Citation
Indian

Material Information

Title:
Indian
Added title page title:
The Indian
Creator:
U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Publisher:
U.S. Naval Base
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright, The Indian. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Sunday Supplement
Related Item:
Gitmo Review
Related Item:
Gitmo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Bay Gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text









9Ae


V__VNo_ U. S.Go aeas asMe Lka ThB ubansine _a_ dy 28_Augst_195

Vol. V1, No. 60 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 28 August 1954


'Frogman' Team Set

Fnr Mnrk Shnbova


While making final adjustmen's in the UDT gear, N. G. Lanouette and M. 0. Lewis display all of the gear that "frogmen" use in operations. Behind them are the unit's supply of aqua lungs, and Lewis sits in one of the rubber rafts used in operations.

Last week, one of the Navy'. more famous and highly specialized units, dubbed by their WW II coinrades as "the Frogmen," arrived in Guantanamo Bay for a two week period of training and operations in conjunction with Fleet Training Group.
The 16-man volunteer detachment, Underwater Demolition Unit TWO, under the direction of Officer-in-Charge LTJG T. E. Galles and Assistant Officer-in-Charge LTJG J. M. Falter, will operate here carrying out mock sabotage attacks at night on ships anchored in the bay and shore installations.
The training which the frogmen are scheduled to undergo here consists of operations which test security measures of ships and shore installations. Working at night from an unknown spot along the shore, the demolition and sabotage teams will head out into the bay in small rubber rafts and then swim up along side ships anchored in the bay. Upon approaching the ship, they will remain out of sight or submerged for the amount of time that it would ordinarily take to attach a mine. Then, to signal that the ship has been sunk or damaged by sabotage, they will surface and send up a flare.
However, the demolition units do not always go undetected, which is the element involved as training and testing of security measures aboard ship.
During the night operations il warmll waters, the frogmen wear the black "longjohn" uniforms both to avoid any possible reflection and to provide protection from
(Continued on Page Six)


Two NaYSta Departments $3,500,000 Landpl ane Hangar
Commended at Inspection ~ UU UI~UI


Last Saturday, 21 August, two departments of the Naval Station r e c e i v e d commendations from CAPT W. R. Caruthers, commanding officer, at the semi-monthly personnel inspection.
The Ordnance Department was cited for performance of duty upon the recommendation by ComTEN during the recent inspection. The Naval Security Group Detachment was commended upon the recommendation of Officer in Charge, LT J. W. Dempsey.


CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, congratulates LCDR H. T. Walling, Officer in Charge, Ordnance Department, for the excellence of training, maintenance, and storage of ammunition by the department.

The Ordnance Department, commended upon the recommendations of ComTEN, maintains a well rounded and complete program of instruction and training including
(Continued on Page Three)


N. G. Lanouette, at left, and M. 0. Lewis show where frogmen are at hoe-in the water.


Commissioned at Leeward


Leeward Point was the scene of the official acceptance of the new land plane hanger and control tower last Wednesday 18th of August and another vital step advanced the ever expanding facilities across the Bay.
-__Mr. J. R. Connor, Project Manager for Frederick Snare CorporaL lahtion, presented the keys to CDR S harp S W. M. Gordon, CEC, Resident Officer in Charge of Construction, who
F L in turn passed them to CAPT R. R.
For Nav ia Allowance McCracken, Commanding Officer of
the Naval Air Station at Guantanamno Bay.
The personnel allowance of the The reinforced concrete shellNaval Station here is tentatively arch type hangar was designed by slated for a sharp setback. Ac- the Roberts and Schefaer Company, cording to LT G. E. Hoppe, Per- engineers of New York City. The sonnel Officer, the slash in man- hangar, including shop and colpower-approximately 25 percent lateral equipment has a price tag
of the present men on board-will of 31/2 million dollars and the congreatly effect every department trol tower (minus electronic and and division, aerological gear,) cost $139,000.
The reason behind the quota The hangar measures 240 feet
slash is not positively known since long and has a 150 foot clear arch the official instruction has not been span. The slab portion of the arch received, but this new policy ap- is four inches thick but is specially pears to be in line with the present designed to withstand hurricanes reallocation of critical rates and or earthquakes. Approximately personnel on all ships and stations. 63,000 bags of Portland Cement and
No action will be taken, however, over 500 tons of reinforcing steel until the official letter is received went into the 20 month project. On from the Bureau of Naval Person- the east side of the hangar is a nel by the personnel office. Little two story, 60 foot wide leanto, or no action will be required in providing office spaces for station carrying out the slash as it will force personnel. On the west side be self-enacting over a period of is a 100 foot wide, two story leanto time. Whenever a man of a critical built primarily for shop areas and rate receives orders, he will not be squadron offices. Both leantos are replaced. This process will continue attached to the main arch portion until the new allowance figure has but remain separated from it by been arrived at. expansion joints and lends no
In anticipation of the slash, all structural support.
departments have surveyed their Leeward Point, a cow pasture
own needs and requirements for just a few short years ago, is now
personnel. As near as possible, it bolstered by a concrete runway, is planned to divide the cut in man- airfield lighting system, jet fuel power equally among the depart- storage, two-100 man enlisted ments and divisions, giving each men's barracks. A 100 man BOQ enough personnel, rated men, and and mess, a 100 man enlisted men's officers to continue the present subsistence building, three addiwork load. tional enlisted men's barracks, a
As well as the Naval Station, 5,000,000 gallon water storage tank other commands here on the Naval and a 2100 KW power plant will Base are expecting a similar slash, soon be added providing a full scale but the percentage or the number activity for ComAir Lant's air arm. of men to be cut from these activ- Those attending the ceremony ities is not known at present. (Continued on Page Six)


9 p








Page Two


Saturday, 28 August 1954


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9-615
Saturday, 28 August 1954
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sandness----------Officer-Advisor
H. E. Davis, JOC-------------------Editor
H. L. Sisson, J03-------------------News
Jerry Lewis, J03------------------Features
F. L. Cannon, JOSN.----__Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and finance with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Naphotos unless otherwise credited.


WGBY Hi-Lites
by John Hull

Several new programs will join the WGBY program schedule next week. Among them is an old daytime favorite back once again, the "Bob Hope Show". To be heard five mornings a week at 10:00, Bob will chat informally with prominent personalities from the world of sports, politics and fashions and a famous Hollywood actress will appear as his guest "Lady Editor of the Week". Bill Goodwin returns as the program announcer and "straight man" for Hope.
A brand new situation comedy show, "That's Rich", starring Stan Freberg, moves into the 8:00 slot on Saturday nights beginning 4 September. As the somewhat wideeyed, innocent Richard E. Wilt, Freberg stumbles and bumbles his way through hilarious situations which are more or less the creation of a cousin-in-law, twice removed, with whom he has over-stayed his welcome. The switchboard operator where he works, the Consolidated Paper Products Company, tries to protect him from his irate boss and keep his mind off birds and on his work, for "Rich" is a birdwatcher by choice. The whole family will enjoy this one.
The "New York Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra" broadcasts will resume their past series beginning Sunday, 5 September at 1:00 P.M. Dimitri Mitropoulos will conduct the orchestra and a prominent concert artist will be featured each week. World famous violinist Yehudi Menuhin will appear on the first program.
Richard Widmark, Karl Malden and Geraldine Page will be starred in the "Theatre Guild On The Air" production of Ferenc Molnar's near-classic fantasy drama, "Liliom" Monday, 30 August at 9:00 P.M. This story may be more familiar to you as the popular Broadway adaptation by Rodgers and Hammerstein, "Carousel".
Be sure to watch the daily program schedule in the "Papoose" for your favorite programs and any changes in the schedule presented each day over WGBY, 1450 on your radio dial.


The Fall term of the Naval Base School began Monday, and the Third Grade class of Mrs. J. T. Usey stands to sing "America" in its opening day session. Approximately 630 students are enrolled this year from the Nursery through the High School with the biggest attendance being reported in the First Grade with about 112 students.


Sunday, 29 August 1954

Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630 Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930-2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic)


Erscnam eltekrtqs VU-10 Prop Blast The Chaplain's Corner


by R. M. (Bob) Quiat, DN
It seems to me that there are many people who do not know the meaning of the word Prosthesis. I have, and many other Dental Technicians, have been asked what does it mean. The dictionary gives this for a definition: the addition to the human body of some artificial part such as: leg, eye or tooth. In simpler terms it means the replacement of a part by artificial means. Applied to dentistry it is prosthetic dentistry or phosthodontia.
This week we bring you the second in a series of personalities of the week. Our purpose is to try to acquaint our readers with the members of our staff who are ready, willing and able to help you with your dental problems. Our personality this week is a member of our prosthetic department. His name is Paul S. King, Jr., DT1, USN, is 29 years old and hails from Fort Wayne, Indiana. Paul entered the Navy exactly one year after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1942. In April of 1943 he completed Hospital Corps School. He became a dental technician in June, 1947. Paul was married in September 1951 and in May 1952 he became a prosthetic technician. Paul and his wife, Johnnie, have a 2 year old daughter named Donna Jean. Paul's hobbies are all sports. Many of the old timers should remember him as the basketball league's leading scorer and a unanimous choice for the All-Star team. He also excels in golf. Paul is quite modest and for this reason I was unable to obtain any more information from him.
Bon Voyage to Dr. Phillippi and C. A. Lowe, DT2 of MCB-8 who depart for the States on 26 August. We all hope that they enjoy their new duty station. They will be relieved by MCB-4. More about MCB-4 in later editions.
Mr. Dote, our own Ben Hogan, has continued his torrid pace in golf when he jumped from seventh to fifth position on the golf ladder when he defeated J. E. Fawcett, DN.
Walter J. De Baun, DN has been in his own private world these last few days .The reason for this is 25 days St ,side leave starting 25 August.


The Baseball Banquet was held on Monday night and two members of the Fighting Mallards were presented All-Star awards. Boo Ferris and Bob Dieden were unanimously elected for the awards. A 'Well Done' goes to the Mallards for a season of good, hard play.
There will be a get-to-gether of all VU-10 officers Saturday, 28 August at the '0' Club Patio. Time: 2030. Uniform: Dress whites. Hope to see you all there.
A recent arrival in the Gtmo area is LT W. M. Halentic's family. His wife Elizabeth, and two daughters, Nancy and Karen flew in from Point Mugu, Calif. where LT Halentic was previously stationed. Welcome aboard and hope you have a pleasant stay with VU-10.
We also received eight new men this week. They are: J. P. Barrett, AN, Parker, Pa., J. H. Dorsey, AN, Bisbee, Ariz., D. L. Gardner AN, Houston, Tex., L. A. Henion, AN, Phila., Pa., J. E. Hull, AN, Rockford, Ill., J. D. Mullins, AD1, Norfolk, Va., J. E. Neeley AN, and W. Y. Wright, AN, both of Columbia, S. C. Welcome aboard men.
Unfortunately, we have to lose men once in a while. The Squadron will sorely miss the services of Chief Baker, Chief Paul, Brook, Jacobson, and Stovall, who are being transferred this week. Good luck at your new stations, men.
The VU-10 Golf Team is now in the process of being organized. As you know, we have won the championship two years in a row, so if we win it again this year, the trophy is permanently ours. All personnel interested in trying out for the team contact LT Ferris. Let's keep that trophy!
The KDC finally arrived last week. Not exactly a ship-shape looking craft at first, but due to the combined efforts of our 'blackshoe' brothers and the grumbling ten-man working party, it has taken on quite a seaworthy appearance.


Little Frederick was saying his prayers one night. His mother tiptoed up and heard this gem. "And please make Tommy stop throwing things at me. By the way, I've mentioned 9 before."


We can hardly think of anything more important in life than the proper education of our children. Take the example of the gardener, or florist. Would he not be considered a very bad business man if he neglected his young plants?
In order to expect children to develop morally and mentally according to the norm of Christian life, there must be a good family atmosphere. The surroundings at home influence children very much. Just as a mold into which hot metal is poured determines the shape of the article desired, so does the character of a family, or home, determine the formation of the child's mentality and morals.
Ono of the most difficult problems in raising children is to obtain from them the reverence which their states of dependence demands. If in the family this reverence is not in evidence, the lack of it will go over into after life, and also into social and public life. Children must also be taught their duties, told about them, and exhorted to them; this is a continual, never-ending part of family life. Parents cannot escape this watchfulness; it belongs to the married life and cannot be separated from it.
Thoroughness is another point that ought to claim much attention on the part of parents. Children ought to be taught to finish what they begin, to do well what they are supposed to do, to take pains in perfecting as far as they can what duty demands of them.
It is the duty of parents to give the best example to their children. This, of course, is especially demaded where their example can easily be seen. If, for instance, the children notice that their parents care little about spiritual opportunities, that they easily excuse themselves from Divine Services on Sunday, what effect is this going to have on those young hearts? One need be no prophet to tell the outcome.
W. J. SPINNEY
LCDR, CHC, USN


THE INDIAN


a





a

Page Three


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 28 August 1954


45,000 Reserve Ranks

Slated for Release

According to a statement issued by Assistant Secretary of the Navy James H. Smith, Jr. 45,000 inactive reserve officers will be dropped from the Navy rolls in an effort to tighten the Naval Reserve.
Mr. Smith emphasized that all those pruned out would be given honorable discharges. He also pointed out that the slash does not affect the 400,000 enlisted reservists, and in fact, Pentagon plans to ask Congress to increase the enlisted reserve strength to 600,000 in 1956.
The cut is the aftermath of a poll of reserve officers which was started in 1953 when more than 100,000 inactive reservists received questionnaires. More than half replied. Twenty-five thousand resigned their commissions, 20,000 retired and 7,00 resumed active participation in the reserve program.
The 45,000 to be dropped now are among those who failed to answer the questionnaire or indicated they no longer desired to participate.
The slash will not include medical and dental officers, naval aviators, officers who served in the Korean War, or officers with over 18 years of satisfactory service.

