in a close contest Tuesday night by squeezing by the NAS Fliers at Hatuey Field in the only game 7-6 in a tight contest that wasn't of the evening. "in the bag" for anyone until the The Marines started out strong final inning was over. with a first inning three run splurNAS started off with a bang as go that gave them early insurance. they pushed two runs across the From that point on, they were plate to jump off to an early lead oeve FTG came cwine in the top of the first inning only ruwnte To ofte scond and to have the Basemakers come back in the bottom of the second to tie two more in the top of the third to it up. come within one run of the hardScoring on grouped hits and hitting Leathernecks. good play, the Basemakers took In the bottom of the third, the advantage and pushed four more taies to a t ina a r runs across the plate in the third the lst fin wersoinning. The fourth inning was ls scoreless for both teams, but the lee e t Fliers came back in the fifth with for the in gn u i a rally that fell one run short of h sti insout inenandwalkin tying the score. In the bottom of the fifth, the two. Markham took the loss for the SeaBees once again added insurTrainers, going the full distance. ance scoring another run. In the At the plate, Jim Pace was the sixth, NAS tallied again and MCBhecdrove in for run an ed 4 went scoreless. The Fliers failed to rally with the needed runs to tie up a round-tripper. Pace went two or win in the seventh inning, fo plate. For the Basemakers, Gregory FTG 3 5 1 went the full distance on the Marines 6 5 1 mound, striking out nine men, NSD L CHB UPSETS walking eight, and giving up five LEATHERNECKS hits. Losing piter Harrel for Wednesday night full activity NAS went two and a third innings, was resumed on both diamonds, gave up five runs, walked five men, and the Marine Leathernecks were and struck out one before he wasa ed u relivedby avi whofinsheth wshtou by ais connin he Supplr-e pot-Cargo Handler nine. The Marcontest. lines went almost hitless, earning MCB-4 7 5 1 only one single and a double -NAS 6 5 6 both by relief pitcher Lee. .NSD-CHB got off to a big start POINE R E as they earned six of their seven wSru or in the first inning. Going Monday night at Hatuey Field, scoreless for two more innings, the Leeward Point came back into play winners added the final marker in after their initial loss to MCB-4tto the fourth. trample VU-10 in a near shutout Milkinel was the winning pitch9-1, proving their pre-season tritr, going the full distance alone, uiiphs. striking out one man, walking The first two innings were fast four, and giving up two hits. Inas both VU-10 and Leeward Point man started for the Marines and came up with no runs. Only one hit was relieved after two outs in the was earned by the Pointers in the first inning by Lee who held NSDtwo innings. CHB to one run in the remaining In the top of the third, the Pointinnings. ers pushed their first two runs acAt the plate, Picola and Sanders ross the plate when Collins stepwere the big men for the winners ped up with two Men out and one as each went two for four at bat. man on and slammed a hon e run. Sanders hit the only home run of Starting out the fourth, the Malthe game. lards went town one, two, three The loss for the Marines dropped while the boys from across the bay them out of first place. pushed ahead by one more run on Marines 0 2 1 two walks, a stolen base by Griffen NSD-CHB 7 8 1 and a sacrifice by J. H. Wood. In a scoreless fifth inning, the LEEWARD POINT BLASTS NAS Mallards left two men stranded on Wednesday night at Hatuey base while Leeward Point went Field, the boys from across the down in order. hay once again proved their potenIn the sixth inning, the Mallards tialities for the season as they went down, no hits, no runs, and blasted the NAS Fliers to the tune no errors. At this point, the game of a 13-0 shutout. was still in question, but the PointStarting off with seven runs in en erased all question marks in the first inning, the Pointers scotheir half of the sixth when they ed almost at will as every frame pushed six big runs across on three was filled other than the fifth and hits, two errors, and a passed ball, seventh innings. The entire contest The