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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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Sunday Supplement
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Gitmo Review
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Guantanamo Gazette
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Daily Gazette
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VGoers TMO Lk The SBuns btye"

Vol. V1, No. 59 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 21 August 1954


H. E. Cavanaugh, Civ., LTJG J. A. Kropack and T. P. Ahlberg, Civ., pose with 20-pound Snapper caught last Sunday. The fish holds a prominent first place in the fishing contest thus far. The three men pictured were chosen to represent Guantanamo Bay in the Miami Amateur Tourney at Key West the 29th of this month. The three spearguns stacked here are world-famous Arbolettes.


Local Divers Compete For National Title


In Key West Underwater Tourney


When the official "Go" signal is given at Key West, Florida on August 29, a three man team representing the local "Denizens of the Deep" will compete for Guantanamo Bay in the National Underwater Spearfishing Championships.
The team selected by its members, includes, E. I. Cavanaugh of NAS, Ted Ahlberg and LTJG J. A. Kropack of Naval Station. They will leave for the Keys the morning of the 28th to compete in the tourney, sponsored this year by the Florida Skin Divers Association and the City of Key West.
The Contest will begin on Sunday morning and last four hours, with a colo ed flag on the National Ship Headquarters indicating the end of competition. The Owen Churchill National Perpetual Trophy goes to the team with the largest aggregate weight total, and the Owen Churchill Individual trophys will be awarded for the top individual 'catch.'
Earl Cavanaugh, 45, a Chief Quarterman at NAS Public Works, fist experienced the thrill of undierwater competition with langosta lind smaller fish, stalking them with the Hawiian sling. Then lie graduated to the CO2 gun, the Squale
(Continued on Page Five)


OTM9 Scouts Present

3rd Annual carnival Today

This afternoon, commencing at 1 P.M. and lasting until 6 P.M. the Scout organizations of Guantanamo Bay will stage their 3rd Annual Scout Carnival at the Naval Air Station Seaplane Ramp on Fisherman's Cove.
The gala event is being presented for the residents of the Naval Base to show what the scouts have been doing.
Proceeds from the carnival will he used to finance the activities of the Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts, Girl Scouts and the Brownies of the base for the coming year.
The highlight of the carnival will come at 8:30 in the afternoon when a door prize will be awarded to some fortunate individual.
Featured at the carnival will be scouting exhibitions, entertainment booths, "goodies" booths and the famous VU-10 Choo-Choo ride for the children.
Admission tickets may be purchased at the entrance or from any of the scouts. Children under 12
(Conti - on Page Seven)


2nd Middie Cruise Taxes Naval Base Facilities

Cruise 'Baker' Arrives Next Week

Yesterday, Midshipmen Cruise "Charlie", consisting of 13 major ships of the line, arrived in Guantanamo Bay for a four day visit on the last leg of a training cruise for 1,360 NROTC Contract Senior Midshimen.
Made up of the JUNEAU, four
destroyers, and seven destroyer
Naval Base School Gets type vessels, Cruise "Charlie",the second midshipmen cruise to arNOWriv ASScre, Ha|nwas led into the hay b
Newthe USS PITTSBURGH flying the flag of RADM Bernard L. Austin,
After over a year of planning, ComCruDiv TWO.
hoping, and dreaming, an audito- The 13 ships that made up Cruise
rium and assembly hall for the "Charlie" departed from Norfolk, Naval Base School is now under Va. late in July and steamed north
construction. to Quebec, Canada. Then, after
This new building, located a- four days training and four nights cross from the school adjacent to ashore, the training task force the Naval Base Chapel, will seat headed south (iowa the Spanish around 500 people and will serve Main and made Havana, Cuba next for both school functions, classes, liberty port. Four (lays were spent and organizational activities. It in Havana before coming to Guanis hoped that it will be ready for tanamo Bay. use by the first of September. Last night saw the first liberty
According to Mr. T. G. Scar- parties from Cruise "Charlie"
borough, Principal of the Naval coming ashore, and as before, the Base School, there has been a need middies taxed all facilities of the for such a building for quite some Naval Base. tim)e now. In the past, assemblies The Naval Station Exchange and nad to be held in two combined the Sports Shop began their night
rooms in the school or in the hours again to handle the onslaught
school patio. Due to the increase of souvenir buying. Clerks at both in school enrollment, these rooms stores were swamped with business are needed for classes now, and as gifts for the folks at home were with the completion of the new ass- the order of the day. enbly hall, this problem will no The Petty Officers Club closed longer be encountered. down to base and fleet petty officers
Also, along with using the hall to facilitate the handling of cool for assemblies, it will be utilized drinks for thirsty cadets. Even by for physical education classes. This using the entire PO Club as a will be made so by the fact that Midshipmen's Club, extra tables folding chairs and not permanent and an extra bar had to be set seats will be installed. up on the lawn in front of the club
Another advantage of the new to handle the large number coining
auditorium will be the fact that ashore. the school and the teen-agers will The Telephone Exchange reportno longer have any problems find- ed a land office business as many in- a place to hold their social (Continued on Page Three)


(Continued on Page Seven)


The lonlg planned and hoped for Naval Base School Auditorium begins to take shape. The new building is located next to the Naval Base Chapel and will seat 0 roximately 500 people.


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Page Two


Saturday, 21 August 1954


The India ns mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Offize, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Decpartment
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9-615
Saturday, 21 August 1954
U. S. NAVAL BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund i. Taylor
Commander
CAP'i G. M. Holler
Chief of Sall
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commandina Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Samlness ----------Officer-Advisor
H. 11. liav is JiC ------------------- Editor
H. 1.. SiSson. ,Je3---------------- News
Jery Lewis Jo- ------Features
Pierce tebmabeck ------------------- Sports
]F.I,. Cannon JOSN - Photographer
THE INDIAN is published weekly at, th Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-Si. Revisedi Nov. 1945. and finnce wit on-approiiriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service. and AFPS material appearing herein must not be rep produced wvicthout written permission. Local nes may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy piloto,, illsless otherswise credited.


Kee Cool, Mani


'REAL COOL


Man, this is a real cool summer
-if you dig heat.
You may simmer, but don't turn red and fall on your head, man. You just gotta beat this crazy heat. So if you don't want to reel and keel-then here's the deal.
Dig some wild water-it's a crazy drink, man. Slug the most you can-it's all gonna pour outa them mad holes in your skin and make you cool, man-real cool.
But watch that sweat, Dad. It's the saltiest! When the sweat pours from your pores-that salt's just gotta go! And you know you gotta put back in ya what the sun fries out!
But we've got a treat that's quite all-reet! The craziest life-savers you ever gulped. Not cherry, not lime, not berry-just salt. Man, they taste like seaweed rio'ht from the wild, wild ocean. But don't be a creep, man. They're the most-and they're FREE.
Three salt pills a (lay keeps the enibalmer away, Dad. So if you don't want to land in your bed
- a (-stoks up on water and salt.
If you don't eat salt, man, it's all your fault! (AFPS)

Cycle Cop: "Say, how many times have I arrested you for speeding on this road?"
Traveler: "Don't ask me, I thought you were keeping score!"
If you're in a hur-ry to find a cop . . . try going 70 mph.

Door to door salesman: "Is your mother engaged ?"
Small boy: "I think she's married."


New US, Mail Schedule In Effect

Following is hte new mail schedule in effect at the base post office: IN COMING MAIL FROM THE UNITED STATES: MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY 0"15 1920 1915 1920 1915
MAIL READY FOR PICKUP BY BASE ACTIVITIES: MONDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY 1100 0800 0800 0800 0800
OUTGOING MAIL TO THE UNITED STATES: MAIL CLOSES AT NAVY POST OFFICE MONDAY 1200
WEDNESDAY 0700-1800 FRIDAY 0700
SATURDAY 0930 MAIL CLOSES AT DROP BOXES: MONDAY 0900
TUESDAY 2000
WEDNESDAY 1500
THURSAY 2000
FRIDAY 2000
SATURDAY 0700 SAN JUAN MAIL CLOSES NAVY POST OFFICE 1700 EACH FRIDAY:


Cub Scouts Visit Construction Progress Seen


Lake Champlain
by Millie Jamieson

On August 14, thirty of the Guantanamo Bay Cub Scouts visited the U.S.S. LAKE CHAMPLAIN (CVA39). Chaplain Budd and six men stationed on the carrier escorted the boys and Den mothers. All visualized the greatness of a floating air strip in being able to see tie elevators, the catapult, the flight deck, the Captain's bridge, and the flight control roon. Many jets were on board and the boys were able to get upon the planes to see all the various instruments and have them explained.
One of the biggest thrills was sensed by riding the escalator up to the officer's wardroon wvhsere refreshments were served. All thoroughly enjoyed the trip and wish to thank the men of the U.S.S. LAKE CHAMPLAIN for their kidness.
Don't forget the Scout Carnival on Saturday, August 21, at 1300 until 1800.


St. Peter challenged the Devil to a game of baseball, claiming that all the great baseball players were up in heaven. "You'll lose," the Devil said, "you won't stand a chance."
"And why not?" asked St. Peter.
"Well," replied the Devil, "we have all the umpires down here."


In Replacement Housing


The housing area of Gi amo Bay Naval Base will s spotted with new cement a crete replacement housing Second Street in Villamar h been completed and is now ual part of Base housing a ilies have been moving in completion of each building
Next on the schedule for c tion is Sixth Street in V which will house 12 fanilie after the completion of ti Sixth Street, the housing u First Street will be complete
Then, adjacent to Villam other areas are presently construction. East of 1st Sti Sherman Avenue, there buildings under constructis there are 12 more buildings ing day by day on Grendiflo
Finally, there will be 12 ings in East Barge, on whi struction was began only re
After all these units hav occupied, even more of th modern apartment building be built in Central and West which will bring tre total to 300 family units.
To slate, four SeaBee bat have participated in the w these housing units, and ab last of August, the fifth ba MCB-4 will relieve MCB-8 gin their part on the proje


VU-1 0 Wives Volunteer As 'Mothers for a Day'














C '~




Every tine the "Thomas" comes into Gtmo, the wives of personnel become "mothers for a day". In order to give the personnel time to relax and do their shopping, the children are in the nursery where they are given the best of care. Pictured left to right, Mrs. McCracken, Mrs. Jamieson, Mrs. Merz, Mrs. Gre Mrs. Henning,' Mrs. Hoy, Mrs. Larimore, and Mrs. Weiland.


antancon be nd conunits. as long an acts famupon

ompleill amsai


Sunday, 22 August 1951

Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630 Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930 - 2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0920-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Wool Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal .Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic)


The Chaplain's Corner


s. Soon There is a lesson for each of us ie new in the life of David. IIe kuew lonenits on liness for he spent much of his ed. youth as a shepherd boy keeping
ar, two watch over his father's flock. He under knew dangers as a boy when he reet off fought wild beasts to protect the are 48 sheep and as a king when he led n and his armies to defend his country. grow- He knew sin for he yielded to his Point. fleshly passions and took the wife build- of another man. He knew sorrow ch con- for he watched his favorite son cently. weaken and die. He knew failure e been for it was necessary for him to e new lead his army against the forces s will of a rebellious son who was atBargo tempting to take the throne from number him.
Many men are crushed by lonetalions liness, danger, sin, sorrow, and ork on failure. But David won the victory out the over each of these experiences and ttalion, pressed on to become the greatest and be- King ever to rule over the Jewish ct. people. What was the secret of
his success ? We find the answer in his own words: "The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want": "For in the time of trouble He shall hide me in His pavilion, in
J the secret of His tabernacle shall
He hide me": "I had rather be a door keeper in the House of the Lord than to dwell in the tents of the wicked": "I was glad when they said unto me, Let us go up to the House of the Lord": "One thing have I desired of the Lord, that will I see after: that I may dwell in the House of toe Lord all the slays of my life to behold the beauty of the Lord and to inquire
m His Temple."
David teaches us that the person
who goes to church regularly and earnestly seeks for spiritual help can find guidance and strength to meet any problem that faces him
in his everyday experiences.
\'U-10 If you learn the lesson of David visiting and become a regular worshiper placed in our Chapel, your life will be above richer, fuller, and happier in the enfield, days that are ahead.
M. 0. Stephenson


THIIE INDIAN


Never Pass,a Stopped choo Bus


Page Two


I







m0


Saturday, 21 August 1954


m


THE INDIAN


MCBs 4 and 8

Shift Positions

Next week, two SeaBee battalions will switch positions, proving once again that they are Mobile Construction Batallions. MCB-8 will depart for their home base, Davisville, R. L, and MCB-4, who already has a large advanced party here, will take over projects now underway here in Cuba.
Including the large advanced party already here, and the main body of the battalion arriving next week, MCB-4 will have a total manpower greater than MCB-8 at present, but their total strength will not be as great as "Eight" when they were at their manpower peak here. .
MCB-8 was the largest battalion to operate here in Cuba, and since MCB-4 is at the same strength, it is estimated that production on SeaBee projects will continue at the same-if not greater-pace.
While here in Cuba, MCB-S's prmary and foresmost project was the replacement housing units. Their progress on these can readily be seen by just looking around in Villamar, Bargo, and other sites where the new units have been going up and remembering what they looked like six months ago.
The secondary project for MCB-8 was the power plant on Leeward Point. This project, next to the housing project, was of prime importance to the base since power for Leeward Point was still being supplied by a temporary power plant upon MCB-8's arrival here.
As well as these two projects, MCB-8 finished up the new RPIO building, which has been a functional part of the Naval Base for several months now. They also undertook many smaller projects as well as road grading, maintenance of buildings and equipment, and assisting Public Works whenever there was a need for their help.
On the extra-curricular side, MCB-8 fielded both a basketball team and a baseball team. Their basketball team, which took over the first-half record of MCB-7, placed seventh in the Base League. In diamond play, the MCB-8 'Bees made an impressive showing as they placed second in the League play and placed several men on the Base All-Star team plus post-season honors.
At the annual Naval Base Carnival, MCB-8 contributed a merrygo-rounld and carnival booth.