Ed: "How did Phil break his leg?"
Ted: "See those steps over there ?"
Ed: "Yes."
Ted: "Well, he didn't."


Commendations . . .
(Continued from Page One)
Navy Training and Correspondendence courses as well as regularly scheduled instruction periods at the request of personnel of the department.
As well as the training program, the Ordnance Department was commended for the excellent maintenance and condition of a total of 60 of 76 earth covered magazines here. No deficiences could be found in the storage, maintenance or storage, maintenance or condition of these magazines.


What would you do with


18 Million $$$$
Gary L. Stone III, A03, attached to the aircraft carrier, USS ANTIETAM, will not easily forget the 20th day of August for the rest of his life. The 22-year-old sailor was astounded to hear that he had inherited an 18-million dollar estate from an aunt killed two weeks ago in an automobile accident.
Stone lives with his mother, Mrs. Louise Sylvester, and a sister, Mrs. Chuck Hensley, at 6842 Foot Hill Blvd, Pasadena.
C h i e f Journalist Albert F. Wright, attached to the Public Information Office at Quonset Point, R. I., said, "Gary's stunned by this unexpected windfall, but he's on duty as usual."
Stone, who has nine months to go on a four-year hitch, said he realized his aunt "had real estate holdings and other investments but I had no idea of the extent of her estate".
Asked what he'll do with his new-found wealth, Stone, a tall youtn described as "good-looking" by the Navy spokesman, just laughed and said: "This is all too sudden. I haven't had time to give that much thought yet."


Middle Cruise 'Baker' Arrives for 4-Day Stay


-~riin uumneu ivi aaii Little Theatre Holds Tryouts . ,

For Mv Three Angels O Wi u


Last night at the Community Auditorium, the Little Theatre began tryouts for their next production, "My Three Angels." Several old faces along with many new ones showed up to try out for the seven male parts and three female parts. Since tryouts will be held again this afternoon at 1300 and tomorrow at the same tie, no characters were definitely cast, and all parts are still open.
Directing "My Three Angels" will be Alan Wagner who is well remembered here for his performance in "Out of the Frying Pan," the Little Theatre's last production. Lee Douglas will be producer. Alan Wagner in directing will be Burt
(Continued on Page Six)


Members of the U.S. Naval Security Group Detachment who were commended for their excellent performance of duty in handling special communications during the month of June 1954 were; left to right, LT J. W. Dempsey, Officer in Charge, G. L. Rousseau, CTC; J. Domashinski, RM1; G. S. Smith, RM1; K. E. Byers, RM1; F. G. Clark, RMC, J. Carroll, RM1; G. L. Hodges, RM1; CHRELE R. W. Fuller, and D. E. Pomeroy, CTC.


A Navy' Wives' Club is now being organized on the base for all enlisted and officers' wives. Preliminary meetings have elected the following officers: Lorraine Yalepresident; Peggy Lisnick-vicepresident; Etta Wells-secretary; Maybelle Clay-treasurer; Geraldine Meriweather sergeant-atarms; and Jessie Green-chaplain.
An open meeting will be held on Thursday, 2 September, at 8:00 P.M. in the Flamingo Room of the Petty Officers' Club in the Fleet Recreation Area. RADM E. B. Taylor, commanding officers of all commands and Chaplain M. 0. Stehpenson have been invited to attend. All interested wives are urged to attend and especially those who are new to the Guantanamo Bay area.
Social activities, service work possibilities and charitable projects of the group will be discussed.
The purpose of the club is to encourage a friendly and sym-pathetic social relationship between the wives of the men of the United States Navy, and to provide mutual assistance and fellowship.
Mrs. Yale, newly-elected president, wishes to emphasize that all Marine wives and wives of retired personnel of 16 years or more service are not only eligible for membership but especially urged to attend.


4







'2




~~-


Cruise "Baker," the last of the midshipmen cruises this year, arrived in Guantanamo Bay Thursday and will remain over the weekend, departing Tuesday morning.
This third contingent of middies is the last of the three groups to visit Guantanamo Bay this year and winds up the annual Summer training of almost 5,000 Naval Academy and NROTC students from contract colleges. When Cruise "Baker" leaves here, it will head back to the States, conducting drills enroute.
The USS WISCONSIN, flying the flag of RADM George R. Cooper, ComBatDiv 2, led Cruise "Baker" into Guantanamo Bay. A total of 13 major warships carrying 1,765 middies make up the cruise.
As in previous middle contingents all facilities of the base were taxed to the limit with almost 6,000 Fleet sailors added to the middle groups which came ashore. Near record sales were reported at the various Exchanges around the base Fleet Recreation activities carried maximiun capacity.


Scouts Net Over $1,000

At Third Annual Oarnival

The 3rd Annual Scout Carnival held here at the Naval Air Station seaplane ramp last Saturday turned out to be a huge success. The scouts of Guantanamo Bay had a hey-day as they enjoyed themselves and netted over a $1,000 for their activities here in the coming year.
The featured door prize of $50.00 went to Mrs. C. R. Mahaffey, and many others left the scout circus with souvenirs and small prizes won at the "Fish Pond," and other carnival booths-not to mention the cakes and cookies that were consumed at the "goodies booth."
All receipts from the carnival will be used in the coming year to finance scout activities here. This will include such items as hobbycrafts, special equipment needed, and parties for special occasions. Also, the scouts receive a yearly donation from the proceeds of the Guantanamo Bay Carnival.
Special guests at this year's carnival were the Boy Scouts of Guantanamo City.





a


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 28 August 1954


Cuban Little League Fishing Tourney Invades Base Tomorrow Prizes Out Sunday


The Little League enampions, the Bears, coletwate their dout (league and tournament title) witn a pary at Phillips Park. and cokes were tihe order of the day. Meanwmole (below) t runners-up in boh the league and the tournament, also celebra of the season with tnier paiiy held ;at T11' Hays' ntUS. Zil M
f'~k-


-.. ....


'is


The first sure signs of F.Al are indicated in the pictu it bowling activity is reporeLd oil iie upswig thlrouignout the n of the base. Above, Fleet s loi-s rake advantage of the bo at Fleet Recreation Center.


Tomorrow afternoon at the Little League Diamond in Villamar the Champion Bears, joined by a quartet of the Runner-up Tigers, will attempt to save face for the Naval Base Little League as they
Face the Colts of Caimanera.
Two weeks ago the Cuban Colts
came aboard after challenging the Hawks and out-slugged the Naval Base Little Leaguers 10-9. Tomorrow's game will see the Bear-Tiger
aggregation as the challengers.
Facing the Cuban Colts will be
top B e a r stand-outs Ronnie Moseley, Fred Meredith, and Larry Smith. And along with these three, Robert Sanborn, one of the most improved Bears since the beginning
of toe season, will be on hand.
Joining the Bears for the game
will be Tigers Jay Radcliff and Bob Tanner who both double either in front of or behind the plate and have proved themselves worthy ble victory sluggers. Joining the pitcher-catchHot (logs 0r duo will be Robert Hayes and ne Tigers, Dale Shelly. Le tlie end '. rine Site. Other Bears listed in the roster
for game are Ramie Morales, James Sanborn, Don McCoy, Mike Sanborn, Frank Kiefer, and Rusty
MagarityThe Cuban Colts proved to be a
strong team in then- first appearance here on the Naval Base, and they will by no means be done awa with easily. The game should provide plenty of thrills and action
for everyone.




S S


The Yankees have a pitcher with
Binghamton (N. Y.) in the Eastern League who is really flying high.
His name is Jim Kite and he has five wins since his discharge from Ft. Lee, Va... . Hard-hitting Billy Wells of the Barstow, Calif., Ma-ines, formerly with the Chicago White Sox, finished the '54 season with a sensational batting average of .538 for 167 times at bat.
He led his teammates in almost every department with 7 triples, 16 doubles, 11 homers, 74 stolen
bees, and 75 runs batted in.
The New York Knickerbockers
of the NBA have signed basketball star Feed Christ, recently discharged from Ft. Monmouth, N. J. Christ was captain and leading scorer for Fordham University in 1951-52 . . . The Ft. Monmouth splashers racked up 77 points to win the First Army Swimming and Diving Championships. Runner-up was Ft. Devens, Mass., with 50 point . . . Parry O'Brien, who holds the world record for the 16-pound shot at 60' 10", is currently an AFROTC
catlet at March AFB, Calif.
2nd Lt. John Baldwin, a University of Kentecky tackle in 1952, will coach the Bitburg AB Eleven in Germany . . . Rememher Al Dorow, the former MichiR an State All - American who starred at quarterback for Bolling AFB, D. C.? Well, he's switched uniforms. This year he'll be pitching the pigskin for the Washington Redskins . . . Another exservicemen on the Redskin roster above as this year in Bob Goode. Last year iaple lanes he played at the Marine Corps wling alley Recruit Depot, Calif.
CWO Offutt Pinion, USN, of



f


Page Four


The winners of the Guantanamo Bay annual fishing tournament will be presented with their prizes at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum on Sunday evening at 7:15 P.M.
Slated to receive awards for snaring the largest fish in the various divisions are:
In the Land Division E. C. Fimbel wins first place for barracuda with his 31-pounder; Michael Sins cops first prize for grouper with his 6-lb 8-oz; Raymond E. MacAnanny pulled in the largest jack, a 19-lb 8-oz; R. D. Howerton had a 5-lb 10-oz mackerel for first place; C. L. Kelly whis first prize for snappers with a 60-lb 8-oz; for snook Leo A. Fath snared a 14-lb 12-oz to win; George Bunda's 28-lb 8-oz tarpon was the winner; and W.V. Dean wins with a 7-lb Spanish mackerel.
In the Afloat Division J. C. Carroll bagged a 24-lb barracuda to win first place; Jim Sanford's 6 -oz grouper took top honors; R. L. Karsten's 12-lb 4-oz jack won; V. A. Roberts hooked a 63-lb snapper; J. H. Smouse's 24-lb wahoo won; Epifanio Emverso's 15-lb 2-oz snook took honors; and D. D. Huffman pulled in a 76-lb 8-oz tarpon for top honors in that class.
In the Special Division, a 6-lb 4-oz albacore by J. H. Smouse won! J. W. Richmond's 4-lb 91/2-oz bonito; D. C. Wenzlall's 3-lb 10-oz bonefish; N. A. LaBarge's 2-lb 5 oz croaker; J. H. Smouse's 4-lb 8-oz ladyfish; D. L. Clark's 8-lb 1-oz parrotfish; Kenneth Bedward's 20-lb pompano; and E. C. Fimbel's 76-lb shark were all winners.
In the Spearfishing Division, top winner in the barracuda class was C. W. Plath with an 18-lb 8-oz specimen; W. V. Dean won with an 18-lb 8-oz jack; L. D. Ellwood took honors with a 56-lb grouper; R. D. Howerton won with a 5-lb 10-oz mackerel; J. A. Kropak speared a 20-lb snapper; and T. P. Ahlberg landed an 8-lb 4-oz hogfish.
Top winner of the tournament was J. H. Smouse, BMC, who ended up with three winners, a wahoo in the Afloat Division and a ladyfish and an albacore in the Special Division.
Among the ladies' entries Irene J. Munson topped all ladies in the Land Division with a 17-lb 4-oz jack. Dale Davenport checked in a winner with her 38-lb snapper in the Afloat Division. In the Special Division Marion A. Wind copped honors with a 2-lb 8-oz bonefish.
All winners are requested to be at the movie lyceum at 7:15 to receive their awards. Prizes for second and third place entries will also be given at that tile.

