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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English

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_____ Govers qTMO Like The Sunshine"Vol. VI, No. 61 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 4 September 1954


August Sales Skyrocket Swimming Lessons Save


At Navy Exchange GTMO Youth's Life


Middies Biggest Buyers

Early last Tuesday morning, the last of the Midshipmen and NROTC cruises departed from Guantanamo Bay ending the annual influx of Middies and reservists here. However, behind them, they left a record of sales at Ship's Service almost as much as in August 1953.
This year, for the month of August, the Naval Station and Naval Air Station Exchanges-including the service departments and restaurants-netted $509,837. Last year the net was also over a half a million standing at a high mark of $516,857. However, the drop from last year is attributed both to a drop in the number of personnel in the Midshipmen cruises as. well as a cut in prices since Au-* gust 1953.
The number one sales item for August proved to be the alligator goods as it jumped better than twice that for July-from $17,212 to $41,563. The alligator goods have always been a big item, especially during the reservist and Middle cruises. Even though the tota) was considerably less than AugdtIt of last year, this is attributed not to less sales but to a slash in prices on the souvenir goods.
Second on the list of popular items was perfume. In July the perfume counters netted only $18,279, but in the big month of August, sales in this department skyrocketed to $42,337.
Also popular was the jewelery counter. This department, which was until recently an exclusive feature of the Air Station exchange, was added also at the Naval Station store with the added feature at both stores of the summer costume jewelery and earrings. With the addition in Naval Station store, a goal was set at the beginning of August of $20,000. When final tabulations were taken, the two counters combined had shot past that goal by $16,285.
At the Sport Shop where the stock has been as complete a possible since its beginning, a variety of items were in demand with the gun department getting the primary nod; and the Middie cruises were attributed for th increase from $21,330 for July to $36,461 for August.
Other sales jumps attributed to the Middies and reservists were in the camera department where net sales went past the $30,000 mark. The cigarette and tobacco counters also reported proportionate jumps in sales.
Several departments reported increased sales where it was thought that sales would remain constant. The household appliance department reported a jump that bettered August of 1953 by more than twice. This was due primarily to the addition of items that have not
(Continued on Page Six)


Timothy Bruce, 6-year-old son of LT and Mrs. B. J. Graves of VU-10, was enrolled in the recent swinmling classes conducted by W. C. Park, AN. Timmy was very successful in learning and progressed very rapidly-and it saved- his life.
A few days ago Tim and his younger brother, Mike, were enticed to go down the cliff to the pier behind the house, even though they had been warned not to many times. But boys will be boys!
The water at the end of the pier is about 5-feet deep. Timmy, intent on a boy's game, fell off the pier into the water. Luckily, he kept a cool head and remembering his
(Continued on Page Three)


OTMO Denizens Take Third Place Honors


At Key West National Spearfishermen's Meet

A red smoke bomb fired from the bridge of the official AAU boat at 1:35 P.M. Sunday while anchored six miles out in the Atlantic off Key West, brought to an end the National Spearfishing Meet which saw the Denizens Of The Deep, representing Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, take thii d


Military Training Be

For Ground Defense

The first phase of the Na tion's annual military t course was completed this when 20% of the station plement returned from t range, the last exercise of in 6-day schedule of drills and I
In accordance with a Na apartment regulation, 80% of mand's complement must b a yearly refresher course fantry training in order to b for any emergency.
The Naval Station, this in previous years, is takir of the complement a week a ting the men through the t in four weekly phases.
This Naval Emergency Defense Force as it is kn given an intensive week o and lectures by qualified tors. Close order drill and and squad tactics are empha the field work while the cl lectures and demonstrations guard duty, scouting, field tion and the construction struction of the .30 calib Lectures and demonstrate given during the week on manship, as well, and the training is capped on the si
(Continued on Page Th


Members of the landing force trainee group step out in the f of their drill in the annual refresher training held for 80% connand's personnel. Known as the Naval Emergency Ground Force, a new group will be trained each week until the requi of complement has completed the refresher.


prize n an extremely close competition between top champions.
Top divers of various teams were
chosen to represent their individual
ni organizations in the finals at Key
nit West after months of preparation.
The meet was sponsored by the val Sta- Florida Skin Divers Association raining and the city of Key West in comorning operation with the International s com- Underwater Spearfishing Asscociahe rifle tion under sanction of the AAU. tensive Taking top honors in the form ectures. of the Owen Churchill Cup were vy De- the well-known Pinder brothers of a con- Miami. The three, Arthur, Fred e given and Donald, are leading members in in- of the Miami Tritons who are e ready presently the Florida States champions. Art Pinder was on a team won second place at the Nationals year as in California last year and was also g 206 awarded the Helms National Ath.nc put- letic award for being the only training spearfisherman to kill a sailfish. In
Sunday's contest, he distinguished Ground himself by bringing in the largest own, is single catch of 90 pounds unassistf drills ed. The Pinder's total agregate instruc- weight was 281% pounds caught platoon in the allotted four hours. sized in Second place winners were the assroom Dolphins of California who are the take in Pacific Coast Champions. Their sanita- total weight was 213 pounds. and in- Charles Blakeslee of the Dolphins re rifle. won honors as top man in largest ons are fish caught with a 37/2 pound marks- nurse shark. entire Taking third place in the tight xth day competition were the Denizens Of ree) The Deep from Guantanamo Bay,
represented by E. H. Cavanaugh (Civ.), T. P. Ahlberg (Civ.) and LTJG J. A. Kropack who weighed
in a total of 207% pounds.
Last year's defending champions,
the Muirmen of California, placed
fourth with 2041/2 pounds.
Participants in what was termed
to be one of the closes competitions on record, swam in a chosen area about six miles out at sea for four hours. Servicing each team was an outboard motor-boat in which the fish were stowed as caught and divers could rest. The tourney was graced by almost perfect weather and proved to be highly successful.
No self-contained breathing devices were employed except for the conventional schnorkel tube which allows the swimmer to breathe while floating face-down on the surface. The weapons were single and double-banded Arbolettes and
the Hawaiin Sling.
The big event was covered by
underwater photographers, sportswriters for many nationally known magazines including Life, the Miami press and reporters from irst day the Guantanamo Bay Naval Staof the tion newspaper, Defense One of the interesting sideed 80% events that took place over the
(Continued on Page Five)








Page Two


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Saturday, 4 September 1954


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9-615
Saturday, 4 September 195,1
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S' NAVAL STATION
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPr william R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sandness----------Officer-Advisor
H. E. Davis, JOC-------------------Editor
H. L. Sisson, JO3 ___--------------News
Jerry Lewis, JO3----------------Features
F. L. Cannon, JOSN_-------.._Photographer
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945. and financed with non-appropriated funds. 'lHE INDIAN is a member of the Army:) Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reprodcd without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to T.E INDIAN.
All photographs are official U, S. Naw . photos unless otherwise credited.


1.000th Baby, 'Jackie' Rae Smouse Born At Hospital Here

-T ----- -\ ----


'S
K
N'


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Jacquelyn Rae inspects her brand new mother, Mrs. Hilda Smouse as Mrs. E. B. Taylor, wife of Commander, Naval Base leans over for a better look Jackie, the first child of Chief and Mrs. John H. Smouse was the 1,000th baby born at the Naval Hospital in Guantanamo Bay at 15 minutes after midnight on August 26th.


Kacb eCis Hospital Notes v U-I10 Prop Blast
En m t tlui csb Bill G & Qt ff


-I


by R. M. (Bob) Quiat

This week your reporter will try to give you a little insight on what sick call, or as in Dentistry so called "Oral Diagnosis" is. It means in simplified terms, examination of your teeth to determine what is wrong with them. Sick call is necessary, so that a definite treatment plan can be made for each patient. Upon completion of the examination an appointment is made, at a time agreeable to both patient and doctor to accomplish the treatment planned at examination. Each plan will be carried out within the resources of this clinic. Emergency treatment will be rendered for pain or urgent treatment which may arise unexpectedly. Emergencies will be taken care of 24 hours a day, but be certain that it is something that can't wait for next sick call. So before you, the future patient, decides to call for an appointment, you'll have to go thru "Oral Diagnosis" for an examination to determine what needs to be done on your teeth.
As the weeks progress, it is getting more and more difficult to obtain a personality of the week. For this week, after a little persuasion, I was able to obtain one. His name is Walter G. Howard Jr., DN, USN. He is 23 years old and hails from Milford, Connecticut. "Walt", as he is known to his numerous friends, entered the Navy in March, 1951. In September, 1951, Walt completed Dental Technician School and served aboard the U.S.S. EVERGLADES AD-24 before his arrival at Gtmo. Walt is an avid sports and movie fan. He's what you might call a walking encyclopedia. There is very little pertaining to all sports that he doesn't know something about. When Walt receives his discharge, he hopes to go back to school and become a salesman. To those who know Walt, they will tell you that with his gift of gab, he should make out quite well in his future undertaking as a salesman.
Welcome aboard to Dr. L. C. Pugliese, LT, DC, USNR and R. Marriott DT3, USN of MCB-4. The


by R. P. Campanozzi, HM2

Heiport News
Sir Stork graciously presented us with three "belle fems" this week; Jaquelyn Rae born to Mrs. John H. Smouse, Marie Ellen born to LT and Mrs. Hubert A. Janicek, and our own HM3 and Mrs. Paul S. Goldberg passed the cigars in honor of their 8 lb girl Paula.
New Arrivals
The hospital staff extends a hearty welcome to J. W. Cuddy, HM2 who arrived this past week from the USS Saipan. Cuddy an X-Ray technician appears to be very prospective in boosting the hospital sports program, being very active in basketball, baseball and bowling.
Departures
J. W. Zeigler, HM2 departed via the THOMAS to New York for separation from the Navy. John was leading corpsman in the operating room for quite some time. We shall miss him and wish him good fortune.
Golf
This column has constantly included articles on our own hospital golf tournaments and standings. One year ago a very small percentage of the staff pursued the sport. We pay tribute to HMC T. G. Byrne whose endless efforts have brought about a vast golf program at this command. At present, at least fifty percent of the hospital crew are playing and learning golf. Byrne has instigated and planned out several hospital tournaments with the result that many nonplayers are giving the sport a try. "T.G.'s" tenure at Gtmo will be coming to an end in a few months, as he is expecting orders to the states. We desire at this time to thank you, Chief, you're par in our book.


welcome mat goes out also to Mrs. R. V. Peterson and two children, who arrived via Cubana Airlines on 30 August. We all hope you will enjoy your stay in Gtmo as much as we enjoy having you.
Bon Voyage to our commanding officers' son, William Stagner, Jr. and his roommate Ronnie Speriere.


y raves a

The traffic was very light in the transfer department this week, with only one loss. Bill W. Sharp, ATC, was transferred to VU-4, NAAS, Chinco, Va., for duty. We hope you enjoy your new duty station. The only receipts were nine men for temporary additional duty of three months from VU-6, NAS, Norfolk, Va. The men are A. D. Johnson, AMI, G. W. Thomas, AT1, R. P. Kruger, AD2, M. W. Edwards, AM3, C. B. Simonse, ATAN, J. H. Goggans, AN, R. A. Peabody AN, R. L. Puglia, AN and R. K. Davis, AA. Welcome aboard and we wish you a pleasant stay with VU-10.
ENS R. T. Palmer, "The Limping Man," has been hobbling around the squadron for the past few days, suffering a sprained ankle. They say this "Hatuey" performs wonders, but this happened after only two cokes. We wish you a quick recovery, Sir!
The KDC and her crew commanded by LTJG T. O. Winkler are working continuously on the "Old Tub" making her look more "shipe shape" everyday. Good luck to the KDC and her hard working crew from all hands. We are patiently waiting to see her "Set Sail."
All officers' wives are cordially reminded that there will be a Bridge Club meeting of the Marine, NAS and VU-10 wives at the Officers' Club swimming pool at 1230 on the 7th of September. Mrs Wayne Blair and Mrs. Chic Draving are in charge of the party.
Anyone interested in teaching swimming contact LT "Boo" Ferris. You should be able to pass a swimming test and know the basic technique of instructing.
Notice to all personnel in our squadron. Be sure and fill out the Christmas Questionnaire and turn in to the Special Service Office.
Sure is good to see Marie Aslin back at home from the hospital.

We hope you enjoyed your vacation with us. We'd all like to wish you the best of luck in the coming semester at South Eastern Louisiana College.


Sunday, 5 September 1954

Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930-2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic)


The Chaplain's Corner



Modern man seems reluctant to admit his personal need for God. He likes to give the impression that he is a well adjusted individual who knows what life is all about. Never would he admit his ignorance of religion. In fact, he delights in an objective discussion of it. His views on the interpretation of a controversial passage of Scripture, his opinion as to the rigllness or wrongness of an act, and his observations of the failures of persons who profess to be religious can be had for the asking. He may even be so broad minded as to admit that religion which is a vague superstitious holdover of a past era may be necessary as a crutch for certain weak individuals but not for him. He knows the score in the game of life. He knows that the only real things are the material objects of this world, and he plunges headlong into the hopeless task of satisfying himself by the possession of these things.
Yet, modern man was created by the One God who created the men of the past and he shares with those men the same deep spiritual needs. He may attempt to hide their existence from his fellowmen. He may use his reasoning powers to deny their presence to himself. He may endeavor to forget them by using all his time and all his energies in the seeking for material things and for social recognition. But he never succeeds in escaping from his need of God. In his sanest moment modern man becomes aware of the emptiness of his life, the futility of all his strivings, and he cries out the inner yearnings of his heart in the words of the Psalmist of old: "My soul thirstieth for God, for the living God: when shall I come and appear before God?".
This column is being written with the confident knowledge that the soul of man is restless until it finds peace in communion with God. The first step in obtaining this peace is taken when you admit your spiritual needs to yourself, to God, and to your fellowmen.
M. 0. Stephenson CDR, CHC, USN


THE INDIAN


a









Saturday 4 September 1954P


Capt. Charles S. Smith (right) explains some of the details of the job to his successor, Capt. John J. Swords.
Capt. 'smitty, Smith Departs

Capt. Charles S. Smith, USMC, departed this past week and was relieved by Capt. John J. Swords. Capt. Smith is under orders to report to the Commanding General, Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, California for further transfer to the 3rd Marine Division for duty. Upon arrival in the States, he will join his wife and child for a brief stay in Penns Grove, N. J. and Arlington, Virginia before proceding to the coast.
Capt. Swords joins the Marine Barracks from Headquarters, Marine Corps, Washington, D. C. He served in Korea with the 1st Bn 1st Marine Division, "A" Company as platoon leader. He is a graduate of Hobart College, Geneva, N. Y. where he received his BA degree. While in college he was active in baseball and participated in high school basketball and football. Living on the base with Capt. Swords is his wife, Marion and their two children, Michael John and Stephanie Jane Swords.