WGBY Hi-Lites
by John Hull

The new winter program schedule will go into effect on WGBY Monday, August 23. With school starting that week, the biggest change will he in "Storyteller Time" which will move into the 5:00 P.M. time slot five days weekly so that the kids can listen in after school.
Martin Block's "Make Believe Ballroom" vill be heard five mornings a week at 11:30 as "Bud's Bandwagon" moves into the 1:00 P.M. slot every weekday. The popular "Last Alan Out" series will move friom Friday to Saturday night at 9:00 replacing "Stage Struck".
A new dramatic program, "Theatre Royal", will be heard on Saturdays at the 7:00 Sir Laurence Oliver will be host for the run of te series and, after the first few broadcast, its regular star. Orson Welles, noted American actor who is now living abroad, will be guest star on the initial broadcast, He


Trading Post Backs


'Toys for Tots' Drive


Christmas is coming, and with it, the Trading Post has organized a "Toys for Tots" drive.
The "Toys for Tots" drive is a full community project with the Trading Post acting as operations center. Participating in the drive will be the Boy Scouts, the Girl Scouts, and the Fire Department.
Along with the collection boxes
-marked "Toys for Christmas"placed at the base exchanges and in the housing areas, the Boy Scouts and the Girl Scouts have volunteered their services in the collection of toys. They will go from door to door and generally scour the base for any toys that have been discarded, outgrown, or broken and turn them into the Fire Department.
The Fire Department, following the form of stateside fire departments, has volunteered :ll its free time-at no charge-from now
until Chirstmas. They will take tovs which have been collected and repair them, repaint them, and put them in top condition in time so that they will be able to be placed out in time for Chirstmas.
After the toys have been repaired and fixed up by the Firemen, they will be placed on sale in the exchanges and at the Trading Post at bargain prices for families of the Naval Base. Then, shortly before Christmas, all remaining toys will he distributed by the Fire Department to families in Cuba and to the orphanage in Gutanrtanamo City.
As well as the collection boxes in the housing areas and at the exchanges, personnel of the Naval Base may turn in toys too large to be placed in the boxes at the Chaplain's Office or the Trading Post.
As well as sponsoring the "Toys for Tots" drive, the Tradino Post also sells anything for anyone at a slight commission. They also accept material donations of any sort-repairing them and offering them for sale.
The profits from all Trading Post projects are used to support community projects undertaken by the organization. At the present time, the Trading Post is financing the construction of a slide in the housing area for kiddies, they are furnishing the equipment needed for the organizations that assist in the baby sitting whenever the THOMAS comes in, aind they are helping the teen-agers with their projects and undertakings.

will portray the lead in Pushkin's classic, "The Queen of Spades".
The "Hollywood Radio Theatre" will present "Edward, My Son", starring Walter Pidgeon as the over-indulgent parent who lavishes on his first son the education aiid social position denied himself and blindly wrecks the lad's life, on Sunday, August 22 at 10:00 P.M.
For several years now Tallulah Bankhead has been conducting a hilarious public feud with Bette Davis over the latter's impersonation of her in the movie, "All AboutEve". On Monday, August 23 at 9:00 P.M., Tallulah gets her revenge as she takes the starring' role in the "Theatre Guild On The Air" production of, "All About Eve".
Be sure to watch the daily program schedule in the "Papoose" for your favorite programs and any chances in the schedule presented each day oe':r WGBY, 1450 on your radio dial


What D' Ya' Say ? -\ !7.A

'ho INDIAN will award a Certiticate good for 11.00 "" of ...wrchandise at ,he Navy Exhangre for ea'h ,!u-m n accepted and used. Submit your questions to Edilor, The Indian, Box 19. The question: What do you think of the
neN 80 octane gas?

The place: Navy Exchange gas station.

- - -0


Mrs. Dorothy .1. Murphy, Victory Hill
"Our car is performing much better. It has more pick up and much better inileare."


Willie, the ice-cream man
"The way I drive my ice-cream truck demands a lot of stops and starts. The new gas gives that extr-a touch of performance. I hope they keep on using it."


Middies.
(Continued from Page One)
calls were placed to relate adventu.es and happenings of the training cruise to folks at home.
The Special Services Department reported a heavy load on rcreational facilities as every effort was made to give the midshipmen every chance possible at recreation.
Cruise "Baker," the last of the three cruises, will arrive here Thursday, 26 August and will depart on :,I August. Leading the training task force and flying the flag of RADM George R. Coopu' wll be the USS WISCONSIN. Other ships carrying the total of 1,765 midshipmen will be the WORCESTER, S T E I N A K E 1, VESOLE, COATES, PARLE, T. P A R K E R, BURDO, DARBY, COOLBAUGH, LOESER,
DELONG, and W. I* f*SH.


M. Tarwater. 11.11, Naval Hospital
"I think it's 1006 better."


INrs W. 11 Johnson, Nill irnar "I love it. I hope they never go back to the other gas. My car Ivoil't rtlO."


W. A. Banks, SD1, BOO 1
"I like it 1001 more. It's got more power and it helps clean the carbon out."


Page Three











Page Four


Saturday, 21 Augtust 1954


Final Fishing Tally Shows 200 Angler Entries


The Guantanamo Bay Fishing Tournament closed last Sunday witni almost 200 entries being made into the official record hook.
Topping the list of entries submitted was a 76-pound, 8-ounce tarpon catight by D. D. I-uffmtan and iegisteied in the Afloat Division. E. C. Fimbel was a close second with a 76-pound shark registered in the Special Division. Fimbel, however, will be awarded a prize for his 31-pound barracuda registered in the Land Division.
Other winning entries in the Land Division are Michael Sims for his 6 lb. 8 oz. grouper; R. E. MacAnanny for his 19-lb, 8-oz jack; R. D. Howerton for his 5-lb, 10-oz king mackerel; V. A. Roberts for his 63-lb snapper; Leo Fath for his 14-1b, 12 oz snook; George Bunda for his 28-lb, 8-oz tarpon; and W. V. Dean for his 7-lb Spanish mackerel.
The Afloat Division winners, besides Huffman's tarpon, are J. C. Carroll's 24-lb barracuda; Jim Sanford's 6 -oz grouper; R. L Karsten's 12-lb, 4-oz jack; J. H. Smouse's 14-lb king mackerel; D. Johnson's 40-lb snapper; J. H. Smouse's 24-lb wahoo; S. Tiaba's 12-lb, 8-oz snook.
The Special Division boasts win ners by J. H. Smouse for his 6-lh, 4-oz albacore, J. W. Richmond for his 4-ib, 91/2-oz bonito; D. C. Wenzall for his 3-lb, 10-oz bonefish; N. A. LaBarge for his 21b, 5%A-oz croaker; J. H. Smouse for his 4-lb, 8-oz ladyfish; D. L. Clark for his 8-lb, 1-oz parrotfish; Kenneth Bedward for his 20-lb pompano; and E. C. Fimbel for his 76-lb shark.
In the Spearfishing Division, C. W. Plath cops a winner with his 18-lb, 8-oz barracuda; W.V. Dean wins with his 18-lb, 8-oz jack; L. D. Ellwood gets a prize for his 56-lb grouper; R. D. Howerton for his 5-lb, 10-oz mackerel; J. A. Kropak for his 20-lb snapper; and T. P. Ahlberg for his 8-lb, 4-oz hogfish.
The above winners were compiled from official entry sheets received at The Indian office and submitted by the weighing stations at the Harbor Police stations. Should there be any corrections or questions concerning winning entries, it is requested that a phone call be made to the Indian office at 9615.
The prizes and trophies will be awarded at the Naval Station movie lyceim on Sunday, August 29th at 7:15 P.M. All winners are urged to attend the ceremonies to receive their awards.
All children who entered fish in the tournament will receive a souvenir >rize whether they were winners or not.
The ladies came through with winners also. There will be special prizes awarded to three ladies for capturing the largest fish in a division. In the Land Division, Irene J. Munson topped the rest of the ladies' entries with a 17-lb, 4-oz jack. In the Afloat Division, Laurie Carrington hooked into a 12-lb, 4-oz snook to cop the ladies' prize for that division. And in the Special Division, Marion A. Wind brought home a 2-lb, 8-oz bonefish to claim a winner.
LAND DIVISION
Barracuda
Fimbel, E. C. __ 31 lbs. Fires, V . A. ____- ____- 15 lbs., 8 ozs. H ackert, A. _____- - ____ 1. lbs., 10 ozs. Dean, W . V. _ ___- _ 12 lbs., 8 ozs. Dexter, J. W . ___ 12 lbs., 7 ozs. Clark, W . W . _2____- __._ 12 hbs. Adams, Mary --____-___ 10 lbs., 8 ozs. Hoppe, G. _________--- 5 lbs., 12 ozs. Meredith, Fred __---_ lbs. Kerslake, Mrs. E. C. lbs., 72 o-s. Barnett, Stella _-______ 3 lbs., 51 ozs. Colt, Linda ------------ 1 lb., 3 ozs.
Shaw, Mrs. W. H. ___-_ 15 ozs. W illiams, Mike _-___--- 91 ozs.


Jafleison, Raymond ___Grouper
Sims, Michael --_----- 6 Hanlin, John Pani . -Gardes, .A. _ -------Burn,, Dill-------------I
H ise, N . L. _ _ ___Shav, Jimmy --------Morales, Reggie
n n J -eh - - - - -
iLasko sskj. Erich --Simsmons, JoAnne--Jacks
MacAnanny, Raymond E. 19 Munson, Irene J- - 17 Simons, Cecii ----------15
Finbl, E. C 4 ---------- 14
ERmano, Sam------------14
N?!xon, WV. G.- ---------- 12
Kilkland, H. A. - --------Pickett, S. I - ---------Gardes, George --Dempsey. Mrs. J.W. -wormwood, Mike----i Shaw, Billy
Mackerel (King Howerton, R. D.
Snapper
Roberts, V. A. _- ___- 63 Kelley, C. L. __ 60
Johnson D --------Roberts. V. A.------5
Johnson, D - 46
Caruso, A. 3. --------- 41
Keiiey, C. L.----__--- 39
Lee, G. A.- - - - - - - -2
Henry, R. L. - -----------1
Fath, L. A - ------------ 15
Heinandez, J. M. -__- 12 Lightfoot, Robert --___ 5 Naegle, W. L. - --------- 5
Dexter, Mrs. J. W. _ __ 2. Hays, Robert ---------- 1
Speice, P. E.- - - - - Brooks, Stanley Lightfoot, Larry ______Wormwood, Mike Simnuons, Diane Hanlin. John __Moo~re, Rickys ----Murphy, Kathy Kerslake, Lynn ---Simmons, Mrs. W. E. _Wiliiams, Mike Skadosii, K. J. Uscy, Tony -----Dexter, James Jameison, Raymond Gardes George Jr. Baker, F. R.-- - -- -
Hise, W. R. Minard, Jim Scott, John -----Solalle, Steven -------Simmons, JoAnne Jameison, Raymond Wiiiiams, JoAnne ----Skadosvski, K. J3.--Shaw, James Simmons, Diane Sinmons, Car--Soblaile, Petir ----Snook


5 ozr.

lbs. ozas.
lb., 14 oz,. 1b., 21 oz,. lb.
8 ozs.
6 ozs.
7 %1 o z- .


lbs., S ozs. lbs., - ozs. lbs.
lbs., i8 ozs. lbs., S8 ozs. lbs, 8 ozs. lbs.
lb i5 ozs.


ill., 151 ,(S
lbs. s
12 zs.
6 ozs.

lbs., 10 ozslbs.
lbs., ozs.


lbs.

lbs , 5 ozs.

lbs.
lbs., 8 ozs.
lbs.
lbs.,12 ozs. lbs., 2 uzs. lbs., l ozs. lbs.


111 ozs.
11 ozs.
11 ozs.
I'>. os.
tl ozs9 os.
8 ozs.
8 os

7 ozs.
6 o zs

6 Xozs.

6 ozs.
5%2 oZs.

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51, ozs



3ozs,
41. , ozs.
4 ozs.

3 sos.
1 oiz.
1 lIz.


Fath, Leo A. ----------- 14 lbs., 12
Bunda, George -------- 10 lbs., 4 Horner, T. A. - --------- 3 lbs.
Tarpon
Bunda, George -------- 28 lbs., 8 Scott, W.H. _------------ 23 lbs., 8
Bedward, Kenneth ____ 21 lbs. Bedward, Kenneth - 17 lbs.
Collins, R. B. - _____-- 16 lbs. Henry, R. L.-- _________ 12 lbs., 4
Mackerel (Spanish) Dean, W. V.- ------------7 his.
AFLOAT DIVISION
Barracuda
Carroll, J. C. ----------- 24 lbs.
Cunningham, J. H. 17 lbs.,
Davenport, Sid---------16 lbs., 8 Haswes, D. D.--------14 lbs., 5
Richmond. J. v - 12 lbs.
ward, G. l. _------------ lbs. 4
Lafnear, R.E _--------_ lss., 1
Collins, liernice R. ____ lss., 10


Sanford, Jim


Groupe Jacks


Karstens, R. I ___-_-- 12 McNeal, H. ------------ 11
Burns, Grace
Mackerel (King) Snouse, J. H..- 14
Smouse, J. H. ---------11
Snapper
.Johnson, D. - ----------- 40
Davenport, Dale - 38
Chandler, CA. ---------- 33
Carroll, I. C ------------30
Sparks, 'W. J.- -----------Is
Ward, G. F. -_______ 12 mflverzo, Epifanio ____ 15 Davenport, Sid ---------12
Clay, Mrs. D. B.- ---------4
Bo rns, Nancy Pait---


Sozs.

Sozs. Sozs.
- ozs. .1 (O55.

-i It.


6 oz,.

lbs., 4 ozs. I bs., I1" oz,.
51, ozs.

lbs.
]b,., S oz'.
I).1



lbs.
I bs., 8 os lbs., 8 ozs. ls 8

lbs.,10 ozs. lbs., 2 ozs. lbs., 8 ozs. lbs.
I I , ozs.


Wahoo
Smouse, J. H. -----------24 lbs.
Snook
Tiaba, S. --------- - 12 lbs., 8 ozs.
Carrington, Laurie ---_ 12 lbs., 4 ozs. Holley, G. - ------------ 10 lbs., 10 ozs.
Smouse, J. H. - --------- 10 lbs., 4 ozs.
Fimsbel, E. C. ------------ -. lbs.
Wilson, W. H. ----------- 6 lbs., q ozs.
Tarpon
Huffman, D. _-------- 76 lbs., 8 ozs.
Andrews, J. W. -------- 59 lbs., 4 ozs.
Fimsbel, E. C. ----------- 40 lbs.
Davis, N. Q. ._--------_ 20 lbs., 4 ozs.
Swanson, G. A. ____ --- 13 lbs., S ozs.
SPECI L DIVISION
Ilbacore
Sm101s5,J. . _. - 6 lbs., 4 15z5.
McNeal, H.P _-...- 1 lb.. 5 ozs.
Holley, G - --- - -----_ 9 ozs.