(See Pane 6 for latest tabulations and final corrections to above story.)

the carrier USS Kula Gulf, did some fancy shooting to win five first place honor in the U. S. Atlantic Fleet Rifle and Pistol Matches at Canp Lejeune, N. C. The Amphibious Force team won the rifle championship and the Naval Air Atlantic teani won the pistol title . . . San Diego Naval Training Center, Calif., marksmen won 34 individual awards in the South Pacific States Regional Pistol Matches.
. . . Rick Casares, former University of Florida gridder now at Ft. Jackson, S. C., player for the College All-Stars in the benefit game against the professional Detroit Lions in Chicago. The Lions won, 31-6.











Baseball Awards Fete Nav Sta Slates


Caps League SeasOn Biggest Golf


RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base heartly congratulates Col. Robert E. Fojt, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks updn presenting him witn the Naval Base League Championship Trophy for the Marine Leathernecks. As well as the coveted League Championship, the Leathernecks won the League Playoffs.


The Marine Leathernecks, Naval Base League Champs and Playoff Champions pose with Col. Robert E. Fojt and RADM Edmund B. Taylor with the team League and Playoff trophies and their individual trophies.


^v L











Toguth r for unc lt I ian of Lie 1954 Baseball Seaon. 62 N ava l
Base All Stars pose along wiuh RADM Edrmund B. Taylor, for the
INDIAN camera.


The annual baseball awards banquet was held at the Chief Petty Officers' Club Monday night and was attended by a large percent age of the baseball stars of the 1954 season.
RADM E. B. Taylor, ComNavBase, was guest of honor and presented the season's awards to the outstanding players.
The Marine Leathernecks were the top percentage winners of the trophies-a team trophy for winning the Naval Base League Chainpionship, a team trophy for winning the post-season tournament, high batting average to catcher Tom Felak, best earned-run average for pitchers to Raoul Santos, and eight representatives on the 1954 All-Star squad. Neither Felak nor Santos were in attendance at the banquet. Santos was sent to Bethesda Naval Hospital several weeks ago for treatment of his hurling arm, and Felak was transferred last week to Jacksonville, Fla.
Colonel Robert E. Fojt, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks, accepted the team trophies on behalf of the team.
The Bees from MCB-8 were awarded a team trophy which they earned as runners-up in the league. The Bees were also awarded the Sportsmanship Trophy for the 1954 season. CDR R. G. Witherell, CO, MCB-8, accepted the trophies for the Bees.
Mandy Mandis of the Naval Station Indians and Jim Dotson of the Bees were awarded the Most Valuable Player trophies. Dotson has been transferred and was not present to accept his award.
Featured at the banquet was a steak dinner and a large cake baked by the CPO Club cooks and the bakers at the Bay Hill galley.
Approximately 90 persons attended the anual affair, and although transfers had decreased the team membership, all teams which participated in the 1954 season attended-the Marines, the Bees, the VU-10 Mallards, the Naval Station Indians and the Naval Air Station Fliers.
Naval Station executive officer, CDR V. J. Soballe and Baseball Commissioner LT James E. M. Coughlin assisted Admiral Taylor in making the award presentations.


"Mandy" Mandis, Naval Station Indian pitcher, shortstop and outfielder receives his trophy fdt "the most valuable player." This year two men-Mandy Mandis and Jim Dotson of MCB-8-were voted by a unanimous tie as "the outstanding player." Jim P tson was not present to receive trophy.


Meet for Sept A

The first annual 72-hole Invitational Golf Tournament, sponsored by the Naval Station is scheduled to commence on the 4th of September. This will be the largest tournament ever undertaken by the local club.
Qualifying rounds are scheduled to be played on September 4th, and handicaps for the tournament will be established by the qualifying round.
All golfers wishing to participate must post their entry at the Golf Club before September 1st. After the qualifying rounds have been played, the top 60 will become eligible to participate in the tourney.
Three new cups have been established for the annual affair: . The "Whitey" Taylor Cup will be presented to the winner of the low gross for the 72-holes, plus a set of golf irons. The cup will be held by the winner for one year and then presented to the winner of the next tournament. A replica of this cup and the other two will be given to the winners for. permanent possession.
For the .72-hole low net scorer the "Tony Grego" Cup will be awarded and a leather golf bag. This cup also will be held for one year.
The Medalist will be awarded the "Arky" Caruthers Cup.
Runner-up in the low gross score will be given a caddy cart, and runner-up for the low net will be .awarded a pair of golf shoes.
Low gross and low net scores for the first 36 holes will win 2 dozen golf balls, as will low gross and net for the 2nd 36 holes.
Over the entire 72 holes, the 2nd, 93rd and 4th place finishers for low gross and low net will receive 2 dozen golf balls.
Low gross and low net scores for . the 2nd, 3rd and 4th daily roonds will receive one dozen golf halls.
.One -golf ball will be given for each birdie over the 72 holes.
And, as a consolation prize, the holder of the highest score of all participants will receive 50 practice balls and a shag bag.


Ladies' Golf Shots

by Miriam Hoy
Last Wednesday morning the ladies held a flag tournament on the back nine. The players carrying their flags farthest on the course were:
1st Flight-Betsy Manning
Polly Herring
2nd Flight-Marge Sheehan
Miriam Roy
3rd Flight-Val Evans
Emma Hutton
After the tournament was over, the ladies had a small meeting in the Snack Shack. It was decided to have our next quarterly luncheon on Wednesday, 8 September, at the Officers' Club Patio. So, be sure to sign the list in the pro shack for yourself and any guests you may wish to bring. Be sure to bring your bathing suits as there will be swimming afterwards,
We are very happy to have De, Stadnik as a newcomer to our club.
Next week we will play odd hole and one-half handicap on the front nine. It sounds like fun, so hope to see everyone out Wednesday morning.


Saturday, 28 August 1954


THE INDIAN


P5age Vive










Page Siy THE INDIAN Saturday, 28 August 1954


What D' Ya' Say?

The INDIAN will award a certificate good for $1.00 worth of merchandise at the Navy Exchange for each question accepted and used. Submit your questions to Editor. The Indian, Box 19.)

The question: What did you enjoy most about the duty here at Guantanamo Bay?

The Place: FLAW Terminal, asked of personnel leaving for transfer.


LTJG D. H.
"The duty? mostest."


McLaughlin, I loved it, it's the


Pierce Lehmbeck, former Indian Sports Editor
"This is the finest little community I've ever seen."


John M. Hernandez, HM3, Naval Hospital
"I liked the people and everthing down here, but as far as my own tastes go I think the best thing
is the fishing."


G. E. Check, AN, VA 85
"Well, I liked the fine weather, the friendly people, and the good liberty in Gtmo.'

..:...Ii~..


BARRACUDA GROUPER JACK
MACKEREL (King) SNAPPER SNOOK
TARPON MACKEREL (Spanish) JACK

BARRACUDA GROUPER JACK
SNAPPER WAHOO SNOOK
TARPON SNAPPER

BARRACUDA JACK
GROUPER MACKEREL SNAPPER qOGFISH

ALBACORE BONITO BONEFISH
CROAKER PARROTFISH POMPANO
-HARK


Larry Lightfoot Peter Soballe Robers Hays P. E. Spelce Mike Wormwood Mike Williams Ricki Moore .im Minard Jim Sanborn Jimmy Shaw Raymond Jamieson John Sentz


Winner - Land 2nd Place - Land
Gftmo Bay 1954 Gtmo Bay 1954
E. C. Fimbel V. A. Fries
Michael Sims John Paul Hanlin
R. E. MacAnanny Cecil Simmons
R. D. Howerton
C. L. Kelly D. Johnson
Leo A. Fath T. A. Horner
George Bunda W. H. Scott
W. V. Dean
Irene J. Munson (Ladies Special Prize Winner - Afloat 2nd Place - Afloat
Gtmo Bay 1954 Gtmo Bay 1954
J. C. Carroll J. H. Cunningham
Jim Sanford
R. L. Karstens H. McNeal
V. A. Roberts D. Johnson
J. H. Smouse
Epifanin Emverzo S. Tiaba
Sid Davennort


3rd Place - Land
Gtimo Bay 1954
A. Hackert
George Gardes Sam Romano
A. J. Caruso
Kenneth Bedward
Land Division.)
3rd Place - Afloat
Gtmo Bay 1954
D. D. Hawes
Grace Burns
C. A. Chandler
Laurie Carrington


D. D. Huffman J. W. Andrews E. C. Fimbel
Dale Davenport (Ladies Special Prize Afloat Division) Winner - Spear 2nd Place - Spear 3rd Place - Spear
Gtmo Bay 1954 Gtmo Bay 1954 Gtmo Bay 1954
C. W. Plath Robert Pace
W. V. Dean H. M. Andrews
L. D. Ellwood E. M. Nichols
R. D. Howerton
J. A. Kropac G. F. Ward
T. P. Ahlberg G. H. Abbott L. F. Ballard
Winner - Special Div. Gtmo Bay 1954
J. H. Smouse
J. W. Richmond
D. C. Wenzall
N. A. La Barge
D. L. Clark
Kenneth Bedward
K. C. Fimbel
Dale Davenport (Ladies Special Certificate Special Division) Fred Meredith (Children's Special Prize Land Division)
SOUVENIR AWARDS - CHILDREN
Reggie Morales Dianne Simmons
Erich R. Laskowski Kathy Murphy
Tony Usey Ellen Sanborn
K. J. Skadowski Edith Morales
James Dexter Lynn Kerslake
Russell Baker Nancy Pat Burns
Bill Hise Kathryn Dalton
N. L. Hise Grace Burns
Carl Simmons JoAnne Simmons
Steve Soballe JoAnne Williams
Robert Lightfoot
Linda Colt


Frogmen. . .
(Continued from Page One)
coral rocks, jelly fish, and other underwater life or material. They are equipped with the squale mask, flippers and knife; and in long operations, they use the aqua lung or SCUBA-Self Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus. This total equipment weights around 50 pounds-the SCUBA itself weighing 42 pounds.
The home base of UDU 2 is Little Creek, Va., where the UDT schooling is also held. The basic schooling consists of fifteen weeks of intensive physical conditioning as well as training in their equipment, assignments, and methods.
The primary mission of UDT is reconnaissance for Beach Groups and clearing of harbors. This includes such jobs as dynamiting coral reefs, sand bars, and man made objects to make room for temporary anchorage or small boats. These operations are conducted from LCPRs-Land Craft Personnel, Raft.
One point, however, that is highly exaggerated by fiction and comic books is the land operations of frogmen. N. G. "Frenchie" Lanouette, QM2, says, "You see comic books of frog men wearing 50 pounds of underwater equipment fighting a 6' - 5" giant on land. It just isn't done. UDT is at home in the water."


ComTEN Golf Tournament

Slated For Octobear


It is anticipated that the ComTen golf tournament for this year will be held at the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base as it was last year. Robert Dale Howerton, AOAN, This year's tourney is scheduled
VU-10 tentatievly for the latter part of
Gerald I. Stillman, YN3 NavSta "I liked m-gr-fishing a lot-that October. Further detafis will be
"I developed a taste for Hatuey." was my m interest." published as receive


Leeward Hangar. . .
(Continued from Page One)
Wednesday were: CDR W. G. Winslow, Executive Officer, LCDR J. N. Parker, OinC of Leeward Point. LT J. Hamilton, Assistant Operations Officer at Leeward, and LT E. Ordway, Engineering Officer. LT T. H. Cushman Jr., Assistant ROinCC and Navy Project Manager, Mr. A. G. Smith, Construction Engineer for the Shilstone Testing Laboratory, and Mr. E. Esteva, Construction Superintendent for Frederic Snare.
Also present were Mrs. R. R. McCracken, and sons Richard and Michael, Mrs. W. G. Winslow, Mrs. W. M. Gordon and sister, Mrs. Eddy, Mrs. J. R. Connor, Mrs. T. H. Cushman, and Mrs. A. G. Smith.


Little Theatre.
(Continued from Page Three) Knight.
The production staff for "My Three Angels" has not been selected yet, but !or all those who are possibly interested in Little Theatre work, they are reminded that these jobs are just as important as those of performing before the footlights. All of these important jobs are on a volunteer basis.
For those who wish to try out or work props, production, etc., further information can be obtained by calling Alan Wagner or dropping in at the Naval Station Library where a copy of the script has been placed for those who wish to try out.



Aggies Added


Washington (AFPS)-The addition of Oklahoma A&M this month brings to 20 the total of colleges and universities offering correspondence courses to members of the Armed Forces.