Mallards finally spoiled a was spotted with extra-base blows shutout for Leeward Point when as J. H. Wood and Bladies chalked they scored their lone run in the up doubles while J. M. Wood and final inning. Kaestler went home with a roundVU-l0 1 1 3 tripper each to their credit. Leeward 9 6 1 Meanwhile, F 1held the FliLeague Standings Gridiron's Top Ten Teams Battle to Retain Ratings (As of Wednesday, 27 Oct.) Halloween activities will take a W L PCT. temporary back seat today as colMCB-4 2 0 1000 lege football enters its seventh Leeward Point 2 1 .666 week of play. Major action will be Marines 2 1 .666 in the Mid-West where four teams FTG 1 1 .500 of the top ten will see action with NSD-CHB 1 1 .500 a fifth big team traveling out. NAS 1 2 .333 Wisconsin, rated as the number Naval Station 0 1 .000 two team across the nation, will VU-10 0 2 .000 face Iowa, and although Iowa has ______________not yet figured in tbe best in gridiron circuits, they should provide Next eek' Schdule the Badgers with more than plenNext Week's Schedule of competition. At Northwestern, Ohio State, rated only two behind Wisconsin, Hatuey Filed will be out to-hold their high ratSaturday, 30 October ing. As well as the top-ten spot, NSD-CHB vs MCB-4 Ohio State will have a Big Ten NAS vs Naval Station standing at stake, so action should Monday, 1 November be hard, fast, and thrilling. NAS vs Marines Seventh place Minnesota will Tuesday, 2 November face a fighting band of Spartans Naval Station vs VU-10 from Michigan State in MinneaWednesday, 3 November polls; and Purdue, voted in a threeMCB-4 vs Leeward Point way tie for tenth spot, will face Thursday, 4 November Illinois in a game where anything NSD-CHB vs FTG could and probably will happen. Friday, 5 November Meanwhile, Notre Dame, rated Leeward Point vs Naval Station second at the first of the season Naval Station Field and dropped back to sixth spot Monday, 1 November since their loss to Purdue, will Leeward Point vs NSD-CHB travel east to Annapolis where they Tuesday, 2 November will be the guests of the Naval MCB-4 vs FTG Academy Midshipmen. Wednesday, 3 November Also in the East Coast, another Naval Station vs Marines top tenner, the Army Cadets, will Thursday, 4 November play Virginia. NAS vs VU-10 In the South, two big teams will Friday, 5 November see action as fifth place Mississippi Naval Station vs Leeward Point will battle LSU while West Virginia, another tenth place team, ers to four singles, walked four face Pittsburgh. men, but struck out none. Forton was extremely well backed by his infield and was credited with thetackle win. Murray started on the mound Texas A&M in a game where there for NAS and was relieved after is not much the question as to the seven runs in the first inning. victor. In the Rocky Mountains, Davis went the remaining innings Colorado, the third team voted and gave up six more runs. Murray into the tenth place tie, will play was credited with the loss. host to number one team, Oklahoma. Although the top team is Leeward 7 15 4 favored. Colorado has their chances NAS 0 4 3 for an upset and will be battling INDIAS SHT OU FTG every second of the contest to INDIANS SHUT OUT FTGtop. Thursday night at the Naval In Far West play, the only topStation Field, the Naval Station ten rated team, third place UCLA, Indians downed Fleet Training will face their arch-rivals, CaliGroup 7-0 in a one hour and ten fornia in a contest that will have minute contest that saw the Inmuch to do with the decision for dians showing fine form both at the West-Coast Rose Bowl entrant. bat and in the field. EAST The Indians first score came in Bosten College vs Xaivier, Ohio the third inning when Petinak Boston U. vs Bucknell Columbia -vs Cornell slammed out a home run with one Harvard vs Ohio U. man out and one man on base. The Lafayette vs Gettyburg Indians went on to score two more Pennsylvania vs Penn State runs in the inning before going Princeton vs Colgoto Rutgers vs Temple back to the field. Syracuse vs Holy Cross In the field, Mandy Mandis was vole vs Darmouth MID-WEST on the mound and was well backed Cincinnati vs Pacifo by his team-mates as the Trainers Detroit vs Marsuette were held to two hits for the entire Iowa State vs