Maries Split Two-Game Series


With West Palm Beach Giant Nine


The Marine baseball club-holder of the Naval Base League Championship and the Post-Season Tournament Championship-journeyed to Miami last week to represent Guantanamo Bay in stateside competition for the first time and gave a good accounting of themselves under a scorching Miami sun. They took ou the best of the Southeastern Florida league
-the Sky Giants from the Air Force Base at West Paln Beach-and split a two-game series, winning
n the first, 9 to 7 and dropping the
Marine[ ' S e Take98 second, 8 to 4.
Playing on the fenceless diamond
PosS eason Honors tt the Marine Air Corps Station
at Opa Locka in 98-degree heat
the local Marines rapped out ten
The annual baseball awards hits in the first game behind the banquet held at the close of each steady pitching of playing-manager baseball season will be held this Chuck Smith who went the disyear on Monday night, 23 August, tance for the victory. Bill Wood and in the Chief Petty Officers' Club. Larry Adams were the big bats
Based on season performances in the first game, both knocking
in all but one case, the champion out long triples that would have Marines and the Bees from MCB-8 gone for circuit clouts on the local
ran away with the honors this year. diamonds but which were chased The Marines copped the double pen- down by the fleet outfielders of the nant of league championship and Sky Giants and held to 3-baggers.
tournament championship. Two Wood got a single in addition to large team trophies will be present- his triple and Adams accounted for ed for the two titles. The Bees will two more safeties via the single receive a team trophy for the route.
runner-up spot in the league and The Marines scored 2 in the secthe Naval Station Indians will re- ond, 3 in the fifth, 1 in the sixth ceive the runner-up trophy for the and iced the game with three more tournament in the seventh.
In addition to the large team
trophies small individual trophies Meawvhile Smith was limiting will be presented to the champions the Sky Giants to eight widely and runners-up of both contests, scattered hits for their seven tallies.
Individual honors this year go In the second game the following
to Jim (Rebel) Dotson of MCB-8 day the Air Force club got off to
for coming through with the most an early lead with one score in Runs Batted In and the most Home- the first and five more in a big runs of the season. His RBI total sixth inning when 11 Giants came was 42 and he topped the league to the plate.
with 12 round trippers. In the safe The Marines were held scoreless hitting department, Tom Felak of until the bottom of the sixth when the Marines gets the nod with a they chased two tallies across, both
way-out-in-front .417 average. His of them by virtue of Tom Felak's closest competitor was team mate booming triple into deep center Jim Pace with .398. field, scoring Androvich and Pace.
The pitching crown goes to Raoul Two more in the bottom of the Santos of the Marines for his earn- seventh made up the total for the ed run average of 1.23. Marines as they were unable to
overcome their 6 to 4 deficit. The
Bonito Sky Giants scored twice more in
Richmond, J. W. - _bI., - I ,ozs. the seventh for insurance and the

\Venzall. D. C. __Bonefsh 3 Its, 10 0z.1 game ended after four LeatherEmverzo, Epifanio -- 2 lbs., 12' ozs. neck hurlers had seen action. Straw wind, Marion A. ------- 2 lb., 8 ozs. took the loss for the Marines deDempsey, Mrs. J. W. __ P' 0zs. spite thr efforts of Schreck, Goens
Gardes, George ___-___ 10 ozs.
Iaskowski W E iM ozs and Androvich.


Sanborn, Ellen ______Croaker
Large, N. A.---Morales, Edith---Sanborn, Jim ---------Burns, Nancy Pat Dalton, Kathryn Morales, Edith -


Ladvfish
Smiouse. J. H. ---------- 4
Parrotfish
Clark, D. __--_----------- 8
Pompano
Bedwvard, Kenneth -__ 20 Giggy, G. K. ------------ 16
Romano, S. - ------------ 8
Fairweather, W. W. ___ 6 Soballe, Peter --------- 2
Dexter, Forrest, E.
Shark


limbel, E. C. Davenport, Dale Mcreith Fcel Leepel, D.EK. Choate, E. J. Henry, R. L. Hawess D. D. tLotternlail. H. E.


76
44 '14

25
22 19 IS


Penner, R
SPEARFISHING
Barracuda
P111219 C. W. 25- 1
Pace. Roseri ----- 1
Andres, R. M - -- - 10 Ward, G. P. _ -----Jacks
Dean, W. V. J -
Andress, R. M. 14
Grouper
Ellwood. L. D- 56
Nichols. E. M.- ---------1
Mackerel
Howserton, R. D - --------Snapper
Kropack, J. A. - --------- 20
Ward, G. F. ------------ 14
Nichols, E. M. ---------- 11
Hogfish
Ahlberg T. P. _____- __-Abbott, G. H.- --_--_--Ballard, L. F. _____ _Kropack, J. A. _ ______W ard, G. F. ._ __ _ __


lbs., 3'.


212
2 2

lbs.. S his.. 1


4 1311

2
7


lbs. lbs.,
lbs., lbs. lbs.,


lbs. lbs., 8 lbs.. 8 lbs., 8 lbs.




lbs. :
lbs.. 5
lbs.,


lbs..


lbs..


Ilbs.. lbs.

lbs.


lbs., 10


l b s . lbs., I1I
lhs.


The Marines are the second club
in Gunatanamo Bay organized baseOzs ball history to cop both the league 0zs- and the post-league titles. The Naozs. val Station Indians accomplished

MI. the feat last year and, ironically
enough, it was the Indians this year who were the only remaining barrier for the Marines in the touros. nament as they breezed through OZ,. without a defeat. ozs. It was a badly battered Indian

team that took the field for the OZs, last gane of the tournament two
weeks ago. Jerry Logsdon, key catcher for the Braves, played the 0zs. left field spot iith a badly splintered hand as a result of the previous ilghit's game. Jerry Morgan started at his usual spot in short, but because of an injured throwing "" hand, also sustained in the previous
game, found it necessary to shift os. to the outfield. Mandy Mandis, ozs. siarring hurler for the Indians,
found himself playing the third base position and Wolgaimuth, utilit. man, toed the mound for several innings along with Todd and Buss os. in a vain effort to stop the Marines.
When the last ball was thrown 0z . the Marines came away the big
winner with a 20 to 7 score and osI. the double title.
And thus, the 1954 baseball season slid into the history book in ozs. Guantanamo Bay.


THE INDIAN


m


0zs. oz,.


ozs. 07,S.



ozs.


2


r








Saturday, 21 August 1954


TIE INDIAN


Base Commands Begin Intra- mural Softball
by Pierce Lehmbeck

As the 1954 Naval Base Baseball League fades into the past, the various commands around the base begin to organize their annual Intramural Softball Leagues which will carry into the month of October when the Base Softball League is slated to commence.
Naval Station
The first command to get intramural play underway will be the
Naval Station. In a recent inter- ~
view with LT E. A. Sandness of
the Special Services Division, the
INDIAN learned that eleven teams
have been entered in the six week
round-robin tournament which is Eddie Erdelatz's Navy football
scheduled to begin on the evening team begins training Aug. 23. The of Monday. 23 August. Double- Middie squad opens its '54 schedule
headers will be played each night, against Wliliam and Mary, Sept. Monday through Friday. 25 . . . More than 10,000 spectators
The eleven teams entered in watched the professional WashingNaval Station competition are the ton Redskins swamp a Navy team Eleventh Division, Flag Division, from the 11th Naval District, 52-0, the Security Groun Detachment, in the annual Navy Relief benefit the Sixth Division, the Commissary gridiron game at Balboa Stadium Store, the High School, the Fifth in San Diego, Aug. 6 . . . Coaching Division, 'M' Division of Fifth. the the Ft. Hood, Tex., football team Fleet Camera Party, Second Divi- this season will be Lt. George sion, and the Third Division. The Malley, a former gridder at Santa Second Division will be the defend- Clara University. ing champions as they made a clean The Ft. Ord., Calif., Warriors sweep of the field during the 1953 dropped another football exhibicampaign. tion. This time to the San FranAn interesting sidelight on tour- cisco 49ers, 42-14, before a crowd nament play will be the fact that of 19,779 at Kezar Stadium in San the Naval Station Officer's will Francisco, Aug. 8 . . . Yale's new form a team which will readily assistant football coach Arthur challenge any team in the league Raimo was an athletic instructor thoughout the regular season of at the Bainbridge Naval Training ulay. This 'dark-horse! team is to Center, Md., during WWII ... The be under the guiding hand of LT New York Giants football team is James Coglin of the Commissary trying to live up to its name this Division. year Joe Springer a 280- ound


Marine Barracks
The Marine Barracks have scheduled the first of September as the date for the beginning of their Intramural League. With but four teams entered in comapetiton, they plan to have several rounds with tournament play ending on approximately the 10th of October.
The four teams entered are the First and Second Sections of Guard Company, the Headquarters Company and the Staff and Officer's Group. The Second Section of Guard Company, the Headquarters Company and the Staff and Officer's Group. The Second Section of Guard Company won the 1953 tournament with an 18 won and 2 loss record.
Naval Air Station
At the time of this writing no definite word had been received from the NAS contingent. However, it is believed that they are planning the formulation of a round-robin league similar to that of the other two commands, the length of which will be determined by the number of teams entered.
For complete coverage of softball competition throughout the coming season, watch the INDIAN sport's section.


Ladies' Golf Shots
by Miriam Hoy

The lady golfers played the front nine last Wednesday morning for low gross and low net scores. The winners of golf balls were:
First Flight
Gross-Corky Henning
Net-Lou Toczko
Second Flight
Gross-two way tie:
Marge Sheehan
Nita Roberts
Net-two war tie:
Betty Lou Tipler
Miriam Hoy
Third Flight
Gross-Evelyn Leach
Net-Val Evans
After several months of absence,


tackle just released from the Army at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo., has been added to the roster. The Giants have a guy by the name of Earl Putnam on the squad-and he only weighs 300 pounds.
1st Lt. Robert S. Cook, former backfield star at Oklahoma A&M, is the new head football coach at Ft. Lewis, Wash. The ex-Aggie star succeeds Les Richter, released from active duty in May and currently undergoing pre-season drills with the professional Los Angels Rams.
Rocky Castellani, No. 1 contender for the middleweight title, took time off from his training at San Rafael, Calif., to visit Hamilton AFB. Castellani meets champion Carl "Bobo" Olson for the title, Aug. 20 . . . Ronnie Perry, Holy Cross pitching star recently signed by the Milwaukee Braves, is now in the Marine Corps at Quantico, Va. . . . Fifteen golfers representing the Army, Navy and Air Force will tee off in the three-day, 72-hole Northeastern U.S. Interservice Golf Championships at Ft. Monmouth, N.J., Sept. 8-10.
Tommy Harrison, ranking lightheavyweight, won the Far East middleweight championship in 1949 while serving with the Army in Japan . . . Ex-Navy airman Gene Littler, National Amateur Golf Champion in 1953, seems to have one-stroke-it since turning professional last February. He finished second by a stroke in the U.S. Open and had the same trouble in the All-America Golf Championships at the Tam O'Shanter Country Club in Chicago .

we would like to extend a big "Welcome back" to Helen King. The past week we had another member, Marie Aslin, who had to spend a few days in the hospital. We all hope she will be back playing again very soon.
The next Scotch Foursome will be played August 29th, so hurry and sign up for it at the Pro Shack.
Next Wednesday we will have a Flag T( -nament on the Back Nine, so * yone come on out.


FF


~/ V/V
V.
C /
/
/ V/V


Hawks Drop Post Season Game to Cuban Colts

An unidentifiable Hawk of the Base Little League takes a rough slide into home plate with the Caimanera Colt catcher riding in on top of him and tagging him for the out with the Cuban pitcher and the plate umpire looking on.
The Hawks accepted the challenge of the Cuban boys team but lost out to them by one run with a 10 to 9 score at the Little League ball diamond here last Sunday afternoon.


Skindivers . . .
(Continued from Page One)
mask and Arbalette spear gun, to ineet the 'giants' on equal terms. Last year lie landed one of the largest fish in Guantanano annals a Jewfish scaling over 200 pounds. Since his first encounter in '48, Mr. Cavanaugh has gone all through the sport's various stages . . . first when he thought fins were useless next when he thought the Squale mask uncomfortable, and later when he found that the snorkel impeded his progress. He seems to have found the winning formula in local competition though, and ulans to pursue spearfishing at least until he retires at 65.
Ted Ahlberg, 27, a Quarterman at the Naval Station Carpenter Shop is a relative tyro at the sport, although his prizes both in local competition and in events at Port Antonio, Jamaica belies that fact. In the Independence Day meet held there, Ted was top man in collective weight of fish speared . . . and he's only been at it two years! Ted has won several local prizes, and placed second in two-man team competition held recently.
LTJG J. A. Kropack, 24. is Assistant Naval Control of Shipping Officer. John or "Kro" as he is called, is an alumnus of the Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point. The 6' 3", 197 pounder participated in football and track there. It was through the Merchant service that he gained valuable amateur experience in spearfishing, diving in various haunts off the coast of Eastern and Southern Africa and the Island of Zanzibar. Actually, his first underwater dip came much earlier . . . at the age of 14 near his home in Lake Worth Florida. "Kro" as a member of the winning t e a m that competed against the Jamaicans last year and has won several first in intramural competition held locally. He is Secretary and vice-president of the Denizens. The Denizens of the Deep was organized at Guantanamo Bay in 1953 and now includes approximately 20 m hers. They make regularly sc led week.


Little League Bears


Add Playoff Sweep To


League Championship

The Little League Bears, sweeping undefeated through the postseason tournament, copped the double crown of the Little League in Guantanamo Bay last week by defeating the runner-up Tigers,
6 to 4.
Larry Smith pitched the distance for the Bears allowing the Tigers only two hits for their four runs. Jay Radcliffe took the loss for the Tigers.
The Bears, managed by R. J. Modrow, YN2, compiled a season league record of 16 wins and 5 losses to gain the championship title for this first year of Little League in Guantanamo Bay. Then in the post-league play-offs they swept the series with one win from the Colts and two from the hardpressing Tigers.
With the opening of the Naval Base School on Monday the Little League now goes into mothballs until next Spring when it is expected to be reactivated.

Some people are like blotters . . . soak it all in, but get it all backwards!

Definiation of a golfer: A man who blames fate for accidents, but feels personally responsible for a hole in one.

