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Indian
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-, overs QTMO Like The Sunshine" Vol. VI, No. 62 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 11 September 1954


Rain Ends Eventful


Labor Day Weekend

With rain ending the Labor Day weekend with a slight shower, Mr. & Mrs. Navy Guantanamo enjoyed a final three day splurge of special events before the fall rainy season set in with its' full force. Weather for the many outdoor events was good both Saturday, Sunday, and early Monday, but many events were slightly hampered Monday night as the light shower set in after a windy afternoon.
The big event of the weekend for the base was the Naval Station Invitational Golf Tournament held for the first time this year. After a day of qualifying rounds Saturday, both fleet, base, and civilian golfers teed off early Sunday morning in the first 36 holes of the 72 hole competition. At the end of the day's activity, LT A. "Tony" Grego, 1954 Naval Base Champion, and Chief L. E. Rogers of the Naval Air Station were tied with a 148 each for the first 36. Monday morning turned out to be a fine golfing day as was seen by the enthusiasm of the many entrants in the tourney. The afternoon, however, turned out not as good as a strong cross-course wind came up hampering drives. At the end of the day, the contest stood the same for Grego and Rogers as their scores still matched for the entire 72 holes.
At the Naval Air Station activity reached its peak Monday night at the Air Station EM Club when The Seven Wonders, a Cuban orchestra straight from the Oasis in Caimanera, entertained members of NAS and VU-10 with dance music from 8 to 11:30. Aproximately 75 men and hostesses from Guantanamo City's. USO were present.
Also over the weekend, fourteen lucky "tourists" made the Air Station's first navigational training hop in the station's new UF-1. The flight departed Friday evening and returned Monday evening after an enjoyable stateside holiday in Miami, Florida.
From a recreational standpoint, NAS had a busy weekend in IntraMural Softball League play. Communications defeated Supply 10-5, Operations tounced Boatshed 9-0, and Administration moved into c second place tie with Operations, burying Communications 14-2. The Leeward Pointers, who will have their own team represented in the Base League, still rule the roost at the half way mark with a perfect record of five wins and no losses.
At the Naval Station, a holiday peak was reported by the Special Services Department. For all three days of the weekend, all recreational facilities were used to the utmost by both fleet and base personnel.
At Windmill Beach, all cabanas were utilized for small private parties all three days, and not a single cabana was left unreserved.
(Continued on Page Three)


Exchange Gas Station

considtred For Expansion

Car owners of the Naval Base may soon be offered faster and better service at the Navy Exchange Gas Station here where an expansion project is presently being prepared for submission to the Navy Ships Store Office. The planned expansion program is being submitted upon recommendation of Mr. A. A. Araneo, Ship Store Representative, who reviewed facilities at the Navy Exchange garage recently.
This expansion program calls for major alterations in the present pumping island. Instead of the two pumps now in use, there will be two modern two-hose pumps with automated nozzles. This will make it possible to service four cars with gas at the same time.
To further speed up gassing operations, it is planned to have a general service area where the grease rack is now located. This area will be for oil changes and such services as checking oil, water, and tires. No service except the sale of gasoline will be given at the pumping islands which will cause less waiting for those wanting only fuel.
The present grease rack, with the addition of more equipment, will be moved to the northwest side of the garage facing . Sherman Avenue.
In addition to these changes, the Navy Exchange has requested of the Naval Supply Depot that authority be granted for the sale of 80-octane gasoline instead of the present 72-octane. For a short time recently, the 80-octane gasoline was
(Continued on Page Six)


120,000 EMs Slated for Fiscal '55 Promotions


Hurricane Edna Blamed

For Heavy Rains Here

Hurricane Edna, which was building up force in the Atlantic Ocean last week and working its way towards the United States, brought many sighs of relief from everyone on the station in the form1 of thunder showers. The first eaaterly wave from the hurricane passed over the station Tuesday mowging, bringing with it thunder showers equalled 1.34 inches of rai4. On Wednesday morning thunder howers occurred again and continued throughout the day. Accordiijg to the NAS Aerology Department, 2.4 inches of rain fell during the two days.
The thunder storms that occurred were connected with the arising of Hurricane Edna, the fifth one to start up this season, which. was 225 miles off the coast of Gtmo Tuesday morning. The storm at that time was moving in a northwesterly direction with winds up to 98-miles an hour.
At this time of the year these
storms which build up in the Atlantic cause what is normally called the rainy season for the tropical areas. The season lasts approximately a month.


Golf fans of Guantanamo Bay intently watch activity on the 9th green during the recent Naval Station Invitational Golf Tournament. Activity at the golf course was at a peak over the weekend as tournament began on Saturday and lasted through Monday.
(See Story on Page Six)


During the current fiscal year, ending June 30, 1955, the Navy is planning to promote about 120,000 enlisted personnel, which will raise the personnel force up to 50 percent petty officers, according to Vice ADM James L. Holloway, Chief of Personnel.
Adm. Holloway said the Navy is tentatively planning to promote between 70,000 and 75,000 new petty officers third class 40,000 promoted to P02, and about, 6,000 to P01.
During the Navy service-wide exams held last month, an estimated 213,000 enlisted personnel were signed up for the tests.
Chief petty officer examinations will be held in February, at which time some 1200 POls can be expected to be promoted to chief ratings, ADM Holloway reported. At the turn of the year, when BuPers makes a service-wide check on billets and vacancies, there is a possibility that more CPO promotions will be made, but are expected to be few.
The biggest problem facing the Navy today is to get those who have served their initial four years to make the Navy a career, ADM Holloway said, but hopes new reenlistment bonus rates will see many first-hitchers reenlist in the Navy.
The Navy has no trouble getting new recruits for at the present time the three training centersBainbridge, Great Lakes and San Diego-are full of recruits. On August 1 the Navy recruiting service had a waiting list of more than 7000 applicants, according to BuPers Chief.



Early Outs Continue


During Fiscal 1955


The two months early separation program is still in effect for enlisted men of the regular Navy, Naval Reserve and Fleet Reserve whose separation date would normally be on or before Jan. 10, 1955.
Those who are due for separation between January 11-20 will be separated December 1-20 and personnel elegible for release January 21-31 will be discharged January 6-31.
Requests are not necessary forseparation since personnel are notified automatically by the personnel office in time to qualify for early discharge.
A full schedule of discharge dates and other pertinent information is available in BuPers Instr. 1910.5B.


- m








Page Two


Saturday, 11 September 1954


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9-615
Saturday, 11 September 1954
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William I Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sandess---------- Officer-Adviscr
H. E. Davis, JOC---------------- Editor
H. L. Sisson, J3 -------------------News
Jerry Lewis, J3----------------- Features
F. L. Cannon, JOSN_ - Photographer D. C. Roberts, JOSN------------Reporter
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Nay photos unless otherwise credited.

WGBY Hi-Lites
by George Engle

At some time during the next few weeks you will notice that things are being shuffled about here at WGBY. Both the "Live" shows and the transcribed programs will be affected. So don't be alarmed if your favorite D.J. is off the air. Chances are he's busy toting a rifle and will be back in a week.
The other chances may be a bit more permanent, but the substitutions are easy to take and we think you'll enjoy them.
Edgar Bergen, with his two money-making wooden-heads, Charley McCarthy and Mortimer Snerd, will steal the Sunday evening spot from Jack Benny. Also featured will be Jack Kirkwood, Gloria Gordon, and Viola Vonn. With music by Ray Noble this rounds out to an enjoyable half-hour of easy listening.
Replacing Amos 'n' Andy at 8:00 on Sunday, will be the bright new comedy show headed by Peter Lind Hayes, and his lovely wife, Mary Healy. Others to appear will be Jerry Vale, ten-year-old singer Leslie Uggams and pianist Teddy Wilson with Norman Leyden's Orchestra.
At 2:30 on Saturday afternoon Marie Wilson will be up to her old feather-headed tricks as My Friend Irma. Judy Canova gives way to this return of a favorite, as Irma and her friends, Mr. Clyde, Mrs. O'Rielly, Prof. Kropotkin and Joe romp thru their paces, proving again that Life Can Be Ridiculous.
The only daytime replacement will be Can You Top This? which will be heard Monday thru Friday at 10:30 in the old Curt Massey/ Martha Tilton spot. Noted comedian Peter Donald will present jokes sent in by listeners, while "Senator" Ed Ford, Harry Hershfield ,and former Governer Harold Hoffman of New Jersey do their level best to register higher on the electric "Laughmeter". A fast moving and highly entertaining show, "Can You Top This ?" is a welcome addition to your, daytime listening.
Consult the daily issues of the Papoose for any other changes in programming over WGBY, 1450 on your dial . . . Good Listening! . . .


Hospital Notes
by R. P. Campanozzi

Heriport News
Recently the girls have been dominating the list in childbirths. This -week, however, the blue edged out the pink three to one: James P. born to YN1 and Mrs. Marguerite Searcy, Gregory P. burn to Lt. and Mrs. Bertha Robinson, and Michael B. born to AOl and Mrs. Miriam Jocks. The little lady is Katherine L. whose parents are SN and Mrs. Juanita Backus.
Sanitation
A department at this command which very few people come in direct contact with, but, although we may not be aware of it have an enormous indirect affiliation with, is the Sanitation Department. The mission of this department is the protection of the health of base personnel by control of enviromental factors which may adversibly affect our health and comfort.
Among the various duties of the Sanitation Department are included: weekly inspections of base food handlers, rodent control, periodic inspections of barracks, sampling and laboratory tests of base drinking ;kater, milk and all Cuban berverages, inspecting all incoming and departing vessels and the issuance of medical clearances to these ships, veneral disease control, and insect control.
As malaria is endemic in Oriente Province, one of the major problems in malaria control. Insect light traps are operated nightly in scattered locations on the base. Control operations are based on the i-esults of these trap catches and - field surveys. Recommendations are then made to Public Work for actual accomplishment of the work. An attempt is made to prevent the local anopholes mosquito (malaria carrier) from hatching. Studies are in progress on most effective ways to control eye gnats and sand flies. Stagnant ponds and pools are visited often by a ;department representative, with emphasis on larval control. The base drinking water is submitted to bacteriological analysis weekly as are the waters of the swimming pools.
We are all familiar with the spraying vehicles. Wind velocity permiting, this is an effective form of insect arrest. The spray is a mixture of 10% DDT in diesel oil; parents are advised to keep children away from the direct spray. Motorist are also cautioned to maintain a safe distance from the vehicle.
Inspection of food handlers is a vital procedures at any installation. All food handlers, military and civilian, are given a short course of instruction by a sanitation department member who constantly stresses cleanliness, hygiene, and proper food handling and distribution.
Our Base Sanitation Officer is CWOHC J. R. Huthcraft, a registered sanitarian and members of the National Association of Sanitarians. Mr. Hutchcraft's staff includes HMC M. 0. Wertley and HM3 C. R. Barrow, both sanitation technicians.
National Nurse Week
The first National Nurse Week in the history of nursing is the result of a Joint Resolution introduced by Congresswoman Frances P. Bolton and passed by the Congress on 11 -August 1954 . . . the centenary of the work of Florence Nightingale in the Crimeaa . . . the year wtich celebrates 100 years of growth_ of professional nursing


Navy Wives' Club

Holds First Meeting

The newly organized chapter of the Navy Wives' Club of America held a meeting in the Flamingo Room, Thursday evening, September 2, with RADM and Mrs. Edmund B. Taylor and Chaplain M. 0. Stephenson as honored guests. Chaplain Stephenson offered the Invocation and Benediction for the gathering.
The purpose of the meeting was to acquaint interested persons and groups with the character and aim of the Navy Wives' Club and also its plan of activity, which will serve both recreational and charitable for its members.
The Navy Wives' Club is a national organization for wives of all naval personnel, both officers and enlisted, including Marine and Coast Guard wives. So if you are new on the base and would like to belong to a women's club, or if you have been here for sometime and wish to enlarge your circle of friends, you are cordially invited to attend.


Now Altarngto l1nifnrm


Sunday, 12 September 1954

Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630 Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930-2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic)


IIesc rii eU UFoIrUII _heChaplain'sCorner Prescribed For Tropics The Chaplain's Corner


A change to the Navy's uniform regulations prescribes this new alternate tropical uniform for officers and CPOs who are serving in hot duty stations. The new uniformconsidered to be cool and practical
-will be open-neck, short-sleeve shirt with collar insignia, long trousers, shoes, socks and cap cover to match, in either white or khaki.

as we know it today. The designation of a week to honor nursing shows the high esteem which nurses have won by their service to the Nation.
Nursepower has become a health resource of vital importance to military and civilian patient-care and other health services. The President of the Unit k States will proclaim the week I ' October 11 to 16 National Nursn vleek.