Final Fishing Tabulation


Saturday, 28 August 1954


Page Six,


THE INDIAN







as


Saturday, 28 August 1A54


TAtE INDIAN


NSD Looks Ahead With Pr


Build a new cold storage plant? A taxes as it is? We already have operation. Sheer nonsense to build layman would say to the new prop plant if he didn't have the proper Depot refrigerated storage operatic Mr. Average Taxpayer to understa
During the past war it was not uncommon to have large convoys of vessels arrive in Guantanamo Bay to reprovision and rendezvous for the long trek to Europe and Africa. The base had to have, in a hurry, adequate refrigerated storage space for logistic support of these convoys. As a result, six disperesed temporary refrigerated plants were constructed during the period from 1941 to 1944. These plants were constructed mainly of wood in order to conserve critical materials. Through constant and careful maintenance on the part of well qualified personnel, they have been operated with a minimum of maintenance cost about 5 years beyond their normal life expectancy.
"Refrigeration maintenance cost? Why that shouldn't be very much!" says Mr. Average Taxpayer. "The plants here are still good enough."
But, are they? The plants are now over ten years old. During the past three years, the tremendous sum of a quarter million dollars has been expended for their maintenance. Termite infestation and dry rot are acute. Plant machinery is continually breaking down. The law of diminishing returns rules these buildings are no longer economical to operate.
Another compelling reason for construction of a new plant is the excessive labor cost now involved in handling refrigerated stores. Unfortunately, our reefer buildings were not designed to permit the use of modern materials handling equipment. None of the entrances or rooms in the present reefer buildings can accommodate electric fork-lift trucks. All stores received into and issued from our reefers must be handled manually. Further, four of the five refrigerated plants are at some distance from dockside, thus requiring double handling in the transporting of products from the ships to these plants. As it is now, a refrigerated vessel can be unloaded in half the time required to receive and correctly stow the cargo in the refrigerated plants. Since the ships must adhere to operating schedules, this means that much extra labor must be used in storage operations while the reefer ships are in port.
The proposed new NSD cold storage plant is to be located on Wharf Baker, separated only by the width of the wharf from incoming refrigerated vessels from the States. This will assist in expeditions stowage of perishable cargos. The new plant is to be a permanent type concrete structure, impervious to termites and dry rot. Entrances and ceiling of the refri-


Five new men have reported aboard recently, they are: Donald Vescovi, YN3, from VP-10 at NAS Brunswick, Maine, Eugene Sukonick, ETR2, from Receiving S t at i o n, Philadelphia, George Wynn, RD1, USS DES MOINES, (CA-134), Eugene Foster, RM2, Receiving Station, Norfolk, and Francis Twiss, QMC, USS CREVALLE, (SS-291). Welcome aboard; we hope you enjoy your tour of duty with the Training Group.

Ship Departures
USS Lake Champlain CVA-39 31 USS Lake Champlain CVA-39 31 Aug
Ship Arrivals 3 USS Huntington DD-781 30 Aug USS Daly DD-519 3 Sep
USS Cotten DD-669 3 Sep
USS Duxbury Bay AVP-36 3 Sep

During the Revolutionary War, British strength against the Colonies never exceeded 52,000 in any given year.

gerated rooms are to be wide and high enough so that a fork-lift operator can drive in with a palletized load of provisions. There is to be an electricaly-operated, adjustable truck loading ramp and a loading scale. Refrigeration maintennace shops and other facilities are to be located within the plant, no longer dispersed over a wide area.
This system will apreciably reduce the cost of handling refrigerated stores. To be constructed at a cost of over a million dollars, it is estimated that the new plant will pay for itself in savings to the Government over a maximum period of five years. From that point on, NSD Gtmo will be able not only to render better service to the B e and Fleet, but will be able to o at less expense to the tax s.


by Sgt W. J. McDowell Jr. and Cpl Joseph Androvich, UsMC

Departing for the States this past week was Sgt Jean A. Godin, Cpl Louis R. Romano, and Cpl Tom Felak. Sgt Godin will report to the VIlarine Barracks Norfolk, Va. for f u r t h e r assignment and Cpl Romano will report to the Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, N. Y. for further assignment. Cpl Tom Felak will report to Jacksonville, Florida for assignment to a Naval hospital.
Cpl Romano was one of our oldest members here at the barracks having served 24 months in Cuba. Lou was a member of the 1953 and 1954 Marine baseball teams. Cpl Tom Felak suffered a recurrence of an injury to his right arm and it was discovered that he had a bone chip in his elbow. Tom was an outstanding member of the Marines championship baseball team and was the league's leading hitter with a .417 average. He was selected as the starting catcher on the Naval Base All-Star team. We all wish the three men the best of luck and hope they enjoy their new duty stations.
Special Services has announced the coming of a picnic to be held at either Phillips Park or Marine Site on Labor Day, September 6th.
The base champion Leathernecks baseball team was the recipients of the majority of awards presented at the annual baseball banquet held Monday at the C. P.O. Club. The leathernecks were presented with individual trophies for winning the league title and post season tournament. Eight members of the Marines were honored as being members of the Base All Star team. The banquet officially brought to a close a very successful baseball season.
The Marine IntraMural softball league is scheduled to begin the 30th of August and end October 8th. The league e composed
of four teams, eacmying a total of twelve games.ol hands are


NAS Crosswinds
by Dick Friz
Who's Who at Naval Air Station
LT Earnest L. Guirey USN . . . Engineering and Maintenance Officer, McCalla Field
LT Earnest Guirey was born in Oakland California, attended high school at Elmonte High in Elmonte, California. He also attended Frank Wiggins Trade School in Los Angeles. He entered the Navy via the enlisted ranks in 1929 at San Diego.
LT Guirey is co-author of the recent (15 May '54) book "Laughter in Hell' dealing with his experiences as a prisoner of war in the Philippines and Japan in '46-47. The LT is also a member of Tennessee Poetry Society.
He was stationed in the Philippines and China for several years and has a fair command of the Japanese language in speaking and translating. Other duty stations include, USS SAN FRANCISCO, USS SARATOGA, USS DOBBIN, USS FABIUS. While with USNAAS at El Centro California, he was investigating officer on a flying saucer report.
LT Guirey m a r r i e d Marvel Packerd of Pasadena, California .in 1945. He has three childrenJeanette, Inez, and Lynn.
The LT is quite a sportsman, listing boxing, wrestling, swimming, oarsman, yachting, and football as those he actively participated in. He also has done some boatbuilding and marine engineering, and enjoys working with plastic, wood, glass, and leather craft.
News of Note
Gerald McCollum BM1 has been assigned to the USS MAUREY AGS-16, -August Matthias, AMC to Patrol Squadron 7, Joseph Monteleone, A/N, Al Shea, A/N, Henry Back, A/N, and Harnon Stenlund A/N, and Richard Atwood ADAN, are all up for discharge. Auf weidersehn.
Here are the NAS softball results up to date: Operations over Boatshed 16-7, Administration over Communication, 8-7, Leeward Point over Supply 16-5, Operations led Administration 6-3 in a disputed contest, Leeward Point defeated Communications 10-9, and Supply edged Boatshed, 4-3.
Tom McCarthy of Leeward Point returns to civilian life and his home in Wausau, Wisconsin. Tom has no political aspirations to replace his namesake, the astute junior Senator-but plans to continue his education . . . Joe Monteleone, another dischargee, will return to the clothing manufacturing business in Lakewood, N.J. Al (Old Dog) Shea plans to work with the Pennsylvania Railroad as block operator. He has left the famous Jasper in the custody of Bobby Bonham.
John Smith, recently departed from Gtmo to the 'greenhouse' at Annapolis, Maryland, wrote this in a recent letter to old buddies at Leeward's control tower. . . "Off I go into this foreign land-over populated with females, and see what trouble I can stir up." Don't rub it in John.
"Duck" Clark of the FLAW crew, set a new endurance record dancing the mambo at the Guantanamo City Carnival last week. According to all reports the Carnival Queen was quite a beauty. One of the comments . . . "The Gauntanamo carnival would make the Mardi Gras look like a church social."

strongly encouraged to participate on their respective teams, and it is hoped that the league will be a very successful one which will provide adequate recreation for everyone.


Page Seven






m


m


Navy-DPPO-10ND-Gtmo.-I24


THE INDIAN


MOVIES


Saturday, 28 August
JOHNNY DARK
Tony Curtis Piper Laurie
A bright young engineer for an independent automobile company builds his own racing car with the help of the chief engineer, but without the knowledge of the firm president. He enters a race, and although he doesn't win, he attracts the attention of the boss.
Sunday, 29 August
CASANOVA'S BIG NIGHT
Bob Hope Joan Fontaine
A tailor's apprentice is mistaken for the great lover, Casanova, and is sent by a duchess to test the love of her prospective daughterin-law. In color.
Monday, 30 August
THE LIMPING MAN
Lloyd Bridges Maria Lister
An American in England becomes entangled with Scotland Yard when the man standing next to him is killed.
Tuesday, 31 August
THE COMMAND
Guy Madison Joan Weldon
The captain of a cavalry troop is killed by Indians. The company's Army Medical Officer is forced to take command and guide a civilian wagon train through the Indian territory. In color.
Wednesday, 1 September
CONQUEST OF EVEREST Members of the expedition
The story of the conquest of Everest by the 1953 British expedition and ascent to the highest peak of the mountain by Edmund P. Hillary and Bhotia Tensing Norkey. It's 29,000 feet was conquered on the day of Queen Elizabeth's coronation. In color.
Thursday, 2 September
TANGANYIKA
Van Heflin Ruth Roman
While enroute to file a land claim in British East Africa, a young Englishman saves the life of a severly wounded man. The act was committed by the wounded man's brother, leader of a native tribe. Trouble ensues.
Friday, 3 September HELL BELOW ZERO
Alan Ladd Joan Tetzel
Ladd and Tetzel fly to Antarctic to investigate death of her father, partner in a mining enterprise, who was murdered by her ex-fiance.


k I
Hospital Notes
by Charles L. Brewer, YN3

Heirport News
Only two births were recorded during the past week: a son, Donald Lee Joyner, born 19 August to ETC and Mrs. John E. Joyner; a daughter, Deborah Lucille Simmons, born 23 August to IM3 and Mrs. Phillip L. Simmons.
New Arrivals
With the arrival of the USNS THOMAS, our staff was increased with ten new men. Sheva, A. J., HM1, Shuttle, J. C., HM2, Jones, W. Z., HM2, Price T. W. HM3 and McCormick B. R., HN all reported from the U. S. Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Maryland. From the U. S. Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania reported Brodley, J. W., HN and Cash, H. C., HN. Hudson, J. L., Jr., SN and Hughart, L. E., SN reported from the Naval Receiving Station, Brooklyn, New York. Bugg, W. C., HN came aboard from the USS LATIMER (APA-152). We hope that you will enjoy your tour of duty here at Guantanamo Bay.


Departures
LT A. Gedarovich and family departed aboard the U S N S THOMAS on the 26th for New York and ultimate separation from the Naval service. Dr. Gedarovich, who was our pediatrician, plans to continue his work in pediatrics in the suburbs of New York City.
Edward T. Connors, HN also left on the THOMAS for New York and separation. Ed plans on returning to school this fall. We wish him the best of luck in his civilian life.
Notice
All persons desiring to travel to Panama or Trinidad are required to have: YELLOW FEVER INNOCULATIONS. Innoculations will be given at the Dependents OutPatient Clinic on Thursday, 2 September at 1300. Armed service personnel are required to present their health records at time of innoculations.

Thomas Macaulay, the famous British historian, was only four years old when a lady came up and asked him gushingly: "Did oo hurt oo's bitty finger?"
"Madam," he replied, "the agony has slightly abated."


I


It


'OOK- N0'W

by Francis L. Cannon, JOSN For Your Information . . . DOMINATIONS AND POWERS
by George Santayana
This is the crowning life work of one of the immensly wise old men of the West-the late George Santayana. He expresses his views on the problems which confront the United Nations, and on the futures of Russia and the United States as world leaders. This provides perhaps the most profound analysis of today's ills. It is a study of the relationship of man in the family, society, state, and group of states, the world. The words "dominations" and "powers" are not meant to be synonomous. They stand for two distinct categories and the relationship between them is the subject of this book.
THE STORY OF PHILOSOPHY
by Will Durant
This book gives the ideas and philosophical systems of the worldfamous "monarchs of the mind": Plato, Aristotle, Voltaire, Spinoza, Santayana, and Dewey, to name but a few. It gives their biographies, their setting in their own time, and their place in our intellectual heritage. The book is scholarly, but not meant solely for scholars; it is vital and alive. THE THEATRE IN OUR TIME
by John Gassner
Mr. Gassner's book is written against a continuous tradition from Ibsen to the most important contemporary American playwrights. It is a work of great scope, relating past and present drama, and showing how they merge in a meaningful way.
For Your Entertainment . . .
DON CAMILLO'S DILEMMA
by Giovanni Guareschi
The never-ending battle between Don Camillo, the two-fisted priest in a little Italian village, and its Communist mayor, Peponne, is on again. This is humor at its best; Guareschi is a sort of an Italian Mark Twain. The book is really the story of God's infinite patience with His creatures.
THE TEAHOUSE OF THE
AUGUST MOON
edited by Margaret Mayorga
Ten outstanding short plays, most of which were written for TV or radio, with complete introduction and text. It also contains a list of Selected Plays of the Year, available for production in America, with a brief summary of plots, and a bibliography of short plays available for production.
THE PRINCE AND THE
PAUPER
by Mark Twain
This story was one of Mark Twain's own favorites. Through and accident the boy Edward, afterward Edward VI of England, changes clothing and place with little Tom Canty, a beggar-lad who is his double. They both meet with strange adventures in their assumed characters. This book contains some of Twain's best writing, especially in the description of scenes.