FHA Backs Home Loans

For Armed Forces

Washington (AFPS)-Members of the Armed Forces are now eligible to obtain housing benefits under provisions of the Housing Act of 1954 which has been signed by President Eisenhower.
The Federal Housing Administration Commissioner has been authorized to insure loans on homes purchased by members of the Armed Forces-including the Coast Guard-up to 95 percent of the FHA-appraised value of the property and not to exceed an insured loan of $17,000. Personnel who have been on
active duty for more than two years and who have a need for such housing will be able to get mortgage insurance for the purchase of new homes.
Both borrowers and property must meet FHA requirements.
Certificates of Eligibility will be issued to servicemen. However, since issuance procedures have not been worked out completely yet, servicemen should not submit applications until an official announcement is made.
The Secretary of Defense will prescribe rules and regulations governing the issuance of certificates to members of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. Members of the Coast Guard will follow the regulations to be set down by the Secretary of the Treasury.
Official regulations on securing the certificates will be announced at an early date.


Leeward Field Plays

Important Role In

Air Gunnery Training

"AIR LANT's Gold Mine" was informally inspected Monday 30 August by the man himself, Vice Admiral F. W. McMahon. The real estate referred to is Leeward Point Field, the new nultimillion dollar jet gunnery training installation at NAS, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
Since this eight thousand foot strip opened for business twenty months ago hundreds of jet pilots attached to AIRLANT squadrons have come to appreciate the meaning of LEEWARD POINT. COM AIR LANT himself is the first to attest to its value for prior to its use embarrasssingly few squadrons in the Atlantic Fleet were qualified in high altitude gunnery. Today such is not the case for the unrestricted, cloud free gunnery areas over the neighboring Caribbean have been in constant use permitting AIR LANT jet squadrons to hang up impressive records in hours flown and squadron E's earned. Because it is the best jet air to air gunnery training area available in the Atlantic, the name "AIR LANT's Gold Mine" is here to stay.
During the inspection, Vice Admiral McMahon accompanied by the Naval Base Commander, Rear Admiral E. B. Taylor, and Captain R. R. McCracken, Commanding Officer of NAS Guantanamo, witnessed jet operations of VF 74, toured the recently completed massive Denver Type hanger, and also saw the concrete enlisted men's barracks, mess hall, bachelor officers' quarters and control tower all of which will soon be ready for use. The transition from a quonset hut village to that of a fully operational jet facility should be heartening news to personnel of east coast jet squadrons.
Vice Admiral McMahon stated that LEEWARD POINT field was most essential to the combat readiness of jet squadrons of AIR FORCE ATLANTIC FLEET and that its continued development must continue.


Isn't it odd that a girl afraid of a mouse will accept a date with a wolf.


'Three Angels' Cast Begin

Rehearsals For Dec. 4 Show

"Three Angels" with slightly tarnished reputations will transform the Little Theatre into a section of the Cayenne, French Guiana penal colony on Nov. 30th when the first performance of the play is scheduled.
A comedy in three acts by Sam and Bella Spewak, "My Three Angels," has the following cast: Neil Murphy, Dorothy Murphy, Ann Saxe, Lillian Armbruster, Alan Wagner, Harlan B. Cope, Ronnie Estafan, Dan Nash, Burton Knight and Tom Judkins.
The producer of the play will be Lee Douglas, stage manager George Hodges and Alan Wagner will direct, assisted by Burt Knight. Make-up crews will he under the direction of Anita Sierra. Many positions in costuming, properties and other backstage functions still exist, and those who may be interested in the backstage operations of Little Theatre are urged to attend the Little Theatre rehearsals on Tuesday and Thursday nights. In addition, a harmonica player is needed for an off-stage sequence during several scenes.

Timmy Bruce. . .
(Continued from Page One)
recent lessons, swam to a nearby boat, pulled himself up and went home.
His non-committal statement when he reached home was, "I had a nice swim in the bay."
If Timmy hadn't taken swimming lessons, and if Bill Park and his assistants hadn't accomplished a great deal with their pupils, Timmy would be just a memory now.
To Park and his helpers-"Well done!"

Military Training. . .
(Continued from Page One)
by actual firing at the rifle range.
The instructors for the defense force this year were given special training and instruction at the Marine Barracks two weeks ago in order to qualify them for instructing the infantry course.
Phase two of the course, with the next 20o of the complement selected, will begin Tuesday morning at 8 o'clock since Monday is a holiday.


The manual of arms is also included in the close by qualified instructors who were given special prior to the start of the general training.

0


order drill conducted training two weeks


PTA Holds First


Meeting Tuesday

The Parent-Teachers Association of Guantanamo Bay will begin their part of the school year here Tuesday night at 7:30 as the first meeting-a back-to-school general meeting-will be held in the patio of the Naval Base School.
Following the theme of "Back to School," Mr. T. E. Scarborough, Principal, will speak on "How Can PTA Best Assist the School" and will introduce the new teachers for this year.
Opening the meeting, Chaplain W. J. Spinney will give the invocation, and the program will begin with Mr. Scarborough's speech and introduction of teachers.
After the main program, there will be a short business meeting. The executive committee has no business to bring before the Association, so parents should keep in mind any questions concerning PTA business that they have. The meeting will close with the benediction by Chaplain M. 0. Stephenson.
After the program and business meeting, there will be a social hour and coffee "klatch" during which time there will be an opportunity for parents to get acquainted with the new teachers.
Attendance registration will be held as usual. However, this year, registration will consist of an attendance book at the door instead of a count of hands. Each individual parent will count as one vote for the class of their child, and the class having the most percentage of parents present will be awarded the attendance banner for the month.


JOHNSON Replaces THOMAS

Next Wednesday morning, 8 September, when personnel of the Naval Base turn out at Wharf to meet the incoming MSTS ship loaded with new arrivals for the base, automobiles, and household goods, they will find that the USNS Pvt. William H. THOMAS is no longer making the bi-monthly utility run. It has been relieved for duty in the European area and is being replaced by the USNS Pvt. E. JOHNSON, a sistership to the THOMAS.
The JOHNSON, which has the same passenger and cargo capacity as the THOMAS, is by no means new to Guantanamo Bay. It made its first of many trips here in 1952 and made its last run 4 December, 1952. The JOHNSON was relieved then for three round trips by the USNS UPSHUR which was in turn relived by the THOMAS.
The JOHNSON will be making the cargo and passenger runs here for an indefinite period of time.

School Sponsors dancingg Classes

Tap and ballet dancing instruction classes for children and teenagers, ages 4 through 18 will be conducted on Saturdays, commencing Saturday, 18 September at the Nursery School, Marina Point (Across from the Community Auditorium). The classes will be conducted by Mrs. W. D. F. Stagner and Mrs. J. F. Frantz, Jr., under the auspices of the Naval Base School. The fee will be $1.00 for each hour lesson, payable monthly. Registration for the classes will be held on Saturday, 11 September from 0900 to 1200 and 1300 to 1500, at the Nursery School.


T1l2 MWbAN


Page Three


Saturday 4 Septernber 1954








Page Four


Saturday, 4 September 1954


American-Korean Foundation

Begins Drive Here Soon

Under the direction of CDR R. M. Beaugrand, Naval Base Plans Officer, a drive will begin here soon for the American-Korean Foundation. The campaign for contributions is being held throughout the Armed Forces of the United States,
The American-Korean Foundation is a non-profit, non-sectarian organization. It is the channel through which Americans can provide aid to millions of Koreans who lost everything except courage in fighting Communism.
Contributions to the Foundation will help achieve two main objectives. Your help in nickles, dimes, or dollars will ease the suffering and hard-ships of the Korean people and will help the Koreans demonstrate the Democratic way of life in Asia, and thus halt the spread of Communism.
Korea needs material aid--medical supplies, hospital equipment, food supplementation, training of doctors, nurses, and teachers, homes for orphans, care for disabled veterans, and help in tracing lost children.
When hostilities ceased, Korea's first task was to survive and preserve life, spirit, and culture. Alone, the Republic of Korea could not accomplish this job, for more than 2,000,000 Korean people had been killed by bullets, bombs, and exposure-as many people as the United States lost in World Wars I and II and the Korean conflict.
Along with this, over 500,000 homes were destroyed and another half million damaged leaving 9,000,000 homeless or as refugees. Then, to make the crisis even more serious, 80 percent of the nation's hospitals were in ruins and over 100,000 children had lost both parents.
For the brave Koreans, survival meant a grim struggle for food, clothing, shelter, and medical care. This struggle still goes on, but now, through the American-Korean Foundation, you can help.
$1,000 will send a student through four years of medical school.
$100 will provide an artificial leg for an amputee veteran and train him for useful work.
$4 will pay for a year's schooling for a child.
$1 will maintain a hospital bed for a day.
50 cents will provide a day's complete care for an orphan.
Further details of this drive will be promulgated when they are available.


Naval Base Thanked For

Cancer Society Contributions

Recently, a certificate of appreciation and a letter of thanks was received by RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, from the American Cancer Society thanking the officers and men of this base for their part in helping to make the 1954 Cancer Crusade the most successful one to date.
The letter from the Chairman of the National Campaign Committee read in part:
"I feel sure that this knowledge (of helping in the success of the Cancer Crusade) will be a source of tremendous satisfaction to you and your men. In tangible acknowledgement of their splendid efforts, we present to you, on behalf of the American Cancer Society, the enclosed Certificate of Appreciation."


Recently eleven Naval Station employees were presented Length of Service Awards for 20 and 30 years of Civil Service. CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, is shown in the above picture shaking hands with John Gumbs, who with Julio Chang received a 30-year award. Others received 20-year awards. Left to right are: Jose Solomon, David Rodriguez, Vicente Costa, Ma Young, Harold Francis, David Marks, Mr. Chang, Montague Derrick, Jose Robles and John B. Lightbourne.
Looking on are: CDR E. L. Rowan, LCDR A. J. Tervo, and LCDR D. C. Edwards.

f


Mr. Axel H. Heimer, Supervisory Fiscal Accounting Officer, GS10, at the Naval Supply Depot, recently was presented his second consecutive Meritorious Civilian Service Award pin and certificate by CDR E.W. Sutherling, Depot Commanding Officer. The award was presented in recognition of a year of superior service, which earned for Mr. Heimer an efficiency rating of "Outstanding."


SCUTTLEBUTT













If you're in a hurry to find a cop . . . try going 70 mph.


U UI bWa U0 uumulates New $27,000 Galley With

Smorgasbord Dinner


On Labor Day, Monday, 6 September, members of the Officers' Club here will celebrate the completion of a brand new $27,000 galley with a Smorgasbord Dinner at 6 P.M.
The new galley, which was completed late this week, has many new features which will offer items not previously available on the menu at the "0" Club. Along with the all new ovens, ranges, and refrigerators, the entire kitchen is a glimmering array of stainless steel sinks, work tables, and modern accessories.
Newly added features not available in the older and smaller galley include a large walk-in-refrigerator making large stock supplies possible, and a plate warming oven which will be especially enjoyable since good hot meals can be served at large banquets with no delay or waiting.
The Smorgasbord dinner planned for the opening of the galley on Labor Day will be the first such event tried here at the "0" Club, and if it proves possible to obtain all the items on the planned menu, it will be a glorious occasion for all members to pleasantly "gorge" themselves,
There will be dinner music and also music for dancing after dinner by the Naval Base Band and a local commercial orchestra.

"You're girl is spoiled, isn't she?"
"No. It's just the perfume she's wearing."

"Why did you steal that $5,000,000 ?"
"Judge-I was hungry."

Old bankers never die-they just sit around and lose interest.


0


Need For Legal Personnel

Cited By Legal Officer

Because of the many recent personnel changes and transfers which have occurred in commands of the Naval Base, an acute shortage of personnel to serve on boards of investigation and court martials has arisen. To remedy this situation, the Naval Base Legal Officer, CDR Gale E. Krause, has asked that all commands take a survey of personnel within their jurisdiction that had legal training or experience.
Duties that such personnel will be asked to perform, as outlined in GTMO Naval Base Notice 5000, will consist of occasional boards and court duty.
Experience acceptable may in elude civilian law school, Naval Justice School, Newport, R. I., or a Navy correspondence course in military law.
Personnel officers of the Naval Base will screen service jackets of officer and enlisted personnel, ask for volunteers, and submit their reports concerning the number of eligible personnel to the Base Legal Office. Additionally, a statement will be included of any current or planned program within the command for enrollment of personnel in Naval Justice School at Newport or in Military Law correspondence cour ses.