Cycle Cop: "Say, how many times have I arrested you for speeding on this road ?"
Traveler: "Don't ask me. I thought you were keeping score!"

end trips together and have official meetings when so directed by the President of the Club, LT Carl Plath of Fleet Training Group. All clubs that compete in Key West the end of this month comply with the Florida Fish and Game Laws and are sanctioned by the A.A.U.


am


Page Five






S


Page Six


Saturday, 21 August 1954


NAS Crosswinds
by Dick Friz

Richard L. McCracken, son of CAPT and Mrs. R. R. McCracken, is visiting with his folks at Guantanamo Bay at present. Richard has recently completed his first year at the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland . . . He reports back for fall classes by the 3rd of September.
A farewell party for LCDR Woodard, and CHAERO Omang on the BOQ patio Monday. CHAERO Omang and family depart Wednesday for duty at PG School in M o n t e r e y, California. W. K. Woodard will leave in September for Navy Purchasing Office in New York City as Assistant to the OIC.
CHAERO Robert M. Whiting, USN, reported Friday from Washington D. C. as Omang's relief.
Central Office has two new faces . . . Mrs. Beatrice Abney and Mrs. Nancy Greenfield have replaced Jane Heywang and Dean Clark. Jane leaves with husband Bob to Key West and Dean will work in the Naval Base School.
The following men left NAS Wednesday for new billets . . . Bill Grubbs, AD3 to Key West, Bill White, AG2, and Gerald Kirby A/N to Jax for discharge, Marlin O'Brien AK3 and Johnnie Johnson, RM3 to the USS RANDOLFPH CVA 15.
The NAS Intramural Softball League opened the season this past week. The following teams are represented: Boatshed, Operations, Administration, Coamuunications, Leeward Point, and Supply. All contests during the week begin at 1700 and weekend games have a 1400 starting time.
Only VF-74 was scheduled to train at Leeward this month, but parts of several squadrons, based primarily aboard the L A K E CHAMPLAIN, are also undergoing gunnery drill. MAG 34, scheduled to arrive this week and will report to Roosevelt Roads after completing training here.
Joe Toth, former linecrewman at Leeward graduated first in his class in Naval Preflight Training as a Naval Cadet at Pensacola, Florida.
LT Earnest Guirey, and LTJG Gerald Aarts were in charge of inspection tours of Leeward Point and McCalla field by 35 Naval Reservists from Masters Field Miami.
The sensational new dance team of Prior and Palmay entertained Barracks AV-50 recently with an impromptu soft-shoe routine.
CDR R. T. Boyd Jr., former Operations Officer at McCalla and recently appointed Skipper of VP34 in Trinidad, was a visitor at Guantanamo Bay over the weekend.
The Naval career of John Musche BMI has been a case of extremes. . . . He transferred from the USS EDISTO, an ice-breaker which roamed the frigid zone near the north pole . . . to Guantanamo Bay and the semi-tropics . . . he had the hazardous task of diving for salvage to the less arduous chore of Master at Arms at AV-50.
John is a native New Yorker ... he attended Bronx Vocational . . . worked for a Drug Company and then joined the Navy. After Boot training at Newport he attended diving school on the NORMANDIE . . . and checked out ships as they prepared for VE day in Europe. They also worked on a captured German Destroyer, Z-39 which was

"Well, I certainly made an in. pression on her," said the canebottomed chair as the nude model stood up.


eNAql NOSMeS

By Sgt. William J. McDowell Jr.
and Cpl. Joe Androvith, USMC
Arriving on board the USNS W. H. THOMAS this week was Capt. John J. Swords and his wife Marion. Capt. Swords will relieve Capt. C. S. Smith here at Marine Barracks. A hearty welcome aboard is extended to Capt. and Mrs. Swords and we all hope you enjoy your stay at Guantanamo Bay. Capt. Smith will leave for the states on the 25th of August where he will spend a 30 day leave between Oranoe,' New Jersey and Arlington, Virginia.
Departing for the states this past week was Cpl. Richard S. Rinker and Pfc Joseph G. Howe. Cpl Rinker will report to the 2nd Marine Division Camp Lejeune N. C. for duty and Pfc Howe will report to MTG-20 Air FMFLant Cherry Point, N. C. for schooling in the Aerial Navigation for a period of 16 weeks. We all wish both men the best of luck and may they enjoy their new duty stations.
On the 16th of the month the Staff NCO Club went on a cash basis and any Guest Members who still have any books may turn them in for their cash value.
* Baseball Bunts
The Base Champions returned home this past Wednesday after a very successful trip to Miami, Florida where they engaged the West Palm Beach Air Force team and divided the two game series with the Leathernecks taking the opening contest 9-7... The Flyers came back to take the closing game of the series by a score of 8-4 . . . Played before a crowd of Marines, a few of whom were former menbers of this command, the Leathernecks had to come from behind to take the first game . . . Capt. "Smitty" Smith, the big winner for the Marines, was credited with the win as he went the entire distance under the scorching Miami sun and the temperature well in the 90's ... 1st baseman Larry Adams was the big gun for the Marines as he collected 3 hits in 4 trips to the plate . . . The 2nd contest saw the Marines use their entire pitching staff in an effort to halt the Flyer uprising but all to no avail as the Flyers went on to score their 8-4 victory . . . Wayne Straw suffered his initial defeated for the Leathernecks as he was hit for 11 hits in the 5 innings ... Playing in an open ball park without the familiar fence deprived the slugging Leathernecks of at least 5 home runs as drives carrying well over 340 feet were caught for easy outs . . . The trip was a most successful one and the members of the team had a wonderful but brief stay in Miami, Florida. A sincere note of thanks from every member of the team to all those who made this trip possible.

sent back to the states from Plymouth, England.
John was a civilian for a few weeks after that, but when one of those $100 a week jobs failed to materialize, and he got hungry, he reupped . . . and served on the USS LEYTE and USS EDISTO as Deck Bosun.
His new duty station will be NAS Alemeda, California and he and his wife Gertrude will probably reside in nearby Oakland. Unless a lucrative job of wine tasting or the like appears on the horizon, John plans to make the Navy a career. . . . He acknowledges Guantanamo as the most interesting duty station he's had in the Navy
'at least 't certainly was diffenrent' he s.


VU-10 Prop Blast TEENAGE-ROUND-UP
by Bill Graves & Staff


LT Ray Grattan has been temporarily attached to the Marines for a short instructor's course. Ray complains of his back, legs, arms, feet, etc. He says men over 35 shouldn't have to play boy scouts.
LT Joe Henson paid the squadron a visit. Joe is attached to a jet squadron from Quonset Point, R. I. down here on a training mission. Joe's buddies reported that "Joe is still a P-Boat pilot at heart."
The baseball banquet will be held Monday night August 23, at the CPO Club. All members are urged to attend the party and have a good time. There will be plenty of food and refreshments.
Everyone had a wonderful time in Miami again this weekend. Fueci says that his party was wonderful. Cokes, chicken, women and tile beach at 5 o'clock. A.M. or P.M.?
LT Bill Cyrus has been admitted to the hospital. He is recovering quite rapidly and should be released with the next week or ten days.
H. 0. Russell, A02, reports that the fishing out at the ATC is wonderful if you have a spinning rod and reel. He has been hanging into some good ones the last few days. For those of you that haven't been catching any fish lately, this is a wonderful place to fish.
LT Bill and Joye Graves, and a aren from NAS went hunting over in Cuba Friday afternoon. They bagged nine guineas for their efforts and a wonderful time was had by all.
Mrs. Marie Aslin is in the hospital for a few days. Seems that she got in some poison ivy while on her vacation.
We lost the services of Howerton, Watson, and Chief Huff the past week. Sure hate to see those fellows leave. They will be missed by all in the squadron.
LT William Hill reported in this week from civilian life. Bill is from Bogota, N.J., and is married to the former Miss Florence T. Hilsee of Atlantic Cly, N.J. They have one son, William, 21 months
CHMACH Williamson is also in the hospital. Everyone that can, dtop by and see these people. They would enjoy seeing you.


NSD Supply Line


Many Depot personnel took advantage of the week-end trip to Port au Prince, Haiti; all reported having had a wonderful time. Those that went were, LT and Mrs. William L. Roberts, Chief and Mrs. John Allen, Gerald Hudson, DK2, Merle Padon, DK3, Benjamin R. Teters, SN, Mrs. John DiMascola, Mrs. Roy Sheridan, Mrs. Douglas Emory, Mrs. Robert Wakefield and Miss Grace O'Connell.
Chief Piercy was anxiously awaiting the THOMAS's arrival last Wednesday as Mrs. Piercy and daughter Sandra Lee were aboard. The Piercy's have been assigned quarters in Villamar.
James B. Tichy, ET2, USN is being transferred 26 August to the Receiving Station, Brooklyn for separation.
LT and Mrs. James F. Huntress left on the THOMAS Wednesday to spend a few days in San Juan, Puerto Rico.
Best wishes for a speedy recovery are extended to Merle Sands, SK2 who is in the hospital.

"Hell, yes," said th- Devil, as he answered the ph


by Judy Yost

Nearly all of the kids entering college this fall are buzzing around the base making preparations for the trip to the States and bracing themselves for the shock of seeing, once again, hundreds of teenagers, instead of the small group that we have here. (Take it easy y'all-the line forms to the right!)
Some of those who will be Gtmo's gift to the campus are; Norman Huddy, Pierce Lehmbeck, George McMichael, Barbara Burke, and Eddie Stafford.
Then, there're the ones who came down to stay the summer and are returning to their respective schools to take up where they left off-Pat Strouhal, Charles Edwards, and Barbara Garris are in this group. We're glad you could make it down, and wish for all of you that are leaving here, the very best of luck.
Welcome back to Linda Thurston.
Guess by now-everybody's all registered and assigned to their permanent classes-and the last minute race is on for pencils, notebooks, etc., and last years report card-which always seems to be the hardest thing for us to find, and the easiest for mothers! !
So-you kats, better "make hay while the sun shines", for tonight will be our last Saturday night, (before school starts, that is), and we've a good reason to celebrate. Everyone should come on down to the Teenage meeting and then to the dance at the Community Building. Let's make this one a big one-we ve the music, the place, the time,-now, all we need is you-So-see ya there!
DID YA DIG -Pierce and his friends making conversation with the gals at the next table in one of the exchanges
-Artie Me. entering the dentist's office with a look of resignationmore and more of the gang showing up on the busses-the happy smiles on the teacher's faces, (Do you suppose they really are that glad to see us?)-Nancy A. looking real pretty at the movies-Jean C. and her alligator bites-(She really has teeth marks to prove it! !)-Ellen and Pat R. shopping-Jimmy H. and Bob P. riding the "0" bus-Sylvia C. digging through the shelves at the library-And the kids reaction to the new record "Rattle and Roll"? ? ?


SCUTTLEBUTT


















"Ask her 0i zhe has; some Mrends!"



"What did you say?"
"Nothing."
"I know. But how did you express it this timee"


THE INDIAN








Saturday, 21 August 1954


THE INDIAN


NSD Fiscal Department Holds Naval Base Purse Strings Ename- Etnc i*tn s


This is a general view of the Fiscal Department, Naval Supply Depot.

How much money was spent for the maintenance and operation of the Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay during the month of June 1954? Approximately one million dollars. Where did this information come from ? From the Fiscal Department, Naval Supply Depot. How did they know this?
The Fiscal Department performs the accounting functions for all the base activities except for the Naval Hospital, Dental Clinic and the Marine Barracks. Because of this & responsibility they are advised of all authorizations for the expenditure of appropriated funds that are made available for the maintenance, operation, expansion, renovation and construction of Naval Base activities. It is in this department, also, where money expended is recorded as an expenditure for labor or material. In connection .
with this responsibility the Fiscal Department keeps records of funds made available and expenditures -S against these funds in a manner similar to a checking account in a commercial bank. Funds are made available in the formi of allotment authorizations and these provide the Fiscal Department with the authority to open individual activ- .
ity allotment records and establish the amount available for expend- a
iture. Allotment, project order and job
Within a basic allotment or order cost records are posted by
authorization, base activities desire bookkeeping machines. In 1953 the to accumulate cost information for Bureau of Supplies and Accounts a particular job. This is called a made available four National Cash job order. These job orders are Register Bookkeeping Machines to used to accumulate expenditure the Fiscal Departmnet, Naval Supdata which is used in the prepara- ply Depot. tion of the various cost reports to local activities and management bureaus of offices. Scout Carnival . . .


Weekly, status of allotment reports are furnished allotment administrators showing the total obligations incurred, value of unliquidated obligations, unobligated and unexpended balances of each allotment. Similar monthly reports are made to the bureaus or offices which granted the allotments. In addition each commanding officer is also furnished a consolidated status of allotment report listing all the allotments and project orders granted to his command as well as their status as of the end of the month.
The reports that are submitted to the cognizant bureaus and offices of the Navy Department provide them with the necessary data to support their annual budget requests. The expenditure cost information submitted to the Comptroller of the Navy thru the cognizant Navy Regional Accounts Offices provides the information required for the preparation of the publication "Annual Navy Ependitures" which is actually an annual balance sheet and operating statement of the Navy. This publication besides supporting the annual budget requests to Congress also provides tax payers with a statement of the cost of operations of the United States Navy.


(Continued from Page One)
will be admitted free and the admission price for adults and children over 12 is 25<. The number on the admission ticket will determine the winner of the door prize, valued at $50.00.
To show personnel of the Naval Base what the scouts have accomplished during the past year there will be two featured exhibitions. One will be a model Boy Scout camp showing all the facilities necessary in their camp activities. The other will be an Indian exhibit, and to make the exhibit even more real, an authentic Indian war dance will be presented.
Cotton candy, "snowballs," ice cream and cookies will be sold in the several booths and the everpopular cake booth will be present with cakes baked by the mothers of the scouts and selling for 10 ' a cut.

First cannibal: "The chief has hay fever."
Second cannibal: "I told him not to eat that grass widow.

Overheard at a faculty meeting "He's the dumbest student I've ever seen. ,Most of them don't know ani~ng, but this guy
doesn't ei3uspect!"


by J. H. (Ollie) Olsen, DT2, USN
We're sorry for missing our write up last issue, readers, but we got sort of busy at the Dental Clinic and our column just seemed to slip by us. We'll try to do better from now on. Incidentally, beginning next issue the "Enamel Etchings" will be written by Robert Quiat, DN, USN.
We here at the Clinic have decided to bring to our readers ai "personality of the week", a write up each week of a person who works in the Dental Clinic. We will give you some of his background, hobbies, etc. so keep reading, our next personality may turn out to be someone you know.
This week we will deal with your new reporter. His name is Robert M. Quiat, is 23 years old and hails from New Jersey (originally from the Bronx). He attended Jersey City Junior College, Seaton Hall University and Fairleigh Dickinson College where he majored in chiemistry. He was trying for a B.S. Degree but was delayed because of his entry into the service in February, 1952. To keep in line with his aspiration to become a dentist he became a dental technician. Before his arrival in GTMO he had duty the U.S. Naval Hospital, St. Albans. While at St. Albans, Bob left the bachelors list and is now happily married to his wife, Gladys. His hobbies are photography, sports and pipes, the latter of which he has quite a collection. That's all the information I was able to get from him (he's quite modest). We hope he uses his background when he starts writing the column next week. We're sure he'll do a good job.
CDR and Mrs. Vogel returned Monday morning after spending, very pleasant week end in Port au Prince, Haiti.
Our personnel officer, Mr. Dote. is either becoming a master at the game of golf or was just slightly unconscious last Sunday morning. At any r-ate, he came off 18 holes with a score of 83 and rushed home immediately to frame his score card.
CDR Nealon and his family departed GTMO 5 August aboard the USNS THOMAS for 20 days leave with relatives and friends in Pennsylvania prior to CDR Nealon's reporting for duty at the Naval Dental Technicians School in Bainbridge, Md. We all miss the Nealons but sincerely hope they enjoy their tour of duty in Maryland.
The golf course will probably never be the same since George "Red" Fauth left Cuba for Brooklyn, N.Y. and subsequent discharge Red planned to return to his home in Detroit, Mich. upon release from the Navy but, knowing him, nobody would be too surprised to hear of him heading for South of the Mason-Dixon line so as to spend more months of the year hitting that little white pill.

Assembly Hall ...
(Continued from Page One)
affairs. Before, such events as the Holiday Ball, the Junior-Senior Prom, the Senior Play, square dances, etc. had to be held in the Community Hall, at the EM Clubs, or at any place made available to the teen-agers. The new auditorium also eliminates this problem giving the school and the teen-agers a building of their own.
It is also planned to use the assembly ball for night meetings for the Parent Tef<;hers Association as well as oth se organizations.