Drake Kansas State vs Kansas contest. Mandy chalked up his first Michigan vs Indiana win of the season in his first start. Tulsa vs Oklahoma A&M Boyette was the loser, going the full distance and giving up eight Alabama vs Ceorgia hits and seven runs. Auburn vs Tulane hisDuke vs Ceorgia Teck NavSta 7 8 1 Florida vs Mississippi State FTG 0 2 4 Kentucky vs Villanova North Carolina S. vs Furman South Carolina vs Maryland SEABEES HAND VU-10 Tennessee vs North Carolina 8-5 LOSS VPI vs William & Mary The MCB-4 Basemakers entered SOUTHWEs play at Hatuey Field Thursday Hardin-Simmons vs Arizona State night and handed an 8-5 loss to the Nice vs Vanderbilt VU-10 Mallards and gave the SeeTexas vs SMU Bees a tighter hold on first place. ROK MOUNTAIN The Mallards fought hard under Arizona vs W. Texas State the f Gbso to omeout Colorado A&H vs Montana the pitching of Gibson to come outMexico of the cellar division, but the sharp Montana State vs Idaho State infielding of the SeeBees and the Utah vs Idaho smooth pitching of Zarner proved Utoh State vs Bridham Young too much for them. Southern Both pitchers went the ful is-tate tall Washington vs Oregon tanc. picher wen theis Stne Mi-W s whegfour Stem 40

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am THE INDIAN Saturday, 30 October 1954 Maximum Punishments For AWOL Increased World's First A-Powered Ship Joins US, Submarine Fleet In last week's issue of "The Indian" the increase of maximum punishments of courtmartials were erroronously printed. Following are the correct maximum punishments.) The president of the United States by Executive Order 10565 amended the Manual for Courts-Martial, United States, 1951 to increase the maximum punishments for the following punishments. Effective 1 November 1954. Offenses Punishments Absence without leave: 1. Failing to go to, or going from, Confinement at hard labor not to the appointed place of duty. exceed one month, and forfeiture 2. From unit, organization, or other place of duty. (a) For not more than 3 days of absence. (b) For more than 3 days but not more than 30 days of absence. (c) For more than 30 days of absence. Missing movement of ship, aircraft or unit: of two-thirds pay per month not to exceed one month. Confinement at hard labor not to exceed one month, and forfeiture of two-thirds pay per month not to exceed one month. Confinement at hard labor not to exceed six months and forfeiture of two-thirds pay per month not to exceed six months. Dishonorable discharge, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and confinement at hard labor not to exceed one year. (1) Through design Dishonorable discharge, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and confinement at hard labor not to exceed one year. (3) Through neglect Bad conduct discharge, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and confinement at hard labor not to exceed six months. In addition to the above, if an accused is found guilty of an offense or offenses for none of which dishonorable discharge is authorized, proof of three or more previous convictions during the year next preceding the commission of any offense of which the accused stands convicted will authorize dishonorable discharge and forfeiture of all pay and allowances and, if the confinement otherwise authorized is less than one year, confinement at hard labor for one year. Veterans' Day 1954 "We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor." On Nov. 11 the United States takes time out to remember all the men and women who served in the Armed Forces during WWI, WWII and in the Korean War-the officers and EM, the regulars, reserves and draftees. All served with the spirit that has been a hallmark of the Armed Forces since the days of the Revolutionary War. Some did heroic jobs. Others performed the small, seemingly unimportant tasks necessary to keep a huge fighting machine in action. Nov. 11 was named Armistice Day originally. But it was so named when people hoped that WWI would be the last war in history. Much lead has passed through the air since 1918 and many men and women have worn the uniforms of our nation since then. And so Armistice Day has become Veterans Day to honor them all. Groton, Conn. (AFPS)-The