P W Rpnghr SRwmII


A steel pile is swung into place by a barge crane as the Waterfront Division of the Public Works Department begins the task of repairing the broken down sea wall along Boat Shed Road by the Naval Station Boat Shed. The new seawall, which is one of many Public Works maintenance projects, is expected to be complete by the 15th of September.


Bay Hill 'Barrel Club' Opens

The Naval Station's new "Barrel Club", located at the eastern base of Bay Hill, is expected to be ready for business by Labor Day.
The new club was erected as a convenience to residents of Bay Hill. Hours of operation will be similar to those of the Enlisted Men's Club in the Fleet Recreation area.


Judging from the high price of feather pillows, down is up.


THE INDIAN


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Page Five


T'iE INDIAN


Saturday. 4 Septembet' 1954


Base Anglers Receive Fishing Prizes


Naval Station Golt Tourney NavSta Softball Season Qualifications Begin Today Swings into Play


RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, presents a certificate, trophy, and prize to one of the many winners in the annual fishing contest. The presentation of awards were made at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum, Saturday, 29 August. Assisting Admiral Taylor was LT E. A. Sandness, Naval Station Special Services Officer.


Key West. . .
(Continued from Page One)
weekend occurred when Jerry H. White of the Ann Arbor Amphibians, dove into the salt water off Miami for the first time after years of hunting the sweet-water areas of the Great Lakes. Jerry sought to acquaint himself with the tropical varieties of fish and took with him a single-band Arbolette. While at the bottom, he speared and captured a 76 pound Snapper that broke all world's records for the individual species.


The younger set of the Base received their share of the honors too. Here Admiral Taylor Awards one of the souvenir prizes to a proud and happy lad.


Ladies' Golf Shots

by Miriam Hoy
Last Sunday was Scotch Foursome Day, and it seemed everyone thoroughly enjoyed themselves. Twenty-two couples participated, and the lucky winners of golf balls were:
1st lowgrossRogers and Hering
2nd low gross-the Scotts
3rd low gross-the Caruthers
1st low net-Lackey and Burke
2nd low netRothenberg and Leach
3rd low net-Simmons
Closest to the pin on No. 15 for the men was Beman, and Rogers had the longset drive on No. 17.
Polly Hering came closest to the pin on No. 14 and she also had the longest drive on No. 16.
The second shot closest to the pin on No. 18 was won by the Mannings. CDR King had the longest putt on No. 9 for men or women, and the Gentry's had the best poker hand on the back nine.
Last Wednesday morning quite a few of the ladies were anxiously waiting to tee off. We played the front nine-odd holes with 1/2 handicap. The winners were:
1st Flight-Lou Toczko, 1st place; 2nd place was a 3-way tie with Mary Ann Pennell, Alma


The first annual Invitational Golf Tournament, sponsored by the Naval Station, swings into the qualifying rounds this morning when the first of over 100 entrants tee off on the local course.
A qualifying round of 18 holes will be shot today. The top 60 players will then be chosen, and the main tournament will get underway tomorrow.
A total of 72 holes will be shot to complete the tournament. The score attained on the first 18-hole qualifying round will be added to the additional 54-hole score to determine the winners. The score from the qualifying round shot today will determine the handicap of the contenders.
The match is expected to produce some top-flight golf. RADM G. B. H. Hall, Commander Tenth Naval District, has registered his entry along with RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander Naval Base. Tony Grego, the 1954 club champion and 1953 ComTen champion, has entered, and if in his usual form, will certainly be among the leading contenders.
This tournament is the first of its size ever undertaken by the Naval Station and has been planned as a- yearly affair. Three cups have been established on a rotating basis-the 'Whitey Taylor Cup" for the winner of low gross score, the "Tony Grego Cup" for the winner of the low net score and the "Arky Caruthers Cup" for the Medalist. Replicas of the trophies will be given to the winners for permanent possesion.
A host of other prizes will be awarded to runners-up.


(Look for the full feature story complete with pictures of the 1954 National Competition at Key West in next weeks INDIAN)


Cuban Little Leaguers Take 2nd Base Win


ANOTHER ONE THAT DIDN'T GET HOME . . . Jim Sanborn of the Bears is stopped at home plate by the Cuban Little catcher during the game last Sunday. The Cuban Little League invaded the base for a second time and went away with a second victory in their pocket, 4 to 1. The base team was made up of the champion Bears and the runner-up Tigers.


McCracken and Marion Caruthers. 2nd Flight-1st place Nita Roberts; 2nd place Evelyn Leach.
3rd Flight-1st place Joyce Simmons; 2nd place Sue Strauss.


Today Corky Henning is leaving for the States, and, although we hate losing one of our best golfers, we all wish her the very best of luck.


The Naval Station Intra-Mural Softball season began Tuesday night on softball diamond number one in the Fleet Recreation area, and if the first two games are any indication of the future, this should be one of the wildest leagues to cavort around the diamond. In the first game of the season the 5th Division team romped over the High School, 21 to 1, and in the second game the Fleet Camera Party paraded around the bases to run up a score of 24 to 8 over the M team of the 5th Division.
Ten teams are entered in this year's league: the High School, Fifth Division, Fleet Camera Party. "M" Division of the Fifth Division, Commi- ary Store, Third and Flag Division, Security Group, Sixth Division, Second Division and the Eleventh Division.
The winner of the league will be determined on the usual won and lost percentage, and plans at present call for a short post-season tournament between the top four finishers. .
Two games will be played each evening, the first commencing at 6 P.M. and the second starting at 8 P.M. In order to finish two games a night, no inning will be started in the first game after 8 o'clock and no inning in the second game will be started after 10 o'clock. In case of rained out games, a mutual agreement between the respective managers will determine the rescheduling.
LT E. A. Sandness, Naval Station Special Services Officer, will act as coordinator and ar-bitrator, but in the case of any protests or unforseen problems, he may call a special meeting of the managers to iron out the difficulty.
The intra-mural season will end on the first of October. As yet, no plans have been formulated for a base softball league.

The softball schedule for the duration of the intra-mural season is reprinted below for spectators' convenience:
The home team will be team whose number appear s first ii schedule in first game, and second in second game each evening. Teams have been arbitrarily a signed a number as follows:
Hi-School No. 1
Fifth Division No. 2
Flt. Camera Party No. 3
M Div. Fifth Div. No. 4
Commissary Store No. 5
Third & Flag Div. No. 6
Security Group No. 7
Sixth Division No. 8
Second Division No. 9
Eleventh Division No. 10
SCHEDULE OF GAMES
Date 1st Game - 1800 2nd Game - 2200 Mon 6 Sept (Holiday) no games scheduled this date
Wed 1 Sept 6-8 7-10
Wed 8 Sept 1 -4 2 -6
Thur 9 Sept 3-9 5-7
Fri 10 Sept 8 - 10 1 - 5


Mon 13 Sept Tues 14 Sept Wed 15 Sept Thur 16 Sept Fri 17 Sept
Mon 20 Sept Tues 21 Sept Wed 22 Sept Thur 23 Sept Fri 24 Sept
Mon 27 Sept Tues 28 Sept Wed 29i Sept Thur 30 Sept Fri 1 Oct


2-3 6 - 10 t-6 3 - 10 8-9
2-8 4-10 1-s 3 -6 5- 10
2- 10 4- 6 1 -10 3-8 6-7


4-8 7-9 2-7
4-5 1-7
3-5 6-9 2-9 4-7 1-9
3-7 5-8 2-5 4 -9


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FTG Handicap Winners Receive Golfing Awards


vSlERVICE




John Landy's time of 3:58 for the "miracle mile" has been officially recognized as a world record by the International Amateur Athletics Federation. Wonder if our generation will still be around when this phenomenal mark is shattered ? ... Lou Little celebrates his silver anniversary this season as head football coach of Columbia University. Little's teams have won 106 games, lost 94 and tied 10.
America's first intercollegiate football game was played between Rutgers and Princeton, Nov. 6, 1869 . . . Prediction: Ezzard Charles won't last 10 rounds in his title bid- against the champ Rocky Marciano at the Yankee Stadium, Sept. 15.
Service Highlights
The professional Chicago Bears and New York Giants of the National Football League will meet at Chicago's Wrigley Field Sept. 12 in the annual Armed Forces benefit game . . . Army opens its 1954 grid wars against South Carolina, Sept. 25 . . . The Great Lakes Naval Training Center, Ill., football team will again be coached by LTJG "C" Elmo Cummins. Earlier it had been announced that the Bluejackets would be coached by LCDR Kermit Montz... Foster Rapier, grid star at John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio, is now in the Army and currently taking training at Ft. Eustis, Va.
Pfc. Frank Baumann, the $100,000 left-handed bonus baby for the Boston Red Sox, took a little time off from his Army duties at Camp Chaffee, Ark., recently to pitch for the Sox against the New York Giants in an exhibition contest. The 20-year-old southpaw racked up the Jints 6-5, giving up nine hits, fanning nine, and walking four. He also rapped out three hits in four trips to the plate. Who said pitchers don't hit? . . . Another service pitcher making headlines lately is Pvt. Wilmer "Vinegar Bend" Mizsll of Ft. McPherson, Ga. The former St. Louis Cardinal lefty recently won his 10th straight game. The popular hurler also coaches and manages the post Little League team.
Pvt. Robert Hynes, former Michigan State swimming ace, is currently splashing his way to new records at Ft. Benning, Ga. He was a member of State's celebrated 300-yard medley relay team which was ranked eighth in the nation in '52 . . . Pvt. William Farrell, third-ranking Amateur Athletic Union platform diver in the U S now showing his championship form at Ft. Sam Houston, Tex. . . . The Naval Academy lost a great coach when H. R. Webb, better known as "Spike", hung up his gloves after 35 years of tutoring middie boxers.


Naval Academy Holds

Alumni Weekend

Beginning at 1000 on Friday, 24 September, the U.S. Naval Academy will hold their annual Alumni Weekend. The three-day weekend will include tours of the academy, luncheon in the mess hall, a dress parade and reception, an informal dance at the Officers' Club, and a general open house Saturday. Highlighting the weekend will be the football game in Thompson Stadium between the Naval Academy Midshipmen and William and Mary College.


Posing proudly with their golfing trophies for the Fleet Training Group Annual Handicap Golf Tournament arse, left to right: LCDR K. E. Skadowski, winner Low Net; CAPT F. L. Tedder, presenting the awards; AMC E. C. Monte, 2nd Low Net; and LCDR D. A. Scott, Low Gross.


pSE VICE STARE




























ComTEN Golf Tourney

Slated For 23, 24 Oct.

The ComTen Golf Tournament, slated to be played again this year on the Guantanamo Bay course, has been tentatively set for the 22nd, 23rd and 24th of October.
Further details will be published as soon as available.

9- Hole Addition Planned

For GMO Golf Course

The extra addition and one which makes this course one of the largest found on any overseas base vill be another 9 holes.
Naval Station Sepecial Services invites your use of another extensive facility for your recreation and good health-play golf!

A chip on the shoulder indicates wood higiler up.

0


Navy Exchange...
(Continued from Page One)
been offered previously. The record department, which has had its sales boosted by virtue of special shipments of late releases from Miami, has doubled their sales in the past month.
About the only departments that did not increase sales were the clothing, shoes, and children's wear counters.
For the last three years now, the two ships services here have bettered the half a million mark with $508,054 in 1952, then a record high mark in 1953 of $516,857, and this August netted $509,837.
In accordance with Navy policy part of the funds taken in at the Navy Exchange will be turned over to the various recreation funds. This amount is computed on a per capita basis.

In addition to the buying sprees of the middies and the reservists, the recreation facilities of the Fleet Recreation area were utilized to the fullest extent. The swimming pool had the biggest play with the basketball courts coming in for their share of business next in line. Full use was made of all softball diamonds, and the corral and the sailboat landing reported rushing business. The extra beer garden, set up on the lawn in front of the Petty Officers' Club, took the overflow from the club which was reserved for the middies' exclusive use. The golf course and the tennis courts were hard pressed to accommnodate extra load, and thskating rink was filled to niearcapacity every night. As a finale to the last middie cruise of the season a dance was held in their honor at the CPO Club Monday night. About 350 middies attended for a last fling before returning to the States and their Fall semester.

Baby Corn: "Mama, where did I come from?"
Mama Corn: "The stalk brought you."

Prize fighter hanging limp on ropes: "If only that bell wouldn't stop saving me!"


Air Station Hobby Shop

Offers New Hobby Craft

The Naval Air Station Hobby Shop, located directly across the street from the Enlisted Men's Barracks (AV-50 and AV-51) and next door to the Sewing and Tailor Shop, has received a complete line of new Hobbycraft items for sale at very reasonable prices. We invite all patrons, including dependents, to visit the Hobby Shop and find an interesting hobby for himself and his family. There are many items which are particularly suitable for children. The Hobby Shop is open seven days a week from 1300 until 1640 and from 1730 until 2200. We are interested in suggestions and any item which we do not carry will be considered for an order.
A few items which we invite you to see are listed below:
Craftint Paint Sets and Super Craftint Paint Sets
Mongol Paint Sets (using colored pencils)
Artistic Oil Paint Sets
Picture Frames
Aluminum Easels
Varnish and mistifier sprayers for Paint Sets
Ruth Fontaine Doll Kits
Royal Tot Birdhouse Kits
Spacemobiles and Pacemobiles
Inlaid Wooden Plaques of Imported Woods
Dozens of all types and sizes of model planes, ships, race cars and a complete line of accessories for all models
A complete line of leather craft items and accessories are available at the Leeward Point Hobby Shop. We will be glad to procure any of these items for patrons at the Naval Air Station Hobby Shop if requested.
Pay us a visit soon and create an interesting hobby in your spare time.