Puerto Ricans Claim

Actor -Son Jose Ferrar
by Dick Friz

Last week, while visiting the University of Puerto Rico at Rio Piedras, we heard some murdered misgivings from a group of students.
They were referring to their most brilliant native son. their idolatrado, Jose Ferrar, who has returned to his San Juan only once in the past twenty-odd rears. That was back in '49 when Chancellor Jaime Benitez conferred an honorary degree on the great actor. Jose had previously received a degree at Princeton, and a Masters in Architecture at Columbia, University.
His designs were of a dramatic nature however. In '50, he wvon the coveted Academy Award for his performance in "Cyrano de Bergerac." Many expected him to repeat, when he projected himself as Toulouse Latrec in "Moulin Rouge." He portrayed a psalmsinger in "Miss Sadie Thompson" but' perhaps the sternest trial awaits him in the "Caine Mutiny." Ferrar has the role of Greenwald the lawyer, but another Oscar winner, Humphrey Bogart, as Captain Queeg, has a commensurate opportunity to excel. The famous court martial scene in which both appear should decide something more than the fictional fate of the Captain.
Ferrar is ready; he has met the critical glare of Broadway's footlights both as actor and director ("The Shrike," "The Fourposter". and "Othello") which enamored him vith the John Mason Browns and Woolcott Gibbs. His performances, they say, "always refills the audience's glass before it is empty." He and his crooning partner, wife Rosemary Clooney, have also invaded the recording game. Their latest waxing is, "A Bunch of Bananas and a Bottle of Gin," a lyric written by Ogden Nash, immortalizing the plane crash of Ernest Hemingway.
This protagonist of the entertainment world, might have pursued an architectural career were it not for a Mrs. Hobart, a thespian in her own right, who visited Jose's father, Don Rafael in the summer of '33. She recognized 'a flint from which the spark had not yet been struck' and it was through her insistant, almost hysterical demands that young Jose was given the opportunity to travel to New York and study.
The elder Ferrar has since passed away, but he lived long enough to hear a glowing tribute from an old family friend, Jorge Bird Arias. Arias had just returned from a stateside visit, and he told Don Manuel, "I saw your son in New York," and I could have killed him. . . . If I'd had a revolver, I think I'd have done so." Don Rafael sat stunned, until Arias explained that Jose had so completely identified himself as the villainous lago in "Othello" that it wasn't until the curtain went up for the encore that he realised it was the young Puerto Rican artist who had arroused his homicidal rage.
-And so the very fact that Jose has not returned to Puerto Rico has proven the measure of his success, his very preeminance, verifies their faith in him. To paraphrase an old quote from "Letters and Social Arts." "Artists must be sacrificed to their art. . . . Like bees they must put their lives into the sting they give."


a*


Page Seven






4M


Navy-DPPO--10ND-GtmGd124


THE, INDIAN


Saturday, 21 August 1954


MOVIES


9OOK -NOOK
by Francis L. Cannon, JOSN


Saturday, 21 August
SPACEWAY
Howard Duff Eva Bartok
A U.S. scientist is working on a n'w rocket for war purposes in an experimental station in England. When he finishes the model, he and his wife disappear. The story revolves around the search for them.
Sunday, 22 August
RHA1PSODY
Elizabeth Taylor Vittorio Gasmann
Society girl falls in love with young violinist and leaves her wealthy home to see if they can find happiness together. She is too possessive so he leaves her for anotner woman. She finds consolation with a pianist, whom she marries. But then many complications set in. In color.
Monday, 23 August
THE BLACK GLOVE
Alex Nicol Eleanor Summerfield
A famous trumpet player is suspected of murdering a blues player. There are many fights and threats of violence, including poison placed on his trumpet mouthpiece before the whole thing is cleared up.
Tuesday, 24 August
THE SHANGHAI STORY
Ruth Roman Edmund O'Brien
American doctor and a Tangierborn beauty risk their lives to help a group of less experienced folk survive Communist police spy-hunt.
Wednesday, 25 August
TERROR STREET
Dan Duryea Elsy Abliin
A U.S. Air Force pilot has just 36 hours to clear himself of charge of murdering his wife. A mission worker helps him escape authorities while he gathers evidence to clear himself .
Thursday, 26 August
PHANTOM OF THE RUE
MORGUE
Karl Malden Claude Dauphin
Pretty French girls are being murdered in Paris at the turn of the century. The two main suspects are a zoologist and a psychologist. The police would like to place the blame on the psychologist. In color.
Friday, 27 August
CASANOVA'S BIG NIGHT
Bob Hope Joan Fontaine
A tailor's apprentice is mistaken for the great lover, Casanova, and is sent by a duchess to test the love of her prospective daughter-in-law. In color.


Blonde and dazzling Peggy Maley is rapidly making a name for herself in filmland. The Pottsville, Pa., miss has seen her name rise from the ranks of the unknown to top billing. She appeared in Columiba Pictures'


FTG Bulletin

by Jack Engstrom
Albert Satter, FP3, FTG Transportation Dispatcher, will leave on the USNS THOMAS next Thursday, 26 August for state-side shore duty. He will report to the Commander, New York Group, LantResFIt, NSD, Bayonne, New Jersey, where he will be stationed for two years. . . . Richard Cousins, Fleet Training Center, has been advanced to Chief Electronics Technician. He put the Chief's hat on last Monday, 16 August. Congratulations. . . . Back in a duty status, after hospitalization, are Donald Hansen, RDC, FTG CIC Department, and Leonard Briggs, YN2, FTG Navigation Office. . . . Glad to see you back with us again. . . . LT Williams, FTG Gunnery Department, wife and two son's arrived on the THOMAS Wednesday, just in time to start a new school year. LT Williams has been assigned quarters on Oil Point. . . . Welcome aboard, we hope you enjoy your stay in Gtmo.

The softball team has been holding practices regularly, and is shaping up in pretty good fashion. Those of you who still wish to play softball this season are urged to attend the practice sessions. Information concerning practices, games, etc. will be posted as needed. For further information contact Don Markham, the team manager, in the ASW Department, or LTJG Varty, in the Gunnery Department.

SHIP ARRIVALS
USS Rushmore LSD-14 23 Aug
USS Bronson DD-668 23 Aug
USS Sperry DD-697 23 Aug
USS Massey DD-778 23 Aug


Hospital Notes

by Charles L. Brewer, YN3
Heirport News
Apparently the stork wishes to give our obstetrician a well earned rest. During the past week only one child was born: a son, Thomas Howard Lotterman, born 10 August to MR3 and Mrs. Howard E. Lotterman.
Golf
With three weeks remaining in the Hospital Ringer Tournament, the leaders in the individual flights are as follows: 1st Flight, Byrne, HMC being hawked by Kelley, HN; 2nd Flight; CAPT Moe with Mayernick, HM1 and close second; 3rd Flight, Filler, HN followed by Davenport, HM3; 4th Flight, Connors, HN with Brewer, YN3 and Toland, HN tied for second place in this closely contested flight. Mrs. North still leads in the Women's Division. Although there has been no change in the leadership the "Ringers" are rolling in and scores have come down tremendously.
New Arrivals
We wish to extend a hearty "Welcome Aboard" to LT J. limburg(MC) USN who reported for duty on 9 August from the U.S. Naval Dispensary, Washington, D. C. Dr. Imnburg is a pediatrician and a member of the American Board of Pediatrics.

USS Smalley DD-565 23 Aug
USS Dealy DE-1006 27 Aug
SHIP DEPARTURES
USS Mitscher DL-2 24 Aug
USS Kirkpatrick DER-318 24 Aug USS McCain DL-3 25 Aug
USS Stoddard DD-566 25 Aug
USS Sturtevant DE-239 27 Aug USS H. D. Crow DE-252 27 Aug


OUR SECRET ALLIES
by Eugene Lyons
The one-way relationship which exists between the Kremlin and its subjects is here explained by Mr. Lyons, a distinguished journalist. The book is based on a lifetime study of Soviet affairs by the author. He cuts through the fog of lies and propaganda which has for 35 years blocked and distorted our views of Russia. He demolishes the myth of unity between the Kremlin and subjects and states that these people would be our firmest allies if we could get to them.
CHAUCER
by Raymond Pveston
The modern reader needs help ho understand the words and forms of Chaucer and this is the book to do it. It attempts to relate Chaucer, a 14th century genius to a 20th century audience, but without modernizing the genius or attempting to archiaze the readers. He does this by quoting units of thought from Chaucer's work, then immediatly underneath interpreting the thought-units so that they will hold the readers' interest.
COMBAT IN KOREA by Capt. Russell A. Gugeler
For the military student this book shows how combat tactics were applied in Korea. For the general reader it shows war stripped of its headlines and of the psychological interpretations of fiction writers. It points up the danger of unpreparedness.
CAVES OF THE GREAT
HUNTERS
by Hans Baumann
In 1940, southwestern France, four boys and a dog went exploring in the woods as children often do. But in this case they really found something-a cave with paintings done by Ice Age men, 22,000 years ago. The paintings and sketches were of the animals well-known to the cave men. Some theorize that the pictures were used to teach children the most vulnarable spots in animals, where to shoot an arrow or spear. Although written for young people, this makes excellent and informative reading for adults as well. 4,000 YEARS UNDER THE SEA
by Phillipe Diole
Before publishing of this book there was no literature on Marine Archaelogy. Phillipe Diole called on technical experts-zoologists, geologists, archaeologists and historians to aid him in this work. He knew that the remnants of great civiliazations were constantly being brought up from the ocean floor. He determined to examine them and attempt to classify similar finds. Through a series of calculations he was able to place relics in their correct historical moments and to reconstruct the stories of their submersions.
MADAME DE POMPADOUR
by Nancy Mitford
A biography of the high-spirited Madame De Pompadour who directed and inspired the artists and great men of her day. She became the mistress of Louis XV of France and reigned for 20 years at Versailles. By far the most influential woman of her time, she played a great role in shaping the destinies of France.
The library now has on its magazine racks two new financial magazines: Barron's, the National Business and Financial Weekly, and Changing Times.


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Full Text

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--Oe Ts TMO Like The Sxnsohne"Vol. VI, No. 59 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 21 August 1954 H. E. Cavanaugh, Civ., LTJG J. A. Kropack and T. P. Ablberg, Civ., pose with 20-pound Snapper caught last Sunday. The fish holds a prominent first place in the fishing contest thus far. The three men pictured were chosen to represent Guantanamo Bay in the Miami Amateur Tourney at Key West the 29th of this month. The three spearguns stacked here are world-famous Arbolettes. Local Divers Compete For National Title In Key West Underwater Tourney When the official "Go" signal is given at Key West, Florida on August 209, a three man team representing the local "Denizens of the Deep" will compete for Guantanamo Bay in the National Underwater Spearfishing Championships. The team selected by its members, includes, E. II. Cavanaugh of NAS, Ted Ahlberg and LTJG J. A. Kropack of Naval Station. They will leave for the Keys the morning of the 28th to compete in the tourney, sponsored this year by the Florida Skin Divers Association and the City of Key West. The Contest will begin on Sunday morning and last four hours, with a colored flag on the National Ship Headquarters indicating the end of competition. The Owen Churchill National Perpetual Trophy goes to the team with the largest aggregate weight total, and the Owen Churchill Individual trophy will be awarded for the top individual 'catch.' Earl Cavanaugh, 45, a Chief Quarterman at NAS Public Works, first experienced the thrill of underwater competition with langosta and smaller fish, stalking them with the Hawiian sling. Then lee gradcated to the CO2 gun, thie Squale (Continued on Page Five) GTMO Scouts Present 3rd Annual Carnival Today This afternoon, commencing at 1 P.M. and lasting until 6 P.M. the Scout organizations of Guantanamo Bay will stage their 3rd Annual Scout Carnival at the Naval Air Station Seaplane Ramp on Fisherman's Cove. The gala event is being presented for the residents of the Naval Base to show what the scouts have been doing. Proceeds from the carnival will be used to finance the activities of the Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts, Girl Scouts and the Brownies of the base for the coming year. The highlight of the carnival will come at 3:30 in the afternoon when a door prize will be awarded to some fortunate individual. Featured at the carnival will be scouting exhibitions, entertainment booths, "goodies" booths and the famous VU-10 Choo-Choo ride for the children. Admission tickets may be purchased at the entrance or from any of the scouts. Children under 12 (Contir 1 on Page Seven) 2nd Middie Cruise Taxes Naval Base Facilities Cruise 'Baker' Arrives Next Week Yesterday, Midshipmen Cruise "Charlie", consisting of 13 major ships of the line, arrived in Guantanamo Bay for a four day visit on the last leg of a training cruise for 1,360 NROTC Contrict Senioi Midshiaxn. Ma de up of the JUNEAU, four Naval Base School Gets type vesselx Cruise hirlie', the New Assembly Hall ive herewasledhitoth bay _________flag of RADMI Beriiard L. Austin, After over a year of planning, ComCruDiv TWO. hoping, and dreaming, an auditoThe 13 ships thot made tp Cise rium and assembly hall for the "Charlie" depsrted fro Noifolk, Navail Basse School is now tinder Va. late in July and stayed noith construction, to Quehec, Canada. Then, aiter This new building, located afotir clays training and four igs cross from the school adjacent to ashore, the training task force the Naeval Base Chapel. will seat headed south down theo Spaiiishs around 500 people and will serve Main and made Havaina, Cuh eext for hoth school functions, classes, lihbeity post. aFoui' days were spent send organizational activities. It in Havani before comiiig to Gxaisis hoped that it will be ready for tanamo Baiy. tie hy the first of Septeemher. Last enighr saw the first libeerty According to Mr. T. G. Scarvaties finn Cruise "Ch arlie" horoughx, Prinscipal of thse Naval coming ashioe, and as for-, ths Base School, there has heen a need ieddie taxed all facilities of rise for sucs a huiidiisg for quite s ee Naval Base B tiime nowy. In thse past, assemblies The Nayvii Statiois Exchsange aind sad to ie hseld us two combined le Spoirtx Si begas treir nigst rooine in thse school or in thse hsTers agaiii to handle tse onslau ist school pxatio. Due to the increase of sotuveisir htiyiing. Clerks at bots is school eisrollmnet, these roois stores were swansled wyiths business are needed for classes now, and as gifts for the folks at oe lre witv the completion of tl e new asstse order of a de day. hisbly hall, this problem will io Te Petty Officers Calclosed longer be countered. dow to bose aid fleet petty officers Also, alseg with using the sall to facilitate the handling of cool for asset lies, it will he utilized drinks for thirsty cadets. Even y for physical education classes. This usi g tie entire PO Cluh as a will a iade so by the fact that Midshipmes's Club, extra tables folding chairs aid iot permanent and an extra bar ad to fr set seats will be installed. tp on tse lawn is froit of tSse elt Ainothser advantage of thse isew to haisdle thse large istmbier coming buditorius Priil be the fact tvat ashore. tse school and the teen-agers will The Telepnxe Exchage reportfo longer ave asy problems findl a ldgnq office husuiies as maey ihg a olace to iold their social Coetdiued n Page Tsree) (Continued on Page Seves) The long planned and hoped for Naval Base School Auditorium begins to take shape. The new building is located next to the Naval Base Chapel and will seat # roximnately 500 people. 9fu