Overheard on a Main Street Bus: "My husband will never chase another woman . . .he's too fine . . . too decent . . . too old!"

Said one girl to another: "Why do you go out with that guy? He can't dance at all."
"You're right," her friend said. "But, boy, can he intermission!"


4

Saturday, 28 August 1954


STUFWY












......I -




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID END99WGJ8_R5WHE3 INGEST_TIME 2015-10-22T18:29:40Z PACKAGE AA00031277_00301
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

9AS. --"Oes (QTMO Like The Sunskine" --Vol. VI, No. 60 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 28 August 1954 Fogman' Teoa Soe For Mock Sabotage While making final adjustmen s in the UDT gear, N. G. Lanouette and M. 0. Lewis display all of the gear that "frogmen" use in operations. Behind them are the unit's supply of aqua lungs, and Lewis sits in one of the rubber rafts used in operations. Last week, one of the Navy'. more famous and highly specialized units, dubbed by their WW II comrades as "the Frogmen," arrived in Guantanamo Bay for a two week period of training and operations in conjunction with Fleet Training Group. The 16-man volunteer detachment, Underwater Demolition Unit TWO, under the direction of Officer-in-Charge LTJG T. E. Galles and Assistant Officer-in-Charge LTJG J. M. Falter, will operate here carrying out mock sabotage attacks at night on ships anchored in the bay and shore installations. The training which the frogmen are scheduled to undergo here consists of operations which test security measures of ships and shore installations. Working at night from an unknown spot along the shore, the demolition and sabotage teams will head out into the bay in small rubber rafts and then swim up along side ships anchored in the bay. Upon approaching the ship, they will remain out of sight or submerged for the amount of time that it would ordinarily take to attach a mine. Then, to signal that the ship has been sunk or damaged by sabotage, they will surface and send up a flare. However, the demolition units do not always go undetected, which is the element involved as training and testing of security measures aboard ship. During the night operations in warm waters, the frogmen wear the black "longjohn" uniforms both to avoid any possible reflection and to provide protection from (Continued on Page Six) CTwo NaSta Departments $3,500,000 Landplane Hangar Last Saturday, 21 August, two departments of the Naval Station r e c e i v e d commendations from CAPT W. R. Caruthers, commanding officer, at the semi-monthly personnel inspection. The Ordnance Department was cited for performance of duty upon the recommendation by ComTEN during the recent inspection. The Naval Security Group Detachment was commended upon the recommendation of Officer in Charge, LT J. W. Dempsey. CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, congratulates LCDR H. T. Walling, Officer in Charge, Ordnance Department, for the excellence of training, maintenance, and storage of ammunition by the department. The Ordnance Department, commended upon the recommendations of ComTEN, maintains a well rounded and complete program of instruction and training including (Continued on Page Three) N. G. Lanouette, at left, and M. 0. Lewis show where frogmen are at home-in the water. Commissioned at Leeward Leeward Point was the scene of the official acceptance of the new land plane hanger and control tower last Wednesday 18th of August and another vital step advanced the ever expanding facilities across the Bay. Mr. J. R. Conner, Project ManSharp Slash Seen ages fos Frederick Snare CorporaSharp Slash Seen to ssne h est D W. M. Gordon, CEC, Resident Offices us Charge of Construction, who For Navta Allowance in un passed them CAPT R. F ornavia Alow nce McCracken, Commanding Officer of the Naval Air Station at Guantanamno Bay. The personnel allowance of the The reinforced concrete shellNaval Station here is tentatively arch type hangar was designed by slated for a sharp setback. Acthe Roberts and Schefaer Company, cording to LT G. E. Hoppe, Perengineers of New York City. The sonnel Officer, the slash in manhangar, including shop and colpower-approximately 25 percent lateral equipment has a price tag of the present men on board-will of 31s million dollars and the congreatly effect every department trol tower (minus electronic and and division. aerological gear,) cost $139,000. The reason behind the quota The hangar measures 240 feet slash is not positively known since long and has a 150 foot clear arch the official instruction has not been span. The slab portion of the arch received, but this new policy apis four inches thick hut is specially pears to be in line with the present designed to withstand hurricanes reallocation of critical rates and or earthquakes. Approximately personnel on all ships and stations. 63,000 bags of Portland Cement and No action will be taken, however, over 500 tons of reinforcing steel until the official letter is received went into the 20 month project. On from the Bureau of Naval Personthe east side of the hangar is a nel by the personnel office. Little two story, 60 foot wide leanto, or no action will be required in providing office spaces for station carrying out the slash as it will force personnel. On the west side be self-enacting over a period of is a 100 foot wide, two story leantu time. Whenever a man of a critical built primarily for shop areas and rate receives orders, he will not be squadron offices. Both lean-tos are replaced. This process will continue attached to the main arch portion until the new allowance figure has but remain separated from it by been arrived at. expansion joints and lends no In anticipation of the slash, all structural support. departments have surveyed their Leeward Point, a cow pasture own needs and requirements for just a few short years ago, is now personnel. As near as possible, it bolstered by a concrete runway, is planned to divide the cut in manairfield lighting system, jet fuel power equally among the departstorage, two-100 man enlisted ments and divisions, giving each men's barracks. A 100 man BOQ enough personnel, rated men, and and mess, a 100 man enlisted men's officers to continue the present subsistence building, three addiwork load. tonal enlisted men's barracks, a As well as the Naval Station, 5,000,000 gallon water storage tank other commands here on the Naval and a 2100 KW power plant will Base are expecting a similar slash, soon be added providing a full scale but the percentage or the number activity for ComAir Lant's air arm. of men to be cut from these activThose attending the ceremony cities is not known at present. (Continued on Page Six) 1 r

PAGE 2

Page Two The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9-615 Saturday, 28 August 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sandness----Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC---------------Editor H. L. Sisson, J03---------News Jerry Lewis, J035-------Fratores F. L. Coonon, JOSN----Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and finae nr with non-appropriated fonds. THE INDIAN is a nermber of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Naphotos unless otherwise credited. WGBY Hi-Lites by John Hull Several new programs will join the WGBY program schedule next week. Among them is an old daytime favorite back once again, the "Bob Hope Show". To be heard five mornings a week at 10:00, Bob will chat informally with prominent personalities from the world of sports, politics and fashions and a famous Hollywood actress will appear as his guest "Lady Editor of the Week". Bill Goodwin returns as the program announcer and "straight man" for Hope. A brand new situation comedy show, "That's Rich", starring Stan Freberg, moves into the 8:00 slot on Saturday nights beginning 4 September. As the somewhat wideeyed, innocent Richard E. Wilt, Freberg stumbles and bumbles his way through hilarious situations which are more or less the creation of a cousin-in-law, twice removed, with whom he has over-stayed his welcome. The switchboard operator where he works, the Consolidated Paper Products Company, tries to protect him from his irate boss and keep his mind off birds and on his work, for "Rich" is a birdwatcher by choice. The whole family will enjoy this one. The "New York Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra" broadcasts will resume their past series beginning Sunday, 5 September at 1:00 P.M. Dimitri Mitropoulos will conduct the orchestra and a prominent concert artist will be featured each week. World famous violinist Yehudi Menuhin will appear on the first program. Richard Widmark, Karl Malden and Geraldine Page will be starred in the "Theatre Guild On The Air" production of Ferenc Molnar's near-classic fantasy drama, "Liliom" Monday, 30 August at 9:00 P.M. This story may be more familiar to you as the popular Broadway adaptation by Rodgers and Hammerstein, "Carousel". Be sure to watch the daily program schedule in the "Papoose" for your favorite programs and any changes in the schedule presented each day over WGBY, 1450 on your radio dial. mf THE INDIAN The Fall term of the Naval Base School began Monday, and the Third Grade class of Mrs. J. T. Usey stands to sing "America" in its opening day session. Approximately 630 students are enrolled this year from the Nursery through the High School with the biggest attendance being reported in the First Grade with about 112 students. Saturday, 28 August 1954 Sunday, 29 August 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: S a turd a y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) Enamel Ettngs VU-10 Prop Blast The Chaplain's Corner by R. M. (Bob) Quiat, DN It seems to me that there are many people who do not know the meaning of the word Prosthesis. I have, and many other Dental Technicians, have been asked what does it mean. The dictionary gives this for a definition: the addition to the human body of some artificial part such as: leg, eye or tooth. In simpler terms it means the replacement of a part by artificial means. Applied to dentistry it is prosthetic dentistry or phosthodontia. This week we bring you the second in a series of personalities of the week. Our purpose is to try to acquaint our readers with the members of our staff who are ready, willing and able to help you with your dental problems. Our personality this week is a member of our prosthetic department. His name is Paul S. King, Jr., DT1, USN, is 29 years old and hails from Fort Wayne, Indiana. Paul entered the Navy exactly one year after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1942. In April of 1943 he completed Hospital Corps School. He became a dental technician in June, 1947. Paul was married in September 1951 and in May 1952 he became a prosthetic technician. Paul and his wife, Johnnie, have a 2 year old daughter named Donna Jean. Paul's hobbies are all sports. Many of the old timers should remember him as the basketball league's leading scorer and a unanimous choice for the All-Star team. He also excels in golf. Paul is quite modest and for this reason I was unable to obtain any more information from him. Bon Voyage to Dr. Phillippi and C. A. Lowe, DT2 of MCB-8 who depart for the States on 26 August. We all hope that they enjoy their new duty station. They will be relieved by MCB-4. More about MCB-4 in later editions. Mr. Dote, our own Ben Hogan, has continued his torrid pace in golf when he jumped from seventh to fifth position on the golf ladder when he defeated J. E. Fawcett, DN. Walter J. De Baun, DN has been in his own private world these last few days The reason for this is 25 days St Uside leave starting 25 August. The Baseball Banquet was held on Monday night and two members of the Fighting Mallards were presented All-Star awards. Boo Ferris and Bob Dieden were unanimously elected for the awards. A 'Well Done' goes to the Mallards for a season of good, hard play. There will be a get-to-gether of all VU-10 officers Saturday, 28 August at the 'O' Club Patio. Time: 2030. Uniform: Dress whites. Hope to see you all there. A recent arrival in the Gtmo area is LT W. M. Halentic's family. His wife Elizabeth, and two daughters, Nancy and Karen flew in from Point Mugu, Calif. where LT Halentic was previously stationed. Welcome aboard and hope you have a pleasant stay with VU-10. We also received eight new men this week. They are: J. P. Barrett, AN, Parker, Pa., J. H. Dorsey, AN, Bisbee, Ariz., D. L. Gardner AN, Houston, Tex., L. A. Henion, AN, Phila., Pa., J. E. Hull, AN, Rockford, Ill., J. D. Mullins, AD1, Norfolk, Va., J. E. Neeley AN, and W. Y. Wright, AN, both of Columbia, S. C. Welcome aboard men. Unfortunately, we have to lose men once in a while. The Squadron will sorely miss the services of Chief Baker, Chief Paul, Brook, Jacobson, and Stovall, who are being transferred this week. Good luck at your new stations, men. The VU-10 Golf Team is now in the process of being organized. As you know, we have won the championship two years in a row, so if we win it again this year, the trophy is permanently ours. All personnel interested in trying out for the team contact LT Ferris. Let's keep that trophy! The KDC finally arrived last week. Not exactly a ship-shape looking craft at first, but due to the combined efforts of our 'blackshoe' brothers and the grumbling ten-man working party, it has taken on quite a seaworthy appearance. Little Frederick was saying his prayers one night. His mother tiptoed up and heard this gem. "And please make Tommy stop throwing things at me. By the way, I've mentioned;s before." We can hardly think of anything more important in life than the proper education of our children. Take the example of the gardener, or florist. Would he not be considered a very bad business man if he neglected his young plants? In order to expect children to develop morally and mentally according to the norm of Christian life, there must be a good family atmosphere. The surroundings at home influence children very much. Just as a mold into which hot metal is poured determines the shape of the article desired, so does the character of a family, or home, determine the formation of the child's mentality and morals. Ono of the most difficult problems in raising children is to obtain from them the reverence which their states of dependence demands. If in the family this reverence is not in evidence, the lack of it will go over into after life, and also into social and public life. Children must also be taught their duties, told about them, and exhorted to them; this is a continual, never-ending part of family life. Parents cannot escape this watchfulness; it belongs to the married life and cannot be separated from it. Thoroughness is another point that ought to claim much attention on the part of parents. Children ought to be taught to finish what they begin, to do well what they are supposed to do, to take pains in perfecting as far as they can what duty demands of them. It is the duty of parents to give the best example to their children. This, of course, is especially demaded where their example can easily be seen. If, for instance, the children notice that their parents care little about spiritual opportunities, that they easily excuse themselves from Divine Services on Sunday, what effect is this going to have on those young hearts ? One need be no prophet to tell the outcome. W. J. SPINNEY LCDR, CHC, USN