NSD Supply Line

Mrs. Helen Beman and Mrs. Evie McDonald were very pleasantly surprised at a luncheon given in their honor at the Family Restaurant last week. Mrs. Beman has resigned her position at the Depot to return to the States with her husband who has received orders to Bethesda, Md. Mrs. McDonald will also return to the States in the near future. Both women received gifts from their co-workers.
Welcome aboard to Mrs. Harriet E. Muehler and son, George, fainily of Vernon D. Muehler, ENI, who arrived September 1 by FLAW. Mrs. Muehler and George have been residing in Somerville, Mass. until quarters were available in GTMO.
Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Griffin, Sr. have returned from a month's vacation in Florida.
Our NSD softball team, after a shaky first inning start, went on to win their third game of the season in six outings by an 8 to 3 victory over the NAS General Mess. The NAS crew scored two quick runs in the first inning when they managed to put across one more. Meanwhile, the booiring bats of our NSD gang rattled the fences in an 11-hit attack which brought eight runs across the plate. Travis Hanselman and Gerald Schneider led the NSD batsmen with a pair of doubles and tree singles.


Some people are like blotters . . . soak it all im, but get it all backwards!


Saturday, 4 September 1954


THE INDIAN









Saturday, 4 Septembet' 1954 TIlE INDIAN Page Seven


NSD Fuel Division In Action

A few weeks ago the Indian featured the story of NSD Gtmo's Fuel Division. The Navy petroleum products stored and the great scope of operations were pointed out. This week, aided and abetted by the fine photographers and staff of the NAS Photo Lab, we present a study in Photo-Journalism-Subject, NSD Fuel Divsion.


Elii

This is the Small Craft Fueling area at Wharf Roger. Here Tubal Gilling is issuing Diesel Fuel to boats, while B. Zungiz, SN, keeps a sharp watch on his fuel tanks. At this wharf, gasoline is also issued. Private craft may obtain fuel here after proper arrangements have been made, but Naval craft need only to pull alongside to get quick service.


A Diesel truck boards the ferry for Leeward Point where it services the enlisted mens galley as well as several portable, power generators.


Here L. R. Sproul, FA, regulates a valve aboard the YON 85 at Pier Charlie, while loading Naval Special Fuel Oil. This non-self propelled barge is towed out into the stream to service ships at anchor.


Here is the new tank truck loading rack just off Sherman Avenue in operation. Diesel Oil and Motor Gasoline are dispensed here for use by small base consumers. The rack has a modern filtering system to keep fuels clean, and has many safety features.


FTG Bulletin
by Jack Engstrom

CHSLK Raymond J. Harper reported aboard on the 26th of August after a tour of duty on the Chief of Naval Operations Staff, Washington, D. C. CHSCLK Harper will relieve CHSCLK Davidson, FTG Reports Officer, who has been ordered to NAS Jacksonville, Florida for duty.
LT Henry W. Hague, now serving aboard the USS ROWAN, (DD-782) in the Western Pacific, has been ordered to Fleet Training Group, Gtmo, to relieve LT Alexander, FTG Electronics Officer. LT Alexander has orders for NAS Argentia, Newfoundland. His wife and daughter departed for the States two weeks ago aboard the USNS THOMAS.

Two men departed from the Fleet Training Center this past week. Ralph Chelf, RDC, departed Wednesday, 1 September via FLAW for a normal tour of shore duty at the U.S. Naval Reserve Training Center, Louisville, Kentucky. Andy Toman, ET2, departed via FLAW on Wednesday also for Jacksonville, Florida, where he will be discharged from the Naval Service.k

The Communications and Engineering Department each picked up a new man this past week. Carl Aumann, ENC, reported on the 27th of August from the USS OTTERSETTER, (DER-244). He will be with the Engineering Department. Going to Communications is Douglas Dunn, QMC(SS), who reported on the 31st of August from the USS CLAMAGORE, (SS343). Welcome aboard, we hope you will enjoy your tour of duty with the Fleet Training Group.

During her four week Refresher Training period, the USS LAKE CHAPLAIN, (CVA-39), was the recipient of 3,440 man hours of shipboard instruction and inspections. Of her 22 days in training she had riders on 19 of these days and was the hostess to 380 shipboard instructors. To conduct her final inspection, it took 77 of the above total. The inspection party consisted of three captains, 29 other officers and 46 enlisted men. Despite the grueling pace, the following message was received on the departure of the LAKE CHAMPLAIN . . . "Bloody, beaten and a much wiser crew, we weigh anchor and send our sincere parting thanks to you and all Gtmo shipmates for your patient persistent help, advice and hospitality" . . . signed Hannegan and Crew. . . .


In order to continually maintain high quality levels of fuel at Guantanamo, a fuel laboratory is provided to check all incoming fuels, as well as provide periodic tests of stored fuels. Here chemist Felipe Dugrot is checking some Navy Special Fuel Oil for quality. This laboratory provides testing services for much of the Caribbean Area, including San Juan, Puerto Rico.


NAS Crosswinds
by Dick Friz

We have just returned from a brief visit to Key West and Miami . . . broke, bothered and bedraggled, but happy to be back. (cross my fingers and hope to die.)
. . . Had an interesting time at the National Spearfishing Championships in the Keys . . . the enthusiasm for the sport is infectuous, and it is easy to see why Gtmo Bay has found so many con verts . . . Our local team fared quite well too, placing third. We were told that it marked the first time any Navy team had ever figured in contention.
. . . Met an old ex-Marine in Miami Beach who was a frequent visitor to the base here. "They had a liberty town called Caimanera," he recalled, "and what a spot it was! I saw an old guy puffin, on a black cigar in '17 and when I returned ten years later, there he was. He hadn't moved an inch."
LT Carl Plath, president of the local Denizens, conferred with Colonial Hunt of the West Palm Beach Air Force Base, and a meet is being arranged between the Air Force and the Navy which will be held probably in San Juan.
The Denizes of the Deep group arrived a little belatedly back in Gtmo. The VU-10 PBM made a one engine landing at Master's Field and had to RON until Tuesday noon.
Local-Flashes
. . . Auf weidersehn to the following NAS personnel up for discharge this week: Norman Gould, ADAN, Dale Osterhout, AD2, Billie Bradbury, ME3, Jack Coup, AC3, John Denny, S/N, and Isadore Malouin, S/N.
. . . The Leeward Pointers and Operations continued on their merry way in intra-mural softball competition this past week. Leeward owned victories over Boat-Shed, and Administration (8-3) and Operations kept pace with a 20-8 bombardment of Communications, and a 7-1 win over Supply. In the first extra inning game of the season, Communications edged the Boatshed 12-11. The big game of the week (score unavailable) was Wednesday's contest between Operations and the men from the Rock . . . both were undefeated.
. . . Saw a very attractive Spanish lass at a Miami nite spot, and wished that I had attended Professor Jone's Spanish classes on base sooner . . . Think I'll start with the new class Thursday night at


5
7
7
8

4
7
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Sep Sep Sep Sep

Sep Sep Sep Sep


the Administration Board room. Everyone from NAS and VU-10 is invited, including dependents ... it doesn't make any difference whether you're just beginning or want to brush up on the lingo . . . Class begins at 1900.
... Wallace Naegle of NAS Personnel dipped his line off the Coast Guard Pier last weekend, and caught himself a 163 pound Grouper on 62 pound test leader. If only the trio of spear fishermen from the Denizens had spotted a Grouper that size! Congratulations Walt.


Saturday, 4 September 1954


TIIE INDIAN


Page Seveni


Ship Arrivals USS Seneca (ATF-91) USS Zellars (DD-777) USS Owen (DD-536) USS Pritchett (DD-561)
Ship Departures USS Hopi (ATF-71) USS Watts (DD-567) USS Black (DD-666) USS Rushmore (LSD-14)







eb


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 4 September 1954


MOVIES


Saturday, 4 September
ARROW IN THE DUST
Sterling Hayden Coleen Gray
A cavalry trooper, deserting his command, overtakes a wagon train and leads it safely thru savage Indian attacks. With the train safe at the fort the trooper goes on alone.

Sunday, 5 September
THE CARNIVAL STORY
Anne Baxter Steve Cochran
A dramatic story of a povertystricker* German girl who sought refuge with an American carnival and experienced three love affairs in a brief period of time. The first a wild, emotional affair, the second a rebound marriage ending in tragedy, the third a happy one.

Monday, 6 September
THE OUTCAST
John Derek Joan Evans
In the beautiful Colorado cattle country, a young rancher learns from a range war that friends are better fighting-allies than hired gunmen. He also learns that a range-bred sweetheart is better than a Virginia-born girl.

Tuesday, 7 September
SIEGE OF RED RIVER
Van Johnson Joanne Dru
Trouble developes between Southern Raiders and a Union Cavalry train when guns are stolen. The thieves were engaged in a secret patriotic mission for the South. Indians get the guns but the Civil War is over by that time so the whites fight together.

Wednesday, 8 September
ANGELS WITH DIRTY FACES Humphrey Bogart Ann Sheridan
Young hoodlums worship a gangster hero. A Priest, who grew up with the gangster tries to help him. He also tries to help the boys. The gangster does one last favor for the Priest by destroying the boy's admiration for him.

Thursday, 9 September
THE IRON GLOVE
Robert Stack Ursula Theiss
The story concerns the devoted loyalty of a soldier to his Prince who is kept from his rightful place on the throne by a schemer who has himself crowned. All ends well and the Prince is restored to his throne.

Friday, 10 September
HEAT WAVE
Alex Nicol Hillary Brooke
A faithless wife makes no effort to help her drowning husband. A young novelist, and unwitting accessory, keeps silent but tells the police after the widow gets her husbands insurance money and jilts him.


F4


May Wynn made her first appearance for Columbia in "The Caine Mutiny." Her bosses were so impressed she was signed immediately for "Rough Company," a big technicolor western.


TEENAGE-ROUND-UP (6


By Linda Thurston
And so, as the sun pulls away from the pier and the ships slowly sink in the west, we hear the boys of GTMO sigh heavily with relief. Not that the boys didn't appreciate the Middies and the fact that a dance was held at the CPO Club for them and almost every available girl on the base was present! Neil Hayes appreciated the fact enough to go to said dance to protect his interests, namely Pat W.
On the more serious side, we get down to some facts and figures in the shape of Barbara Burke, Norman Huddy, George MacMichael, Jim Beman and Ed Stafford. The facts are that our gal, Barb, has been holding the base together for nine years now, and George and Norman have been residents for nigh onto nine years. These kats are heading for greener pastures (it always looks greener). Barb and George to the University of Florida, in Gainesville, Norm to Villanova, Beman to Bethesda, Md. and Eddy is deserting us for the Air Force. Our very best wishes go with you along with all the luck in the world.
DID YA' SEE . .. .
The cute new junior gal who hails from Washington State and is known by her friends as Bobbie (Johnsen) . . . and the new senior boy (Allah, Allah) whose name is David Shyver from Jax, Fla. (We're glad to have you aboard) . . . Phil Keenan breaking all speed records on the Windmill Beach Road, doing a dusty 30 mph. . . . Eunice looking sick . . . Pat Fojt doing her version of the Cuban mambo, jitterbug style. . . .
Attention, Bill B: please return B's earring! !


by Sgt W. J. McDowell Jr. and Cpl Joseph Androvich, USMC
A hearty welcome was extended to Pfc. Calvin E. Powell when he reported to this command this past week. Pfc. Powell came from Headquarters Bn. Headquarters Marine Corps. We all hope you enjoy your stay here at Gtmo and we wish you all the luck in the world.
On the 6th of September the members of Marine Barracks will hold a Field Meet on the parade grounds at Marine Site. Various athletic events will be held and a luncheon will feature the activities. All available hands are urged to participate to make this event a most enjoyable one for all.
Personnel celebrating birthday anniversaries this coming week are Cpl. W. L. Anderson Sept. 10th; SSgt. R. Dwyer, Sept. 10th; and Sgt. V. Williamson, Sept. 11th.
The weekend anglers leaving the Marine Boat Shed, once again, found the fishing rather unsuccessful as all of the boats returned to the boat shed empty. 'I'm sure there's fish in that water!'
Congratulations to S e r g e a n t Rogers who recently received his present rank by a meritorious promotion.
Marines! This is your column. All stories and suggestions would gladly be appreciated and accepted by this department. So if you have an article of interest you would like to pass along please let us know.

The glue that sticks U.S. postage stamps is made of hybrid-corn and casava mixture and is not only palatable but slightly nutritious.


*


:0 0K-NOOK
by George Engle

For Your Information . . .
THE LIFE OF REASON
or
PROGRESS
by George Santayana
THE PHASES OF HUMAN This one volume resume of the five volume works described as Santayana's best known and most important book remains, in the opinion of many, his masterpiece. It gives us, more than any one work of his, the clue to his philosophy as a whole. (Not for browsing.)

YOU'VE GOT IT COMING TO YOU
by Erauls Mallen
Here are the answers to your questions about rights, benefits, and privileges in and out of the Armed Forces. The only book containing complete information for the serviceman, the veteran, and the members of his family. Up-dating are provided to keep abreast of all new legislation.

SUCCESSFUL COLOR
PHOTOGRAPHY by Andreas Feininger
LIFE Staff Photographer
This is the simplest and yet most complete discussion of color photbgraphy ever put down in book form. You're not only given the "how-to" of color photography, but also the necessary technical information to enable you to take your photographs out of the ordinary and give them the special distinction and originality which every photographer is after.

ADMINISTRATION
(The Art and Science of Organizations & Management)
by Albert Tepawsky
This illuminates the principles and operational procedures of the executive, administrator, and manager in all walks of life-business, governmental and social. (This book examines the work day of the administrator from the top executive down to the small office secretary as she "manages the boss.") It is an invaluable discussion of the administrative roots of our culture.