PAGE 2

Saturday, 21 August 1954 The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Ofice, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center ciTelephone 9-615 Saturday, 21 August 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Cruthers, USN Commanding Oflicer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sadness Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC --Editor H. -. Sisson, JOLNews Ier Leisi, i(,cct--F ere Pec Lehmc~ulOON -Oll_______Secorts F'. L,. Cannon, JOSN_---Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly at th, Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and finance with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material anearing 1erein must not be reproduced permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given o THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. Keep Cool, Man, 'REAL COOL!' Man, this is a real cool summer -if you dig heat. You may simmer, but don't turn red and fall on your head, man. You just gotta beat this crazy heat. So if you don't want to reel and keel-then here's the deal. Dig some wild water-it's a crazy drink, man. Slug the most you can-it's all gonna pour outa them mad holes in your skin and make you cool, mlan-real cool. But watch that sweat, Dad. It's the saltiest! When the sweat pours from your pores-that salt's just gotta go! And you know you gotta put back in ya what the sun fries out! But we've got a treat that's quite all-reet! The craziest life-savers you ever gulped. Not cherry, not lime, not herry-just salt. Man, they taste like seaweed right from the wild, wild ocean. But don't be a creep, man. They're the most-and they're FREE. Three salt pills a day keeps the embahner away, Dad. So if you don't want to land in your bed -cad-stoke u p on water and salt. If you don't eat salt, man, it's all your fault! (AFPS) Cycle Cop: "Say, how many times have I arrested you for speeding on this road?" Traveler: "Don't ask 111e, I thought you were k keeping score!" If you're in a hlry to find a cop ...try going 70 mph. Door to door salesman: "Is your mother engaged? ?" Small boy: "I think she's married." New U.S. Mail Schedule In Effect Following is lhte new mail schedule in effect at the base post office: INCOMING MAIL FROM THE UNITED STATES: MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY 0",15 1920 1915 1920 1915 IAIL READY FOR PICKUP BY BASE ACTIVITIES: MONDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY 1100 0800 0800 0800 0800 OUTGOING MAIL TO THE UNITED STATES: MAIL CLOSES AT NAVY POST OFFICE MONDAY 1200 WEDNESDAY 0700-1800 FRIDAY 0700 SATURDAY 0930 MAIL CLOSES AT DROP BOXES: MONDAY 0900 TUESDAY 2000 WEDNESDAY 1500 THURSAY 2000 FRIDAY 2000 SATURDAY 0700 SAN JUAN MAIL CLOSES NAVY POST OFFICE 1700 EACH FRIDAY: Cub Scouts Visit Construction Progress Seen Lake Champlain by Millie Jamieson On August 14, thirty of the Guantanamo Bay Cub Scouts visited the U.S.S. LAKE CHAMPLAIN (CVA39). Chaplain Budd and six men stationed on the carrier escorted the boys and Den mothers. All visualized the greatness of a floating air strip in being able to see tile elevators, the catapult, the flight deck, the Captain's bridge, and the flight control room. Many jets were on board and the boys were able to get upon the planes to see all the various instruments and have them explained. One of the biggest thrills was sensed by riding the escalator up to the officer's wardroom where refreshments were served. All thoroughly enjoyed the trip and wish to thank the men of the U.S.S. LAKE CHAMPLAIN for their kindness. Don't forget the Scout Carnival on Saturday, August 21, at 1300 until 1800. St. Peter challenged the Devil to a game of baseball, claiming that all the great baseball players were up in heaven. "You'll lose," the Devil said, "you won't stand a chance." "And why not?" asked St. Peter. "Well," replied the Devil, "we have all the umpires down here." In Replacement Housing The housing area of Guantanamo Bay Naval Base will soon be spotted with new cement and concrete replacement housing units. Second Street in Villamar has long been completed and is now an actual part of Base housing as families have been moving in upon completion of each building. Next on the schedule for completion is Sixth Street in Villamar which will house 12 families. Soon after the completion of the new Sixth Street, the housing units on First Street will be completed. Then, adjacent to Villamar, two other areas are presently under construction. East of 1st Street off Sherman Avenue, there are 48 buildings under construction and there are 12 more buildings growing day by day on Grendito Point. Finally, there will be 12 buildings in East Bargo, on which construction was began only recently. After all these units have been occupied, even more of the new modern apartment buildings will be built in Central and West Bargo which will bring te total number to 300 family units. To date, four SeaBee battalions have participated in the work: on these housing units, and about the last of August, the fifth battalion, MCB-4 will relieve MCB-8 and begin their part on the project. VU-10 Wives Volunteer As 'Mothers for a Day' Every time the "Thomas" comes into Gtmo, the wives of VU-10 personnel become "mothers for a day". In order to give the visiting personnel time to relax and do their shopping, the children are placed in the nursery where they are given the best of care. Pictured above left to right, Mrs. McCracken, Mrs. Jamieson, Mrs. Merz, Mrs. Greenfield, Mrs. Henning. Mrs. Hoy, Mrs. Larimiore, and Mrs. Weiland. Sunday, 22 August 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: S a t u r di a y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 09 0-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CIC, USN (Catholic) The Chaplain's Corner There is a lesson for each of us in the life of David. He knew loneliness for he spent much of his youth as a shepherd boy keeping watch over his father's flock. He knew dangers as a boy when he fought wild beasts to protect the sheep and as a king when he led his armies to defend his country. He knew sin for he yielded to his fleshly passions and took the wife of another man. He knew sorrow for he watched his favorite son weaken and die. He knew failure for it was necessary for him to lead his army against the forces of a rebellious son who was attempting to take the throne from him. Many men are crushed by loneliness, danger, sin, sorrow, and failure. But David won the victory over each of these experiences and pressed on to become the greatest King ever to rule over the Jewish people. What was the secret of his success ? We find the answer in his own words: "The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want": "For in the time of trouble He shall hide me in His pavilion, in the secret of His tabernacle shall He hide me": "I had rather le a door keeper in the House of the Lord than to dwell in the tents of the wicked": "I wias glad when they said unto me, Let us go up to the House of toe Lord": "One thing have I desired of the Lord, that will I see after: that I may dwell in the House of tihe Lord all the days of my life to behold the beauty of the Lord and to inquire in His Temple." David teaches us that the person who goes to church regularly and earnestly seeks for spiritual help can find guidance and strength to meet any problem that faces him in his everyday experiences. If you learn the lesson of David and become a regular worshiper in our Chapel, your life will be richer, fuller, and happier in the days that are ahead. 1. 0. Stephenson m Page T M TiH INDIAN Never Passia Stopped School Bus we wo I

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Saturday. 21 August 1954 MCBs 4 and 8 Shift Positions Next week, two SeaBee battalions will switch positions, proving once again that they are Mobile Construction Batallions. MCB-8 will depart for their home base, Davisville, 1. I., and MCB-4, who already has a large advanced party here, will take over projects now underway here in Cuba. Including the large advanced party already here, and the main body of the battalion arriving next week, MCB-4 will have a total manpower greater than MCB-8 at present, but their total strength will not be as great as "Eight" when they were at their manpower peak here. MCB-8 was the largest battalion to operate here in Cuba, and since MCB-4 is at the same strength, it is estimated that production on SeaBee projects will continue at the same-if not greater-pace. While here in Cuba, MCB-8's pr_mtary and foresmsost project was the replacement housing units. Their progress on these can readily be seen by just looking around in Villamar, Bargo, and other sites where the new units have been going up and remembering what they looked like six months ago. The secondary project for MCB-8 was the power plant on Leeward Point. This project, next to the housing project, was of prime importance to the base since power for Leeward Point was still being supplied by a temporary power plant upon MCB-8's arrival here. As well as these two projects, MCB-8 finished up the new RPIO building, which has been a functional part of the Naval Base for several months now. They also undertook many smaller projects as well as road grading, maintenance of buildings and equipment, and assisting Public Works whenever there was a need for their help. On the extra-curricular side, MCB-8 fielded both a basketball team and a baseball team. Their basketball team, which took over the first-half record of MCB-7, placed seventh in the Base League. Its diamond play, the MCB-8 'Bees made an impressive showing as they placed second in the League play and placed several tien on the Base All-Star team plus post-season itonors. At the annual Naval Base Carnival, MCB-8 contributed a mserrygo-round and carnival booth. WGBY Hi-Lites by John Hull The new winter program schedule will go into effect on WGBY Monday, August 23. With school starting that week, the biggest change will be in "Storyteller Time" which will move into the 5:00 P.M. time slot five dlays weekly so that the kids can listen in after school. Martin Block's "Make Believe Ballroom" will be heard five mornings a week at 11:30 as "Bud's Bandwagon" moves into the 1:00 P.I. slot every weekday. The popular "Last Man Out" series will move from Friday to Saturday night at 9:00 replacing "Stage Struck". A new dramatic program, "Theatre Royal", will be heard on Saturdays at the 7:00 Sir Laurence Oliver will be host for the run of the series and, after the first few broadcast, its regular star. Orson Welles, noted American actor who is now living abroad, will be guest star on the initial broadcast. He Trading Post Backs 'Toys for Tots' Drive Christmas is coning, and with it, the Trading Post has organized a "Toys for Tots" drive. The "Toys for Tots" drive is a full community project with the Trading Post acting as operations center. Participating in the drive will be the Boy Scouts, the Girl Scouts, and the Fire Department. Along with the collection boxes -marked "Toys for Christmas"placed at the base exchanges and in the housing areas, the Boy Scouts and the Girl Scouts have volunteered their services in the collection of toys. They will go from door to door and generally scour the base for any toys that have been discarded, outgrown, or broken and turn them into the Fire Department. The Fire Department, following the form of stateside fire departments, has volunteered all its free time-at no charge-from now until Chirstmas. They will take toys which have been collected and repair them, repaint them, and put theim in top condition in time so that they will be able to be place out in time for Chirstmas. After the toys have been repaired and fixed up by the Firemen, they will be placed on sale in the exchanges and at the Trading Post at bargain prices for families of the Naval Base. Then, shortly before Christmas, all remaining toys will be distributed by the Fire Department to families in Cuba and to the orphanage in Guantanamo City. As well as the collection boxes in the housing areas and at the exchanges, personnel of the Naval Base may turn in toys too large to be placed in the boxes at the Chaplain's Office or the Trading Post. As well as sponsoring the "Toys for Tots" drive, the Trading Post also sells anything for anyone at a slight commission. They also accept material donations of any sort-repairing them and offering them for sale. The profits from all Trading Post projects are used to support cointunity projects undertaken by the organization. At the present time, the Trading Post is financing the construction of a slide in the housing area for kiddies, they are furnishing the equipment needed for the organizations that assist in the baby sitting whenever the THOMAS comes in, and they are helping the teen-agers with their projects and undertakings. will portray the lead in Pushkin's classic, "The Queen of Spades". The "Hollywood Radio Theatre" will present "Edward, My Son", starring Walter Pidgeon as the over-indulgent parent who lavishes on his first son the education and social position denied himself and blindly wrecks the lad's life, on Sunday, August 22 at 10:00 P.M. For several years now Tallulah Bankhead has been conducting a hilarious public feud with Bette Davis over the latter's inpersonation of her in the movie, "All About Eve". On Monday, August 23 at 9:00 P.M., Tallulah gets her revenge as she takes the starring role in the "Theatre Guild On The Air" production of, "All About Eve". Be sure to watch the daily program schedule in the "Papoose" for your favorite programs and any changes in the schedule presented each day o' ,:r WGBY, 1450 on ,our radio dial What D' Ya' Say? TheINItANi will award-, a certiicate good cor $1.00l w h wff merchamlise at the Navy Exchnte for each onetion acceptecd and used. Submit your qtuestions to Editor. The Indian, Box 19.1 The question: What do you think of the new t80 octane gas? The place: Navy Exchange gas station. iUD~AY ame Mrs. Dorothy J. Murphy, Victory Hill "Our car is performing much lute'. It t is itre pick up and mxuchx better mileage." _________ Willie, the ice-cream man "The way I drive my ice-cream truck demands a lot of stops and starts. The new gas gives that extra touch of performance. I hope they keep on using it." Middies ... (Continued from Page One) calls were placed to relate adventures and happenings of the training cruise to folks at honie. The Special Services Department reported a heavy load on recreational facilities as every effort was made to give the midshipmen every chance possible at recreation. Cruise "Baker," the last of the three cruises, will arrive here Thursday, 26 August and will depart on 31 August. Leading the training task force and flying the flag of RADM George R. Cooper ill be the USS WISCONSIN. Oilier ships carrying the total of 1,765 midshipmen will be the WORCESTER, S T EINAK E R, VESOLE, COATES, PAROLE, T. P A R K E R, BURDO, DARBY, COOLBAUGH, LOESER, DELONG, and W. P USH. J. 1. Tarwater, HM1, Naval Hospital "I think it's 100% better." Mrs. W. P. Johnson, Villamar "I love it. I hope they never go back to the other gas. My car won't run." WN. A. Banks, SD1, BOQ 1 "I like it 100' more. It's got more power and it helps clean the carbon out." am m THE INDIAN Page Three