PAGE 3

Saturday, 28 August 1954 45,000 Reserve Ranks Slated for Release According to a statement issued by Assistant Secretary of the Navy James H. Smith, Jr. 45,000 inactive reserve officers will be dropped from the Navy rolls in an effort to tighten the Naval Reserve. Mr. Smith emphasized that all those pruned out would be given honorable discharges. He also pointed out that the slash does not affect the 400,000 enlisted reservists, and in fact, Pentagon plans to ask Congress to increase the enlisted reserve strength to 600,000 in 1956. The cut is the aftermath of poll of reserve officers which was started in 1953 when more than 100,000 inactive reservists received questionnaires. More than half replied. Twenty-five thousand resigned their commissions, 20,000 retired and 7,00 resumed active participation in the reserve program. The 45,000 to be dropped now are among those who failed to answer the questionnaire or indicated they no longer desired to participate. The slash will not include medical and dental officers, naval aviators, officers who served in the Korean War, or officers with over 18 years of satisfactory service. Ed: "How did Phil break his leg?" Ted: "See those steps over there? Ed: "Yes." Ted: "Well, he didn't." Commendations. .. (Continued from Page One) Navy Training and Correspondendence courses as well as regularly scheduled instruction periods at the request of personnel of the department. As well as the training program, the Ordnance Department was commended for the excellent maintenance and condition of a total of 60 of 76 earth covered magazines here. No deficiences could be found in the storage, maintenance or storage, maintenance or condition of these magazines. What would you do with 18 Million $$$$ Gary L. Stone III, A03, attached to the aircraft carrier, USS ANTIETAM, will not easily forget the 20th day of August for the rest of his life. The 22-year-old sailor was astounded to hear that he had inherited an 18-million dollar estate from an aunt killed two weeks ago in an automobile accident. Stone lives with his mother, Mrs. Louise Sylvester, and a sister, Mrs. Chuck Hensley, at 6842 Foot Hill Blvd, Pasadena. C h i e f Journalist Albert F. Wright, attached to the Public Information Office at Quonset Point, R. I., said, "Gary's stunned by this unexpected windfall, but he's on duty as usual." Stone, who has nine months to go on a four-year hitch, said he realized his aunt "had real estate holdings and other investments but I had no idea of the extent of her estate". Asked what he'll do with his new-found wealth, Stone, a tall youth described as "good-looking" by the Navy spokesman, just laughed and said: "This is all too sudden. I haven't had time to give that much thought yet." Middle Cruise 'Baker' Arrives tr 4-Day Stay flL. fl.AG.J 5. O4.4 Plans Outlined for Start Little Theatre Holds Tryouts Of Navy Wives' Club For My Three Angtels' Last night at the Community Auditorium, the Little Theatre began tryouts for their next production, "My Three Angels." Several old faces along with many new ones showed up to try out for the seven male parts and three female parts. Since tryouts will be held again this afternoon at 1300 and tomorrow at the same time, no characters were definitely cast, and all parts are still open. Directing "My Three Angels" will be Alan Wagner who is well remembered here for his performance in "Out of the Frying Pan," the Little Theatre's last production. Lee Douglas will be producer. Alan Wagner in directing will be Burt (Continued on Page Six) A Navy' Wives' Club is now being organized on the base for all enlisted and officers' wives. Preliminary meetings have elected the following officers: Lorraine Yalepresident; Peggy Lisnick-vicepresident; Etta Wells-secretary; Maybelle Clay-treasurer; Geraldine Meriweather sergeant-atarms; and Jessie Green-chaplain. An open meeting will be held on Thursday, 2 September, at 8:00 P.M. in the Flamingo Room of the Petty Officers' Club in the Fleet Recreation Area. RADM E. B. Taylor, commanding officers of all commands and Chaplain M. 0. Stehpenson have been invited to attend. All interested wives are urged to attend and especially those who are new to the Guantanamo Bay area. Social activities, service work possibilities and charitable projects of the group will be discussed. The purpose of the club is to encourage a friendly and sympathetic social relationship between the wives of the men of the United States Navy, and to provide mutual Cruise "Baker," the last of the midshipmen cruises this year, arrived in Guantanamo Bay Thursday and will remain over the weekend, departing Tuesday morning. This third contingent of middies is the last of the three groups to visit Guantanamo Bay this year and winds up the annual Summer training of almost 5,000 Naval Academy and NROTC students from contract colleges. When Cruise "Baker" leaves here, it will head back to the States, conducting drills enroute. The USS WISCONSIN, flying the flag of RADM George R. Cooper, ComBatDiv 2, led Cruise "Baker" into Guantanamo Bay. A total of 13 major warships carrying 1,765 middies make up the cruise. As in previous middle contingents all facilities of the base were taxed to the limit with almost 6,000 Fleet sailors added to the middie groups which came ashore. Near record sales were reported at the various Exchanges around the base Fleet Recreation activities carried maximum capacity. Scouts Net Over $1,000 At Third Annual Carnival Members of the U.S. Naval Security Group Detachment who were commended for their excellent performance of duty in handling special communications during the month of June 1954 were; left to right, LT J. W. Dempsey, Officer in Charge, G. L. Rousseau, CTC; J. Domashinski, RM1; G. S. Smith, RM1; K. E. Byers, RM1; F. G. Clark, RMC, J. Carroll, RM1; G. L. Hodges, RM1; CHRELE R. W. Fuller, and D. E. Pomeroy, CTC. a assesance an e ows rp. Mrs. Yale, newly-elected dent, wishes to emphasize Marine wives and wives of personnel of 16 years or service are not only eligi membership but especially to attend. P4 C4 .Lfsw presiThe 3rd Annual Scout Carnival hat all held here at the Naval Air Station retired seaplane ramp last Saturday turned more out to be a huge success. The ble for scouts of Guantanamo Bay had a urged hey-day as they enjoyed themselves and netted over a $1,000 for their activities here in the coming year. The featured door prize of $50.00 went to Mrs. C. R. Mahaffey, and many others left the scout circus with souvenirs and small prizes won at the "Fish Pond," and other carnival booths-not to mention the cakes and cookies that were consumed at the "goodies booth." All receipts from the carnival will be used in the coming year to finance scout activities here. This will include such items as hobbycrafts, special equipment needed, and parties for special occasions. Also, the scouts receive a yearly donation from the proceeds of the Guantanamo Bay Carnival. Special guests at this year's carnival were the Boy Scouts of Guantanamo City. THE INDIAN Page Three

PAGE 4

Page Four 4U11 THE INDIAN Saturday, 28 August 1954 Cuban Little League Fishing Tourney Invades Base Tomorrow Prizes Out Sunday The Little League champions, the Bears, celebrate their double victory (league and tournament title) with a party at Phillips Park. Hot dogs and cokes were the order of the day. Meanwhile (below) the Tigers, runners-up in both the league and the tournament, also celebrate the end of the season with their paty held at the Hayes' house at Marine Site. The first sure signs of Fll are indicated in the picture above as bowling activity is reported on tie upswing throughout the maple lanes of the base. Above, Fleet salors take advantage of the bowling alley at Fleet Recreation Center. Tomorrow afternoon at the Little League Diamond in Villamar the Champion Bears, joined by a quartet of the Runner-up Tigers, will attempt to save face for the Naval Base Little League as they face the Colts of Caimanera. Two weeks ago the Cuban Colts came aboard after challenging the Hawks and out-slugged the Naval Base Little Leaguers 10-9. Tomorrow's game will see the Bear-Tiger aggregation as the challengers. Facing the Cuban Colts will be top B e a r stand-outs Ronnie Moseley, Fred Meredith, and Larry Smith. And along with these three, Robert Sanborn, one of the most improved Bears since the beginning of the season, will be on hand. Joining the Bears for the game will be Tigers Jay Radcliff and Bob Tanner who both double either in front of or behind the plate and have proved themselves worthy sluggers. Joining the pitcher-catcher duo will be Robert Hayes and Dale Shelly. Other Bears listed in the roster for game are Ramie Morales, James Sanborn, Don McCoy, Mike Sanborn, Frank Kiefer, and Rusty Magarity. The Cuban Colts proved to be a strong team in their first appearance here on the Naval Base, and they will by no means be done away with easily. The game should provide plenty of thrills and action for everyone. vr SERVICE The Yankees have a pitcher with Binghamton (N. Y.) in the Eastern League who is really flying high. His name is Jim Kite and he has five wins since his discharge from Ft. Lee, Va. Hard-hitting Billy Wells of the Barstow, Calif., Marines, formerly with the Chicago White Sox, finished the '54 season with a sensational batting average of .538 for 167 times at bat. He led his teammates in almost every department with 7 triples, 16 doubles, 11 homers, 74 stolen bases, and 75 runs batted in. The New York Knickerbockers of the NBA have signed basketball star Fred Christ, recently discharged from Ft. Monmouth, N. J. Christ was captain and leading scorer for Fordham University in 1951-52 ...The Ft. Monmouth splashers racked up 77 points to win the First Army Swimming and Diving Championships. Runner-up was Ft. Devens, Mass., with 50 point .Parry O'Brien, who holds the world record for the 16-pound shot at 60' 10", is currently an AFROTC cadet at March AFB, Calif. 2nd Lt. John Baldwin, a University of Kentcky tackle in 1952, will coach the Bitburg AB eleven in Germany ...Remember Al Dorow, the former Michigan State All -American who starred at quarterback for Bolling AFB, D. C.? Well, he's switched uniforms. This year he'll be pitching the pigskin for the Washington Redskins ...Another exservicemen on the Redskin roster this year in Bob Goode. Last year he played at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Calif. CWO Offutt Pinion, USN, of 9P The winners of the Guantanamo Bay annual fishing tournament will be presented with their prizes at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum on Sunday evening at 7:15 P.M. Slated to receive awards for snaring the largest fish in the various divisions are: In the Land Division E. C. Fimbel wins first place for barracuda with his 31-pounder; Michael Sims cops first prize for grouper with his 6-lb 8-oz; Raymond E. MacAnanny pulled in the largest jack, a 19-1b 8-oz; R. D. Howerton had a 5-lb 10-oz mackerel for first place; C. L. Kelly whis first prize for snappers with a 60-1b 8-oz; for snook Leo A. Fath snared a 14-1h 12-oz to win; George Bunda's 28-lb 8-oz tarpon was the winner; and W. V. Dean wins with a 7-lb Spanish mackerel. In the Afloat Division J. C. Carroll bagged a 24-1b barracuda to win first place; Jim Sanford's 61/-oz grouper took top honors; R. L. Karsten's 12-1b 4-oz jack won; V. A. Roberts hooked a 63-1b snapper; J. H. Smouse's 24-1b wahoo won; Epifanio Emverso's 15-1b 2-oz snook took honors; and D. D. Huffman pulled in a 76-lb 8-oz tarpon for top honors in that class. In the Special Division, a 6-lb 4-oz albacore by J. H. Smouse won, J. W. Richmond's 4-lb 91-oz bonito; D. C. Wenzlall's 3-lb 10-oz bonefish; N. A. LaBarge's 2-lb 5i/oz croaker; J. H. Smouse's 4-lb 8-oz ladyfish; D. L. Clark's 8-lb 1-oz parrotfish; Kenneth Bedward's 20-1b pompano; and E. C. Fimbel's 76-1b shark were all winners. In the Spearfishing Division, top winner in the barracuda class was C. W. Plath with an 18-1b 8-oz specimen; W. V. Dean won with an 18-1b 8-oz jack; L. D. Ellwood took honors with a 56-1b grouper; R. D. Howerton won with a 5-lb 10-oz mackerel; J. A. Kropak speared a 20-1b snapper; and T. P. Ahlberg landed an 8-lb 4-oz hogfish. Top winner of the tournament was J. H. Smouse, BMC, who ended up with three winners, a wahoo in the Afloat Division and a ladyfish and an albacore in the Special Division. Among the ladies' entries Irene J. Munson topped all ladies in the Land Division with a 17-lb 4-oz jack. Dale Davenport checked in a winner with her 38-1b snapper in the Afloat Division. In the Special Division Marion A. Wind copped honors with a 2-lb 8-oz bonefish. All winners are requested to be at the movie lyceum at 7:15 to receive their awards. Prizes for second and third place entries will also be given at that time. (See Page 5 for latest tabulations and final corrections to above story.) the carrier USS Kula Gulf, did some fancy shooting to win five first place honor in the U. S. Atlantic Fleet Rifle and Pistol Matches at Camp Lejeune, N. C. The Amphibious Force team won the rifle championship and the Naval Air Atlantic team won the pistol title ...San Diego Naval Training Center, Calif., marksmen won 34 individual awards in the South Pacific States Regional Pistol Matches. Rick Casares, former University of Florida gridder now at Ft. Jackson, S. C., player for the College All-Stars in the benefit game against the professional Detroit Lions in Chicago. The Lions won, 31-6.