For Your Entertainment IA THE WORLD, THE FLASH, AND
H. ALLEN SMITH
by H. Allen Smith
This anthology of Smith's best includes his sharp, often acid and always witty comments on such varied subjects as hitch-hikers and Hollywood stars, kings and cowboys, Gertrude Stein and Dizzy Dean, antelopes and wasps. As Fred Allen says, "He is a very funny man."

PICTURES FROM AN
INSTITUTION by Randall Jarrell
"Pictures From An Institution" is a wonderfully imaginative evocation of that modern and peculiarly American product, the progressive college for women. He explores the aspirations and antics of a small group of the faculty and the students at Benton College, and the result is a marvelously readable and entertaining book.

Two Ubangi belles met in the jungle on a hot day. One of them stuck her face close to the other and said: "Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers. Now you fan me for a while."


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mt S Os. _"Goers cTMO Like The SunsLine" Vol. VI, No. 61 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 4 September 1954 August Sales Skyrocket Swimming Lessons Save At Navy Exchange GTMO Youth's Life Middies Biggest Buyers Early last Tuesday morning, the last of the Midshipmen and NROTC cruises departed from Guantanamo Bay ending the annual influx of Middies and reservists here. However, behind them, they left a record of sales at Ship's Service almost as much as in August 1953. This year, for the month of August, the Naval Station and Naval Air Station Exchanges-including the service departments and restaurants-netted $509,837. Last year the net was also over a half a million standing at a high mark of $516,857. However, the drop from last year is attributed both to a drop in the number of personnel in the Midshipmen cruises as well as a cut in prices since August 1953. The number one sales item for August proved to be the alligator goods as it jumped better than twice that for July-from $17,212 to $41,563. The alligator goods have always been a big item, especially during the reservist and Middie cruises. Even though the total ,was considerably less than Augstt of last year, this is attributed not to less sales but to a slash in prices on the souvenir goods. Second on the list of popular items was perfume. In July the perfume counters netted only $18,279, but in the big month of August, sales in this department skyrocketed to $42,337. Also popular was the jewelery counter. This department, which was until recently an exclusive feature of the Air Station exchange, was added also at the Naval Station store with the added feature at both stores of the summer costume jewelery and earrings. With the addition in Naval Station store, agoal was set at the beginning of August of $20,000. When final tabulations were taken, the two counters combined had shot past that goal by $16,285. At the Sport Shop where the stock has been as complete as possible since its beginning, a variety of items were in demand with the gun department getting the primary nod; and the Middie cruises were attributed for th< increase from $21,330 for July to $36,461 for August. Other sales jumps attributed to the Middies and reservists were in the camera department where net sales went past the $30,000 mark. The cigarette and tobacco counters also reported proportionate jumps in sales. Several departments reported increased sales where it was thought that sales would remain constant. The household appliance department reported a jump that bettered August of 1953 by more than twice. This was due primarily to the addition of items that have not (Continued on Page Six) Timothy Bruce, 6-year-old son of LT and Mrs. B. J. Graves of VU-10, was enrolled in the recent swimming classes conducted by W. C. Park, AN. Timmy was very successful in learning and progressed very rapidly-and it saved his life. A few days ago Tim and his younger brother, Mike, were enticed to go down the cliff to the pier behind the house, even though they had been warned not to many times. But boys will be boys! The water at the end of the pier is about 5-feet deep. Timmy, intent on a boy's game, fell off the pier into the water. Luckily, he kept a cool head and remembering his (Continued on Page Three) GTMO Denizens Take Third Place Honors At Key West National Spearfishermen's Meet A red smoke bomb fired from the bridge of the official AAU boat at 1:35 P.M. Sunday while anchored six miles out in the Atlantic off Key West, brought to an end the National Spearfishing Meet which saw the Denizens Of The Deep, representing Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, take third Military Training Begins For Ground Defense Unit The first phase of the Naval Station's annual military training course was completed this morning when 20% of the station's complement returned from the rifle range, the last exercise of intensive 6-day schedule of drills and lectures. In accordance with a Navy Department regulation, 80% of a command's complement must be given a yearly refresher course in infantry training in order to be ready for any emergency. The Naval Station, this year as in previous years, is taking 20% of the complement a week and putting the men through the training in four weekly phases. This Naval Emergency Ground Defense Force as it is known, is given an intensive week of drills and lectures by qualified instructors. Close order drill and platoon and squad tactics are emphasized in the field work while the classroom lectures and demonstrations take in guard duty, scouting, field sanitation and the construction and instruction of the .30 calibre rifle. Lectures and demonstrations are given during the week on marksmanship, as well, and the entire training is capped on the sixth day (Continued on Page Three) Members of the landing force trainee group step out in the first day of their drill in the annual refresher training held for 80% of the command's personnel. Known as the Naval Emergency Ground Defense Force, a new group will be trained each week until the required 80% of complement has completed the refresher. prize in an extremely close competition between top champions. Top divers of various teams were chosen to represent their individual organizations in the finals at Key West after months of preparation. The meet was sponsored by the Florida Skin Divers Association and the city of Key West in cooperation with the International Underwater Spearfishing Asscociation under sanction of the AAU. Taking top honors in the form of the Owen Churchill Cup were the well-known Pinder brothers of Miami. The three, Arthur, Fred and Donald, are leading members of the Miami Tritons who are presently the Florida States champions. Art Pinder was on a team won second place at the Nationals in California last year and was also awarded the Helms National Athletic award for being the only spearfisherman to kill a sailfish. In Sunday's contest, he distinguished himself by bringing in the largest single catch of 90 pounds unassisted. The Pinder's total agregate weight was 281 pounds caught in the allotted four hours. Second place winners were the Dolphins of California who are the Pacific Coast Champions. Their total weight was 213 pounds. Charles Blakeslee of the Dolphins won honors as top man in largest fish caught with a 37/2 pound nurse shark. Taking third place in the tight competition were the Denizens Of The Deep from Guantanamo Bay, represented by E. H. Cavanaugh (Civ.), T. P. Ahlberg (Civ.) and LTJG J. A. Kropack who weighed in a total of 207/2 pounds. Last year's defending champions, the Muirmen of California, placed fourth with 204/2 pounds. Participants in what was termed to be one of the closes competitions on record, swam in a chosen area about six miles out at sea for four hours. Servicing each team was an outboard motor-boat in which the fish were stowed as caught and divers could rest. The tourney was graced by almost perfect weather and proved to be highly successful. No self-contained breathing devices were employed except for the conventional schnorkel tube which allows the swimmer to breathe while floating face-down on the surface. The weapons were single and double-banded Arbolettes and the Hawaiin Sling. The big event was covered by underwater photographers, sportswriters for many nationally known magazines including Life, the Miami press and reporters from the Guantanamo Bay Naval Station newspaper. One of the interesting sideevents that took place over the (Continued on Page Five)