world's first nuclear-powered ship-the Navy submarine USS Nautilus-has joined the U.S. Fleet in commissioning ceremonies at the General Dynamics Corp. plant here. New Stateside Ferry Begins Service To Cardenas, Cuba Recently, in Key West, Fla., a new ferry was commission. Named "The City of Key West" the ferry has already began a scheduled run between Key West and Cuba. "The City of Key West" is a brand new 1,000 ton vessel capable of carrying many cars and passangers and is able to make the run between Key West and Cardenas, Cuba in eight hours. The new ferry run is primarily for tourists, but personnel vacationing from the base or returning ot the States might be able to take advantage of the new service. As far as highways are concerned, the road from Santiago de Cuba to Cardenas has been reported as a good road. The main ploblem, however, is getting to Santiago. Many personnel of the base have already had experience with this road, and it has not been reported good by anyone. "The City of Key West" makes three trips a week, leaving Key West at 9 A.M. on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday and returning on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 10:00 A.M. Rates are standard as a price of $29.50 has been set for one way cars with one driver. An additional $7.50 is charged for each passenger. Cardenas, the landing point for "The City of Key West" is about 100 miles this side of Havana on the northern coast of Cuba. The sailor was relating his hair raising experiences aboard a torpedoed ship. The dear little lady was listening wide-eyed. "And there I sees a torpedo, lady. headin' straight for us." "Oh dear," she gasped, "I do hope it was one of ours." "My new boy-friend is like the fourth man in the Conga line." "How?" "You know, one, two, three, jerk." a Principal speaker at the ceremonies was ADM Jerauld Wright, USN, Commander-in-Chief, U. S. Atlantic Fleet, who said, "Today the Navy turns a channel marker in the course of history." The admiral noted that as the first true submersible in history the Nautilus is able to hunt enemy ships and subs in their own waters for weeks, p os s i b l y months, without returning to base, "and thus will evolve a new era of strategy and tactics." ADM Wright also announced that "many sister ships" of the Nautilus will be produced as quickly as possible to support the new weapon. One sister ship-the Sea Wolf-is already under construction at the Groton shipyards here. The Nautilus, 300 feet long with a beam of 28 feet, has the most powerful submarine engine ever constructed. Commanding officer of the new undersea craft is CDR Eugene P. Wilkinson, USN, who is a veteran of submarine operations in the Pacific during WWII. He is also an experienced nuclear physicist and engineer. The Nautilus has a complement of 11 officers and 85 EM, all specially trained for this assignment. She is not expected to make her first sea trial run for three months. Page Six

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Saturday 30 October 1954 ,audy 10Otbr15 H NINPg ee Cooks' Touv by Dorothy Murphy Thanksgiving is in the air, and even though Guantanamo climate is not conducive to thoughts of "Frost on the Pumpkin," still husbands and children are yearning for "Turkey and all the fixin's." This week, Mrs. W. R. Caruthers, wife of the Naval Station commanding officer, presents an unusual Turkey recipe for wives aboard who are looking forward to the holiday. ROAST TURKEY & DRESSING Contents Seasonings Required Bay Leaf Mace Paprika Cloves Celery Seed Cayanne Pepper Coriander Tumeric Preserved Ginger Marjoram Coleman's Mustard Savory Caraway Seed Sage or Thyme Poppy Seed Onion Juice Oregano Vegetables Fruit One can Water One Apple Chestunits One Orange Parsley One Can Crushed Garlic Pineapple Four Large Onios One Lemon Miscellaneous One 25 pound Turkey Bread Crumbs /4 lb. Ground Veal 1/4 lb. freshly Ground Pork /4 lb. butter 2 eggs Cider Method Rub the bird inside and out with salt and pepper. In a stew pan put the chopped gizzard, neck and and heart; and one bay leaf, one teaspon of paprika, a half teaspoon of coriander, a clove of garlic, four cups of water and salt to taste. Let simmer. DRESSING: In one bowl, one