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Page Four Final Fishing Tally Shows 200 Angler Entries The Guantanamo Bay Fishing Tournament closed last Sunday with almost 200 entries being made into the official record book. Topping the list of entries submitted was a 76-pound, 8-ounce tarpon caught by D. D. Huffman and registered in the Afloat Division. E. C. Fimbel was a close second with a 76-pound shark registered in the Special Division. Fimbel, however, will be awarded a prize for his 31-pound barracuda registered in the Land Division. Other winning entries in the Land Division are Michael Sims for his 6 lbx. 8 oz. grouper; R. E. MacAnanny for his 19-1b, 8-oz jack; R. D. Howerton for his 5-1b, 10-oz king mackerel; V. A. Roberts for his 63-1b snapper; Leo Fath for his 14-1b, 12 oz snook; George Bunda for his 28-11b, 8-oz tarpon; and W. V. Dean for his 7-lb Spanish mackerel. The Afloat Division winners, besides Huffman's tarpon, are J. C. Carroll's 24-1b barracuda; Jim Sanford's 6 -oz grouper; R. L. Karsten's 12-lb, 4-oz jack; J. H. Smouse's 14-1b king mackerel; D. Johnson's 40-1b snapper; J. H. Smouse's 24-1b wahoo; S. Tiaba's 12-1b, 8-oz snook. The Special Division boasts winners by J. H. Smouse for his 6-1i, 4-oz albacore, J. W. Richmond for his 4-lb, 91/2-oz bonito; D. C. Wenzall for his 3-lb, 10-oz bonefish; N. A. LaBarge for his 21b, 5 -oz croaker; J. H. Smouse for his 4-lb, 8-oz ladyfish; D. L. Clark for his 8-lb, 1-oz parrotfish; Kenneth Bedward for his 20-1b pompano; and E. C. Fimbel for his 76-1b shark. In the Spearfishing Division, C. W. Plath cops a winner with his 18-1b, 8-oz barracuda; W. V. Dean wins with his 18-11b, 8-oz jack; L. D. Ellwood gets a prize for his 56-lb grouper; R. D. Howerton for his 5-lb, 10-oz mackerel; J. A. Kropak for his 20-1b snapper; and T. P. Ahlberg for his 8-lb, 4-oz hogfish. The above winners were compiled from official entry sheets received at The Indian office and submitted by the weighing stations at the Harbor Police stations. Should there be any corrections or questions concerning winning entries, it is requested that a phone call be made to the Indian office at 9615. The prizes and trophies will be awarded at the Naval Station movie lyceum on Sunday, August 29th at 7:15 P.M. All winners are urged to attend the ceremonies to receive their awards. All children who entered fish in the tournament will receive a souvenir prize whether they were winners or iot. The ladies came through with winners also. There will be special prizes awarded to three ladies for capturing the largest fish in a division. In the Land Division, Irene J. Munson topped the rest of the ladies' entries with a 17-l1, 4-oz jack. In the Afloat Division, Laurie Carrington hooked into a 12-lb, 4-oz snook to cop the ladies' prize for that division. And in the Special Division, Marion A. Wind brought home a 2-lb, 8-oz bonefish to claim a winner. LAND DIVISION Barracuda Fimbel, E. C. 31 lbs. Fires, V. A. 15 lbs., S ozs. Hackert, A. 141 lbs., 10 ozs. Dean, W. V. --12 Ibs., S ozs. Dexter, J. W. v. --12 lb., 7 ozs. Clark, W. W. 12 lbs. Adams, Mary 10 lbs., S ozs. Hope, G.__ 5-lbs., 12 ozs. Meredith, Fred -5 lbs. Kerslake, Mrs. E C. 3 bs., 7:%: ozs. Barnett, Stella --3 lb., ozs. Colt, Linda -1 lb 3 ozs. Shaw. Mrs. .H. 15 o s. Williams. Mike --9%ozs. Jameison, Raymond ___ 8 Grouper Sims Michael __ __ 1' lbs., 8 Hanlin, John Paul 1 lb., 14 Gardes, G. A. I lb., 2!A Burns, Bill 1 lb. H ise, N .L. ----Shaw, Jimmy -----. -8 Morales, Reggie 7!" Laskowski, Erich _6i!1 Simmons, JoAnne --13, Jacks MacAnanny, Raymond E. 19 lbs., 8 Munson, Irene J. ---17 lbs., 4 Simons, Cecil 15 lbs. Fimbel, E. C. 14 bs., 151Romano, Sam -_14 lbs., 81 Nixon, W. G. 12 lbs., 8 Kilkland, H. A. S lbs., S Pickett, S. L. 7 Ibs. Gardens, George 1 lb. 15 Dempsey, Mrs. J. W 1 lb., 10 Wormwood, Mike 121, Shaw, Billy _6 Mackerel (King Howerton, R. D. 5 lbs., 10 Snapper Roberts, V. A. 63 lbs. Kelley, C. L. -60 ibs., Johnson, D. 56 lbs. Roberts, V. A. 50 lbs. Johnson, D. -46 lbs. Caruso, A. J. 41 lbs., 8 Kelley, C. L. -39 lbs. Lee, G. A. 25 ibs., 8 Henry, R. L. 24 lbs. Faith, L. A. 15 lbs., S Heinandez, J. M. 12 lbs. Lightfoot, Robert 5 ils., 12 Naegle, W. L. -5 lbs., 3 Dexter, Mrs. J. W. -2 lbs., 9 Hays, Robert 1 lb., 7 Spelce, P. E. ___-. -E 14 Brooks, Stanley --_ ----111, Lightfoot, Larry 11 Simmons, Diane ___ 93,, Han lin, John ---9-2 Moore, Ricky -9 Murphy, Kathy --Kerslake, Lynn 8 Simmons, Mrs. W.E._ 8 Williams, Mike 7 Skadowski, K. J. 6 Usey, Tony _61;: Dexter, James 6---fl Jameison, Raymond -6 Gardes George Jr. _51; Baker, F. R. -Hise, W. R. 5 1Minard, Jim 5 Sent, John 51: Soballe, Steven -5% Simmons, JoAnne i ib5x Jameison, Raymond Williams, JoAnne --4'._ Skadowski, K. id -----4 Shaw, James 3% Simmons, Diane 3 Simmons, Carl O Soballe, Peter 1 Snook Faith, Leo A. 14 lbs., 12 Bunda, George 10 lbs., 4 Horner, T. A. 3 lbs. Tarpon Bunda, George 28 lbs., 8 Scott, W .H. ___ _2:3 lbs., 8 Bedward, Kenneth _--21 lbs. Bedward, Kenneth -17 lbs. Collins, R. B. ----16 lbs. Henry, R. L. 12 1bs., 4 Mackerel (Spanish) Dean, WV. V. ___ 7 lbs. AFLOAT DIVISION Barracuda Carroll, J. C. 24 lbs. Cunningham, J. H i 17 lbs., Davenport, Sid 16 lbs., S8 Hawes, D. D. 14 lbs., 8 Richmond, J. W. --12 lbs. W ard, G. F .--10 lbs1. 4 Lafnear, R. E. 9 lbs 1? Collins, Bernice R. 8 lbs., 10 Grouper Sanford, Jim 6% ---Jacks Karstens, R. L. _ _12 lbs., 4 McNeal, H. .-i-11 bs., 1ll, Burns, Grace5% Mackerel (King) Smouse, J. H. -----14 lbs. Smouse, J. H. 11 lbs., S8 Snapper Johnson, D. 40 lbs. Davenport, Dale ----3S Ibs. Chandler, C. A. 33 lbs., 8 Carroll, J. C. --_ -30 lbs., 8 Sparks, W .J. -----18 lbs., 8 Ward, G. F. -12 lbs., 10 Emnverzo, Epifanio --15 Ibs., 2 Davenport, Sid --__ -12 lbs., 8 Clay, Mrs. D. B. 4 lbs. Burns, Nancy Pat 4r, Wahoo Smouse, J. H. ----4 Abs. Snook Tiaba, S. xx12 lbs. Carrington, Laurie 12 Ths., 4 Holley, G. -10 lbs., 10 Smouse, J. H. lbs. 4 Fimbel, E. C. __ 9 lbs. Wilson. W. H. 6 lbs., S Tarpon Huffman, D.n. -76 lbs., S Andrews, J.1V. -59 lbs., 4 Fimbel, E. C. -0 lbs. Davis, N. Q. 20 lbs., 4 Swanson. G. A. --13 lbs., S SPECIAiL DIVISION Smcuse, J. H lacr 6 lbs., 4 McNeal, H. 1 -1 1h., 5 Holley, G. __ -Maries Split Two-Game Series With West Palm Beach Giant Nine The Marine baseball club-holder of the Naval Base League Championship and the Post-Season Tournament Championship journeyed to liami last week to represent Guantanamo Bay in stateside competition for the first tine and gave a good accounting of themselves under a scorching Miami sun. They tools on the best of the Southeastern Florida league -the Sky Giants from the Air Force Base at West Pal Beach-and split a two-game series, winning ates' SeeBees Take e t, 9 to 7 ani d cropping the P1layimg on tue fenceless diaimoind Post Season Honors at thxe Marine Air Co.rp~s Station lt 0 0a Loca in 98-0egree heat the local Alarines rappledi out tein The annual baseball awards hits ii txe first game iehinu the banquet held at the close of each steady pitcing of playing-manager baseball season will be held this Chuck Smith vho went the disyear on Monday night, 23 August, calco for the victory. Bill Wood ans in the Chief Petty Officers' Club. Larrv Adams xere the iig ats Based on season performances in the first game, both knocking in all but one case, the champion t bug triples that xouli have Marines and the Bees from MCB-8 goue for circuit clouds on ble local ran away with the honors this year. diamonds but xhich xere chased The Marines copped the double pendoxn by the fleet outfielders of the nant of league championship and Sky Giants and held to 3-baggers. tournament championship. Two Wood got a single in addition to large team trophies will be presenthis triple and Aiais accounted for ed for the two titles. The Bees will txo more safeties via the single receive a team trophy for the route. zs.unne-up spot in the league and ozs.the Naval Station Indians i rezsceive the runner-up trophy for the ozs. touna ent. ozs. addition to the large team MS. tophies sixall individual trophies ix" zswill be presented to tihe champions ozs.and runnes-up of both contests. ozs. Iividual honors this year go ozS. ozs.to Jim (Rebel) Dotson of MCB-8 ozs.fo coming through ih the most ozsRuns Batte In and the most Homeozs. runs of the season. His RBI total ozs. a 42 and e topped the league ozs ith 12 round trippers. In the cafe ozs. ozs.hitting iepatent, Tom Felak of ozsthe Maries gets the noi vith a Ozs.way-out-in-frot .417 average. His ozs.closes competitor was team ate ozs. im Pace xit .398. ozs. e pitching crown goes to Raul ozs.Santos of the Marines for is earnoz. u average of oz. ozs.B nt ozs. Rcm nJ ._ b. Bonefis.h ozs D C. i ib., is ozs i Mrs. W E ozs sGore.0 os ozs. vs i .._ __ 9!1o s ozs. S n on le ---3;_os e N. A o sEdih ozsR ozs ,Nac.a --O1.os ozs. Datn Kahy --? o ozs. MoaeEih2 os ozs. Ldfs Smuezs.4 I, S os ozs.Paifish ozs. Cl ozs. Pom isno ozs. is. i zs ozs. Fireihe, W ozs. So alP tr _ -_ -2 11? os ozs. is cei Dvenpote rune-up__ trophy, fozth wei beFresented bsto th capons Indviua n t. ya go oz. Henr, Ri.L. __ 22 iibs., os tos. Jab, ti. o. to o.M Rz. un Bterat n. a. te Im I Hm. e runs ofe he, ea. s H bis.,R tota wh n. SPEARFiSHING hittin deatet To elko Path, C. W. Pace. Robert Andrew,,, R. M. Ward, G. F. Denn, W. V. Andrews, R. M. Ellwood, L. D. Nichols. E. M. Howerton, R. D. Kropack, J. A. Ward, G. F. Nichols, E. M. Ahlberg Tr. P. Abbott, G. H. HallardI, .F. Kropnek, J. A. Ward, G. F. arracu a 18 bs., ozs. 12 lbs. 5 lbs. 631 ozs. Jacks ----18 ]bs., 8 ozs. (4 14 lbs. Grouper 56 lb,. 16 lbs. Mackerel 5 lbs. 10 ozs. Snapper 20 lbs. ----14 lbs., 13 ozs. -14 lbs. Hogfish S lbs., 4I ozs. 12 ozs. _ _ ..s The Marines scored 2 in the second, 3 in the fifth, 1 in the sixth and iced the game with three more in the seventh. Meanwhile Smith was limiting the Sky Giants to eight widely scattered hits for their seven tallies. In the second game the following lay the Air Force club got off to an early lead with one score in the first and five more in a big sixth inning when 11 Giants came to the plate. The Marines were held scoreless until the bottom of the sixth when they chased two tallies across, both of them by virtue of Tom Felak's booming triple into deep center field, scoring Androvich and Pace. Two more in the bottom of the seventh made up the total for the Marines as they were unable to overcome their 6 to 4 deficit. The Sky Giants scored twice more in the seventh for insurance and the game ended after four Leatherneck hurlers had seen action. Straw took the loss for the Marines despite tue efforts of Schreck, Goens and Androvich. The Marines are the second club in Gmuatanam o Bay organized baseball history to cop both the league and the post-league titles. The Naval Station Indians accomplished the feat last year and, ironically enough, it was the Indians this year who were the only remaining barrier for the Marines in the tournament as they breezed through without a defeat. It was a badly battered Indian team that took the field for the last game of the tournament two weeks ago. Jerry Logsdon, key catcher for the Braves, played the left field spot with a badly splintered hand as a result of the previous night's game. Jerry Morgan started at his usual spot in short, but because of an injured throwing hand, also sustained in the previous gaie, found it necessary to shift to the outfield. Mandy Mandis, starring hurler for the Indians, found himself playing the third base position and Wolgamuth, utility man, toed the mound for several innings along with Todd and Buss in a vain effort to stop the Marines. When the last ball was thrown the Marines came away the big winner swith a 20 to 7 score and the double title. And thus, the 1954 baseball season slid into the history book in Guantamanuo Bay. Saturday, 21 August 1954 m THt INDIAN