*

In the family circle, there are always arising occasions of dispute, disagreement, and argument. Parents ought not only to step in and assert their authority in settling these differences, but they ought to do so with all the tact and wisdom of which they are capable.
A person's influence doesn't go very far in handling others unless it is warm and uplifting. Cold, rough treatment generally has a cold, rough effect. But where there is warmth of sympathetic feeling and nobleness of purpose, there is generally success. Our Lord reminded us that out of the heart the mouth speaketh. If the heart is lacking in feeling and understanding, the words will be harsh and often unreasonable.
It is good to remember though that persuasion always goes farther than force. Because a persuaded person sees the reasons behind things, whereas one who is forced merely acquiesces. Persuasion is what made Our Lord so successful as a speaker. The people listened to Him attentively. He gained them; He made them think; He moved them to see the reasons of things.
However, when necessary, force must be used; yet it should be rather firmness than force. Firmness on the part of parents, combined with self-control , is very powerful to prevent and heal disagreements in the family. Our Saviour did not hesitate, when He thought it necessary, to lay His finger on the sore spot, and to demand betterment.
Prudence must be preserved. The father and mother must not take up for one against the other without just cause. What must be kept in mind is the family peace, not just the satisfaction of one or the other. The common good always comes first. Our Saviour treated the people in this manner. He was not partial.

W. J. Spinney
LCDR, CHC, USN


THE INDIAN


Pap-e Two






0


Saturday, 11 September 1954 Tll~ INDIAN


A Letter For You


'The Boss' Answers Some Questions


Often a daydreaming sailor can "see" himself walking up to "The Boss" and saying, "Now look here, Admiral, I wanna' know something. How about . . ." And The Boss puts his arm around the shoulders of our boy and says, "Well, son, I'll tell you . . ." And just about that time the chief's voice bellows into that pink cloud: "Hey, Potrzebie, where's that bucket I sent you after?" So, our hero ends his chat with the admiral before it even gets started.
Well, direct from The Boss, himself, comes some straight answers to some mighty pertinent questions that have been kicked around about your Navy. The Boss, Admiral R. B. Carney, Chief of Naval Operations (OpNav), recently answered a letter from Vice Admiral A. S. Merrill, director of the Navy League of the United States, Greater New Orleans Council. Admiral Merrill asked The Boss what the Navy has accomplished or is in the process of accomplishing to make the Navy more attractive as a career.
And, here, printed verbatim, as received by Admiral Merrill, is Admiral Carney's reply. It is an excellent resume of the entire subject and careful reading will provide more than ordinary interest to all personnel, both officer and enlisted.
(Because of the length of the letter and the interesting reading it provides, The Indian will print the reply in two parts. This is the first half. Look for the conclusion next week.)
Department of The Navy
Office of the Chief of Naval
Operations
Washington 25, D. C.
17 August 1954
A. S. Merrill, Vice Admiral, USN
(Ret.)
Navy League of the United States Greater New Orleans Council 608 Canal Street
New Orleans, La. Dear Tip:
I haven't forgotten my promise to round up a list of items that will give some indication of what we, ourselves, have accomplished or are in the process of accomplishing by way of making the Navy more attractive as a career. Needless to say the problem is a big one, not easily solved and the achievements to date do not measure up to either our needs or our desires.
There are even times when our efforts to increase service benefits suffer serious setbacks. A rider in the Army Civil Functions Appropriation Act this year, for example, deprived the services of the right to maintain hospitals in the Canal Zone. Our men and dependents in that area must now rely for hospitalization on a Canal Zone government that already has difficulty in maintaining adequate medical staffs for its own use. For another example, the recently enacted Internal Revenue Code gives some income tax relief to everyone living on retired pay except retired members of the Armed Services.
Such setbacks are discouraging but the things we have done will serve at least to show the direction in which we are moving. However long it may take, I assure you that I will not give up, while I am the


Chief of Naval Operations, in this effort to improve the lot of those who make a career of the Naval Service.
I will not attempt to deal with the Womble Report point by point since this report dealt with all three Military Services and many of the items do not apply or apply only in part to the Navy. It will be obvious, however, to what extent the items related below apply to the four general areas of the Womble Report which were: (1) World Commitments and National Attitudes (2) Military Authority and Leadership Has Declined (3) Increased Competition With Industry for Good Men (4) Budgetary Considerations Should Not Be Permitted To Transcend Combat Effectiveness.
Here, then, in a miscellaneous package, are some of the things we are doing:
1. What we are doing to improve the caliber of officers and men and to put a premium on ability
We are tightening up on officers' promotions as a spur to a superior performance of duty. We are also returning to the practice of "selecting out" Regular officers whose capabilities do not justify promoting them to higher grades. These officers can retire under the legal provisions that cover such cases.
A return to traditional high professional standards will include, by next year, the employment of correspondence courses and the reinstitution of promotion examinations. This includes modified programs applicable to Temporary and Reserve officers on active duty and further modified to govern promotion of Reserves on inactive duty.
We have a new officer's fitness report designed to do a better job of measuring ability to take on higher responsibilities.
We have directed early separation of enlisted personnel who are unsuitable or are turning in an inferior performance of duty. Only those who come up to service requirements will be permitted to reenlist.
Current reduction in forces are being utilized to retain those whose particular skills and agein-grade make them most desirable as career people. The best. of the Reserve officers who are retained in the rank of Lieutenant and below will be offered an opportunity to transfer to the Regular Navy.
We are taking steps, but will need some legislative help, to increase the authority of commanding officers to enforce routine discipline. We particularly want to discourage absenteeism in order to better distribute, hence ease, the general work load.
We are now permitting voluntary resignation of officers after 4 years of service except for those with special voluntary commitments. This has already had a beneficial morale effect on younger officers who felt they were "captives" and the resignations, so far, have been fewer than we anticipated.
For the older officers we are now permitting voluntary retirement after 20 years or more service. This is being done on a carefully controlled and restricted basis and will remain in effect if it is not abused to a point where the service suffers. We have instituted a transfer program for- 'gh-caliber men in


WO Retirement Rules

Clarified By SecNav

Washington (AFPS)-Commencing Nov. 1, 1954, all Navy permanent WOs, including those in higher grades, will retire on the last day of the month in which 60 days expire after the date of completion of 30 years active service, according to the Secretary of the Navy.
Permanent WOs desiring to continue on active duty beyond their 30 year retirement date must submit requests for retention to the Seceretary of the Navy via the chain of command at least four months prior to the date of completion of 30 years active service.
Requests must state duration of extension desired, but not to extend beyond the statutory retirement age.
Permanent WOs completing more than 30 years active service prior to Nov. 1, will retire on Dec. 31, unless requests for extension are submitted and approved.


Brownies Begin Activity

Next Week At Meeting


Next Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, the Brownies of Guantanamo Bay will meet to officially register all members, organize into troops, and sign up new members for the coming year. All three meetings will be held immediately after school at the Brownie Hut next door to the Community Auditorium on Marina Point and will last approximately an hour.
To speed up registration, it has been planned to hold the meetings for age groups with 9-year-olds meeting on Tuesday, 7-year-olds meeting on Wednesday, and 8-yearolds on Thursday.
All mothers are welcome at these meetings, and catalogues will be available so that they can order and select uniforms for their girls.
Since registration will take place during these three days, girls may bring $1.00 at this time for their National Brownie dues.
Any interested girls or parents who have any questions concerning these meetings or Brownie activities may call any of the following leaders.
Mrs. H. T. Wallings (7-year-olds)
8331
Mrs. D. J. Murphy (7-year-olds)
8652
Mrs. D. B. Powers (8-year-olds)
8439
Miss Barbara Davie (9-yearolds) 8146
Mrs. A. D. Nelson Jr. 8855

chief and first class petty officer rates who desire to change over to skilled electronics ratings. They will be sent to school and then reclassified without demotion in rating.
We have improved sea and shore duty rotation opportunities for all of our career personnel by providing additional shore billets for those ratings who formerly had to spend a high percentage of their time at sea. A boilerman, for instance, who used to have to spend most of his time on ship board can now look forward to a fair shake when his turn comes for shore duty.


7


ComNayBase Officially Opens

Bay Hill 'Barrel Club'

The delayed opening of the enlisted men's Barrel Club, located at the foot of Bay Hill, finally came about last evening when RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base cut the ribbon and opened the club for business.
Originally scheduled for Labor Day, the opening was delayed by unfinished work.
The Club will be operated by the Naval Station Special Services Department and will be primarily for the personnel living in the Bay Hill barracks. The hours of operation will be the same as for the Enlisted Men's Club now in operation in the Fleet Recreation area.
Beer, soft drinks and a large variety of snacks will be available at all times. Uniform of the day will be the required dress.
Continual improvements will be made to the club in the form of a juke box, shuffleboard, coin machines, etc. as funds become available from the profits, according to LT E. A. Sadness, Special Services Officer.
Highlighting the opening ceremony was the serving of refreshments in a "free lunch counter" style.


Labor Day . . .
(Continued from Page One)
the base, many longer excursions were made by base organizations to the picnic grounds at the Yateras River.
In the Fleet Recreation Area, the usual weekend activities of base and fleet personnel was reported. The swimming pool, archery range, baseball batting range, tennis courts and skating rink were seldom idle. Although the Naval Station Softball League scheduled no games over the holiday, there were several practice games on the part of both base and fleet personnel.
At the Officers' Club, the opening of the new $27,000 galley with a smorgasbord dinner Monday night proved to be one of the biggest events of the year. Even despite the light shower at the beginning of the evening, the attendance at the special event far surpassed all expectations. The dinner, according to reports, turned out 'supreme'.
Sunday night, the Flamingo Room of the Petty Officer's Club held a special uniform dance which saw one of the largest crowds ever known turning out.



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Pagd Three


THE INDIAN








PAef Pour


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 11 September 1954


GTMO Denizen Trio Places Third In Colorful



Key Wester Spearfishing Nationals


by Jerry Lewis

The tantalizing aroma of an outdoor fish-fry wafted about the spacious lawn of the Casa Roma hotel a few miles south of the city of Key West late last month. It was Saturday, August 28, 6:30 P.M.
Gathering in small groups about the crystal-like swimming pool were top spearfishermen from the east, west, north and south of the United


- ~


Tired but happy, Kropack, Cavanaugh and Ahlberg hold third place honors in the 1954 Nationals. Owen Churchill Cup (far left) next years prize perhaps.

States. There were underwater movie photographers and reporters from some of the top sporting magazines of the country. A photographer from Life magazine, various skin-diving magazines, Miami newsmen and reporters from this paper talk-


ed shop as a glowing tropical sunset graced the western skies over the keys.
Officials of the A.A.U., representatives of the Chamber of Commerce of the city of Key West, various hosts, residents and dignitaries from the sporting world mingled with the champion divers.
Set apart from the crowd, enclosed by a low-cut, semi-circled hedge stood a gleaming array of trophies. In the center, the large silver Owen Churchill cup stood, the incentive and top honor for one of the teams gathered there in the dusk.
The fish-fry brought together participants, observers and reporters, eager to roll into action the following morning when the signal would be given to commence the 1954 National Spearfishing contest, one of the years most lookedforward to major events.
The evening wore on. Finally, the attention of all present was called and the rules and regulations of the International Spearfishing Association were read and discussed by officials of the A.A.U.


and the Miami Skindiving Association. Questions were answered by the experts and the party dissipated to fall in for a good nights sleep in preparation for the big day.
At seven the following morning, two fifty-foot fishing craft left the docks at Key West. One boat, the "Savannas", carried the press and photographers, w h il e t h e "Greyhound", the divers, determined to cop the grand prize for their team and "bring home the bacon".
The gleaming silver cup displayed on the lawn at Casa Roma the preceeding evening held a prominent place in the minds of the divers as they readied their Arbolettes and Hawalan Slings, checked their schnorkels and cleaned glass face-masks.
Six miles and two hours later, both boats dropped anchor off Pelican Shoals. The fathometer in the Savannas' wheelhouse marked 30 f eet.
Assigned to each team was a trim outboard motor-boat and into these they climbed, anxious for the signal that would send them


The starting signal is given exactly 9:25 A.M., and the boats roar off in different directions almost immediately. In a few months, the only occupants are the operators. The divers are far below.

on their way to the bottom. A last minute briefing took place on the fantail of the Greyhound as the six small craft buzzed impatiently about like worker bees around their queen, waiting to spread out and commence the hunt.
The "go" was given at exactly 9:25 and the boats roared off in different directions almost immediately.
The hunt was on!
In a few more moments, the only occupants of the small boats were the operators. The divers were far below, hunting the shoals and coral formations that hid their quarry. Every variety of tropical fish scurried this way and that as the divers advanced towards the silent world of brystalblue water and real- life fantasy.
Soon, the depths slowly and hesitatingly gave up its secrets and the small boats started filling with almost every species of fish as the divers brought their catches


to the surface, many with badly bent spears that attested to the short, swift struggle that took place far below seconds before. The hunters would blow h a r d through clogged schnorkels, gulp fresh air and descend once again. So it went for hours under a blistering August sun hanging in a sky filled with great billowing clouds.
The only swimmers equipped with Aqualungs were the underwater movie photographers who followed the divers, their cameras grinding away at the fantastic scenes taking place as the hunters climbed coral shelves, along white sandy floors and through strange and beautiful formations that created a natural setting far beyond the capacity of a Hollywood movie set. When a kill was made, there was almost certain to be a movie or still camera recording the scene from within water-tight plastic cases as it happened.
The weather remained clear and visibility below was as near-perfeet as could be expected.
Four hours passed.
At precisely 1:25 P.M., a red smoke b o m b billowed skyward from the official's boat-signifying the end. It was all over but the shouting, and that was soon to follow.