PAGE 5

Baseball Awards Fete Nav Sta Slates Cas League Season Biggest Golf RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base heartly congratulates Col. Robert E. Fojt, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks upon presenting him with the Naval Base League Championship Trophy for the Marine Leathernecks. As well as the coveted League Championship, the Leathernecks won the League Playoffs. The Marine Leathernecks, Naval Base League Champs and Playoff Champions pose with Col. Robert E. Fojt and RADM Edmund B. Taylor with the team League and Playoff trophies and their individual trophies. Together for the last time of the 1954 Baseball Season, the Naval Base All Stars pose along with RADM E nd B. Taylor, for the INDIAN camera. Efr The annual baseball awards banquet was held at the Chief Petty Officers' Club Monday night and was attended by a large percent= age of the baseball stars of the 1954 season. RADM E. B. Taylor, ComNavBase, was guest of honor and presented the season's awards to the outstanding players. The Marine Leathernecks were the top percentage winners of the trophies-a team trophy for winning the Naval Base League Championship, a team trophy for winning the post-season tournament, high batting average to catcher Tom Felak, best earned-run average for pitchers to Raoul Santos, and eight representatives on the 1954 All-Star squad. Neither Felak nor Santos were in attendance at the banquet. Santos was sent to Bethesda Naval Hospital several weeks ago for treatment of his hurling arm, and Felak was transferred last week to Jacksonville, Fla. Colonel Robert E. Fojt, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks, accepted the team trophies on behalf of the team. The Bees from MCB-8 were awarded a team trophy which they earned as runners-up in the league. The Bees were also awarded the Sportsmanship Trophy for the 1954 season. CDR R. G. Witherell, CO, MCB-8, accepted the trophies for the Bees. Mandy Mandis of the Naval Station Indians and Jim Dotson of the Bees were awarded the Most Valuable Player trophies. Dotson has been transferred and was not present to accept his award. Featured at the banquet was a steak dinner and a large cake baked by the CPO Club cooks and the bakers at the Bay Hill galley. Approximately 90 persons attended the anual affair, and although transfers had decreased the team membership, all teams which participated in the 1954 season attended-the Marines, the Bees, the VU-10 Mallards, the Naval Station Indians and the Naval Air Station Fliers. Naval Station executive officer, CDR V. J. Soballe and Baseball Commissioner LT James E. M. Coughlin assisted Admiral Taylor in making the award presentations. "Mandy" Mandis, Naval Station Indian pitcher, shortstop and outfielder receives his trophy .f4i "the most valuable player." This year two men-Mandy Mandis and Jim Dotson of MCB-8-were voted by a unanimous tie as "the outstanding player." Jim Ptson was not present to receive trophy. Meet for Sept 4 The first annual 72-hole Invitational Golf Tournament, sponsored by the Naval Station is scheduled to commence on the 4th of September. This will be the largest tournament ever undertaken by the local club. Qualifying rounds are scheduled to be played on September 4th, and handicaps for the tournament will be established by the qualifying round. All golfers wishing to participate must post their entry at the Golf Club before September 1st. After the iqualifying rounds have been played, the top 60 will become eligible to participate in the tourney. Three new cups have been established for the annual affair: The "Whitey" Taylor Cup will be presented to the winner of the low gross for the 72-holes, plus a set of golf irons. The cup will be held by the winner for one year and then presented to the winner of the next tournament. A replica of this cup and the other two will be given to the winners for. permanent possession. For the .72-hole low net scorer the "Tony Grego" Cup will be awarded and a leather golf bag. This cup also will be held for one year. The Medalist will be awarded the "Arky" Caruthers Cup. Runner-up in the low gross score will be given a caddy cart, and runner-up for the low net will be awarded a pair of golf shoes. Low gross and low net scores for the first 36 holes will win 2 dozen golf balls, as will low gross and net for the 2nd 36 holes. Over the entire 72 holes, the 2nd, 3rd and 4th place finishers for low *grss and low net will receive 2 doxen golf balls. Low gross and low net scores for the 2nd, 3rd and 4th daily ronhds will receive one dozen golf ,blls. O1e golf ball will be given for each birdie over the 72 holes. And, as a consolation prize, the holder of the highest score of all participants will receive 50 practice balls and a shag bag. Ladies' Golf Shots by Miriam Hoy Last Wednesday morning the ladies held a flag tournament on the back nine. The players carrying their flags farthest on the course were: 1st Flight-Betsy Manning Polly Herring 2nd Flight-Marge Sheehan Miriam Hoy 3rd Flight-Val Evans Emma Hutton After the tournament was over, the ladies had a small meeting in the Snack Shack. It was decided to have our next quarterly luncheon on Wednesday, 8 September, at the Officers' Club Patio. So, be sure to sign the list in the pro shack for yourself and any guests you may wish to bring. Be sure to bring your bathing suits as there will be swimming afterwards. We are very happy to have De' Stadnik as a newcomer to our club. Next week we will play odd hole and one-half handicap on the front nine. It sounds like fun, so hope to see everyone out Wednesday morning. Saturday, 28 August 1954 THE INDIAN Page Five

PAGE 6

Page Six What D' Ya' Say? O 1. LTJG D. H. McLaughlin, "The duty? I loved it, it's the mostest." Pierce Lehmbeck, former Indian Sports Editor "This is the finest little community I've ever seen." Gerald I. Stillman, YN3 NavSta "I developed a taste for Hatuey." John M. Hernandez, HM3, Naval Hospital "I liked the people and everthing down here, but as far as my own tastes go I think the best thing is the fishing." G. E. Check, AN, VA 85 "Well, I liked the fine weather, the friendly people, and the good liberty in Gtmo." Robert Dale Howerton, AOAN, VU-10 "I liked r-fishing a lot-that was my interestt" The INDIAN will award a certificate good for $1.00 worth of merchandise at the Navy Exchange for each question accepted and used. Submit your questions to Editor. The Indian, Box 19.) The question: What did you enjoy most about the duty here at Guantanamo Bay? The Place: FLAW Terminal, asked of personnel leaving for transfer. BARRACUDA GROUPER JACK MACKEREL (King) SNAPPER SNOOK TARPON MACKEREL (Spanish) JACK BARRACUDA GROUPER JACK SNAPPER WAHOO SNOOK TARPON SNAPPER BARRACUDA JACK GROUPER MACKEREL SNAPPER HOGFISH ALBACORE BONITO BONEFISH CROAKER PARROTFISH POMPANO HARK Larry Lightfoot Peter Soballe Robers Hays P. E. Spelce Mike Wormwood Mike Williams Ricki Moore Jim Minard Jim Sanborn Jimmy Shaw Raymond Jamieson John Sentz Frogmen. .. (Continued from Page One) coral rocks, jelly fish, and other underwater life or material. They are equipped with the squale mask, flippers and knife; and in long operations, they use the aqua lung or SCUBA-Self Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus. This total equipment weights around 50 pounds-the SCUBA itself weighing 42 pounds. The home base of UDU 2 is Little Creek, Va., where the UDT schooling is also held. The basic schooling consists of fifteen weeks of intensive physical conditioning as well as training in their equipment, assignments, and methods. The primary mission of UDT is reconnaissance for Beach Groups and clearing of harbors. This includes such jobs as dynamiting coral reefs, sand bars, and man made objects to make room for temporary anchorage or small boats. These operations are conducted from LCPRs-Land Craft Personnel, Raft. One point, however, that is highly exaggerated by fiction and comic books is the land operations of frogmen. N. G. "Frenchie" Lanouette, QM2, says, "You see comic books of frog men wearing 50 pounds of underwater equipment fighting a 6' -5" giant on land. It just isn't done. UDT is at home in the water." ComTEN Golf Tournament Slated For October It is anticipated that the ComTen golf tournament for this year will be held at the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base as it was last year. This year's tourney is scheduled tentatievly for the latter part of October. Further det 'Is will be published as receive Leeward Hangar. (Continued from Page One) Wednesday were: CDR W. G. Winslow, Executive Officer, LCDR J. N. Parker, OinC of Leeward Point. LT J. Hamilton, Assistant Operations Officer at Leeward, and LT E. Ordway, Engineering Officer. LT T. H. Cushman Jr., Assistant ROinCC and Navy Project Manager, Mr. A. G. Smith, Construction Engineer for the Shilstone Testing Laboratory, and Mr. E. Esteva, Construction Superintendent for Frederic Snare. Also present were Mrs. R. R. McCracken, and sons Richard and Michael, Mrs. W. G. Winslow, Mrs. W. M. Gordon and sister, Mrs. Eddy, Mrs. J. R. Connor, Mrs. T. H. Cushman, and Mrs. A. G. Smith. Little Theatre .. (Continued from Page Three) Knight. The production staff for "My Three Angels" has not been selected yet, but for all those who are possibly interested in Little Theatre work, they are reminded that these jobs are just as important as those of performing before the footlights. All of these important jobs are on a volunteer basis. For those who wish to try out or work props, production, etc., further information can be obtained by calling Alan Wagner or dropping in at the Naval Station Library where a copy of the script has been placed for those who wish to try out. Aggies Added Washington (AFPS)-The addition of Oklahoma A&M this month brings to 20 the total of colleges and universities offering correspondence courses to members of the Armed Forces. Saturday, 28 August 1954 ft THE INDIAN Winner -Land 2nd Place -Land 3rd Place -Land Gtmo Bay 1954 Gtmo Bay 1954 Gtmo Bay 1954 E. C. Fimbel V. A. Fries A. Hackert Michael Sims John Paul Hanlin George Gardes R. E. MacAnanny Cecil Simmons Sam Romano R. D. Howerton C. L. Kelly D. Johnson A. J. Caruso Leo A. Fath T. A. Horner George Bonda W. H. Scott Kenneth Bedward W. V. Dean Irene J. Munson (Ladies Special Prize Land Division.) Winner -Afloat 2nd Place -Afloat 3rd Place -Alloat Gtmo Bay 1954 Gtmo Bay 1954 Gtmo Bay 1954 J. C. Carroll J. H. Cunningham D. Hawes Jim Sanford R. L. Karstens H. McNeal Grace Burns V. A. Roberts D. Johnson C. A. Chandler J. H. Smouse Epifanio Emverzo S. Tiaba Laurie Carrington Sid Davenport D. D. Huffman J. W. Andrews E. C. Fimbel Dale Davenport (Ladies Special Prize Afloat Division) Winner -Spear 2nd Place -Spear 3rd Place -Spear Gtmo Bay 1954 Gtmno Bay 1954 Gtmo Bay 1954 C. W. Plath Robert Pace W. V. Dean H. M. Andrews L. D. Ellwood E. M. Nichols R .Howerton J. A. Kropac G. F. Ward T. P. Ahlberg G. H. Abbott L. F. Ballard Winner -Special Div. Gtmo Bay 1954 J. H. Smouse J. W. Richmond D. C. Wenzall N. A. La Barge D. L. Clark Kenneth Bedward E. C. Fimbel Dale Davenport (Ladies Special Certificate Special Division) Fred Meredith (Children's Special Prize Land Division) SOUVENIR AWARDS-CHILDREN Reggie Morales Dianne Simmons Erich R. Laskowski Kathy Msrphy Tony Usey Ellen Sanborn K. J. Skadowski Edith Morales James Dexter Lynn Kerslake Russell Baker Nancy Pat aarn Bill Hise Kathryn Dalton N. L. Hiv* Crone B*rns Carl Simmons JoAnne Simmons Steve Soballe JoAnne Williams Robert Lightfoot Linda Colt Final Fishing Tabulation