diced apple, one diced orange, one large can of crushed pineapple, the grated rind of one lemon, one can of drained water chestnuts, three tablespoons of chopped preserved ginger. In another bowl; Three packages of bread crumbs, /4 pound of ground veal, one quarter pound of ground fresh pork, quarter of a pound of butter, and all the fat from the turkey. In another bowl: Two teaspoon of Colman's mustard, two teaspoon of Coleman's mustard, two teaspoon of caraway seed, three teaspoons of celery seed, two teaspoon of poppy seed, two and one-half teaspoons of oregano, one wellcrushed large bay leaf, one teaspoon of black pepper, one half teaspoon of mace, four tablespoons of well chopped parsley, four or five finely minced cloves of garlic, four cloves (minus the heads) and well chopped, one-half teaspoon of turmeric, four large well chopped onions, six well chopped stalks of celery, one half teaspoon marjoram, one half teaspoon of savory, one tablespoon of poultry seasoning (sage or thyme.) Mix well the contents in each bowl. Mix contents of the three bowls together, well. Toss enough so that it isn't a dough mass. Stuff turkey. In one cup make a paste as follows: Yoke of two eggs, one teaspoon of Coleman's mustard, one clove of minced garlic, one teaspoon of onion juice (put it through chopper and catch the juice), one half teaspoon of salt, two pinches of cayenne pepper, one teaspoon of lemon juice, and enough sifted flour to make a stiff paste. Place turkey in red-hot oven and let it brown all over. Remove turkey and turn oven down to 355 degrees While turkey is sizzling hot, paint it completely, Hospital Notes TEENAGE-ROUND-UP by R. P. Campanozzi, HM2 HEIRPORT NEWS Two boys and two girls were added to the Gtmo birth list this week. The little gents are: Herbert Neal born to QM2 and Mrs. Helen Nelson; and, Howard James Jr. whose parents are AL2 and Mrs. May Kelly. The young ladies are Margaret Mary to TE2 and Mrs. Jean Schuster; and, Margaret Cora to Mr. & Mrs. W. E. Sheppard. ARRIVALS LCDR C. R. Hall, (MC), USN reported to us for duty from USNH, Oagland, Calif. Dr. Hall, a graduate of Texas University he is a registered radiologist, is married and has two children. Also arriving a week ago was HN Jack Bennett from USNH, Charleston, South Carolina. DEPARTURES There were no departure of any staff personnel this week but they're still talking about the notorious Charley Brewer. Charley's farewell was featured by a brief champagne party and it appeared that he would have liked to stay at Gtmo a while longer. In leaving Brewer asked me to convey his thanks for the gift he received from the crew here. TYPE "AB" BLOOD IS NEEDED The laboratory is seeking names of persons who posses type "AB" blood. If you have this type blood and are willing to donate, your name will be placed on the Donors Availability List. Should an emergency arise which necessitates the use of your type blood, the lab will notify you. Potential contributors are requested to phone 8659 or appear in person at the hospital laboratory. SPORTS The Hospital Ping Pong Tournament Championship match was the most spectacular game of the tourney. "Gypsy" Corradetti finally edged out Walt Jones for the top honors. Jones took an early edged and maintained it up till the final few points, but, Corradetti surged back with tremendous counter-serves and overpowered Jones. Trophies are expected to be presented next week. Incidentally, both the "Gypsy" and Jones hold several ping pong laurels from past tournaments. Corradetti who hails from Chester, Pa., holds two municipal championships of that city. Jones has been very active in service-wide competition. OUR COACH Dr. G. V. Hering will be at the helm of the basketball team this year. A graduate of Minnesota U., he is the most vivid sports supporter at this activity. This years squad will display many new faces on Gtmo courts; but veterans of last years first squad, namely: Maddix, O'Brien and Moebus are still on hand for the fighting maroon of USNH. all over with paste. Plate again in oven and paste will set in few minutes. Take it out again and paint again. Put turkey back in oven and repeat this until paste is all used up. Add one cup of cider to the gizzard-neck