The "Greyhound" returns with its' cargo of tired divers anxious for final weighing in. Note movieman aft recording crowds waiting at the pier as the 50-footer prepares to tie-up.


I

.-- A-''. -...









Last minute briefing takes place on fantail of Official's boat as the small craft buzz about, taking their teams aboard and readying for the 'go'.


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Saturday, 11 September 1954


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includes BAITWTA E I .;-, , *


Back in Guantanamo Bay, the third place trio along with the Denizen president, LT Carl Plath, center, received congratulations from RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, in an informal office ceremony.


In a few moments, the entire party was re-grouped and underway for Key West with sun-burned observers and tired spearfishermen. The loss of guns-stolen by the big fellows, badly bent spears and parted lines were discussed on the journey home. Notes of the "big ones that got away" were compared and each contestant was caught up and held by the anxiety of the final weighing-in.
A tropical squall parading north showered the boats with a cool, welcome rain on the way in but the trip was unhampered. Upon returning to the point of departure, the divers found a large crowd on hand to welcome them and to wait for the final results. The battery of photographers perched around the dock started firing flash bulbs before the Greyhound tied up at the pier.
The next 30 minutes is sports history.
The Miami "Tritons", made up of the well-known brothers, Art, Fred and Don Pinder, copped top honors for their organization with an aggregate total of 281/2 pounds of fish!
Taking second slot with 213 pounds were the Pacific Coast Champions, the "Dolphins" of California who travelled about 3,000 miles to compete. Charlie Blakes-


Credit Charlie Blakeslee of the California "Dolphins" for turning this 37 pound nurse shark into a statistic which won him the prize for the largest single fish caught.


lee of the "Dolphins" won a single prize for himself by bringing back a 37% pound nurse shark for the largest single-fish catch of the day.
In third place were the "Denizens of the Deep" representing Guantanamo Bay Naval Base. Earl Cavanaugh, Ted Ahlberg and John Kropack, bringing in a grand total of 207 pounds in the very tight competition. The Navy team came in far ahead of expectations, throwthe odds for a loop. The three showed up magnificently against other amateur spearfishermen of top standing.
John Kropack will never forgive that 'Cuda that swiped his Arbollete
-a 'Cuda that would have meant second place for the Denizens.
Following the Denizens were the defending champions of 1954, the "Muirmen" of California with 204 pounds.
A brief but very wet Floridatype thundershower dampened the spirits of the crowd for a short time during the presentations of awards, but divers and photogs remained a n d congragulations were in order for the winning teams.
Follow-ups in the contest were t h e Central California Regional winners, the Monterey Sea Otters; the Great Lakes Regional winners who are known to the sports world as the Ann Arbor "Amphibians"; and the "Blackfish" from Brooklyn, N.Y. The latter, having never fished for tropical prey, were awed by the clarity of the Key West water.
After the weighing-in was completed and prizes awarded, the gross catch of approximately 800 pounds was cleaned and sold for charity.
Tne contest was sponsored by the Florida Skindivers Association and the City of Key West in coopera ion with and under rules and regulations of the International Speaifishing Association under sanction of the A.A.U. The first National Meet sanctioned by the A. A.U. was held at Laguna Beach, California, in 1951, the first new sport to be recognized by that body in over 40 years.
The rich hunting grounds off the coast of Key West offer an untold variety of fish, almost unlimited in scope, and has consequently grown to be one of the major points of interest for the under-


John Kropack and Earl C4vanaugh assist in hoisting their basket to scale as A.A.U. official checks figures. Total weight of Denizen catch was 207%pounds.


water fisherman. Two majqr factors are the crystal-clearness of the water and the abundance of some of the world's finest gamefish.
Such meets as the "Key Nvester" are proving to the world that there is to be found below the surface of the water, entirely new vistas open to exploration, photography and the thrilling sport, officially recognized now, of hunting on the homegrounds of the game being sought.
LT Carl Plath, President of the Denizens Of The Deep, is drawing


up tentative plans for a local meet at San Juan, P.R., towards the end of this year.
On behalf of the Indian and the Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, surely one of the most sportsminded of such installations in the entire Navy, this reporter would like to extend a hearty 'well-done' to Earl Cavanaugh, Ted Ahlberg and John Kropack for proving they are champion material and for bringing home to Guantanamo Bay Naval Base third place honors in the 1954 Nationals.


...'0~ ::~


These are the ones that didn't get away! Over 700 pounds of fish to be cleaned and sold for charity after Meet is officially over.



7


Page Five


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Page Six


e


Saturday, 11 September 1954


Grego, Rogers Tie in First NaySta Invitational Golf Tournament


RADM G. B. H. Hall, Commander, Tenth Naval District, (back to camera) sinks an 18-footer on the 17th green during the Invitational tournament.


. . .- - - -. ::;.'. .. .....
Perpetual Tony Grego sinks his last putt of the tournament on the 18th green (left) while his opponent, Lee Rogers drops his in from the same distance. Both Grego and Rogers tied for the low gross title with 293.

The unprecedented happened last week-end when a comparative newcomer matched Perpetual Tony Grego stroke for stroke in the Naval Station's first annual Invitational and wound up in a first place tie with the "old champ" for the "Whitey Taylor Cup."
Lee Rogers, of Roanaoke, Va. and
the maintenance and engineering chief of the Operations Department of NAS swung through the 72hole tournament side by side with the 1954 club champion and came off the last green with an identical score of 293 to divide honors for the low gross.
Next in line for low gross was
Chuck Loggins of VU-10 with a 304.
Grego came up with a 72 on the
first 18 to win the medalist title and the "Arky Caruthers Cup" , and Rogers took second place net honors with 261.
Charles Blake from Port Control
took low net honors and the "Tony Grego Cup" with 246.
Qualifying rounds for the Invitational started Saturday morning with over 100 golfers in the running. The top 60 were chosen to compete and they teed off on the main part of the tournament Sun- W. L. Neagele YN3, of the Naval
day morning. Air Station Personnel Office, smiles
Rogers had his most troublesome victoriously as he displays the 163 time during the qualifying round pound Grouper that he caught off while Grego's toughest hole was the Coast Guard pier here recently. the 14th on the last round when _______he shot a five for the par 3 hole. 1954 Naval Base Championship.
Lee Rogers has been aboard the Following Grego and Rogers and
base a little over two months and Loggins for low gross scores were has been playing golf only 2% Acree with 310, Scott of FTG with
years. He says he started in Pensa- 312 and Bush of Naval Station cola, Fla. in 1951 and felt lucky with 315. Behind Blake and Loggins if he broke 100 in those early days. in the low net division came Owens
Perpetual Tony from Patterson, of Naval Station with 269, Kelley N. J. probably has more champion- of the Naval Hospital with 271 and ships to his credit than any of the Brough of VU-10 with 272. local linksters will see in their Anchor man in the tournament lifetime. He held the ComSix title and winner of the shag bag and for three years, the South Central practice balls was George Willich crown for two years, the Army- of Fleet Camera Party with a 72Navy championship in Panama for hole total of 405. 4% years, the Jacksonville Naval Loggins had 10 birdies for the
Air Station championship for 2 match, Rogers had eight and Grego
years, the Pensacola title for 2 came in with seven. Acree had years and the Patuxent River six, and Scott, Dempsey, Byrne,
championship for 1 year. In the Mauldin, Blake, Brough a n d two years that he has been at Houston had five while Vanderheof,
Guantanamo Bay, Tony has copped Kelley Broughton and Stanovich the 1953 ComTen crown and the had four .


VU-10 Prop Blast
by Bill Graves & Staff

With three in the loss column the Transfer Department went ahead of the receipts this week. The transfers were Charles F. Pickhardt, Richard L. Munsell and Luther D. Smith all to civilian life. The two received were Burl H. Dixon, AD1 from the Receiving Station, Norfolk, Va., and Jack J. French, AD2 from VF-44, Jacksonville, Fla.
The "Old Timers" party last Sunday night at Ed Keatings quarters was a wonderful success. Everyone had a good time and the entertainment was excellent.
Thanks to LT Jack Hawkins on his party Friday night at the AOQ, and congratulations again on the promotion.
Christi, AD1 is going to the eye doctor to have his eyes tested for glasses. Every bird that comes up looks like a quail to him, even those little bitty Field Larks?
It is understood from reliable sources that three "Par Busters" took Lippy Stanovich to the cleaners last week in a very hot golf game, Swartz, Hobson and Mace lead the assault.
I hear from the grapevine that Chief Chipparoni won't be sweating anymore trips to Kingston.
Utility Squadron TEN's office personnel fully deserve sea pay for the month of September. Tuesday during the rain the hangar roof sprang a leak (a HOLE) and the offices were flooded. If the rain doesn't cease, all personnel will be ordered to wear a Mae West or seek a higher level.


Gas Station
(Continued from Page One)
offered on a trial basis, and it was found that approximately 99 out of a 100 car owners definitely preferred the higher test gas.
To carry out the request of the Navy Exchange, CDR E. W. Sutherling, Commanding Officer, Naval Supply Depot, has written to the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts requesting authority to offer the 80-octane gasoline to the Navy Exchange.
As well as the proposed changes in the gas station, the Navy Exchange will also completely revamp and remodel the Cob! Shop adding all new modern chinery.


Base Softball League

Slated tar 18 Oct. Opening

The Naval Base Softball League will commence its season schedule on October 18th according to LTJG J. G. Morgan, chairman of the softball committee.
The Base Athletic Commission met last week with representatives of the commnands entering a team this year and elected Morgan chairman.
There will be a meeting of the committee itself later this month for the purpose of devising any special rules and regulations and forming the season's schedule.
The are eight teams representing various commands entered this year in the league. The are: Naval Station, Naval Air Station, Leeward Point, VU-10, Marines, Naval Supply Depot - Cargo Handlers (combined), Fleet Tarining Group and MCB-4.
The season will run from October 18th through December 3rd, including any play-offs or tournaments.



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THE INDIAN


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atrdav 11 Senteher 1954TH N AP


MAq)OSU6S

By Sgt. William J. McDowell Jr.
and Cpl. Joe Androvich, USMC
There were two departures this week in the person of Sgt. F. C. Bailey and Pvt. Melendez. Sgt. Bailey will report to Norfolk, Va. for reassignment and Private Melendez will report to Marine Barracks, San Juan, P. R. for duty. We all wish both men the best of luck at their new duty stations.
Last Monday, Marine Barracks had one of the best Field Meets ever held at the Barracks. There were all types of events and everyone present had a good time. Chicken, beer, and soft drinks were consumed all during the Meet. Winners of the events were as follows: Tug of War, Guard Section; Blind Mans' Relay, Headquarters Platoon; Volley Ball Game, Staff NCO's and Officers; 100 yard Dash, tie between Pfc Chuck Mason and Sgt. Lee Haurik; Skeet Shooting, Pfc Herman Lugauer of Guard Section; Broad jump, 1st Place, Pfc Gourdine, 2nd Place, Sgt. Lee Haurik, both of Headquarters Section; Dodge Ball, Pfc A. R. Garten; Egg Toss, Pfc Eisenzimmer and Pfc Manuel Gomez. Individual prizes were awarded to the various winners. The Tug of War gave many good laughs-the rope broke three times and what a pile up of men on both sides. On the fourth attempt Guard rallied and won after almost being pulled across the line. Must have been the good chow and beer.
The only successful fishermen over the holiday weekend were Sgt. L. G. Jones and Hospital Corpsman HM3 Nilsen of the Marine Dispensary. Sgt. Jones went out to the back bay and caught a 10/2 pound Snapper and a 12 pound Barracuda. Nilsen landed a 5'/2 pound barracuda measuring 30% inches. "Naturally, the 'big ones' got away!"
The Headquarters team of the Marine Intra-Mural Softball league got off to a fast start by winning their first two gamse and giving them a 1/2 game lead over the 2nd Section Guard. The 1st Section is in third place followed by the Staff & Officers team which is yet to get in the winning column, losing their first two games.
Standings
Headquarters 2 0
2nd Section 2 1
1st Section 1 2
SNCO'S-Officer 0 2


Sultry-voiced Gina Lollobrigida, Italian film actress, has oeen awarded the Silver Ribbon-Italy's version of Hollywood's Oscar.