PAGE 7

Saturday, 28 August 1954 NSD Looks Ahead With Pr Build a new cold storage plant? I taxes as it is? We already have operation. Sheer nonsense to build ; layman would say to the new prop plant if he didn't have the proper Depot refrigerated storage operatic Mr. Average Taxpayer to understa During the past war it was not uncommon to have large convoys of vessels arrive in Guantanamo Bay to reprovision and rendezvous for the long trek to Europe and Africa. The base had to have, in a hurry, adequate refrigerated storage space for logistic support of these convoys. As a result, six disperesed temporary refrigerated plants were constructed during the period from 1941 to 1944. These plants were constructed mainly of wood in order to conserve critical materials. Through constant and careful maintenance on the part of well qualified personnel, they have been operated with a minimum of maintenance cost about 5 years beyond their normal life expectancy. "Refrigeration maintenance cost? Why that shouldn't be very much!" says Mr. Average Taxpayer. "The plants here are still good enough." But, are they? The plants are now over ten years old. During the past three years, the tremendous sum of a quarter million dollars has been expended for their maintenance. Termite infestation and dry rot are acute. Plant machinery is continually breaking down. The law of diminishing returns rules these buildings are no longer economical to operate. Another compelling reason for construction of a new plant is the excessive labor cost now involved in handling refrigerated stores. Unfortunately, our reefer buildings were not designed to permit the use of modern materials handling equipment. None of the entrances or rooms in the present reefer buildings can accommodate electric fork-lift trucks. All stores received into and issued from our reefers must be handled manually. Further, four of the five refrigerated plants are at some distance from dockside, thus requiring double handling in the transporting of products from the ships to these plants. As it is now, a refrigerated vessel can be unloaded in half the time required to receive and correctly stow the cargo in the refrigerated plants. Since the ships must adhere to operating schedules, this means that much extra labor must be used in storage operations while the reefer ships are in port. The proposed new NSD cold storage plant is to be located on Wharf Baker, separated only by the width of the wharf from incoming refrigerated vessels from the States. This will assist in expeditions stowage of perishable cargos. The new plant is to be a permanent type concrete structure, impervious to termites and dry rot. Entrances and ceiling of the refriFive new men have reported aboard recently, they are: Donald Vescovi, YN3, from VP-10 at NAS Brunswick, Maine, Eugene Sukonick, ETR2, from Receiving St at io n, Philadelphia, George Wynn, RD1, USS DES MOINES, (CA-134), Eugene Foster, RM2, Receiving Station, Norfolk, and Francis Twiss, QMC, USS CREVALLE, (SS-291). We l come aboard; we hope you enjoy your tour of duty with the Training Group. Ship Departures USS Lake Champlain CVA-39 31 USS Lake Champlain CVA-39 31 Aug Ship Arrivals USS Huntington DD-781 30 Aug USS Daly DD-519 3 Sep USS Cotten DD-669 3 Sep USS Duxbury Bay AVP-36 3 Sep During the Revolutionary War, British strength against the Colonies never exceeded 52,000 in any given year. gerated rooms are to be wide and high enough so that a fork-lift operator can drive in with a palletized load of provisions. There is to be an electricaly-operated, adjustable truck loading ramp and a loading scale. Refrigeration maintennace shops and other facilities are to be located within the plant, no longer dispersed over a wide area. This system will apreciably reduce the cost of handling refrigerated stores. To be constructed at a cost of over a million dollars, it is estimated that the new plant will pay for itself in savings to the Government over a maximum period of five years. From that point on, NSD Gtito will be able not only to render better service to the B e and Fleet, but will be able to o at less expense to the tax s. by Sgt W. J. McDowell Jr. and Cpl Joseph Androvich, USMC Departing for the States this past week was Sgt Jean A. Godin, Cpl Louis R. Romano, and Cpl Tom Felak. Sgt Godin will report to the tlarine Barracks Norfolk, Va. for f u r t h e r assignment and Cpl Romano will report to the Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, N. Y. for further assignment. Cpl Tom Felak will report to Jacksonville, Florida for assignment to a Naval hospital. Cpl Romano was one of our oldest members here at the barracks having served 24 months in Cuba. Lou was a member of the 1953 and 1954 Marine baseball teams. Cpl Tom Felak suffered a recurrence of an injury to his right arm and it was discovered that he had a bone chip in his elbow. Tom was an outstanding member of the Marines championship baseball team and was the league's leading hitter with a .417 average. He was selected as the starting catcher on the Naval Base All-Star team. We all wish the three men the best of luck and hope they enjoy their new duty stations. Special Services has announced the coming of a picnic to be held at either Phillips Park or Marine Site on Labor Day, September 6th. The base champion Leathernecks baseball team was the recipients of the majority of awards presented at the annual baseball banquet held Monday at the C. P.O. Club. The leathernecks were presented with individual trophies for winning the league title and post season tournament. Eight members of the Marines were honored as being members of the Base All Star team. The banquet officially brought to a close a very successful baseball season. The Marine IntraMural softball league is scheduled to begin the 30th of August and end October 8th. The league w'' be composed of four teams, eac ying a total of twelve games. hands are NAS Crosswinds by Dick Friz Who's Who at Naval Air Station LT Earnest L. Guirey USN Engineering and Maintenance Officer, McCalla Field LT Earnest Guirey was born in Oakland California, attended high school at Elmonte High in Elmonte, California. He also attended Frank Wiggins Trade School in Los Angeles. He entered the Navy via the enlisted ranks in 1929 at San Diego. LT Guirey is co-author of the recent (15 May '54) book "Laughter in Hell' dealing with his experiences as a prisoner of war in the Philippines and Japan in '46-47. The LT is also a member of Tennessee Poetry Society. He was stationed in the Philippines and China for several years and has a fair command of the Japanese language in speaking and translating. Other duty stations include, USS SAN FRANCISCO, USS SARATOGA, USS DOBBIN, USS FABIUS. While with USNAAS at El Centro California, he was investigating officer on a flying saucer report. LT Guirey m a r r i e d Marvel Packerd of Pasadena, California in 1945. He has three childrenJeanette, Inez, and Lynn. The LT is quite a sportsman, listing boxing, wrestling, swimming, oarsman, yachting, and football as those he actively participated in. He also has done some boatbuilding and marine engineering, and enjoys working with plastic, wood, glass, and leather craft. News of Note Gerald McCollum BM1 has been assigned to the USS MAUREY AGS-16, August Matthias, AMC to Patrol Squadron 7, Joseph Monteleone, A/N, Al Shea, A/N, Henry Back, A/N, and Harmon Stenlund A/N, and Richard Atwood ADAN, are all up for discharge. Auf weidersehn. Here are the NAS softball results up to date: Operations over Boatshed 16-7, Administration over Communication, 8-7, Leeward Point over Supply 16-5, Operations led Administration 6-3 in a disputed contest, Leeward Point defeated Communications 10-9, and Supply edged Boatshed, 4-3. Tom McCarthy of Leeward Point returns to civilian life and his home in Wausau, Wisconsin. Tom has no political aspirations to replace his namesake, the astute junior Senator-but plans to continue his education ...Joe Monteleone, another discharged, will return to the clothing manufacturing business in Lakewood, N.J. Al (Old Dog) Shea plans to work with the Pennsylvania Railroad as block operator. He has left the famous Jasper in the custody of Bobby Bonham. John Smith, recently departed from Gtmo to the 'greenhouse' at Annapolis, Maryland, wrote this in a recent letter to old buddies at Leeward's control tower. "Off I go into this foreign land-over populated with females, and see what trouble I can stir up." Don't rub it in John. "Duck" Clark of the FLAW crew, set a new endurance record dancing the mambo at the Guantanamo City Carnival last week. According to all reports the Carnival Queen was quite a beauty. One of the comments ..."The Gauntanamo carnival would make the Mardi Gras look like a church social." strongly encouraged to participate on their respective teams, and it is hoped that the league will be a very successful one which will provide adequate recreation for everyone. S THE INDIAN Page Seven

PAGE 8

Navy-tDPP o-10ND-tme.-0124 m HE INDIAN Saturday, 28 August 1954 MOVIES Saturday, 28 August JOHNNY DARK Tony Curtis Piper Laurie A bright young engineer for an independent automobile company builds his own racing car with the help of the chief engineer, but without the knowledge of the firm president. He enters a race, and although he doesn't win, he attracts the attention of the boss. Sunday, 29 August CASANOVA'S BIG NIGHT Bob Hope Joan Fontaine A tailor's apprentice is mistaken for the great lover, Casanova, and is sent by a duchess to test the love of her prospective daughterin-law. In color. Monday, 30 August THE LIMPING MAN Lloyd Bridges Maria Lister An American in England becomes entangled with Scotland Yard when the man standing next to him is killed. Tuesday, 31 August THE COMMAND Guy Madison Joan Weldon The captain of a cavalry troop is killed by Indians. The company's Army Medical Officer is forced to take command and guide a civilian wagon train through the Indian territory. In color. Wednesday, 1 September CONQUEST OF EVEREST Members of the expedition The story of the conquest of Everest by the 1953 British expedition and ascent to the highest peak of the mountain by Edmund P. Hillary and Bhotia Tensing Norkey. It's 29,000 feet was conquered on the day of Queen Elizabeth's coronation. In color. Thursday, 2 September TANGANYIKA Van Heflin Ruth Roman While enroute to file a land claim in British East Africa, a young Englishman saves the life of a severly wounded man. The act was committed by the wounded man's brother, leader of a native tribe. Trouble ensues. Friday, 3 September HELL BELOW ZERO Alan Ladd Joan Tetzel Ladd and Tetzel fly to Antarctic to investigate death of her father, partner in a mining enterprise, who was murdered by her ex-fiance. Hospital Notes by Charles L. Brewer, YN3 Heirport News Only two births were recorded during the past week: a son, Donald Lee Joyner, born 19 August to ETC and Mrs. John E. Joyner; a daughter, Deborah Lucille Simmons, born 23 August to IM3 and Mrs. Phillip L. Simmons. New Arrivals With the arrival of the USNS THOMAS, our staff was increased with ten new men. Sheva, A. J., HM1, Shuttle, J. C., HM2, Jones, W. Z., HM2, Price T. W. HM3 and McCormick B. R., HN all reported from the U. S. Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Maryland. From the U. S. Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania reported Brodley, J. W., HN and Cash, H. C., HN. Hudson, J. L., Jr., SN and Hughart, L. E., SN reported from the Naval Receiving Station, Brooklyn, New York. Bugg, W. C., HN came aboard from the USS LATIMER (APA-152). We hope that you will enjoy your tour of duty here at Guantanamo Bay. Departures LT A. Gedarovich and family departed aboard the USN S THOMAS on the 26th for New York and ultimate separation from the Naval service. Dr. Gedarovich, who was our pediatrician, plans to continue his work in pediatrics in the suburbs of New York City. Edward T. Connors, HN also left on the THOMAS for New York and separation. Ed plans on returning to school this fall. We wish him the best of luck in his civilian life. Notice All persons desiring to travel to Panama or Trinidad are required to have: YELLOW FEVER INNOCULATIONS. Innoculations will be given at the Dependents OutPatient Clinic on Thursday, 2 September at 1300. Armed service personnel are required to present their health records at time of innoculations. Thomas Macaulay, the famous British historian, was only four years old when a lady came up and asked him gushingly: "Did oo hurt oo's bitty finger?" "Madam," he replied, "the agony has slightly abated." I 0 oK* NOK by Francis L. Cannon, JOSN For Your Information ... DOMINATIONS AND POWERS by George Santayana This is the crowning life work of one of the immensly wise old men of the West-the late George Santayana. He expresses his views on the problems which confront the United Nations, and on the futures of Russia and the United States as world leaders. This provides perhaps the most profound analysis of today's ills. It is a study of the relationship of man in the family, society, state, and group of states, the world. The words "dominations" and "powers" are not meant to be synonomous. They stand for two distinct categories and the relationship between them is the subject of this book. THE STORY OF PHILOSOPHY by Will Durant This book gives the ideas and philosophical systems of the worldfamous "monarchs of the mind": Plato, Aristotle, Voltaire, Spinoza, Santayana, and Dewey, to name but a few. It gives their biographies, their setting in their own time, and their place in our intellectual heritage. The book is scholarly, but not meant solely for scholars; it is vital and alive. THE THEATRE IN OUR TIME by John Gassner Mr. Gassner's book is written against a continuous tradition from Ibsen to the most important contemporary American playwrights. It is a work of great scope, relating past and present drama, and showing how they merge in a meaningful way. For Your Entertainment ... DON CAMILLO'S DILEMMA by Giovanni Guareschi The never-ending battle between Don Camillo, the two-fisted priest in a little Italian village, and its Communist mayor, Peponne, is on again. This is humor at its best; Guareschi is a sort of an Italian Mark Twain. The book is really the story of God's infinite patience with His creatures. THE TEAHOUSE OF THE AUGUST MOON edited by Margaret Mayorga Ten outstanding short plays, most of which were written for TV or radio, with complete introduction and text. It also contains a list of Selected Plays of the Year, available for production in America, with a brief summary of plots, and a bibliography of short plays available for production. THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER by Mark Twain This story was one of Mark Twain's own favorites. Through and accident the boy Edward, afterward Edward VI of England, changes clothing and place with little Tom Canty, a beggar-lad who is his double. They both meet with strange adventures in their assumed characters. This book contains some of Twain's best writing, especially in the description of scenes. Overheard on a Main Street Bus: "My husband. will never chase another woman ...he's too fine ...too decent ...too old!" Said one girl to another: "Why do you go out with that guy? He can't dance at all." "You're right," her friend said. "But, boy, can he intermission!"