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Page Two 1.000th Baby, 'Jackie' Rae Smouse Born At Hospital Here The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9-615 Saturday, 4 September 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPr William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sandness----Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC----------------Editor H. L. Sisson, JOS-----------News Jerry Lewvis, J103---Features F. L. Cannon, JOSN----Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Arnm Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Nav. photos unless otherwise credited. Enacm~neL Etchings by R. M. (Bob) Quiat This week your reporter will try to give you a little insight on what sick call, or as in Dentistry so called "Oral Diagnosis" is. It means in simplified terms, examination of your teeth to determine what is wrong with them. Sick call is necessary, so that a definite treatment plan can be made for each patient. Upon completion of the examination an appointment is made, at a time agreeable to both patient and doctor to accomplish the treatment planned at exanination. Each plan will be carried out within the resources of this clinic. Emergency treatment will be rendered for pain or urgent treatment which may arise unexpectedly. Emergencies will be taken care of 24 hours a day, but be certain that it is something that can't wait for next sick call. So before you, the future patient, decides to call for an appointment, you'll have to go thru "Oral Diagnosis" for an examination to determine what needs to be done on your teeth. As the weeks progress, it is getting more and more difficult to obtain a personality of the week. For this week, after a little persuasion, I was able to obtain one. His name is Walter G. Howard Jr., DN, USN. He is 23 years old and hails from Milford, Connecticut. "Walt", as he is known to his numerous friends, entered the Navy in Marcii, 1951. In September, 1951, Walt completed Dental Technician School and served aboard the U.SS. EVERGLADES AD-24 before his arrival at Gtmo. Walt is an avid sports and movie fan. He's what you might call a walking encyclopedia. There is very little pertaining to all sports that he doesn't know something about. When Walt receives his discharge, he hopes to go back to school and become a salesman. To those who know Walt, they will tell you that with his gift of gab, he should make out quite well in his future undertaking as a salesman. Welcome aboard to Dr. L. C. Pugliese, LT, DC, USNR and R. Marriott DT3, USN of MCB-4. The Jacquelyn Rae inspects her brand new mother, Mrs. Hilda Smouse as Mrs. E. B. Taylor, wife of Commander, Naval Base leans over for a better look Jackie, the first child of Chief and Mrs. John H. Smouse was the 1,000th baby born at the Naval Hospital in Guantanamo Bay at 15 minutes after midnight on August 26th. Hospital Notes VU-10 Prop Blast by R. P. Campanozzi, HM2 Heiport News Sir Stork graciously presented us with three "belle fems" this week; Jaquelyn Rae born to Mrs. John H. Smouse, Marie Ellen born to LT and Mrs. Hubert A. Janicek, and our own HM3 and Mrs. Paul S. Goldberg passed the cigars in honor of their 8 lb girl Paula. New Arrivals The hospital staff extends a hearty welcome to J. W. Cuddy, HM2 who arrived this past week from the USS Saipan. Cuddy an X-Ray technician appears to be very prospective in boosting the hospital sports program, being very active in basketball, baseball and bowling. Departures J. W. Zeigler, HM2 departed via the THOMAS to New York for separation from the Navy. John was leading corpsman in the operating room for quite some time. We shall miss him and wish him good fortune. Golf This column has constantly included articles on our own hospital golf tournaments and standings. One year ago a very small percentage of the staff pursued the sport. We pay tribute to HMC T. G. Byrne whose endless efforts have brought about a vast golf program at this command. At present, at least fifty percent of the hospital crew are playing and learning golf. Byrne has instigated and planned out several hospital tournaments with the result that many nonplayers are giving the sport a try. "T.G.'s" tenure at Gtmo will be coming to an end in a few months, as he is expecting orders to the states. We desire at this time to thank you, Chief, you're par in our book. welcome mat goes out also to Mrs. R. V. Peterson and two children, who arrived via Cubana Airlines on 30 August. We all hope you will enjoy your stay in Gtmo as much as we enjoy having you. Bon Voyage to our commanding officers' son, William Stagner, Jr. and his roommate Ronnie Speriere. by Bill Graves & Staff The traffic was very light in the transfer department this week, with only one loss. Bill W. Sharp, ATC, was transferred to VU-4, NAAS, Chinco, Va., for duty. We hope you enjoy your new duty station. The only receipts were nine men for temporary additional duty of three months from VU-6, NAS, Norfolk, Va. The men are A. D. Johnson, AM1, G. W. Thomas, AT1, R. P. Kruger, AD2 M. W. Edwards, AM3, C. B. Simonse, ATAN, J. H. Goggans, AN, R. A. Peabody AN, R. L. Puglia, AN and R. K. Davis, AA. Welcome aboard and we wish you a pleasant stay with VU-10. ENS R. T. Palmer, "The Limping Man," has been hobbling around the squadron for the past few days, suffering a sprained ankle. They say this "Hatuey" performs wonders, but this happened after only two cokes. We wish you a quick recovery, Sir! The KDC and her crew commanded by LTJG T. O. Winkler are working continuously on the "Old Tub" making her look more "shipe shape" everyday. Good luck to the KDC and her hard working crew from all hands. We are patiently waiting to see her "Set Sail." All officers' wives are cordially reminded that there will be a Bridge Club meeting of the Marine, NAS and VU-10 wives at the Officers' Club swimming pool at 1230 on the 7th of September. Mrs. Wayne Blair and Mrs. Chic Draving are in charge of the party. Anyone interested in teaching swimming, contact LT "Boo" Ferris. You should be able to pass a swimming test and know the basic technique of instructing. Notice to all personnel in our squadron. Be sure and fill out the Christmas Questionnaire and turn in to the Special Service Office. Sure is good to see Marie Aslin back at home from the hospital. We hope you enjoyed your vacation with us. We'd all like to wish you the best of luck in the coming semester at South Eastern Louisiana College. 0 Sunday, 5 September 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) The Chaplain's Corner T Modern man seems reluctant to admit his personal need for God. He likes to give the impression that he is a well adjusted individual who knows what life is all about. Never would he admit his ignorance of religion. In fact, he delights in an objective discussion of it. His views on the interpretation of a controversial passage of Scripture, his opinion as to the rigEiness or wrongness of an act, and his observations of the failures of persons who profess to be religious can be had for the asking. He may even be so broad minded as to admit that religion which is a vague superstitious holdover of a past era may be necessary as a crutch for certain weak individuals but not for him. He knows the score in the game of life. He knows that the only real things are the material objects of this world, and he plunges headlong into the hopeless task of satisfying himself by the possession of these things. Yet, modern man was created by the One God who created the men of the past and he shares with those men the same deep spiritual needs. He may attempt to hide their existence from his fellowmen. He may use his reasoning powers to deny their presence to himself. He may endeavor to forget them by using all his time and all his energies in the seeking for material things and for social recognition. But he never succeeds in escaping from his need of God. In his sanest moment modern man becomes aware of the emptiness of his life, the futility of all his strivings, and he cries out the inner yearnings of his heart in the words of the Psalmist of old: "My soul thirstieth for God, for the living God: when shall I come and appear before God?". This column is being written with the confident knowledge that the soul of man is restless until it finds peace in communion with God. The first step in obtaining this peace is taken when you admit your spiritual needs to yourself, to God, and to your fellowmen. M. 0. Stephenson CDR, CHC, USN Saturday, 4 September 1954 m THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 4 September 1954 Capt. Charles S. Smith (right) explains some of the details of the job to his successor, Capt. John J. Swords. Capt. 'Smitty' Smith Departs Capt. Charles S. Smith, USMC, departed this past week and was relieved by Capt. John J. Swords. Capt. Smith is under orders to report to the Commanding General, Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, California for further transfer to the 3rd Marine Division for duty. Upon arrival in the States, he will join his wife and child for a brief stay in Penns Grove, N. J. and Arlington, Virginia before proceding to the coast. Capt. Swords joins the Marine Barracks from Headquarters, Marine Corps, Washington, D. C. He served in Korea with the 1st Bn 1st Marine Division, "A" Company as platoon leader. He is a graduate of Hobart College, Geneva, N. Y. where he received his BA degree. While in college he was active in baseball and participated in high school basketball and football. Living on the base with Capt. Swords is his wife, Marion and their two children, Michael John and Stephanie Jane Swords. FHA Backs Home Loans For Armed Forces Washington (AFPS)-Members of the Armed Forces are now eligible to obtain housing benefits under provisions of the Housing Act of 1954 which has been signed by President Eisenhower. The Federal Housing Administration Commissioner has been authorized to insure loans on homes purchased by members of the Armed Forces-including the Coast Guard-up to 95 percent of the FHA-appraised value of the property and not to exceed an insured loan of $17,000. Personnel who have been on active duty for more than two years and who have a need for such housing will be able to get mortgage insurance for the purchase of new homes. Both borrowers and property must meet FHA requirements. Certificates of Eligibility will be issued to servicemen. However, since issuance procedures have not been worked out completely yet, servicemen should not submit applications until an official announcement is made. The Secretary of Defense will prescribe rules and regulations governing the issuance of certificates to members of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. Members of the Coast Guard will follow the regulations to be set down by the Secretary of the Treasury. Official regulations on securing the certificates will be announced at an early date. Leeward Field Plays Important Role In Air Gunnery Training "AIR LANT's Gold Mine" was informally inspected Monday 30 August by the man himself, Vice Admiral F. W. McMahon. The real estate referred to is Leeward Point Field, the new multimillion dollar jet gunnery training installation at NAS, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Since this eight thousand foot strip opened for business twenty months ago hundreds of jet pilots attached to AIRLANT squadrons have come to appreciate the meaning of LEEWARD POINT. COM AIR LANT himself is the first to attest to its value for prior to its use embarrasssingly few squadrons in the Atlantic Fleet were qualified in high altitude gunnery. Today such is not the case for the unrestricted, cloud free gunnery areas over the neighboring Caribbean have been in constant use permitting AIR LANT jet squadrons to hang up impressive records in hours flown and squadron E's earned. Because it is the best jet air to air gunnery training area available in the Atlantic, the name "AIR LANT's Gold Mine" is here to stay. During the inspection, Vice Admiral McMahon accompanied by the Naval Base Commander, Rear Admiral E. B. Taylor, and Captain R. R. McCracken, Commanding Officer of NAS Guantanamo, witnessed jet operations of VF 74, toured the recently completed massive Denver Type hanger, and also saw the concrete enlisted men's barracks, mess hall, bachelor officers' quarters and control tower all of which will soon be ready for use. The transition from a quonset hut village to that of a fully operational jet facility should be heartening news to personnel of east coast jet squadrons. Vice Admiral McMahon stated that LEEWARD POINT field was most essential to the combat readiness of jet squadrons of AIR FORCE ATLANTIC FLEET and that its continued development must continue. Isn't it odd that a girl afraid of a mouse will accept a date with a wolf. 'Three Angels' Cast Begin Rehearsals For Dec. 4 Show "Three Angels" with slightly tarnished reputations will transform the Little Theatre into a section of the Cayenne, French Guiana penal colony on Nov. 30th when the first performance of the play is scheduled. A comedy in three acts by Sam and Bella Spewak, "My Three Angels," has the following cast: Neil Murphy, Dorothy Murphy, Ann Saxe, Lillian Armbruster, Alan Wagner, Harlan B. Cope, Ronnie Estafan, Dan Nash, Burton Knight and Tom Judkins. The producer of the play will be Lee Douglas, stage manager George Hodges and Alan Wagner will direct, assisted by Burt Knight. Make-up crews will be under the direction of Anita Sierra. Many positions in costuming, properties and other backstage functions still exist, and those who may be interested in the backstage operations of Little Theatre are urged to attend the Little Theatre rehearsals on Tuesday and Thursday nights. In addition, a harmonica player is needed for an off-stage sequence during several scenes. Timmy Bruce. (Continued from Page One) recent lessons, swam to a nearby boat, pulled himself up and went home. His non-committal statement when he reached home was, "I had a nice swim in the bay." If Timmy hadn't taken swimming lessons, and if Bill Park and his assistants hadn't accomplished a great deal with their pupils, Timmy would be just a memory now. To Park and his helpers-"Well done!" Military Training. (Continued from Page One) by actual firing at the rifle range. The instructors for the defense force this year were given special training and instruction at the Marine Barracks two weeks ago in order to qualify them for instructing the infantry course. Phase two of the course, with the next 20% of the complement selected, will begin Tuesday morning at 8 o'clock since Monday is a holiday. The manual of arms is also included in the close order drill conducted by qualified instructors who were given special training two weeks prior to the start of the general training. 100 PTA Holds First Meeting Tuesday The Parent-Teachers Association of Guantanamo Bay will begin their part of the school year here Tuesday night at 7:30 as the first meeting-a back-to-school general meeting-will be held in the patio of the Naval Base School. Following the theme of "Back to School," Mr. T. E. Scarborough, Principal, will speak on "How Can PTA Best Assist the School" and will introduce the new teachers for this year. Opening the meeting, Chaplain W. J. Spinney will give the invocation, and the program will begin with Mr. Scarborough's speech and introduction of teachers. After the main program, there will be a short business meeting. The executive committee has no business to bring before the Association, so parents should keep in mind any questions concerning PTA business that they have. The meeting will close with the benediction by Chaplain M. 0. Stephenson. After the program and business meeting, there will be a social hour and coffee "klatch" during which time there will le an opportunity for parents to get acquainted with the new teachers. Attendance registration will be held as usual. However, this year, registration will consist of an attendance book at the door instead of a count of hands. Each individual parent will count as one vote for the class of their child, and the class having the most percentage of parents present will be awarded the attendance banner for the month. JOHNSON Replaces THOMAS Next Wednesday morning, 8 September, when personnel of the Naval Base turn out at Wharf to meet the incoming MSTS ship loaded with new arrivals for the base, automobiles, and household goods, they will find that the USNS Pvt. William H. THOMAS is no longer making the bi-monthly utility run. It has been relieved for duty in the European area and is being replaced by the USNS Pvt. E. JOHNSON, a sistership to the THOMAS. The JOHNSON, which has the same passenger and cargo capacity as the THOMAS, is by no means new to Guantanamo Bay. It made its first of many trips here in 1952 and made its last run 4 December, 1952. The JOHNSON was relieved then for three round trips by the USNS UPSHUR which was in turn relived by the THOMAS. The JOHNSON will be making the cargo and passenger runs here for an indefinite period of time. School Sponsors Dancing Classes Tap and ballet dancing instruction classes for children and teenagers, ages 4 through 18 will be conducted on Saturdays, commencing Saturday, 18 September at the Nursery School, Marina Point (Across from the Community Auditorium). The classes will be conducted by Mrs. W. D. F. Stagner and Mrs. J. F. Frantz, Jr., under the auspices of the Naval Base School. The fee will be $1.00 for each hour lesson, payable monthly. Registration for the classes will be held on Saturday, 11 September from 0900 to 1200 and 1300 to 1500, at the Nursery School. FliE INDIAN Pagd Three

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Page Four American-Korean Foundation Begins Drive Here Soon Under the direction of CDR R. M. Beaugrand, Naval Base Plans Officer, a drive will begin here soon for the American-Korean Foundation. The campaign for contributions is being held throughout the Armed Forces of the United States. The American-Korean Foundation is a non-profit, non-sectarian organization. It is the channel through which Americans can provide aid to millions of Koreans who lost everything except courage in fighting Communism. Contributions to the Foundation will help achieve two main objectives. Your help in nickles, dimes, or dollars will ease the suffering and hard-ships of the Korean people and will help the Koreans demonstrate the Democratic way of life in Asia, and thus halt the spread of Communism. Korea needs material aid-medical supplies, hospital equipment, food supplementation, training of doctors, nurses, and teachers, homes for orphans, care for disabled veterans, and help in tracing lost children. When hostilities ceased, Korea's first task was to survive and preserve life, spirit, and culture. Alone, the Republic of Korea could not accomplish this job, for more than 2,000,000 Korean people had been killed by bullets, bombs, and exposure-as many people as the United States lost in World Wars I and II and the Korean conflict. Along with this, over 500,000 homes were destroyed and another half million damaged leaving 9,000,000 homeless or as refugees. Then, to make the crisis even more serious, 80 percent of the nation's hospitals were in ruins and over 100,000 children had lost both parents. For the brave Koreans, survival meant a grim struggle for food, clothing, shelter, and medical care. This struggle still goes on, but now, through the American-Korean Foundation, you can help. $1,000 will send a student through four years of medical school. $100 will provide an artificial leg for an amputee veteran and train him for useful work. $4 will pay for a year's schooling for a child. $1 will maintain a hospital bed for a day. 50 cents will provide a day's complete care for an orphan. Further details of this drive will be promulgated when they are available. Naval Base Thanked For Cancer Society Contributions Recently, a certificate of appreciation and a letter of thanks was received by RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, from the American Cancer Society thanking the officers and men of this base for their part in helping to make the 1954 Cancer Crusade the most successful one to date. The letter from the Chairman of the National Campaign Committee read in part: "I feel sure that this knowledge (of helping in the success of the Cancer Crusade) will be a source of tremendous satisfaction to you and your men. In tangible acknowledgement of their splendid efforts, we present to you, on behalf of the American Cancer Society, the enclosed Certificate of Appreciation." Recently eleven Naval Station employees were presented Length of Service Awards for 20 and 30 years of Civil Service. CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, is shown in the above picture shaking hands with John Gumbs, who with Julio Chang received a 30-year award. Others received 20-year awards. Left to right are: Jose Solomon, David Rodriguez, Vicente Costa, Ma Young, Harold Francis, David Marks, Mr. Chang, Montague Derrick, Jose Robles and John B. Lightbourne. Looking on are: CDR E. L. Rowan, LCDR A. J. Tervo, and LCDR D. C. Edwards. Mr. Axel H. Heimer, Supervisory Fiscal Accounting Officer, GS10, at the Naval Supply Depot, recently was presented his second consecutive Meritorious Civilian Service Award pin and certificate by CDR E. W. Sutherling, Depot Commanding Officer. The award was presented in recognition of a year of superior service, which earned for Mr. Heimer an efficiency rating of "Outstanding." SCUTTLEBUTT If you're in a hurry to find a cop ...try going 70 mph. *0 Officers' Club Celebrates New $27,000 Galley With Smorgasbord Dinner On Labor Day, Monday, 6 September, members of the Officers' Club here will celebrate the completion of a brand new $27,000 galley with a Smorgasbord Dinner at 6 P.M. The new galley, which was completed late this week, has many new features which will offer items not previously available on the menu at the "0" Club. Along with the all new ovens, ranges, and refrigerators, the entire kitchen is a glimmering array of stainless steel sinks, work tables, and modern accessories. Newly added features not available in the older and smaller galley include a large walk-in-refrigerator making large stock supplies possible, and a plate warming oven which will be especially enjoyable since good hot meals can be served at large banquets with no delay or waiting. The Smorgasbord dinner planned for the opening of the galley on Labor Day will be the first such event tried here at the "0" Club, and if it proves possible to obtain all the items on the planned menu, it will be a glorious occasion for all members to pleasantly "gorge" themselves, There will be dinner music and also music for dancing after dinner by the Naval Base Band and a local commercial orchestra. "You're girl is spoiled, isn't she?" "No. It's just the perfume she's wearing." "Why did you steal that $5,000,000?" "Judge-I was hungry." Old bankers never die-they just sit around and lose interest. Need For Legal Personnel Cited By Legal Officer Because of the many recent personnel changes and transfers which have occurred in commands of the Naval Base, an acute shortage of personnel to serve on boards of investigation and court martials has arisen. To remedy this situation, the Naval Base Legal Officer, CDR Gale E. Krause, has asked that all commands take a survey of personnel within their jurisdiction that had legal training or experience. Duties that such personnel will be asked to perform, as outlined in GTMO Naval Base Notice 5000, will consist of occasional boards and court duty. Experience acceptable may in elude civilian law school, Naval Justice School, Newport, R. I., or a Navy correspondence course in military law. Personnel officers of the Naval Base will screen service jackets of officer and enlisted personnel, ask for volunteers, and submit their reports concerning the number of eligible personnel to the Base Legal Office. Additionally, a statement will be included of any current or planned program within the command for enrollment of personnel in Naval Justice School at Newport or in Military Law correspondence courses. P. W. Repairs Seawall A steel pile is swung into place by a barge crane as the Waterfront Division of the Public Works Department begins the task of repairing the broken down sea wall along Boat Shed Road by the Naval Station Boat Shed. The new seawall, which is one of many Public Works maintenance projects, is expected to be complete by the 15th of September. Bay Hill 'Barrel Club' Opens The Naval Station's new "Barrel Club", located at the eastern base of Bay Hill, is expected to be ready for business by Labor Day. The new club was erected as a convenience to residents of Bay Hill. Hours of operation will be similar to those of the Enlisted Men's Club in the Fleet Recreation area. Judging from the high price of feather pillows, down is up. Saturday, 4 September 1954 m THE INDIAN