FTG Bulletin
by Jack Engstrom

Lieutenant M. C. Alexander, FTG Electronics Officer departed yesterday on the USS RUSMORE, (LSD-14) for the states. He will report to the Commanding Officer, NAS Argentia, Newfoundland for duty.
Chief Ships Clerk Davidson, FTG Reports Officer, departed GTMO last Wednesday via FLAW for NAS Jacksonville, Florida where he will complete his last tour of duty in the Naval Service before retiring.

Paul Hauenstein, ET1, Fleet Training Center also departed Gtmo via FLAW last Wednesday for NAS Jacksonville where he will be separated from the service.

William Smiley, RM1, FTG Communications, will depart on the USNS JOHNSON on its return trip to the states. He will report in at the U.S. Naval Reserve Station, Brooklyn, New York for separation from the service.
Lawrence Lightfoot, TMC, FTG Gunnery Department, will be heading to the states shortly for a tour of Instructor Shore Duty. He will report to the Commanding Officer, U.S. Naval Training Center, San Diego, California for duty involving training of Recruits.
Good luck to you all in your new ventures.


Ship Arrivals USS Cushing (DD-797) USS Batfish (SS-310) USS Hancock (DD-675)
Departures
None


13 Sep 15 Sep 17 Sep


NSD Supply Line

LT and Mrs. P. D. Larson and Chief Parachute Rigger and Mrs. E. R. Erickson spent their long Labor Day weekend to good advantage as the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Santiago Fajardo, Leadingman Stevedore, Mr. Mauricio Serret, Storekeeper General, and Mr. Roger A. Dannery, Clerktypist, at Guantanamo City. They enjoyed a traditional Cuban pig barbeque with all the trimmings. Among the picturesque sights they saw were the caverns near the Guaso River.
George P. Tennant, Storekeeper, Transit Shed, is enjoying a two weeks vacation in Jamaica.
We're all happy to hear that Merle Sands is on his feet again, and although no definite time has been set for his release from the hospital, we're all hoping he'll be 'back with us soon.
Mrs. Evelyn MacDonald leaves us Friday and will be leaving GTMO the next time the USNS Pvt. Elden H. Johnson comes this way. We'll all miss you, Evie!
Nereida de los Santos of Santiago, is spending this week as the guest of her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. & Mrs. Joseph L. West.
In a game played last Thursday under the arcs on diamond number two, the NSD softball team extended their winning streak to four in a row as they squeezed through with an 11-10 decision over FTG.
Trailing the Trainers by a 10-5 count in the bottom half of the seventh, the NSD nine pushed five runs across the plate to tie the score and push the game into extra innings.
ENS Kezef's hard hit ground ball with tw* but in the bottom


NAS Crosswinds
by Dick Friz

Who's Who at NAS
LT Everett Pierce, Photographic and Special Services Officer.
LT Pierce was born in Belmond, Iowa and attended High School there. He joined the Navy in '32 and took Boot training at San Diego. He served as a seaman on the USS SARATOGA from '32-36. In '37 he entered the U.S. Naval Shool of Photography. In 38-'40 he was a photographer for the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, and later served on the USS FULTON. He was commissioned Ensign in October of 1943. Since that time, LT Pierce has held positions as Photographic Officer with VJ-11, CinCPacFlt P.I.O., assistant Pictorial Officer for EXOS-Pub Info, worked with BuAer photo division in '49 and'50. His last duty station was with Fleet Aircraft Service in Pax. He married Delores in Honolulu in 1947 and they have three children, Anthony, Timothy, and Sherry.
Hail Alma Mater
September's back-to-school' pattern has had some of the AV-50 residents recalling with evident nostalgia, the good old days when they too carried books under their arms. (Their thoughts are probably focused on coeds in tight sweaters, rather than integral calculus or objects of the preposition).
One of the boys received a letter from Ralph Hurst, ex AM3 who was discharged several months ago. Ralph is attending Southern Illinois U. in Carbondale. This is the old alma mater of "Bear" Woodrome. Bobby Bear, an Agriculture major at Illinois U., was seen playing a record of rnarch tunes by the famous Illini Band, sent to him by the Alumini Association . . . And Jim Jamison, an Iowa State grad, and Duck Clark, who attended Dickerson U., were seen quibbling over the relative merits of Sigma Chi and Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
John Schmitt, recently traisferred to Pax, is attending school part time at Georgetown U. Many others at AV-50 have expressed their desire to take advantage of the new G. I. Bill which incidentally had its second birthday August 19. In that period, a third of a million men (out of a possible 3 million Y have utilized its benefits. This fall's enrollment is predicted to exceed the all time G. I. high of 355,000 men in April of 1954.
And The Angels Sing
The Airdales have been joining the Protestant and Catholic choirs in large numbers recently. Paul Snyder and Bob Chadeleott have joined the Catholic group, while Bert Messmer has intentions?.?. LT C. Echols is president of the Protestant Choir, and Bill Wells, Joseph Clemens, John Kidwell, Tom Phillips, John Page, Anthony Pavlos, Bill Dean, and Dick Friz boom in the Bass section. Just a second- we heard a tenor in the group: it's Pavlos.
Barracks Chatter
OVERHEAD: "You must have had a terrific weekend: your eyes are sure bloodshot." "You oughta see them from this side."

half of the eighth inning provided the winning tally.
Circuit clouts by Bob Griffith and Francis Hanselman, along with John Wright's three hits, sparked the NSD batsmen.


dErWtde Word m

A girl with universal appeal, Miriam Stevenson, a South Carolina coed, wears her crown of Miss Universe with regal dignity. Miriam was chosen Miss U.S.A. two nights earlier at the annual Long Beach, Calif., judging. And judging by her measurements of 36-24-36, there was no doubt of the outcome.


Want a $1000 Prize?










O4 GST MAO ANN
wvtNcEWMTOM.AN.
ONE i ThE $EKV ACE CAN
INTE?_THE GON ~T i \

What does America mean to you ? Enter the 1954 Freedoms Foundations Contest. Send your letter of no more than 500 words to Awards Editor. Armed Forces Radio Service, 1016 N. McCadden Place, Los Angeles 38, Calif. Your letter must bear your name, rank, service number, and organization.
It must be received before midnight Nov 11, 1954. Letters received after that date will be considered for the next year's awards. (AFPS)

A staggering drunk, seeing a St. Bernard dog walk toward him with a whisky flash around his neck, gasped, "At last! Man's best friend and a dog."


Page Seven


Saturday 11 Septemb 54


THE INDIAN






a f


Navy=DPPO--1OND-Gtno.-0224


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 11 September 1954


MOVIES


Saturday, 11 September THE FORTY-NINERS
Bill Elliott Virginia Grey
Elliott, a U.S. Marshall, poses as a killer to track down three murderers. He eventually comes upon the trio, each of whom has since become a fairly respectable businessman in a California goldboom town.

Sunday, 12 September
THE LONG, LONG TRAILER
Lucille Ball Desi Arnaz
A honeymoon on wheels turns out to be a nightmare when the groom finds his funds strained by the purchase of a super-streamlined trailer. In color.

Monday, 13 September
JIVARO
Fernando Lamas Rhonda Fleming
A young man runs a jungle trading post at a small river settlement near the dangerous Jivaro Indian country on the Amazon. A girl comes there looking for her sweetheart who has become a drifter, only to find that he has been killed by the natives. In color.

Tuesday, 14 September THE MAD MAGICIAN
Vincent Price Eva Gabor
. After working for years with a manufacturer of magician's illusions, a young magician kills him. This leads from one killing to another, each with a new way of disposing of the body.

Wednesday, 15 September MAKE HASTE TO LIVE
Dorothy McGuire Stephen McNally
A newspaper woman in a small New Mexico town is confronted with her terrible past when her husband, a gangster with a prison record turns up and tries to ruin her life and the life of their teenage daughter.

Hear about the firefly in the small town who was all lit up but no place to glow? -


With the coming of fall and cooler weather beach beaties, such as this unidentified lass, begin to cover up with sweaters. She still looks good.


Rnamnel Etckta s
by R. M. (Bob) Quiat
Many people might think that the field called, "Operative Dentistry", means a surgical operation. Technicaly this is so, since the actual meaning given in the dictionary states that it is that particular branch of the science and art of dentistry which aims at the preservation of the natural teeth to a state of health and beauty. In more common language, it is the filling, in of lost tooth structures by mechanical procedures. Operative work is necessary before any specific tooth deficiences can be corrected.
This week I'd like to present our fourth in a series of personalities of the week. His name is Carl H. Biedenharn, DT3, USN, is 24 years old and hails from Mason City, Illinois. Carl attended Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois and the University of Illinois, before entering the Navy in February of 1951. In July of the same year he completed Dental Technician School at Great Lakes, Illinois. He served two years in Jacksonville, Florida before coming to Gtmo. Carl is a happily married man and his wife, Hester, is presently living


in Jacksonville. Upon discharge from the Navy, Carl and Hester plan on making their home in Illinois. "Bied", as he is called by his many friends, enjoys hunting and fishing. It seems that all the technicians are quite modest and Bied is no exception, so this is all the information I was able to obtain from him.
Bon Voyage Dr. Hayme s and family, who depart via FLAW for the good old U.S.A. We all hope you enjoy your new duty station as much as you enjoyed your tour of duty in Gtmo.
The Dental Clinic was quite proud this past weekend to have several of it's golfers qualify for the tournament that was held. Headed by the number one man on the clinic golf ladder, they were as follows: Dr. Lyons, CDR Vogel, and King, DT1. Even though they didn't fare too well, we know they gave it the old college try. Things have been changing on the Dental Clinic Golf Ladder. Mr. Dote has cooled off from his torrid pace of the last few weeks and was defeated in a close battle by Jef Fawcett.
That's it for this week, readers., See you again next week with the latest news and views from the Dental Clinic atop Bay Hill.


I

SO K~NOOK
by Francis L. Cannon, JOSN

For Your Information THE INEXHAUSTABLE SEA by Hawthorne Daniel and Francis Minot
The vast expanse of the sea is a great storehouse for an almost untouched supply of food and minerals. This book explains what the sea possesses and how to get it out. It explains the problems faced by those who would tap these resources and what they must do to overcome many of them. The authors state that the sea, unlike fresh water, is itself sufficient for growth, because of chemicals present in its composition. They also state that the amount of fishing done now does no more to deplete the resouces of the sea than does taking a handful of sand from a mountain.
THE FAITHS MEN LIVE BY by Charles Francis Potter
This book explains the basic truths which guide more than 50 of the world's major religions today. It tells of their rites, customs and origins, present membership and strength. It is completely objective in its approach. THE ROOSEVELT FAMILY OF
SAGAMORE HILL by Hermann Hagedorn
This is a gay romp with Teddy and all the boys, little ones, that is. It portrays the family setting of one of our greatest presidents. Teddy Roosevelt was a man of unbeatable spirit which put him out front in everything. He had a refreshing directness and boldness which characterized his whole family, from the early days at Sagamore Hill to the White House. When he died in 1919 one commentator observed that it seemed as though a military band had stopped playing. This book is the perfect explanation of that remark. For Your Entertainment
THE REBEL YELL
by H. Allen Smith
"Being a carpet bagger's attempt to establish the truth concerning the screech of the confederate soldier plus lesser matters appertaining to the peculiar habits of the south. "So the forward to this hilarious book states. He didn't quite find out what a rebel yell was, but he did come upon a number of other interesting things concerning the south.
THE COMPLETE BOOK OF BARBECUE AND ROTISSERIE
COOKING by Jim Beard
A simple, clear and direct guide to some of the best meals of your life. Here you can find out how to build a barbecue or select a rotisserie. Plus a generous number of recipies for indoor and outdoor cooking.
HUNTER'S CHOICE
by Alexander Lake
Alexander Lake is widely recognized as the dean of professional hunters. Here is a collection of some of his own adventures in Africa, ranging from the humorous episode of a drunk hunter finding a hippo in the water closet to blood-tingling revalations about the Mau Mau.
In Passing . . .
The Best Short Plays of 1953-54, Ed. by Margaret Mayorga-Ten outstanding new short plays.
General Jo Shelby, by Daniel O'Flaherty-Biography of the great cavalry general of the Confederacy.
Terror On Broadway, by David Alexander-For the mystery fans, murder in the bigtown.