and heart stew. Remove from stove but keep warm and stir occassionally. Baste turkey with this fluid every fifteen minutes. After the bird has cooked for one hour and a half, turn over on its stomach, back in air, and cook in this position until the last fifteen nijutes. Turkey should cook from four and one-half to five and one-hal' ours. -5 by Judy Yost This past week found most of us water-logged and having to stay under shelter of some kind -darting from cars and busses for the nearest doors-trying so hard to miss the big, wet puddles, and ending up with soaking feet and dribbly noses! Some nature lovers could be seen walking along in the downpour just as calmly as if "ole Sol" were up there shining down on them! All of the high school gang were really swinging their partners and learning to follow the square dance calls during P. E. Come on Kats, let's get with it and maybe we can have a real swingeroo when we learn how to "dooo, si, dooo." (Wonder if there's shoe available on the Base with safety toes? ? Sunday brought us blue skies and the beaches, pools, tennis courts and corral more loaded with our lively and energetic ones. Yep, never a dull moment. Dave had everyone frantic when his head didn't pop up once in a while he was having himself a nice swim under the water-and Edgar really earning his title of Life Guard as he brought in a little boy who was having trouble-Peggy getting a nasty cut on her leg after swimming out to the raft-that "huge, huge" Barracuda that was licking his chops too near for comfort. Then, there was Mary Jane, Prissy, Lucile M. and Nicky on the hoss trail-Phil looking over the Chirstmas display at the Air Station-all the gals heading for Pat McGowan's house-Ralph celebrating his birthday with a party -Evelyn swacking those tennis balls like a pro-(now, if we can only learn to get them inside the court! !) Little Theatre News Ensign Dick Helland replaced Dan Nash, recently transferred in the cast of "My Three Angels", Little Theatre Director Alan Wagner, announced this week. ENS Holland is attached to MCB-4 and was active in the the San Antonio, Texas Little Theatre prior to entry into the service. He appeared in "Kiss Me Kate" and "One Foot In Heaven", in Texas and previously had organized a Drama Club in the local High School. The cast for the play, a comedy in three acts by Sam and Bella Spewack, includes, in the title roles, E. B. Cope, Ronnie Estefan, and Alan Wagner. Anne Saxe, Lillian Armbruster, Burt Knight, Neil and Dorothy Murphy and Tom Judkins complete the cast. Rehearsals are intensifying next week and the cast is notified that starting time is now 7:00 P.M. on Mondays, Wednesday and Fridays. Tickets for the play will be available through members of the cast by November 7th and will go on sale in public areas the week of November 20th. Personnel are urged to obtain tickets early, by Ticket chairman Ethel Beach as a sell-out is indicated. "Did you vote for the honor system?" "You bet I did-three times." Sailor: "I love you, darling; I adore you." Wave: "Are you going to marry me?" Sailor: "Don't Change the subject." by Sgt William J. McDowell Jr., USMC and Cpl J. Androvich, USMC Arriving aboard the USNS ELDEN H JOHNSON on its last visit to Gtmo were seven new members from the 2nd Marine Division and one new member reporting from the Marine Barracks, Boston, Mass. A hearty welcome aboard is extended to all "new hands" and we hope you enjoy your stay in Gtmo Bay. The new members of Marine Barracks are as follows: Pfc Raymond J. Adomonis, Pfc Robert F. Barnett, Pfc Kenneth R. Carpenter, Ffe Kenneth C. Conlow, Pfc Earl L. Know, Pfc James G. Morissette, Pfc Harold R. Wesp, and Pvt John Coady. Departing for the states on the 3rd of November are MCgt Henry J. Litzelman, Pfc Leonard R. Lambert, and Cpl William L. Anderson. MSgt Litzelman, Marine Barracks Sergeant Major, will report to the Marine Barracks, Norfolk, Va. for further transfer to Camp Lejeune, N. C. Cpl Anderson and Pfc Lambert will report to the Marine Barracks, Norfolk, Va. for discharge. "Bon Voyage" men and the best of luck to you from all hands at Marine Barracks. "Ready on the firing line" will be the word at the rifle range this morning as 42 Marines