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Page Five THE INDIAN Saturday. 4 September' 1954 Base Anglers Receive Fishing Prizes Naval Station Golf Tourney NavSta Softball Season Qualifications Begin Today SWingS Into Play RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, presents a certificate, trophy, and prize to one of the many winners in the annual fishing contest. The presentation of awards were made at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum, Saturday, 29 August. Assisting Admiral Taylor was LT E. A. Sandness, Naval Station Special Services Officer. Key West. (Continued from Page One) weekend occurred when Jerry H. White of the Ann Arbor Amphibians, dove into the salt water off Miami for the first time after years of hunting the sweet-water areas of the Great Lakes. Jerry sought to acquaint himself with the tropical varieties of fish and took with him a single-band Arbolette. While at the bottom, he speared and captured a 76 pound Snapper that broke all world's records for the individual species. The younger set of the Base received their share of the honors too. Here Admiral Taylor Awards one of the souvenir prizes to a proud and happy lad. Ladies' Golf Shots by Miriam Hoy Last Sunday was Scotch Foursome Day, and it seemed everyone thoroughly enjoyed themselves. Twenty-two couples participated, and the lucky winners of golf balls were: 1st lowgrossRogers and Hering 2nd low gross-the Scotts 3rd low gross-the Caruthers 1st low net-Lackey and Burke 2nd low netRothenberg and Leach 3rd low net-Simmons Closest to the pin on No. 15 for the men was Beman, and Rogers had the longset drive on No. 17. Polly Hering came closest to the pin on No. 14 and she also had the longest drive on No. 16. The second shot closest to the pin on No. 18 was won by the Mannings. CDR King had the longest putt on No. 9 for men or women, and the Gentry's had the best poker hand on the back nine. Last Wednesday morning quite a few of the ladies were anxiously waiting to tee off. We played the front nine-odd holes with /2 handicap. The winners were: 1st Flight-Lou Toczko, 1st place; 2nd place was a 3-way tie with Mary Ann Pennell, Alma The first annual Invitational Golf Tournament, sponsored by the Naval Station, swings into the qualifying rounds this morning when the first of over 100 entrants tee off on the local course. A qualifying round of 18 holes will be shot today. The top 60 players will then be chosen, and the main tournament will get underway tomorrow. A total of 72 holes will be shot to complete the tournament. The score attained on the first 18-hole qualifying round will be added to the additional 54-hole score to determine the winners. The score from the qualifying round shot today will determine the handicap of the contenders. The match is expected to produce some top-flight golf. RADM G. B. H. Hall, Commander Tenth Naval District, has registered his entry along with RADM E. B. Taylor, Commander Naval Base. Tony Grego, the 1954 club champion and 1953 ComTen champion, has entered, and if in his usual form, will certainly be among the leading contenders. This tournament is the first of its size ever undertaken by the Naval Station and has been planned as a yearly affair. Three cups have been established on a rotating basis-the "'Whitey Taylor Cup" for the winner of low gross score, the "Tony Grego Cup" for the winner of the low net score and the "Arky Caruthers Cup" for the Medalist. Replicas of the trophies will be given to the winners for permanent possesion. A host of other prizes will be awarded to runners-up. (Look for the full feature story complete with pictures of the 1954 National Competition at Key West in next weeks INDIAN) Cuban Little Leaguers Take 2nd Base Win ANOTHER ONE THAT DIDN'T GET HOME .Jim Sanborn of the Bears is stopped at home plate by the Cuban Little catcher during the game last Sunday. The Cuban Little League invaded the base for a second time and went away with a second victory in their pocket, 4 to 1. The base team was made up of the champion Bears and the runner-up Tigers. McCracken and Marion Caruthers. 2nd Flight--1st place Nita Roberts; 2nd place Evelyn Leach. 3rd Flight-1st place Joyce Simmons; 2nd place Sue Strauss. Today Corky Henning is leaving for the States, and, although we hate losing one of our best golfers, we all wish her the very best of luck. The Naval Station Intra-Mural Softball season began Tuesday night on softball diamond number one in the Fleet Recreation area, and if the first two games are any indication of the future, this should be one of the wildest leagues to cavort around the diamond. In the first game of the season the 5th Division team romped over the High School, 21 to 1, and in the second game the Fleet Camera Party paraded around the bases to run up a score of 24 to 8 over the M team of the 5th Division. Ten teams are entered in this year's league: the High School, Fifth Division, Fleet Camera Party. "M" Division of the Fifth Division, Commigary Store, Third and Flag Division, Security Group, Sixth Division, Second Division and the Eleventh Division. The winner of the league will be determined on the usual won and lost percentage, and plans at present call for a short post-season tournament between the top four finishers. Two games will be played each evening, the first commencing at 6 P.M. and the second starting at 8 P.M. In order to finish two games a night, no inning will be started in the first game after 8 o'clock and no inning in the second game will be started after 10 o'clock. In case of rained out games, a mutual agreement between the respective managers will determine the rescheduling. LT E. A. Sandness, Naval Station Special Services Officer, will act as coordinator and arbitrator, but in the case of any protests or unforseen problems, he may call a special meeting of the managers to iron out the difficulty. The intra-mural season will end on the first of October. As yet, no plans have been formulated for a base softball league. The softball schedule for the duration of the intra-mural season is reprinted below for spectators' convenience: The home team will be team whose number appear s first ii schedule in first game, and second in second game each evening. Teams have been arbitrarily a signed a number as follows: Hi-School No. 1 Fifth Division No. 2 Fit. Camera Party No. 3 M Div. Fifth Div. No. 4 Commissary Store No. 5 Third & Flag Div. No. 6 Security Group No. 7 Sixth Division No. 8 Second Division No. 9 Eleventh Division No. 10 SCHEDULE OF GAMES Date 1st Game -1800 2nd Game -2200 Mon 6 Sept (Holiday) no games scheduled this date Wed I Sept 6 -8 7 -10 Wed s Sept 14 2-6 Thur 9 Sept 39 57 Fri 10 Sept 8-10 15 Mon 13 Sept Tues 14 Sept Wed 15 Sept Thur 16 Sept Fri 17 Sept Mon 20 Sept Tues 21 Sept Wed 22 Sept Thur 23 Sept Fri 24 Sept Mon 27 Sept Tues 28 Sept Wed 29 Sept Thur 30 Sept Fri 1 Oct 2-3 6 -10 1-6 3 -10 s-s 2-s 4 -10 1-s i-s 5 -10 2 -10 4-6 1 -10 3-s 6-7 7-9 2-7 4-5 1-7 3-5 6-s 2-s 4-7 1-s 3-7 5-s 2-5 4-9 ,aura 4S tebr15

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4m m Page Six FTG Handi John Landy's time of 3:58 for the "miracle mile" has been officially recognized as a world reeord by the International Amateur Athletics Federation. Wonder if our generation will still be around when this phenomenal mark is shattered? .Lou Little celebrates his silver anniversary this season as head football coach of Columbia University. Little's teams have won 106 games, lost 94 and tied 10. America's first intercollegiate football game was played between Rutgers and Princeton, Nov. 6, 1869 ...Prediction: Ezzard Charles won't last 10 rounds in his title bid" against the champ Rocky Marciano at the Yankee Stadium, Sept. 15. Service Highlights The professional Chicago Bears and New York Giants of the National Football League will meet at Chicago's Wrigley Field Sept. 12 in the annual Armed Forces benefit game ...Army opens its Posing proudly 1954 grid wars against South Group Annual H Carolina, Sept. 25 ...The Great K E Skadowsli Lakes Naval Training Center, Ill., football team will again be coached awards AMC E by LTJG "C" Elmo Cummins. Low Goss Earlier it had been announced that the Bluejackets would be coached by LCDR Kermit Montz. Foster Rapier, grid star at John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio, is now in the Army and currently 'taking training at Ft. Eustis, Va. Pfc. Frank Baumann, the $100,000 left-handed bonus baby for the Boston Red Sox, took a little time off from his Army duties at Camp Chaffee, Ark., recently to pitch for the Sox against the New York Giants in an exhibition contest. The 20-year-old southpaw racked up the Jints 6-5, giving up nine hits, fanning nine, and walking four. He also rapped out three hits in four trips to the plate. Who said pitchers don't hit? ...A other service pitcher making he lines lately is Pvt. Wilmer "Vinegar Bend" Mizs11 of Ft. McPherson, Ga. The former St. Louis Cardinal < aJ lefty recently won his 10th straight game. The popular hurler also coaches and manages the post Little League team. Pvt. Robert Hynes, former Michigan State swimming ace, is currently splashing his way to new records at Ft. Benning, Ga. He was a member of State's celebrated 300-yard medley relay team which was ranked eighth in the nation in '52 ...Pvt. William Farrell, ComTEN G third-ranking Amateur Athletic Union platform diver in the U.S., Slated For now showing his championship form at Ft. Sam Houston, Tex. The Naval Academy lost a great coach when H. R. Webb, better The CoiTei known as "Spike", hung up his slated to be play gloves after 35 years of tutoring on the Guantanan middle boxers. heP tentatively Naval Academy Holds Alumni Weekend Beginning at 1000 on Friday, 24 September, the U.S. Naval Academy will hold their annual Alumni Weekend. The three-day weekend will include tours of the academy, luncheon in the mess hall, a dress parade and reception, an informal dance at the Officers' Club, and a general open house Saturday. Highlighting the weekend will be the football game in Thompson Stadium between the Naval Academy Midshipmen and William and Mary College. 23rd and 24th of Further details as soon as avails 9-Hole Addi For GTMO The extra addi makes this cou largest found on will be another 9 Naval Station invites your use sive facility for THE INDIAN m* cap Winners Receive Golfing Awards with their golfing trophies for the Fleet Training andicap Golf Tournament are, left to right: LCDR winner Low Net; CAPT F. L. Tedder, presenting the C. Monte, 2nd Low Net; and LCDR D. A. Scott, Navy Exchange. n(Continued from Page One) been offered previously. The record dGpartmet, which has had its sales ry w boosted by virtue of special shipmnts of late releases from Miami, a doubled their sales in the past month. About the only departments that ddnot increase sales were te -, clothing, shoes, and children's wear counters. or the last three years now, the two ships sevcshere have October.ice bettered time half a million mark with $508,054 in 1952, then a record high mark in 1953 of $516,657, 4 ~L4'aiid this August netted $509,837. accordance with Navy policy f ait of the funds taken in at the Navy Exchange will be turned over to the various recreation funds. This amount is computed on a per tae basi en addition to the buying sprees of the middies and the reservists, the recreation facilities of the Fleet Recreation area were utilized to the fullest extent. The swimming pool had the biggest play with the bketball courts coming in for Af Tourney thetw share of business next in line. Full use was made of all softw ball diamonds, and the corral and the sailboat landing reported rushing business. The extra beer Golf Tournament, garden, set up on the lawn in front ed again this year of the Petty Officers' Club, took the in Bay course, has overflow from the club which was set for the 22nd, reserved for the middies' exclusive October. use. The golf course and the tennis will be published courts were hard pressed to achiis. coeodate extra load, and the -__ skating rink was filled to nearcapacity every night. As a finale to the last middle cruise of the seasoii a dance was Golf Course held in their honor at the CPO Club Monday night. About 350 tthmiddies attended for a last fling ,ion aid one which before returning to the States and f-s1, their Fall semester. rse one o e any overseas base holes. Sepecial Services of another extenyour recreation Baby Corn: "Mama, where did I come from?" Mama Corn: "The stalk brought you." and good health-play golf! __ Prize fighter hanging limp on A chip on this shoulder iidiropes: "If only that bell wouldn't sates wood higb r up. stop saving me!" Saturday, 4 September 1954 Air Station Hobby Shop Offers New Hobby Craft The Naval Air Station Hobby Shop, located directly across the street from the Enlisted Men's Barracks (AV-50 and AV-51) and next door to the Sewing and Tailor Shop, has received a complete line of new Hobbyeraft items for sale at very reasonable prices. We invite all patrons, including dependents, to visit the Hobby Shop and find an interesting hobby for himself and his family. There are many items which are particularly suitable for children. The Hobby Shop is open seven days a week from 1300 until 1640 and from 1730 until 2200. We are interested in suggestions and any item which we do not carry will be considered for an order. A few items which we invite you to see are listed below: Craftint Paint Sets and Super Craftint Paint Sets Mongol Paint Sets (using colored pencils) Artistic Oil Paint Sets Picture Frames Aluminum Easels Varnish and mistifier sprayers for Paint Sets Ruth Fontaine Doll Kits Royal Tot Birdhouse Kits Spacemobiles and Pacemobiles Inlaid Wooden Plaques of Imported Woods Dozens of all types and sizes of model planes, ships, race cars and a complete line of accessories for all models A complete line of leather craft items and accessories are available at the Leeward Point Hobby Shop. We will be glad to procure any of these items for patrons at the Naval Air Station Hobby Shop if requested. Pay us a visit soon and create an interesting hobby in your spare time. NS0 Supply Line Mrs. Helen Beman and Mrs. Evie McDonald were very pleasantly surprised at a luncheon given in their honor at the Family Restaurant last week. Mrs. Beman has resigned her position at the Depot to return to the States with her husband who has received orders to Bethesda, Md. Mrs. McDonald will also return to the States in the near future. Both women received gifts from their co-workers. Welcome aboard to Mrs. Harriet E. Muehler and son, George, family of Vernon D. Muehler, EN1, who arrived September 1 by FLAW. Mrs. Muehler and George have been residing in Somerville, Mass. until quarters were available in GTMO. Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Griffin, Sr. have returned from a month's vacation in Florida. Our NSD softball team, after a shaky first inning start, went on to win their third game of the season in six outings by an 8 to 3 victory over the NAS General Mess. The NAS crew scored two quick runs in the first inning when they managed to put across one more. Meanwhile, the booming bats of our NSD gang rattled the fences in an 11-hit attack which brought eight runs across the plate. Travis Hanselman and Gerald Schneider led the NSD batsmen with a pair of doubles and three singles. Some people are like blotters ...soak it all in, but get it all backwards!