Full Text

PAGE 1

-. Voters NTMO Like The ,unskiSe" Vol. VI, No. 62 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 11 September 1954 Rain Ends Eventful Labor Day Weekend With rain ending the Labor Day weekend with a slight shower, Mr. & Mrs. Navy Guantanamo enjoyed a final three day splurge of special events before the fall rainy season set in with its' full force. Weather for the many outdoor events was good both Saturday, Sunday, and early Monday, but many events were slightly hampered Monday night as the light shower set in after a windy afternoon. The big event of the weekend for the base was the Naval Station Invitational Golf Tournament held for the first time this year. After a day of qualifying rounds Saturday, both fleet, base, and civilian golfers teed off early Sunday morning in the first 36 holes of the 72 hole competition. At the end of the day's activity, LT A. "Tony" Grego, 1954 Naval Base Champion, and Chief L. E. Rogers of the Naval Air Station were tied with a 148 each for the first 36. Monday morning turned out to be a fine golfing day as was seen by the enthusiasm of the many entrants in the tourney. The afternoon, however, turned out not as good as a strong cross-course wind came up hampering drives. At the end of the day, the contest stood the same for Grego and Rogers as their scores still matched for the entire 72 holes. At the Naval Air Station activity reached its peak Monday night at the Air Station EM Club when The Seven Wonders, a Cuban orchestra straight from the Oasis in Caimanera, entertained members of NAS and VU-10 with dance music from 8 to 11:30. Aproximately 75 men and hostesses from Guantanamo City's USO were present. Also over the weekend, fourteen lucky "tourists" made the Air Station's first navigational training hop in the station's new UF-1. The flight departed Friday evening and returned Monday evening after an enjoyable stateside holiday in Miami, Florida. From a recreational standpoint, NAS had a busy weekend in IntraMural Softball League play. Communications defeated Supply 10-5, Operations tounced Boatshed 9-0, and Administration moved into r second place tie with Operations, burying Communications 14-2. The Leeward Pointers, who will have their own team represented in the Base League, still rule the roost at the half way mark with a perfect record of five wins and no losses. At the Naval Station, a holiday peak was reported by the Special Services Department. For all three days of the weekend, all recreational facilities were used to the utmost by both fleet and base personnel. At Windmill Beach, all cabanas were utilized for small private parties all three days, and not a single cabana was left unreserved. (Continued on Page Three) Exchange Gas Station Considered For Expansion Car owners of the Naval Base may soon be offered faster and better service at the Navy Exchange Gas Station here where an expansion project is presently being prepared for submission to the Navy Ships Store Office. The planned expansion program is being submitted upon recommendation of Mr. A. A. Araneo, Ship Store Representative, who reviewed facilities at the Navy Exchange garage recently. This expansion program calls for major alterations in the present pumping island. Instead of the two pumps now in use, there will be two modern two-hose pumps with automatic nozzles. This will make it possible to service four cars with gas at the same time. To further speed up gassing operations, it is planned to have a general service area where the grease rack is now located. This area will be for oil changes and such services as checking oil, water, and tires. No service except the sale of gasoline will be given at the pumping islands which will cause less waiting for those wanting only fuel. The present grease rack, with the addition of more equipment, will be moved to the northwest side of the garage facing Sherman Avenue. In addition to these changes, the Navy Exchange has requested of the Naval Supply Depot that authority be granted for the sale of 80-octane gasoline instead of the present 72-octane. For a short time recently, the 80-octane gasoline was (Continued on Page Six) 120,000 EMs Slated for Fiscal '55 Promotions Hurricane Edna Blamed For Heavy Rains Here Hurricane Edna, which was building up force in the Atlantic Ocean last week and working its way towards the United States, brought many sighs of relief from everyone on the station in the form of thunder showers. The first eagerly wave from the hurricane p ssed over the station Tuesday mopping, bringing with it thunder showers equalled 1.34 inches of rain .On Wednesday morning thunder 4howers occurred again and continued throughout the day. According to the NAS Aerology Departmet, 2.4 inches of rain, fell during the two days. The thunder storms that curred were connected with the arising of Hurricane Edna, the fifth one to start up this season, which was 225 miles off the coast of Gtmo Tuesday morning. The storm at that time was moving in a northwesterly direction with winds up to 98-miles an hour. At this time of the year these storms which build up in the Atlantic cause what is normally called the rainy season for the tropical areas. The season lasts approximately a month. Golf fans of Guantanamo Bay intently watch activity on the 9th green during the recent Naval Station Invitational Golf Tournament. Activity at the golf course was at a peak over the weekend as tournament began on Saturday and lasted through Monday. (See Story on Page Six) During the current fiscal year, ending June 30, 1955, the Navy is planning to promote about 120,000 enlisted personnel, which will raise the personnel force up to 50 percent petty officers, according to Vice ADM James L. Holloway, Chief of Personnel. Adm. Holloway said the Navy is tentatively planning to promote between 70,000 and 75,000 new petty officers third class 40,000 promoted to P02, and about, 6,000 to POL During the Navy service-wide exams held last month, an estimated 213,000 enlisted personnel were signed up for the tests. Chief petty officer examinations will be held in February, at which time some 1200 POls can be expected to be promoted to chief ratings, ADM Holloway reported. At the turn of the year, when BuPers makes a service-wide check on billets and vacancies, there is a possibility that more CPO promotions will be made, but are expected to be few. The biggest problem facing the Navy today is to get those who have served their initial four years to make the Navy a career, ADM Holloway said, but hopes new reenlistment bonus rates will see many first-hitchers reenlist in the Navy. The Navy has no trouble getting new recruits for at the present time the three training centersBainbridge, Great Lakes and San Diego-are full of recruits. On August 1 the Navy recruiting service had a waiting list of more than 7000 applicants, according to BuPers Chief. Early Outs Continue During Fiscal 1955 The two months early separation program is still in effect for enlisted men of the regular Navy, Naval Reserve and Fleet Reserve whose separation date would normally be on or before Jan. 10, 1955. Those who are due for separation between January 11-20 will be separated December 1-20 and personnel elegible for release January 21-31 will be discharged January 6-31. Requests are not necessary forseparation since personnel are notified automatically by the personnel office in time to qualify for early discharge. A full schedule of discharge dates and other pertinent information is available in BuPers Instr. 1910.5B. g

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aT Page Two TEIDA audy 1Spebr15 t9Idaai The Indian's missionTo inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9-615 Saturday, 11 September 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. SandnessOfficer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC ---Editor H. L. Sisson, JOL -----t---News Jerry Lewis, JO ---Features F. L. Cannon, JOSN----Photographer D. C. Roberts, JOSN -__ Reporter THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Na photos unless otherwise credited. WGBY Hi-Lites by George Engle At some time during the next few weeks you will notice that things are being shuffled about here at WGBY. Both the "Live" shows and the transcribed programs will be affected. So don't be alarmed if your favorite D.J. is off the air. Chances are he's busy toting a rifle and will be back in a week. The other chances may be a bit more permanent, but the substitutions are easy to take and we think you'll enjoy them. Edgar Bergen, with his two money-making wooden-heads, Charley McCarthy and Mortimer Snerd, will steal the Sunday evening spot from Jack Benny. Also featured will be Jack Kirkwood, Gloria Gordon, and Viola Vonn. With music by Ray Noble this rounds out to an enjoyable half-hour of easy listening. Replacing Amos 'n' Andy at 8:00 on Sunday, will be the bright new comedy show headed by Peter Lind Hayes, and his lovely wife, Mary Healy. Others to appear will be Jerry Vale, ten-year-old singer Leslie Uggams and pianist Teddy Wilson with Norman Leyden's Orchestra. At 2:30 on Saturday afternoon Marie Wilson will be up to her old feather-headed tricks as My Friend Irma. Judy Canova gives way to this return of a favorite, as Irma and her friends, Mr. Clyde, Mrs. O'Rielly, Prof. Kropotkin and Joe romp thru their paces, proving again that Life Can Be Ridiculous. The only daytime replacement will be Can You Top This? which will be heard Monday thru Friday at 10:30 in the old Curt Massey/ Martha Tilton spot. Noted comedian Peter Donald will present jokes sent in by listeners, while "Senator" Ed Ford, Harry Hershfield ,and former Governer Harold Hoffman of New Jersey do their level best to register higher on the electric "Laughmeter". A fast moving and highly entertaining show, "Can You Top This?" is a welcome addition to your, daytime listening. Consult the daily issues of the Papoose for any other changes in programming over WGBY, 1450 on your dial ...Good Listening! ... Hospital Notes by R. P. Campanozzi Heriport News Recently the girls have been dominating the list in childbirths. This -week, however, the blue edged out the pink three to one: James P. born to YN1 and Mrs. Marguerite Searcy, Gregory P. burn to Lt. and Mrs. Bertha Robinson, and Michael B. born to AO1 and Mrs. Miriam Jocks. The little lady is Katherine L. whose parents are SN and Mrs. Juanita Backus. Sanitation A department at this command which very few people come in direct contact with, but, although we may not be aware of it have an enormous indirect affiliation with, is the Sanitation Department. The mission of this department is the protection of the health of base personnel by control of enviromental factors which may adversibly affect our health and comfort. Among the various duties of the Sanitation Department are included: weekly inspections of base food handlers, rodent control, periodic inspections of barracks, sampling and 14boratory tests of base drinking dsater, milk and all Cuban berverages, inspecting all incoming and departing vessels and the issuance of medical clearances to these ships, veneral disease control, and insect control. As malaria is endemic in Oriente Province, one of the major problems in malaria control. Insect light traps are operated nightly in scattered locations on the base. Control operations are based on the testilts of these trap catches and field surveys. Recommendations are then made to Public Works for actual accomplishment of the work. An attempt is made to prevent the local anopholes mosquito (malaria carrier) from hatching. Studies are in progress on most effective ways to control eye gnats and sand flies. Stagnant ponds and pools are visited often by a department representative, with emphasis on larval control. The base drinking water is submitted to bacteriological analysis weekly as are the waters of the swimming pools. We are all familiar with the spraying vehicles. Wind velocity permiting, this is an effective form of insect arrest. The spray is a mixture of 10% DDT in diesel oil; parents are advised to keep children away from the direct spray. Motorist are also cautioned to maintain a safe distance from the vehicle. Inspection of food handlers is a vital procedures at any installation. All food handlers, military and civilian, are given a short course of instruction by a sanitation department member who constantly stresses cleanliness, hygiene, and proper food handling and distribution. Our Base Sanitation Officer is CWOHC J. R. Hutheraft, a registered sanitarian and members of the National Association of Sanitarians. Mr. Hutcheraft's staff includes HMC M. 0. Wertley and HM3 C. R. Barrow, both sanitation technicians. National Nurse Week The first National Nurse Week in the history of nursing is the result of a Joint Resolution introduced by Congresswoman Frances P. Bolton and passed by the Congress on 11-August 1954. .the centenary of the work of Florence Nightingale in the Crimeaa the year vtich celebrates 100 years of growth of professional nursing Navy Wives' Club Holds First Meeting The newly organized chapter of the Navy Wives' Club of America held a meeting in the Flamingo Room, Thursday evening, September 2, with RADM and Mrs. Edmund B. Taylor and Chaplain M. 0. Stephenson as honored guests. Chaplain Stephenson offered the Invocation and Benediction for the gathering. The purpose of the meeting was to acquaint interested persons and groups with the character and aim of the Navy Wives' Club and also its plan of activity, which will serve both recreational and charitable for its members. The Navy Wives' Club is a national organization for wives of all naval personnel, both officers and enlisted, including Marine and Coast Guard wives. So if you are new on the base and would like to belong to a women's club, or if you have been here for sometime and wish to enlarge your circle of friends, you are cordially invited to attend. New Alterna Uniform Sunday, 12 September 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) Prescribed For Tropics The Chaplain's Corner A change to the Navy's uniform regulations prescribes this new alternate tropical uniform for officers and CPOs who are serving in hot duty stations. The new uniformconsidered to be cool and practical -will be open-neck, short-sleeve shirt with collar insignia, long trousers, shoes, socks and cap cover to match, in either white or khaki. as we know it today. The designation of a week to honor nursing shows the high esteem which nurses have won by their service to the Nation. Nursepower has become a health resource of vital importance to military and civilian patient-care and other health services. The President of the Unit1States will proclaim the week October 11 to 16 National Nurse Neek. In the family circle, there are always arising occasions of dispute, disagreement, and argument. Parents ought not only to step in and assert their authority in settling these differences, but they ought to do so with all the tact and wisdom of which they are capable. A person's influence doesn't go very far in handling others unless it is warm and uplifting. Cold, rough treatment generally has a cold, rough effect. But where there is warmth of sympathetic feeling and nobleness of purpose, there is generally success. Our Lord reminded us that out of the heart the mouth speaketh. If the heart is lacking in feeling and understanding, the words will be harsh and often unreasonable. It is good to remember though that persuasion always goes farther than force. Because a persuaded person sees the reasons behind things, whereas one who is forced merely acquiesces. Persuasion is what made Our Lord so successful as a speaker. The people listened to Him attentively. He gained them; He made them think; He moved them to see the reasons of things. However, when necessary, force must be used; yet it should be rather firmness than force. Firmness on the part of parents, combined with self-control, is very powerful to prevent and heal disagreements in the family. Our Saviour did not hesitate, when He thought it necessary, to lay His finger on the sore spot, and to demand betterment. Prudence must be preserved. The father and mother must not take up for one against the other without just cause. What must be kept in mind is the family peace, not just the satisfaction of one or the other. The common good always comes first. Our Saviour treated the people in this manner. He was not partial. W. J. Spinney LCDR, CHC, USN Saturday, 11 September 1954 THE INDIAN