begin firing for record. Each man has been well instructed and has become well acquainted with his rifle so lets "hold em in" and lots of luck to everyone. NOTICE There are only 55 days until Christmas so to avoid the Christmas rush at the Post Office, mail your Christmas packages as soon as possible. NSD Supply Line Mrs. Mildred DiMascola resigned her position as Captain's Secretary to return to the States with her husband, who has completed a tour of duty here at Gtmo. Before returning to the States on November 20, Mildred is planning to spend some time on the Golf Course in an effort to give her husband some good competition. Upon returning to the States, the DiMascolas will spend some time in Massachusetts on leave before reporting to their new duty station at Norfolk, Virginia. The DiMascolas were very popular during their tour of duty at Gtmo and will be greatly missed by their many friends. Mrs. Nell Giggy will be the Captain's new secretary, filling the position left vacant by Mrs. DiMascola's departure. Nell was formerly employed in the Planning Department at NSD. Merel Sands, SK2 and Mrs. Sands depart next week aboard the USNS JOHNSON for the States. Sands has been transferred to the U. S. Naval Hospital, Charleston, South Carolina. Mrs. Sands was employed in the Fiscal Department at NSD. James E. Harris, SKSN, whose home town is Dexter, Kentucky, recently reported to the Depot from Storekeeper School at Newport, Rhode Island. Although J. T. Kenney, SN, lost his Gtmo tan while on leave in the States, he gained a new brode. Kenney was married on 20 September in Waverly, Ohio. YN1: You say that Chief is conceited ?" Wave: "Yeah, he joined the Navy to let the world see him." Page Seven THE INDIAN

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Navy DPPO-10ND-Gtmo.-0224 I Saturday, 30 October 1954 THE INDIAN MOVIES Saturday, Oct. 30 HONDO John Wayne Geraldine Page A U.S. Cavalryman in the Southwest in 1874 tries to persuade a young woman and her small son to leave their ranch because of Indian danger. He attempts to escort them to safety and becomes involved in battles with Indians. Sunday, Oct. 31 GLENN MILLER STORY James Stuart June Allyson Story of the famous band leader who lost his life during WWII. It tells of his struggle to make the grade and of his faithful wife's aid in accomplishing this. Monday, Nov. 1 IT SHOULD HAPPEN TO YOU Judy Holliday Peter Lawford A young girl comes to New York seeking fame and fortune. Finding neither she rents a huge signboard over Columbus Circle and has her name emblazoned on it. But her boyfriend convinces her that she must earn her fame. Tuesday, Nov. 2 CAPTAIN'S PARADISE Alec Guiness Yvonne DeCarlo Story if a ship captain plying between Gibralter and North Africa and his loves in both ports; a loving, solid wife in Gibralter and an exotic dnace rin North Africa. Wednesday, Nov. 3 BREAKING THE SOUND BARRIER Ralph Richardson Ann Todd A plane tycoon lets nothing stand in the way of his main goal-a supersonic plane. His daughter develops a hate for him when both her husband and brother are killed testing experimental craft. Thursday, Nov. 4 BLACKBEARD THE PIRATE Robert Newton Linda Darnell Takes place in the 17th century and deals with the conflict between the pirate and a famous buccaneer. There are bloody battles much intrigue and a dash of romance. PINCH ME, QUICK! -Actress Ann Robinson, sineway red-headed beauty, was selected by Jack Webb for the policewoman role in Warner Bros.' feature-length production "Dragnet," which Webb stars in and directed in WarnerColor. From this angle it's obvious that Ann gets her man. WGBY HiLites by George Engle You can just about plan on finding the same programs when you dial 1450 this coming week that were there last week. Thru' some marvelous stroke of fate -no changes this week. Normally there is at least one change to report but it seems that the current favorites are holding fast to their popularity. Who says the public is fickle The dramatic shows are producing some fine entertainment this week and have come up with some all-star casts. An example is George Bernard Shaw's comedy, "Man and Superman", Which Theatre Guild On The Air will present this Monday at 9:00 P.M. It