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Saturday, 4 Septembes' 1d54 fliE INDIAN Page Seven NSD Fuel Division In Action A few weeks ago the Indian featured the story of NSD Gtmo's Fuel Division. The Navy petroleum products stored and the great scope of operations were pointed out. This week, aided and abetted by the fine photographers and staff of the NAS Photo Lab, we present a study in Photo-Journalism-Subject, NSD Fuel Divsion. This is the Small Craft Fueling area at Wharf Roger. Here Tubal Gilling is issuing Diesel Fuel to boats, while B. Zungiz, SN, keeps a sharp watch on his fuel tanks. At this wharf, gasoline is also issued. Private craft may obtain fuel here after proper arrangements have been made, but Naval craft need only to pull alongside to get quick service. A Diesel truck boards the ferry for Leeward Point where it services the enlisted mens galley as well as several portable, power generators. Here L. R. Sproul, FA, regulates a valve aboard the YON 85 at Pier Charlie, while loading Naval Special Fuel Oil. This non-self propelled barge is towed out into the stream to service ships at anchor. Here is the new tank truck loading rack just off Sherman Avenue in operation. Diesel Oil and Motor Gasoline are dispensed here for use by small base consumers. The rack has a modern filtering system to keep fuels clean, and has many safety features. 4 In order to continually maintain high quality levels of fuel at Guantanamo, a fuel laboratory is provided to check all incoming fuels, as well as provide periodic tests of stored fuels. Here chemist Felipe Dugrot is checking some Navy Special Fuel Oil for quality. This laboratory provides testing services for much of the Caribbean Area, including San Juan, Puerto Rico. NAS Crosswinds by Dick Friz We have just returned from a brief visit to Key West and Miami ...broke, bothered and bedraggled, but happy to be back. (cross my fingers and hope to die.) Had an interesting time at the National Spearfishing Championships in the Keys ...the enthusiasm for the sport is infectuous, and it is easy to see why Gtmo Bay has found so many con verts ...Our local team fared quite well too, placing third. We were told that it marked the first time any Navy team had ever figured in contention. .Met an old ex-Marine in Miami Beach who was a frequent visitor to the base here. "They had a liberty town called Caimanera," he recalled, "and what a spot it was! I saw an old guy puffin, on a black cigar in '17 and when I returned ten years later, there he was. He hadn't moved an inch." LT Carl Plath, president of the local Denizens, conferred with Colonial Hunt of the West Palm Beach Air Force Base, and a meet is being arranged between the Air Force and the Navy which will be held probably in San Juan. The Denizes of the Deep group arrived a little belatedly back in Gtmo. The VU-10 PBM made a one engine landing at Master's Field and had to RON until Tuesday noon. Local-Flashes Auf weidersehn to the following NAS personnel up for discharge this week: Norman Gould, ADAN, Dale Osterhout, AD2, Billie Bradbury, ME3, Jack Coup, AC3, John Denny, S/N, and Isadore Malouin, S/N. .The Leeward Pointers and Operations continued on their merry way in intra-mural softball competition this past week. Leeward owned victories over Boat-Shed, and Administration (8-3) and Operations kept pace with a 20-8 bombardment of Communications, and a 7-1 win over Supply. In the first extra inning game of the season, Communications edged the Boatshed 12-11. The big game of the week (score unavailable) was Wednesday's contest between Operations and the men from the Rock ...both were undefeated. Saw a very attractive Spanish lass at a Miami nite spot, and wished that I had attended Professor Jone's Spanish classes on base sooner ...Think I'll start with the new class Thursday night at 0 FT G Bulletin by Jack Engstrom CHSLK Raymond J. Harper reported aboard on the 26th of August after a tour of duty on the Chief of Naval Operations Staff, Washington, D. C. CHSCLK Harper will relieve CHSCLK Davidson, FTG Reports Officer, who has been ordered to NAS Jacksonville, Florida for duty. LT Henry W. Hague, now serving aboard the USS ROWAN, (DD-782) in the Western Pacific, has been ordered to Fleet Training Group, Gtmo, to relieve LT Alexander, FTG Electronics Officer. LT Alexander has orders for NAS Argentia, Newfoundland. His wife and daughter departed for the States two weeks ago aboard the USNS THOMAS. Two men departed from the Fleet Training Center this past week. Ralph Chelf, RDC, departed Wednesday, 1 September via FLAW for a normal tour of shore duty at the U.S. Naval Reserve Training Center, Louisville, Kentucky. Andy Toman, ET2, departed via FLAW on Wednesday also for Jacksonville, Florida, where he will be discharged from the Naval Service@i The Communications and Engineering Department each picked up a new man this past week. Carl Aumann, ENC, reported on the 27th of August from the USS OTTERSETTER, (DER-244). He will be with the Engineering Department. Going to Communications is Douglas Dunn, QMC(SS), who reported on the 31st of August from the USS CLAMAGORE, (SS343). Welcome aboard, we hope you will enjoy your tour of duty with the Fleet Training Group. During her four week Refresher Training period, the USS LAKE CHAPLAIN, (CVA-39), was the recipient of 3,440 man hours of shipboard instruction and inspections. Of her 22 days in training she had riders on 19 of these days and was the hostess to 380 shipboard instructors. To conduct her final inspection, it took 77 of the above total. The inspection party consisted of three captains, 29 other officers and 46 enlisted men. Despite the grueling pace, the following message was received on the departure of the LAKE CHAMPLAIN ..."Bloody, beaten and a much wiser crew, we weigh anchor and send our sincere parting thanks to you and all Gtmo shipmates for your patient persistent help, advice and hospitality" ...signed Hannegan and Crew. Ship Arrivals USS Seneca (ATF-91) USS Zellars (DD-777) USS Owen (DD-536) USS Pritchett (DD-561) Ship Departures USS Hopi (ATF-71) USS Watts (DD-567) USS Black (DD-666) USS Rushmore (LSD-14) 5 7 7 8 4 7 8 10 Sep Sep Sep Sep Sep Sep Sep Sep the Administration Board room. Everyone from NAS and VU-10 is invited, including dependents it doesn't make any difference whether you're just beginning or want to brush up on the lingo ... Class begins at 1900. .Wallace Naegle of NAS Personnel dipped his line off the Coast Guard Pier last weekend, and caught himself a 163 pound Grouper on 62 pound test leader. If only the trio of spear fishermen from the Denizens had spotted a Grouper that size! Congratulations Walt. Saturday, 4 September 1954 TIHE INDIAN Page Severn

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m m Navy-DPPO-10ND---Gtni.-0224 MOVIES Saturday, 4 September ARROW IN THE DUST Sterling Hayden Coleen Gray A cavalry trooper, deserting his command, overtakes a wagon train and leads it safely thru savage Indian attacks. With the train safe at the fort the trooper goes on alone. Sunday, 5 September THE CARNIVAL STORY Anne Baxter Steve Cochran A dramatic story of a povertystrickersGerman girl who sought refuge with an American carnival and experienced three love affairs in a brief period of time. The first a wild, emotional affair, the second a rebound marriage ending in tragedy, the third a happy one. Monday, 6 September THE OUTCAST John Derek Joan Evans In the beautiful Colorado cattle country, a young rancher learns from a range war that friends are better fighting-allies than hired gunmen. He also learns that a range-bred sweetheart is better than a Virginia-born girl. Tuesday, 7 September SIEGE OF RED RIVER Van Johnson Joanne Dru Trouble developes between Southern Raiders and a Union Cavalry train when guns are stolen. The thieves were engaged in a secret patriotic mission for the South. Indians get the guns but the Civil War is over by that time so the whites fight together. Wednesday, 8 September ANGELS WITH DIRTY FACES Humphrey Bogart Ann Sheridan Young hoodlums worship a gangster hero. A Priest, who grew up with the gangster tries to help him. He also tries to help the boys. The gangster does one last favor for the Priest by destroying the boy's admiration for him. Thursday, 9 September THE IRON GLOVE Robert Stack Ursula Theiss The story concerns the devoted loyalty of a soldier to his Prince who is kept from his rightful place on the throne by a schemer who has himself crowned. All ends well and the Prince is restored to his throne. Friday, 10 September HEAT WAVE Alex Nicol Hillary Brooke A faithless wife makes no effort to help her drowning husband. A young novelist, and unwitting accessory, keeps silent but tells the police after the widow gets her husbands insurance money and jilts him. TIlE INDIAN m W Saturday, 4 September 1954 May Wynn made her first appearance for Columbia in "The Caine Mutiny." Her bosses were so impressed she was signed immediately for "Rough Company," a big technicolor western. TEENAGEROUND-UP By Linda Thurston And so, as the sun pulls away from the pier and the ships slowly sink in the west, we hear the boys of GTMO sigh heavily with relief. Not that the boys didn't appreciate the Middies and the fact that a dance was held at the CPO Club for them and almost every available girl on the base was present! Neil Hayes appreciated the fact enough to go to said dance to protect his interests, namely Pat W. On the more serious side, we get down to some facts and figures in the shape of Barbara Burke, Norman Huddy, George MacMichael, Jim Beman and Ed Stafford. The facts are that our gal, Barb, has been holding the base together for nine years now, and George and Norman have been residents for nigh onto nine years. These kats are heading for greener pastures (it always looks greener). Barb and George to the University of Florida, in Gainesville, Norm to Villanova, Beman to Bethesda, Md. and Eddy is deserting us for the Air Force. Our very best wishes go with you along with all the luck in the world. DID YA' SEE .. The cute new junior gal who hails from Washington State and is known by her friends as Bobbie (Johnsen) ...and the new senior boy (Allah, Allah) whose name is David Shyver from Jax, Fla. (We're glad to have you aboard) ...Phil Keenan breaking all speed records on the Windmill Beach Road, doing a dusty 30 mph. ...Eunice looking sick ...Pat Fojt doing her version of the Cuban mambo, jitterbug style. Attention, Bill B: please return B's earring! 0 by Sgt W. J. McDowell Jr. and Cpl Joseph Androvich, USMC A hearty welcome was extended to Pfc. Calvin E. Powell when he reported to this command this past week. Pfc. Powell came from Headquarters Bn. Headquarters Marine Corps. We all hope you enjoy your stay here at Gtmo and we wish you all the luck in the world. On the 6th of September the members of Marine Barracks will hold a Field Meet on the parade grounds at Marine Site. Various athletic events will be held and a luncheon will feature the activities. All available hands are urged to participate to make this event a most enjoyable one for all. Personnel celebrating birthday anniversaries this coming week are Cpl. W. L. Anderson, Sept. 10th; SSgt. R. Dwyer, Sept. 10th; and Sgt. V. Williamson, Sept. 11th. The weekend anglers leaving the Marine Boat Shed, once again, found the fishing rather unsuccessful as all of the boats returned to the boat shed empty. 'I'm sure there's fish in that water!' Congratulations to S e r g e a n t Rogers who recently received his present rank by a meritorious promotion. Marines! This is your column. All stories and suggestions would gladly be appreciated and accepted by this department. So if you have an article of interest you would like to pass along please let us know. The glue that sticks U.S. postage stamps is made of hybrid-corn and casava mixture and is not only palatable but slightly nutritious. 0 Be OKNOOK by George Engle For Your Information THE LIFE OF REASON or PROGRESS by George Santayana THE PHASES OF HUMAN This one volume resume of the five volume works described as Santayana's best known and most important book remains, in the opinion of many, his masterpiece. It gives us, more than any one work of his, the clue to his philosophy as a whole. (Not for browsing.) YOU'VE GOT IT COMING TO YOU by Erauls Mallen Here are the answers to your questions about rights, benefits, and privileges in and out of the Armed Forces. The only book containing complete information for the serviceman, the veteran, and the members of his family. Up-dating are provided to keep abreast of all new legislation. SUCCESSFUL COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY by Andreas Feininger LIFE Staff Photographer This is the simplest and yet most complete discussion of color photography ever put down in book form. You're not only given the "how-to" of color photography, but also the necessary technical information to enable you to take your photographs out of the ordinary and give them the special distinction and originality which every photographer is after. ADMINISTRATION (The Art and Science of Organizations & Management) by Albert Tepawsky This illuminates the principles and operational procedures of the executive, administrator, and manager in all walks of life-business, governmental and social. (This book examines the work day of the administrator from the top executive down to the small office secretary as she "manages the boss.") It is an invaluable discussion of the administrative roots of our culture. For Your Entertainment .. THE WORLD, THE FLASH, AND H. ALLEN SMITH by H. Allen Smith This anthology of Smith's best includes his sharp, often acid and always witty comments on such varied subjects as hitch-hikers and Hollywood stars, kings and cowboys, Gertrude Stein and Dizzy Dean, antelopes and wasps. As Fred Allen says, "He is a very funny man." PICTURES FROM AN INSTITUTION by Randall Jarrell "Pictures From An Institution" is a wonderfully imaginative evocation of that modern and peculiarly American product, the progressive college for women. He explores the aspirations and antics of a small group of the faculty and the students at Benton College, and the result is a marvelously readable and entertaining book. Two Ubangi belles met in the jungle on a hot day. One of them stuck her face close to the other and said: "Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers. Now you fan me for a while."


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