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S0 Saturday, 11 September 1954 A Letter For You 1The Boss' Answers Some questions Often a daydreaming sailor can "see" himself walking up to "The Boss" and saying, "Now look here, Admiral, I wanna' know something. How about ..." And The Boss puts his arm around the shoulders of our boy and says, "Well, son, I'll tell you ..." And just about that time the chief's voice bellows into that pink cloud: "Hey, Potrzebie, where's that bucket I sent you after?" So, our hero ends his chat with the admiral before it even gets started. Well, direct from The Boss, himself, comes some straight answers to some mighty pertinent questions that have been kicked around about your Navy. The Boss, Admiral R. B. Carney, Chief of Naval Operations (OpNav), recently answered a letter from Vice Admiral A. S. Merrill, director of the Navy League of the United States, Greater New Orleans Council. Admiral Merrill asked The Boss what the Navy has accomplished or is in the process of accomplishing to make the Navy more attractive as a career. And, here, printed verbatim, as received by Admiral Merrill, is Admiral Carney's reply. It is an excellent resume of the entire subject and careful reading will provide more than ordinary interest to all personnel, both officer and enlisted. (Because of the length of the letter and the interesting reading it provides, The Indian will print the reply in two parts. This is the first half. Look for the conclusion next week.) Department of The Navy Office of the Chief of Naval Operations Washington 25, D. C. 17 August 1954 A. S. Merrill, Vice Admiral, USN (Ret.) Navy League of the United States Greater New Orleans Council 608 Canal Street New Orleans, La. Dear Tip: I haven't forgotten my promise to round up a list of items that will give some indication of what we, ourselves, have accomplished or are in the process of accomplishing by way of making the Navy more attractive as a career. Needless to say the problem is a big one, not easily solved and the achievements to date do not measure up to either our needs or our desires. There are even times when our efforts to increase service benefits suffer serious setbacks. A rider in the Army Civil Functions Appropriation Act this year, for example, deprived the services of the right to maintain hospitals in the Canal Zone. Our men and dependents in that area must now rely for hospitalization on a Canal Zone government that already has difficulty in maintaining adequate medical staffs for its own use. For another example, the recently enacted Internal Revenue Code gives some income tax relief to everyone living on retired pay except retired members of the Armed Services. Such setbacks are discouraging but the things we have done will serve at least to show the direction in which we are moving. However long it may take, I assure you that I will not give up, while I am the Chief of Naval Operations, in this effort to improve the lot of those who make a career of the Naval Service. I will not attempt to deal with the Womble Report point by point since this report dealt with all three Military Services and many of the items do not apply or apply only in part to the Navy. It will be obvious, however, to what extent the items related below apply to the four general areas of the Womble Report which were: (1) World Commitments and National Attitudes (2) Military Authority and Leadership Has Declined (3) Increased Competition With Industry for Good Men (4) Budgetary Considerations Should Not Be Permitted To Transcend Combat Effectiveness. Here, then, in a miscellaneous package, are some of the things we are doing: 1. What we are doing to improve the caliber of officers and men and to put a premium on ability We are tightening up on officers' promotions as a spur to a superior performance of duty. We are also returning to the practice of "selecting out" Regular officers whose capabilities do not justify promoting them to higher grades. These officers can retire under the legal provisions that cover such cases. A return to traditional high professional standards will include, by next year, the employment of correspondence courses and the reinstitution of promotion examinations. This includes modified programs applicable to Temporary and Reserve officers on active duty and further modified to govern promotion of Reserves on inactive duty. We have a new officer's fitness report designed to do a better job of measuring ability to take on higher responsibilities. We have directed early separation of enlisted personnel who are unsuitable or are turning in an inferior performance of duty. Only those who come up to service requirements will be permitted to reenlist. Current reduction in forces are being utilized to retain those whose particular skills and agein-grade make them most desirable as career people. The best. of the Reserve officers who are retained in the rank of Lieutenant and below will be offered an opportunity to transfer to the Regular Navy. We are taking steps, but will need some legislative help, to increase the authority of commanding officers to enforce routine discipline. We particularly want to discourage absenteeism in order to better distribute, hence ease, the general work load. We are now permitting voluntary resignation of officers after 4 years of service except for those with special voluntary commitments. This has already had a beneficial morale effect on younger officers who felt they were "captives" and the resignations, so far, have been fewer than we anticipated. For the older officers we are now permitting voluntary retirement after 20 years or more service. This is being done on a carefully controlled and restricted basis and will remain in effect if it is not abused to a point where the service suffers. We have instituted a transfer program for gh-caliber men in WO Retirement Rules Clarified By SecNav Washington (AFPS)-Commencing Nov. 1, 1954, all Navy permanent WOs, including those in higher grades, will retire on the last day of the month in which 60 days expire after the date of completion of 30 years active service, according to the Secretary of the Navy. Permanent WOs desiring to continue on active duty beyond their 30 year retirement date must submit requests for retention to the Seceretary of the Navy via the chain of command at least four months prior to the date of completion of 30 years active service. Requests must state duration of extension desired, but not to extend beyond the statutory retirement age. Permanent WOs completing nore than 30 years active service prior to Nov. 1, will retire on Dec. 31, unless requests for extension are submitted and approved. Brownies Begin Activity Next Week At Meeting Next Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, the Brownies of Guantanamo Bay will meet to officially register all members, organize into troops, and sign up new members for the coming year. All three meetings will be held immediately after school at the Brownie Hut next door to the Community Auditorium on Marina Point and will last approximately an hour. To speed up registration, it has been planned to hold the meetings for age groups with 9-year-olds meeting on Tuesday, 7-year-olds meeting on Wednesday, and 8-yearolds on Thursday. All mothers are welcome at these meetings, and catalogues will be available so that they can order and select uniforms for their girls. Since registration will take place during these three days, girls may bring $1.00 at this time for their National Brownie dues. Any interested girls or parents who have any questions concerning these meetings or Brownie activities may call any of the following leaders. Mrs. H. T. Wallings (7-year-olds) 8331 Mrs. D. J. Murphy (7-year-olds) 8652 Mrs. D. B. Powers (8-year-olds) 8439 Miss Barbara Davie (9-yearolds) 8146 Mrs. A. D. Nelson Jr. 8855 chief and first class petty officer rates who desire to change over to skilled electronics ratings. They will be sent to school and then reclassified without demotion in rating. We have improved sea and shore duty rotation opportunities for all of our career personnel by providing additional shore billets for those ratings who formerly had to spend a high percentage of their time at sea. A boilerman, for instance, who used to have to spend most of his time on ship board can now look forward to a fair shake when his turn comes for shore duty. I ComNavBase Officially Opens Bay Hill 'Barrel Club' The delayed opening of the enlisted men's Barrel Club, located at the foot of Bay Hill, finally came about last evening when RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base cut the ribbon and opened the club for business. Originally scheduled for Labor Day, the opening was delayed by unfinished work. The Club will be operated by the Naval Station Special Services Department and will be primarily for the personnel living in the Bay Hill barracks. The hours of operation will be the same as for the Enlisted Men's Club now in operation in the Fleet Recreation area. Beer, soft drinks and a large variety of snacks will be available at all times. Uniform of the day will be the required dress. Continual improvements will be made to the club in the form of a juke box, shuffleboard, coin machines, etc. as funds become available from the profits, according to LT E. A. Sandness, Special Services Officer. Highlighting the opening ceremony was the serving of refreshments in a "free lunch counter" style. Labor Day .. (Continued from Page One) the base, many longer excursions were made by base organizations to the picnic grounds at the Yateras River. In the Fleet Recreation Area, the usual weekend activities of base and fleet personnel was reported. The swimming pool, archery range, baseball batting range, tennis courts and skating rink were seldom idle. Although the Naval Station Softball League scheduled no games over the holiday, there were several practice games on the part of both base and fleet personnel. At the Officers' Club, the opening of the new $27,000 galley with a smorgasbord dinner Monday night proved to be one of the biggest events of the year. Even despite the light shower at the beginning of the evening, the attendance at the special event far surpassed all expectations. The dinner, according to reports, turned out 'supreme'. Sunday night, the Flamingo Room of the Petty Officer's Club held a special uniform dance which saw one of the largest crowds ever known turning out. SCUTTLEBUTT "Will you please walk on the paper mt THE INDIAN Page Three

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Paes Pour GTIMO Denizen Trio Places Third In Colorful Key Wester Spearfishing Nationals by Jerry Lewis The tantalizing aroma of an outdoor fish-fry wafted about the spacious lawn of the Casa Roma hotel a few miles south of the city of Key West late last month. It was Saturday, August 28, 6:30 P.M. Gathering in small groups about the crystal-like swimming pool were top spearfishermen from the east, west, north and south of the United The starting signal is given exactly 9:25 A.M., and the boats roar off in different directions almost immediately. In a few months, the only occupants are the operators. The divers are far below. on their way to the bottom. A last minute briefing took place on the fantail of the Greyhound as the six small craft buzzed impatiently about like worker bees around their queen, waiting to spread out and commence the hunt. The "go" was given at exactly 9:25 and the boats, roared off in different directions almost immediately. Tired but happy, Kropack, Cavanaugh and Ahlberg hold third place honors in the 1954 Nationals. Owen Churchill Cup (far left) next years prize perhaps. States. There were underwater movie photographers and reporters from some of the top sporting magazines of the country. A photographer from Life magazine, various skin-diving magazines, Miami newsmen and reporters from this paper talked shop as a glowing tropical sunset graced the western skies over the keys. Officials of the A.A.U., representatives of the Chamber of Commerce of the city of Key West, various hosts, residents and dignitaries from the sporting world mingled with the champion divers. Set apart from the crowd, enclosed by a low-cut, semi-circled hedge stood a gleaming array of trophies. In the center, the large silver Owen Churchill cup stood, the incentive and top honor for one of the teams gathered there in the dusk. The fish-fry brought together participants, observers and reporters, eager to roll into action the following morning when the signal would be given to commence the 1954 National Spearfishing contest, one of the years most lookedforward to major events. The evening wore on. Finally, the attention of all present was called and the rules and regulations of the International Spearfishing Association were read and discussed by officials of the A.A.U. and the Miami Skindiving Association. Questions were answered by the experts and the party dissipated to fall in for a good nights sleep in preparation for the big day. At seven the following morning, two fifty-foot fishing craft left the docks at Key West. One boat, the "Savannas", carried the press and photographers, wh ile t he "Greyhound", the divers, determined to cop the grand prize for their team and "bring home the bacon". The gleaming silver cup displayed on the lawn at Casa Roma the preceeding evening held a prominent place in the minds of the divers as they readied their Arbolettes and Hawaian Slings, checked their schnorkels and cleaned glass face-masks. Six miles and two hours later, both boats dropped anchor off Pelican Shoals. The fathometer in the Savannas' wheelhouse marked 30 feet. Assigned to each team was a trim outboard motor-boat and into these they climbed, anxious for the signal that would send them to the surface, many with badly bent spears that attested to the short, swift struggle that took place far below seconds before. The hunters would blow h a r d through clogged schnorkels, gulp fresh air and descend once again. So it went for hours under a blistering August sun hanging in a sky filled with great billowing clouds. The only swimmers equipped with Aqualungs were the underwater movie photographers who followed the divers, their cameras grinding away at the fantastic scenes taking place as the hunters climbed coral shelves, along white sandy floors and through strange and beautiful formations that created a natural setting far beyond the capacity of a Hollywood movie set. When a kill was made, there was almost certain to be a movie or still camera recording the scene from within water-tight plastic cases as it happened. The weather remained clear and visibility below was as near-perfect as could be expected. Four hours passed. At precisely 1:25 P.M., a red smoke b o m b billowed skyward from the official's boat-signifying the end. It was all over but the shouting, and that was soon to follow. The hunt was on! In a few more moments, the only occupants of the small boats were the operators. The divers were far below, hunting the shoals and coral formations that hid their quarry. Every variety of tropical fish scurried this way and that as the divers advanced towards the silent world of prystalblue water and reallife fantasy. The Greyhound" returns with Soon, the depths slowly and hesits cargo of tired dives anxious itatingly gave up its secrets and for final weighing in. Note moviethe small boats started filling with man aft recording crowds waiting almost every species of fish as at the pier as the 50-footer prethe divers brought their catches pares to tie-up. Last minute briefing takes place on fantail of Official's boat as the small craft buzz about, taking their teams aboard and readying for the 'go'. Saturday, 11 September 1954 a THE INDIAN Page Pour