will star Maurice Evans in the role which has done so much to cinch his claim to fame as one of our finest contemporary actors, that of Jack Tanner appointed guardian of Anne, wealthy young heiress. Deborah Kerr will portray Anne, whose big ambition in life is to marry her guardian. The chase from England to the continent where Jack is finally caught provides comedy entertainment at it's very best. On Hollywood Radio Theatre Sunday night at 10:00 P.M. a radio adaptation of the motion picture "Because of You" will be presented with Jeff Chandler recreating his original role and elfinlike June Allyson as his co-star. June portrays the country girl who becomes innocently involved with a dope smuggler and serves a term in prison. Jeff will play the part of the young Air Force officer with whom she eventually finds happiness. Jean and James Cagney willostar on Family Theatre's presentation of "Mental Blocks." The story of a professional gambler and his sister, a student of psychology. How she attempts to cure him of his gambling mania thru mental suggestion and mental control over a pair of dice makes for an unusual and entertaining story. Consult your daily Papoose for any changes in the schedule of programs to be presented over WGBY, 1450 on your radio dial. .Good Listening. ... OPERATON _ND lt'f C4 w ; J 7 *B OK* NOO by Francis L. Cannon. JOSN For Your Information ABRAHAM LINCOLN by Carl Sandburg This is the one volume edition, taken from Sandburg's monumental six-volume work. Sandburg undertook this work forty years ago, to reproduce Lincoln's life as it was lived, giving the reader the feeling that he himself was living in the times. As a boy, Sandburg grew up in Lincoln country and knew men who remembered Lincoln. In his travels he sought out kin of people who knew Lincoln well. His research has been exhaustive. The result has given literature and biography a great work. EUROPEAN-A JOURNEY WITH PICTURES by Anne Fremantle and Bryan Holme This takes the reader on a romantic tour of the Old World. The wonders of western Europe, visited by thousands of Americans yearly are here illustrated. The journey includes castles and palaces, ancient festivals, natives in picturesque costumes. The text is an excellent combination of travel, history, pertinent quotations, unusual sidelights and fascinating stories. THE ART OF EATING by M. F. K. Fisher The idea of this book is well summed up by a quotation from Thackeray: "Next to eating good dinners, a healthy man with a benevolent turn of mind, must like, I think, to read about them." A wise and witty cook-book is this. But it's much more than a cookbook, it's a guide to the highest delights in eating, spiced with stories, humor and how-to-do-it. AN ENGLISH YEAR by Nan Fairbrother Like the sixthteenth -century house in which it was written, this book is mellow and sturdy. It is the reflections of an English mother and the daily rhythm of life as she lived during one wartime year with her two young sons in and old Buckinghamshire farmhouse. From there she contemplates the country seasons, her childhood, the books she has read, the music she has listened to. It is rich with insights into life. For Your Entertainment SMALL TOWN D.A. by Robert Traver A unique picture of life of a Michigan country as seen through the eyes of the District Attorney. The D.A. usually sees the seamier side of life, but rarely is it depicted with such humerous highlights as here. LADY OF BEAUTY by Kikou Yamata Against the background of Japan during WWII, this book depicts the lonliness, decline and death of the too beautiful too richly endowed Nobuka. Aloof and cultivated, she symbolized the plight of the spirit of old Japan in wartime. MOST LIKELY TO SUCCEED by John Dos Passos Jed Morris' college class voted him "the most likely to succeed." He was talented, brilliant, had driving idealistic ambition that the Twenties considered essential for every young American. And he did succeed, but throughout his climb to succees he clung to the destructive philosiphy that cut humanity out of his soul. He could find no true values in Greenwich Village, or Hollywood. This is the story of an incomplete man, mocked by his own standards, warped by his own selfishness.