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Saturday, 11 September 1954 S THE INDIAN Back in Guantanamo Bay, the third place trio along with the Denizen president, LT Carl Plath, center, received congratulations from RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, in an informal office ceremony. In a few moments, the entire party was re-grouped and underway for Key West with sun-burned observers and tired spearfishermen. The loss of guns-stolen by the big fellows, badly bent spears and parted lines were discussed on the journey home. Notes of the "big ones that got away" were compared and each contestant was caught up and held by the anxiety of the final weighing-in. A tropical squall parading north showered the boats with a cool, welcome rain on the way in but the trip was unhampered. Upon returning to the point of departure, the divers found a large crowd on hand to welcome them and to wait for the final results. The battery of photographers perched around the dock started firing flash bulbs before the Greyhound tied up at the pier. The next 30 minutes is sports history. The Miami "Tritons", made up of the well-known brothers, Art, Fred and Don Pinder, copped top honors for their organization with an aggregate total of 2811/2 pounds of fish! Taking second slot with 213 pounds were the Pacific Coast Champions, the "Dolphins" of California who travelled about 3,000 miles to compete. Charlie BlakesCredit Charlie Blakeslee of the California "Dolphins" for turning this 37 pound nurse shark into a statistic which won him the prize for the largest single fish caught. lee of the "Dolphins" won a single prize for himself by bringing back a 371/ pound nurse shark for the largest single-fish catch of the day. In third place were the "Denizens of the Deep" representing Guantanamo Bay Naval Base. Earl Cavanaugh, Ted Ahlberg and John Kropack, bringing in a grand total of 207/2 pounds in the very tight competition. The Navy team came in far ahead of expectations, throwthe odds for a loop. The three showed up magnificently against other amateur spearfishermen of top standing. John Kropack will never forgive that 'Cuda that swiped his Arbollete -a 'Cuda that would have meant second place for the Denizens. Following the Denizens were the defending champions of 1954, the "Muirmen" of California with 204 1s pounds. A brief but very wet Floridatype thundershower dampened the spirits of the crowd for a short time during the presentations of awards, but divers and photogs remained and congragulations were in order for the winning teams. Follow-ups in the contest were t h e Central California Regional winners, the Monterey Sea Otters; the Great Lakes Regional winners who are known to the sports world as the Ann Arbor "Amphibians"; and the "Blackfish" from Brooklyn, N.Y. The latter, having never fished for tropical prey, were awed by the clarity of the Key West water. After the weighing-in was completed and prizes awarded, the gross catch of approximately 800 pounds was cleaned and sold for charity. Tne contest was sponsored by the Florida Skindivers Association and the City of Key West in cooperation with and under rules and regulations of the International Speaifishing Association under sanction of the A.A.U. The first National Meet sanctioned by the A. A.U. was held at Laguna Beach, California, in 1951, the first new sport to be recognized by that body in over 40 years. The rich hunting grounds off the coast of Key West offer an untold variety of fish, almost unlimited in scope, and has consequently grown to be one of the major points of interest for the underI John Kropack and Earl Cjvanaugh assist inhoisting their basket to scale as A.A.U. official cheeks figures. Total weight of Denizen catch was 207%Vpounds. water fisherman. Two majqr facup tentative plans for a local meet tors are the crystal-clearness of at San Juan, P.R., towards the end the water and the abundance of some of the wotid's finest! gameof this year. fish. On behalf of the Indian and the Such meets as the "Key Vester" Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, are proving to the world that there surely one of the most sportsis to be found below the surface minded of such installations in the of the water, entirely new vistas entire Navy, this reporter would open to exploration, photography like to extend a hearty 'well-done' and the thrilling sport, officially to Earl Cavanaugh, Ted Ahlberg recognized now, of hunting on the and John Kropack for proving homegrounds of the game being they are champion material and sought. for bringing home to Guantanamo LT Carl Plath, President of the Bay Naval Base third place honors Denizens Of The Deep, is drawing in the 1954 Nationals. These are the ones that didn't get away! Over 700 pounds of fish to be cleaned and sold for charity after Meet is officially over. 7 m a Page Five

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Psage Six Grego, Rogers Tie in First NavSta Invitational Golf Tournament RADM G. B. H. Hall, Commander, Tenth Naval District, (back to camera) sinks an 18-footer on the 17th green during the Invitational tournament. Perpetual Tony Grego sinks his last putt of the tournament on the 18th green (left) while his opponent, Lee Rogers drops his in from the same distance. Both Grego and Rogers tied for the low gross title with 293. The unprecedented happened last week-end when a comparative newcomer matched Perpetual Tony Grego stroke for stroke in the Naval Station's first annual Invitational and wound up in a first place tie with the "old champ" for the "Whitey Taylor Cup." Lee Rogers, of Roanaoke, Va. and the maintenance and engineering chief of the Operations Department of NAS swung through the 72hole tournament side by side with the 1954 club champion and came off the last green with an identical score of 293 to divide honors for the low gross. Next in line for low gross was Chuck Loggins of VU-10 with a 304. Grego came up with a 72 on the first 18 to win the medalist title and the "Arky Caruthers Cup", and Rogers took second place net honors with 261. Charles Blake from Port Control took low net honors and the "Tony Grego Cup" with 246. Qualifying rounds for the Invitational started Saturday morning with over 100 golfers in the running. The top 60 were chosen to compete and they teed off on the main part of the tournament SunW. L. Neagele, YN3, of the Naval day morning. Air Station Personnel Office, smiles Rogers had his most troublesome victoriously as he displays the 163 time during the qualifying round pound Grouper that he caught off while Grego's toughest hole was the Coast Guard pier here recently. the 14th on the last round when he shot a five for the par 3 hole. 1954 Naval Base Championship. Lee Rogers has been aboard the Following Grego and Rogers and base a little over two months and Loggins for low gross scores were has been playing golf only 2% Acres with 310, Scott of FTG with years. He says he started in Pensa312 and Bush of Naval Station cola, Fla. in 1951 and felt lucky with 315. Behind Blake and Loggins if he broke 100 in those early days. in the low net division came Owens Perpetual Tony from Patterson, of Naval Station with 269, Kelley N. J. probably has more championof the Naval Hospital with 271 and ships to his credit than any of the Brough of VU-10 with 272. local linksters will see in their Anchor man in the tournament lifetime. He held the ComSix title and winner of the shag bag and for three years, the South Central practice balls was George Willich crown for two years, the Armyof Fleet Camera Party with a 72Navy championship in Panama for hole total of 405. 4Y2 years, the Jacksonville Naval Loggins had 10 birdies for the Air Station championship for 2 match, Rogers had eight and Grego years, the Pensacola title for 2 came in with seven. Acres had years and the Patuxent River six, and Scott, Dempsey, Byrne, championship for 1 year. In the Mauldin, Blake, Brough a n d two years that he has been at Houston had five while Vanderheof, Guantanamo Bay, Tony has copped Kelley Broughton and Stanovich the 1953 ComTen crown and the had four gi. VU-10 Prop Blast by Bill Graves & Staff With three in the loss column the Transfer Department went ahead of the receipts this week. The transfers were Charles F. Pickhardt, Richard L. Munsell and Luther D. Smith all to civilian life. The two received were Burl H. Dixon, AD1 from the Receiving Station, Norfolk, Va., and Jack J. French, AD2 from VF-44, Jacksonville, Fla. The "Old Timers" party last Sunday night at Ed Keatings quarters was a wonderful success. Everyone had a good time and the entertainment was excellent. Thanks to LT Jack Hawkins on his party Friday night at the AOQ, and congratulations again on the promotion. Christi, AD1 is going to the eye doctor to have his eyes tested for glasses. Every bird that comes up looks like a quail to him, even those little bitty Field Larks? It is understood from reliable sources that three "Par Busters" took Lippy Stanovich to the cleaners last week in a very hot golf game, Swartz, Hobson and Mace lead the assault. I hear from the grapevine that Chief Chipparoni won't be sweating anymore trips to Kingston. Utility Squadron TEN's office personnel fully deserve sea pay for the month of September. Tuesday during the rain the hangar roof sprang a leak (a HOLE) and the offices were flooded. If the rain doesn't cease, all personnel will be ordered to wear a Mae West or seek a higher level. Gas Station (Continued from Page One) offered on a trial basis, and it was found that approximately 99 out of a 100 car owners definitely preferred the higher test gas. To carry out the request of the Navy Exchange, CDR E. W. Sutherling, Commanding Officer, Naval Supply Depot, has written to the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts requesting authority to offer the 80-octane gasoline to the Navy Exchange. As well as the proposed changes in the gas station, the Navy Exchange will also completely revamp and remodel the CobV Shop adding all new modern pchinery. Base Softball League Slated for 18 Oct, Opening The Naval Base Softball League will commence its season schedule on October 18th according to LTJG J. G. Morgan, chairman of the softball committee. The Base Athletic Commission met last week with representatives of the commands entering a team this year and elected Morgan chairman. There will be a meeting of the committee itself later this month for the purpose of devising any special rules and regulations and forming the season's schedule. The are eight teams representing various commands entered this year in the league. The are: Naval Station, Naval Air Station, Leeward Point, VU-10, Marines, Naval Supply Depot -Cargo Handlers (combined), Fleet Tarining Group and MCB-4. The season will run from October 18th through December 3rd, including any play-offs or tournaments. SCUTTLEBUTT F.~*~4 Saturday, 11 September 1954 m THE INDIAN sm

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Saturda 11 Setember 1954TPg eM i( nstos(es By Sgt. William J. McDowell Jr. and Cpl. Joe Androvich, USMC There were two departures this week in the person of Sgt. F. C. Bailey and Pvt. Melendez. Sgt. Bailey will report to Norfolk, Va. for reassignment and Private Melendez will report to Marine Barracks, San Juan, P. R. for duty. We all wish both men the best of luck at their new duty stations. Last Monday, Marine Barracks had one of the best Field Meets ever held at the Barracks. There were all types of events and everyone present had a good time. Chicken, beer, and soft drinks were consumed all during the Meet. Winners of the events were as follows: Tug of War, Guard Section; Blind Mans' Relay, Headquarters Platoon; Volley Ball Game, Staff NCO's and Officers; 100 yard Dash, tie between Pfc Chuck Mason and Sgt. Lee Haurik; Skeet Shooting, Pfc Herman Lugauer of Guard Section; Broad jump, 1st Place, Pfc Gourdine, 2nd Place, Sgt. Lee Haurik, both of Headquarters Section; Dodge Ball, Pfc A. R. Garten; Egg Toss, Pfc Eisenzimmer and Pfc Manuel Gomez. Individual prizes were awarded to the various winners. The Tug of War gave many good laughs-the rope broke three times and what a pile up of men on both sides. On the fourth attempt Guard rallied and won after almost being pulled across the line. Must have been the good chow and beer. The only successful fishermen over the holiday weekend were Sgt. L. G. Jones and Hospital Corpsman HM3 Nilsen of the Marine Dispensary. Sgt. Jones went out to the back bay and caught a 10% pound Snapper and a 12 pound Barracuda. Nilsen landed a 5/2 pound barracuda measuring 302 inches. "Naturally, the 'big ones' got away!" The Headquarters team of the Marine Intra-Mural Softball league got off to a fast start by winning their first two gamse and giving them a 1/ game lead over the 2nd Section Guard. The 1st Section is in third place followed by the Staff & Officers team which is yet to get in the winning column, losing their first two games. Standings Headquarters 2 0 2nd Section 2 1 1st Section 1 2 SNCO'S-Officer 0 2 Sultry-voiced Gina Lollobrigida, Italian film actress, has oeen awarded the Silver Ribbon-Italy's version of Hollywood's Oscar. FTG Bulletin by Jack Engstrom Lieutenant M. C. Alexander, FTG Electronics Officer departed yesterday on the USS RUSMORE, (LSD-14) for the states. He will report to the Commanding Officer, NAS Argentia, Newfoundland for duty. Chief Ships Clerk Davidson, FTG Reports Officer, departed GTMO last Wednesday via FLAW for NAS Jacksonville, Florida where he will complete his last tour of duty in the Naval Service before retiring. Paul Hauenstein, ET1, Fleet Training Center also departed Gtmo via FLAW last Wednesday for NAS Jacksonville where he will be separated from the service. William Smiley, RM1, FTG Communications, will depart on the USNS JOHNSON on its return trip to the states. He will report in at the U.S. Naval Reserve Station, Brooklyn, New York for separation from the service. Lawrence Lightfoot, TMC, FTG Gunnery Department, will ing to the states shortly for of Instructor Shore Duty. report to the Commanding U.S. Naval Training Cent Diego, California for duty ing training of Recruits. Good luck to you all i new ventures. USS USS USS Ship Arrivals Cushing (DD-797) Batfish (SS-310) Hancock (DD-675) Departures None NSD Supply Line LT and Mrs. P. D. Lars Chief Parachute Rigger an E. R. Erickson spent their Labor Day weekend to g vantage as the guests of Mrs. Santiago Fajardo, L man Stevedore, Mr. M Serret. Storekeeper Gener Mr. Roger A. Dannery, typist, at Guantanamo Cit enjoyed a traditional Cub barbeque with all the trir Among the picturesque sigh saw were the caverns n Guaso River. George P. Tennant, Store Transit Shed, is enjoying weeks vacation in Jamaica. We're all happy to he Merle Sands is on his feet and although no definite ti been set for his release fr hospital, we're all hoping 'back with us soon. Mrs. Evelyn MacDonald us Friday and will be GTMO the next time the Pvt. Elden H. Johnson con way. We'll all miss you, E Nereida de los Santos tiago, is spending this week guest of her brother-in-l sister, Mr. & Mrs. Joseph L In a game played last T under the arcs on diamond two, the NSD softball te tended their winning streak in a row as they squeezed with an 11-10 decision over Trailing the Trainers by count in the bottom half seventh, the NSD nine pus runs across the plate to score and push the gai extra innings. ENS Kezer's hard hit ball with tw 'but in the NAS Crosswinds by Dick Friz Who's Who at NAS LT Everett Pierce, Photographic and Special Services Officer. LT Pierce was born in Belmond, Iowa and attended High School there. He joined the Navy in '32 and took Boot training at San Diego. He served as a seaman on the USS SARATOGA from '32-36. In '37 he entered the U.S. Naval Shool of Photography. In 38-'40 he was a photographer for the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, and later served on the USS FULTON. He was commissioned Ensign in October of 1943. Since that time, LT Pierce has held positions as Photographic Officer with VJ-11, CinCPacFlt P.L.O., assistant Pictorial Officer for EXOS-Pub Info, worked with BuAer photo division in '49 and'50. His last duty station was with Fleet Aircraft Service in Pax. He married Delores in Honolulu in 1947 and they have three children, Anthony, Timothy, and Sherry. Hail Alma Mater be headSpebrsbc-osho'pt a tour tern has had some of the AV-50 He will residents recalling with evident Officer, nostalgia, the good old days when er, San they too carried books under their involvarms. (Their thoughts are probably focused on coeds in tight n your sweaters, rather than integral calculus or objects of the p~reposition). 1Se One of the boys received a letter 13 Sep from Ralph Hurst, ex AM3 who 15 Sep was discharged several nths 17 Sep ago. Ralph is attending Southern Illinois U. in Carbondale. This is the old alma mater of "Bear" Woodrome. Bobby Bear, an Agriculture major at Illinois U.' was ei seen playing a record of ngar tunes by the famous Illini Band, sent to him by the Alumini Ason and association ...And Jim Jamison, an d Mrs Iowa State grad, and Duck Clark, ir long who attended Dickerson U., were od adseen quibbling over the relative Mr and merits of Sigma Chi and Sigma eadingAlpha Epsilon. lauriclo John Schmitt, recently transferal, and red to Pax, is attending school part Clerktime at Georgetown U. Many others y. They at AV-50 have expressed their dean pig sire to take advantage of the new nmings. G. I. Bill which incidentally had its its they second birthday August 19. In that ear the period, a third of a million men (out of a possible 3 millionY' have keeper, utilized its benefits. This fall's ena two rollment is predicted to exceed the all time G. I. high of 355,000 men ar that in April of 1954. again, And The Angels Sing me has The Airdales have been joining oem the o hbe the 1Protestant and Catholic choirs he'll in arg numbers recently. Paul leaves Snyder and Bob Chadeleott have leaving joined the Catholic group, while laig Bert Messmer has intentions?.?. USNS LT C Echols is president of the es this Protestant Choir, and Bill Wells, vie! Joseph Clemens, John Kidwell, of SanTom Phillips, John Page, Anthony as the Pavlos, Bill Dean, and Dick Friz aw and boom in the Bass section. Just a West. secondwe heard a tenor in the hursday group: it's Pavlos. number Barracks Chatter am exto four OVERHEAD: "You must have through had a terrific weekend: your eyes FTG. are sure bloodshot. You ought r sie see them from this side." a of the hed five tie the ne into ground bottom half of the eighth inning provided the winning tally. Circuit clouts by Bob Griffith and Francis Hanselman, along with John Wright's three hits, sparked the NSD batsmen. A girl with universal appeal, Miriam Stevenson, a South Carolina coed, wears her crown of Miss Universe with regal dignity. Miriam was chosen Miss U.S.A. two nights earlier at the annual Long Beach, Calif., judging. And judging by her measurements of 36-24-36, there was no doubt of the outcome. Want a $1000 Prize? ENTER THE CONTEST What does America mean to you? Enter the 1954 Freedoms Foundations Contest. Send your letter of no more than 500 words to Awards Editor. Armed Forces Radio Service, 1016 N. McCadden Place, Los Angeles 38, Calif. Your letter must bear your name, rank, service number, and organization. It must be received before midnight Nov 11, 1954. Letters received after that date will be considered for the next year's awards. (AFPS) A staggering drunk, seeing a St. Bernard dog walk toward him with a whisky flash around his neck, gasped, "At last! Man's best friend and a dog." THE INDIAN Page Seven Saturday 11 Septe 54

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Navy=DPPO-10ND-Gtmo.-0224 a THE INDIAN' Saturday, 11 September 1954 MOVIES Saturday, 11 September THE FORTY-NINERS Bill Elliott Virginia Grey Elliott, a U.S. Marshall, poses as a killer to track down three murderers. He eventually comes upon the trio, each of whom has since become a fairly respectable businessman in a California goldboom town. Sunday, 12 September THE LONG, LONG TRAILER Lucille Ball Desi Arnaz A honeymoon on wheels turns out to be a nightmare when the groom finds his funds strained by the purchase of a super-streamlined trailer. In color. Monday, 13 September JIVARO Fernando Lamas Rhonda Fleming A young man runs a jungle trading post at a small river settlement near the dangerous Jivaro Indian country on the Amazon. A girl comes there looking for her sweetheart who has become a drifter, only to find that he has been killed by the natives. In color. Tuesday, 14 September THE MAD MAGICIAN Vincent Price Eva Gabor After working for years with a manufacturer of magician's illusions, a young magician kills him. This leads from one killing to another, each with a new way of disposing of the body. Wednesday, 15 September MAKE HASTE TO LIVE Dorothy McGuire Stephen McNally A newspaper woman in a small New Mexico town is confronted with her terrible past when her husband, a gangster with a prison record turns up and tries to ruin her life and the life of their teenage daughter. Hear about the firefly in the small town who was all lit up but no place to glow? With the coming of fall and cooler weather beach beaties, such as this unidentified lass, begin to cover up with sweaters. She still looks good. Inamet Etchins by R. M. (Bob) Quiat Many people might think that the field called, "Operative Dentistry", means a surgical operation. Technicaly this is so, since the actual meaning given in the dictionary states that it is that particular branch of the science and art of dentistry which aims at the preservation of the natural teeth to a state of health and beauty. In more common language, it is the filling in of lost tooth structures by mechanical procedures. Operative work is necessary before any specific tooth deficiences can be corrected. This week I'd like to present our fourth in a series of personalities of the week. His name is Carl H. Biedenharn, DT3, USN, is 24 years old and hails from Mason City, Illinois. Carl attended Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois and the University of Illinois, before entering the Navy in February of 1951. In July of the same year he completed Dental Technician School at Great Lakes, Illinois. He served two years in Jacksonville, Florida before coming to Gtmo. Carl is a happily married man and his wife, Hester, is presently living in Jacksonville. Upon discharge from the Navy, Carl and Hester plan on making their home in Illinois. "Bied", as he is called by his many friends, enjoys hunting and fishing. It seems that all the technicians are quite modest and Bied is no exception, so this is all the information I was able to obtain from him. Bon Voyage Dr. Hayme s and family, who depart via FLAW for the good old U.S.A. We all hope you enjoy your new duty _station as much as you enjoyed your tour of duty in Gtmo. The Dental Clinic was quite proud this past weekend to have several of it's golfers qualify for the tournament that was. held. Headed by the number one man on the clinic golf ladder, they were as follows: Dr. Lyons, CDR Vogel, and King, DT1. Even though they didn't fare too well, we know they gave it the old college try. Things have been changing oi the Dental Clinic Golf Ladder. Mr. Dote has cooled off from his torrid pace of the last few weeks and was defeated in a close battle by Jef Fawcett. That's it for this week, readers., See you again next week with the latest news and views from the Dental Clinic atop Bay Hill. *O OK NOOK by Francis L. Cannon. JOSN For Your Information THE INEXHAUSTABLE SEA by Hawthorne Daniel and Francis Minot The vast expanse of the sea is a great storehouse for an almost untouched supply of food and minerals. This book explains what the sea possesses and how to get it out. It explains the problems faced by those who would tap these resources and what they must do to overcome many of them. The authors state that the sea, unlike fresh water, is itself sufficient for growth, because of chemicals present in its composition. They also state that the amount of fishing done now does no more to deplete the resouces of the sea than does taking a handful of sand from a mountain. THE FAITHS MEN LIVE BY by Charles Francis Potter This book explains the basic truths which guide more than 50 of the world's major religions today. It tells of their rites, customs and origins, present membership and strength. It is completely objective in its approach. THE ROOSEVELT FAMILY OF SAGAMORE HILL by Hermann Hagedorn This is a gay romp with Teddy and all the boys, little ones, that is. It portrays the family setting of one of our greatest presidents. Teddy Roosevelt was a man of unbeatable spirit which put him out front in everything. He had a refreshing directness and boldness which characterized his whole family, from the early days at Sagamore Hill to the White House. When he died in 1919 one commentator observed that it seemed as though a military band had stopped playing. This book is the perfect explanation of that remark. For Your Entertainment THE REBEL YELL by H. Allen Smith "Being a carpet bagger's attempt to establish the truth concerning the screech of the confederate soldier plus lesser matters appertaining to the peculiar habits of the south. "So the forward to this hilarious book states. He didn't quite find out what a rebel yell was, but he did come upon a number of other interesting things concerning the south. THE COMPLETE BOOK OF BARBECUE AND ROTISSERIE COOKING by Jim Beard A simple, clear and direct guide to some of the best meals of your life. Here you can find out how to build a barbecue or select a rotisserie. Plus a generous number of recipies for indoor and outdoor cooking. HUNTER'S CHOICE by Alexander Lake Alexander Lake is widely recognized as the dean of professional hunters. Here is a collection of some of his own adventures in Africa, ranging from the humorous episode of a drunk hunter finding a hippo in the water closet to blood-tingling revalations about the Mau Mau. In Passing The Best Short Plays of 1953-54, Ed. by Margaret Mayorga-Ten outstanding new short plays. General Jo Shelby, by Daniel O'Flaherty-Biography of the great cavalry general of the Confederacy. Terror On Broadway, by David Alexander-For the mystery fans, murder in the bigtown.


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