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Saturday, 21 August 1954 Base Commands Begin Intra -mural Softball by Pierce Lehmbeck As the 1954 Naval Base Baseball League fades into the past, the various commands around the base begin to organize their annual Intramural Softball Leagues which will carry into the month of October when the Base Softball League is slated to commence. Naval Station The first command to get intramural play underway will be the Naval Station. In a recent interview with LT E. A. Sandness of the Special Services Division, the INDIAN learned that eleven teams have been entered in the six week round-robin tournament which is Eddie Erdelatz's Navy football scheduled to begin on the evening team begins training Aug. 23. Tme of Monday, 23 August. DoubleMiddle squad opens its '54 schedule headers will be played each night, against Wliliam and Mary, Sept. Monday through Friday. 25 ...More than 10,000 spectators The eleven teams entered in watched the professional WashingNaval Station competition are the ton Redskins swamp a Navy team Eleventh Division, Flag Division, from the 11th Naval District, 52-0, the Security Groun Detachment, in the annual Navy Relief benefit the Sixth Division, the Commissary gridiron game at Balboa Stadium Store, the High School, the Fifth in San Diego, Aug. 6 .Coaching Division, 'M' Division of Fifth, the the Ft. Hood, Tex., football team Fleet Camera Party, Second Divithis season will be Lt. George sion, and the Third Division. The Malley, a former gridder at Santa Second Division will be the defendClara University. ing champions as they made a clean The Ft. Ord., Calif., Warriors sweep of the field during the 1953 dropped another football exhibicampaign. tion. This time to the San FranAn interesting sidelight on tourcisco 49ers, 42-14, before a crowd nament play will be the fact that of 19,779 at Kezar Stadium in San the Naval Station Officer's will Francisco, Aug. 8 ...Yale's new form a team which will readily assistant football coach Arthur challenge any team in the league Raimo was an athletic instructor thoughout the regular season of at the Bainbridge Naval Training clay. This 'dark-horse! team is to Center, Md., during WWII. The be under the guiding hand of LT New York Giants football team is James Coglin of the Commissary trying to live up to its name this Division. year. Joe Springer, a 280-poud Marine Barracks tackle just released from the Army The Marine Barracks have schedat Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo., has been uled the first of September as the added to the roster. The Giants date for the beginning of their have a guy by the name of Earl Intramural League. With but four Putnam on the squad-and he only teams entered in competitor, they weighs 300 pounds. plan to have several rounds with 1st Lt. Robert S. Cook, former tournament play ending on approxbackfield star at Oklahoma A&M, imately the 10th of October. is the new head football coach at The four teams entered are the Ft. Lewis, Wash. The ex-Aggie star First and Second Sections of Guard succeeds Les Richter, released from Company, the Headquarters Coiactive duty in May and currently pany and the Staff and Officer's undergoing pre-seasoi drills with Group. The Second Section of the professional Los Angels Rais. Guard Company, the Headquarters GdCompany the tffadqOfficers Rocky Castellani, No. 1 contender Company and the Staff and Officer's frtemdlwih ilto Group. The Second Section of Guard te mileweigh tt too Company won the 1953 tournament time off f hist atiSan with an 18 won and 2 loss record. AFal Cali toevs hamion Naval Air Station Carl "Bobo" Olson for the title, At the time of this writing no definite word had been received Aug. 20tching Ronnieerry Holy from the NAS contingent. However,is now it is believed that they are planning in the Marine Corps at Quantico, the formulation of a round-robin Va. .Fifteen golfers representleague similar to that of the other lug tie Army, Navy and Air Force two commands, the length of will tee off in the three-day, 72-hole which will be determined by the Northeastern U.S. Interservice Golf number of teams entered. For complete coverage of softball Sps aF Mn u competition throughout the coming N.J., Sept. 8-10. season, watch the INDIAN heavyweight, won the Far East section. iiiiainstWiicampianipMar, Spt Ladies' Golf Shots by Miriam Hoy The lady golfers played the front nine last Wednesday morning for low gross and low net scores. The winners of golf balls were: First Flight Gross-Corky Henning Net-Lou Toczko Second Flight Gross-two way tie: Marge Sheehan Nita Roberts Net-two way tie: Betty Lou Tipler Miriam Hoy Third Flight Gross-Evelyn Leach Net-Val Evans After several months of absence, middleweight championship in 1949 while serving with the Army in Japan ...Ex-Navy airman Gene Littler, National Amateur Golf Champion in 1953, seems to have one-stroke-it since turning professional last February. He finished second by a stroke in the U.S. Open and had the same trouble in the All-America Golf Championships at the Tam O'Shanter Country Club in Chicago we would like to extend a big "Welcome back" to Helen King. The past week we had another member, Marie Aslin, who had to spend a few days in the hospital. We all hope she will be back playlug again very soon. The next Scotch Foursome will be played August 29th, so hurry and sign up for it at the Pro Shack. Next Wednesday we will have a Flag T nament on the Back Nine, so yone come on out. Hawks Drop Post Season Game to Cuban Colts An unidentifiable Hawk of the Base Little League takes a rough slide into home plate with the Caimanera Colt catcher riding in on top of him and tagging him for the out with the Cuban pitcher and the plate umpire looking on. The Hawks accepted the challenge of the Cuban boys team but lost out to them by one run with a 10 to 9 score at the Little League ball diamond here last Sunday afternoon. Skindivers .. (Continued from Page One) mask and Arbalette spear gun, to meet the 'giants' on equal terms. Last year he landed one of the largest fish in Guantanamo annals a Jewfish scaling over 200 pounds. Since his first encounter in '48, Mr. Cavanaugh has gone all through the sport's various stages ...first when he thought fins were useless next when he thought the Squale mask uncomfortable, and later when he found that the snorkel impeded his progress. He seems to have found the winning formula in local competition though, and clans to pursue spearfishing at least until he retires at 65. Ted Ahlberg, 27, a Quarterman at the Naval Station Carpenter Shop is a relative tyro at the sport, although his prizes both in local competition and in events at Port Antonio, Jamaica belies that fact. In the Independence Day meet held there, Ted was top man in collective weight of fish speared ...and he's only been at it two years! Ted has won several local prizes, and placed second in two-man team competition held recently. LTJG J. A. Kropack, 24. is Assistant Naval Control of Shipping Officer. John or "Kro" as he is called, is an alumnus of the Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point. The 6' 3", 197 pounder particiated in football and track there. It was through the Merchant service that he gained valuable amateur experience in spearfishing, diving in various haunts off the coast of Eastern and Southern Africa and the Island of Zanzibar. Actually, his first underwater dip enme much earlier .at the age of 14 near his home in Lake Worth Florida. "Kro" as a member of the winning t e a in that competed against the Jamaicans last year and has won several first in intramural competition held locally. He is Secretary and vice-president of the Denizens. The Denizens of the Deep was organized at Guantanamo Bay in 1953 and now includes approximately 20 a hers. They make regularly soled weekLittle League Bears Add Playoff Sweep To League Championship The Little League Bears, sweeping undefeated through the postseason tournament, copped the double crown of the Little League in Guantanamo Bay last week by defeating the runner-up Tigers, 6 to 4. Larry Smith pitched the distance for the Bears allowing the Tigers only two hits for their four runs. Jay Radcliffe took the loss for the Tigers. The Bears, managed by R. J. Modrow, YN2, compiled a season league record of 16 wins and 5 losses to gain the championship title for this first year of Little League in Guantanamo Bay. Then in the post-league play-offs they swept the series with one win from the Colts and two from the hardpressing Tigers. With the opening of the Naval Base School on Monday the Little League now goes into mothballs until next Spring when it is expected to be reactivated. Some people are like blotters soak it all in, but get it all backwards! Definiation of a golfer: A man who blames fate for accidents, but feels personally responsible for a hole in one. Cycle Cop: "Say, how many times have I arrested you for speeding on this road?" Traveler: "Don't ask me. I thought you were keeping score!" end trips together and have official meetings when so directed by the President of the Club, LT Carl Plath of Fleet Training Group. All clubs that compete in Key West the end of this month comply with the Florida Fish and Game Laws and are sanctioned by the A.A.U. m Tr1E INDIAN m Page Five

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m Page Six Saturday, 21 August 1954 NAS Crosswinds by Dick Friz Richard L. McCracken, son of CAPT and Mrs. R. R. McCracken, is visiting with his folks at Guantanamo Bay at present. Richard has recently completed his first year at the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland ...He reports back for fall classes by the 3rd of September. A farewell party for LCDR Woodard, and CHAERO Omang on the BOQ patio Monday. CHAERO Omang and family depart Wednesday for duty at PG School in Montere y, California. W. K. Woodard will leave in September for Navy Purchasing Office in New York City as Assistant to the OIC. CHAERO Robert M. Whiting, USN, reported Friday from Washington D. C. as Omang's relief. Central Office has two new faces Mrs. Beatrice Abney and Mrs. Nancy Greenfield have replaced Jane Heywang and Dean Clark. Jane leaves with husband Bob to Key West and Dean will work in the Naval Base School. The following men left NAS Wednesday for new billets ...Bill Grubbs, AD3 to Key West, Bill White, AG2, and Gerald Kirby A/N to Jax for discharge, Marlin O'Brien AK3 and Johnnie Johnson, RM3 to the USS RANDOLFPH CVA 15. The NAS Intramural Softball League opened the season this past week. The following teams are represented: Boatshed, Operations, Administration, Communications, Leeward Point, and Supply. All contests during the week begin at 1700 and weekend games have a 1400 starting time. Only VF-74 was scheduled to train at Leeward this month, but parts of several squadrons, based primarily aboard the LAK E CHAMPLAIN, are also undergoing gunnery drill. MAG 34, scheduled to arrive this week and will report to Roosevelt Roads after completing training here. Joe Toth, former linecrewman at Leeward graduated first in his class in Naval Preflight Training as a Naval Cadet at Pensacola, Florida. LT Earnest Guirey, and LTJG Gerald Aarts were in charge of inspection tours of Leeward Point and McCalla field by 35 Naval Reservists from Masters Field Miami. The sensational new dance team of Prior and Palmay entertained Barracks AV-50 recently with an impromptu soft-shoe routine. CDR R. T. Boyd Jr., former Operations Officer at McCalla and recently appointed Skipper of VP34 in Trinidad, was a visitor at Guantanamo Bay over the weekend. The Naval career of John Musche BM1 has been a case of extremes. ...He transferred from the USS EDISTO, an ice-breaker which roamed the frigid zone near the north pole ..to Guantanamo Bay and the semi-tropics ...he had the hazardous task of diving for salvage to the less arduous chore of Master at Arms at AV-50. John is a native New Yorker .. he attended Bronx Vocational worked for a Drug Company and then joined the Navy. After Boot training at Newport he attended diving school on the NORMANDIE ...and checked out ships as they prepared for VE day in Europe. They also worked on a captured German Destroyer, Z-39 which was "Well, I certainly made an impression on her," said the canebottomed chair as the nude model stood up. VU-10 Prop Blast TEENAGE-ROUND-UP By Sgt. William J. McDowell Jr. and Cpl. Joe Androvith, USMC Arriving on board the USNS W. H. THOMAS this week was Capt. John J. Swords and his wife Marion. Capt. Swords will relieve Capt. C. S. Smith here at Marine Barracks. A hearty welcome aboard is extended to Capt. and Mrs. Swords and we all hope you enjoy your stay at Guantanamo Bay. Capt. Smith will leave for the states on the 25th of August where he will spend a 30 day leave between Oranoe, New Jersey and Arlington, Virginia. Departing for the states this past week was Cpl. Richard S. Rinker and Pfc Joseph G. Howe. Cpl Rinker will report to the 2nd Marine Division Camp Lejeune N. C. for duty and Pfc Howe will report to MTG-20 Air FMFLant Cherry Point, N. C. for schooling in the Aerial Navigation for a period of 16 weeks. We all wish both men the best of luck and may they enjoy their new duty stations. On the 16th of the month the Staff NCO Club went on a cash basis and any Guest Members who still have any books may turn them in for their cash value. Baseball Bunts The Base Champions returned home this past Wednesday after a very successful trip to Miami, Florida where they engaged the West Palm Beach Air Force team and divided the two game series with the Leathernecks taking the opening contest 9-7. The Flyers came back to take the closing game of the series by a score of 8-4 ... Played before a crowd of Marines, a few of whom were former members of this command, the Leathernecks had to come from behind to take the first game ...Capt. "Smitty" Smith, the big winner for the Marines, was credited with the win as he went the entire distance under the scorching Miami sun and the temperature well in the 90's ...1st baseman Larry Adams was the big gun for the Marines as he collected 3 hits in 4 trips to the plate ..The 2nd contest saw the Marines use their entire pitching staff in an effort to halt the Flyer uprising but all to no avail as the Flyers went on to score their 8-4 victory .Wayne Straw suffered his initial defeated for the Leathernecks as he was hit for 11 hits in the 5 innings ...Playing in an open ball park without the familiar fence deprived the slugging Leathernecks of at least 5 home runs as drives carrying well over 340 feet were caught for easy outs ...The trip was a most successful one and the members of the team had a wonderful but brief stay in Miami, Florida. A sincere note of thanks from every member of the team to all those who made this trip possible. sent back to the states from Plymouth, England. John was a civilian for a few weeks after that, but when one of those $100 a week jobs failed to materialize, and he got hungry, he reupped ...and served on the USS LEYTE and USS EDISTO as Deck Bosun. His new duty station will be NAS Alemeda, California and he and his wife Gertrude will probably reside in nearby Oakland. Unless a lucrative job of wine tasting or the like appears on the horizon, John plans to make the Navy a career. He acknowledges Guantanamo as the most interesting duty station ie's had in the Navy .at leas t certainly was diffenrent' hies. by Bill Graves &. Staff LT Ray Grattan has been temporarily attached to the Marines for a short instructor's course. Ray complains of his back, legs, arms, feet, etc. He says men over 35 shouldn't have to play boy scouts. LT Joe Henson paid the squadron a visit. Joe is attached to a jet squadron from Quonset Point, R. I. down here on a training mission. Joe's buddies reported that "Joe is still a P-Boat pilot at heart." The baseball banquet will be held Monday night August 23, at the CPO Club. All members are urged to attend the party and have a good time. There will be plenty of food and refreshments. Everyone had a wonderful time in Miami again this weekend. Fucci says that his party was wonderful. Cokes, chicken, women and the beach at 5 o'clock. A.M. or P.M.? LT Bill Cyrus has been admitted to the hospital. He is recovering quite rapidly and should be released with the next week or ten days. H. 0. Russell, A02, reports that the fishing out at the ATC is wonderful if you have a spinning rod and reel. He has been hanging into some good ones the last few days. For those of you that haven't been catching any fish lately, this is a wonderful place to fish. LT Bill and Joye Graves, and a roup from NAS went hunting over in Cuba Friday afternoon. They bagged nine guineas for their efforts and a wonderful time was had by all. Mrs. Marie Aslin is in the hospital for a few days. Seems that she got in some poison ivy while on her vacation. We lost the services of Howerton, Watson, and Chief Huff the past week. Sure hate to see those fellows leave. They will be missed by all in the squadron. LT William Hill reported in this week from civilian life. Bill is from Bogota, N.J., and is married to the former Miss Florence T. Hilsee of Atlantic Ciy, N.J. They have one son, William, 21 months. CHMACH Williamson is also in the hospital. Everyone that can, drop by and see these people. They would enjoy seeing you. NS0 Supply Line Many Depot personnel took advantage of the week-end trip to Port au Prince, Haiti; all reported having had a wonderful time. Those that went were, LT and Mrs. William L. Roberts, Chief and Mrs. John Allen, Gerald Hudson, DK2, Merle Padon, DK3, Benjamin R. Teters, SN, Mrs. John DiMascola, Mrs. Roy Sheridan, Mrs. Douglas Emory, Mrs. Robert Wakefield and Miss Grace O'Connell. Chief Piercy was anxiously awaiting the THOMAS's arrival last Wednesday as Mrs. Piercy and daughter Sandra Lee were aboard. The Piercy's have been assigned quarters in Villamar. James B. Tichy, ET2, USN is being transferred 26 August to the Receiving Station, Brooklyn for separation. LT and Mrs. James F. Huntress left on the THOMAS Wednesday to spend a few days in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Best wishes for a speedy recovery are extended to Merle Sands, SK2 who is in the hospital. "Hell, yes," said tb Devil, as he answered the ph0 by Judy Yost Nearly all of the kids entering college this fall are buzzing around the base making preparations for the trip to the States and bracing themselves for the shock of seeing, once again, hundreds of teenagers, instead of the small group that we have here. (Take it easy y'all-the line forms to the right!) Some of those who will be Gtmo's gift to the campus are; Norman Huddy, Pierce Lehmbeck, George McMichael, Barbara Burke, and Eddie Stafford. Then, there're the ones who came clown to stay the summer and are returning to their respective schools to take up where they left off-Pat Strouhal, Charles Edwards, and Barbara Garris are in this group. We're glad you could make it down, and wish for all of you that are leaving here, the very best of luck. Welcome back to Linda Thurston. Guess by now-everybody's all registered and assigned to their permanent classes-and the last minute race is on for pencils, notebooks, etc., and last years report card-which always seems to be the hardest thing for us to find, and the easiest for mothers! So-you kats, better "make hay while the sun shines", for tonight will be our last Saturday night, (before school starts, that is), and we've a good reason to celebrate. Everyone should come on down to the Teenage meeting and then to the dance at the Community Building. Let's make this one a big one-we've the music, the place, the time,-now, all we need is you-So-see ya there! DID YA DIG -Pierce and his friends making conversation with the gals at the next table in one of the exchanges -Artie Mc. entering the dentist's office with a look of resignationmore and more of the gang showing up on the busses-the happy smiles on the teacher's faces, (Do you suppose they really are that glad to see us ?)-Nancy A. looking real pretty at the movies-Jean C. and her alligator bites-(She really has teeth marks to prove it! !)-Ellen and Pat R. shopping-Jimmy H. and Bob P. riding the "0" busSylvia C. digging through the shelves at the library-And the kids reaction to the new record "Rattle and Roll" ? ? ? SCUTTLEBUTT "Ask her if Ace hs same fnends!" "What did you say?" "Nothing." "I know. But how did you express it this time?" THE INDIAN 4m

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Page Seven THE INDIAN Saturday, 21 August 1954 NSO Fiscal Department Holds Naval Base Purse Strings Enamel Ettcgs This is a general view of the Fiscal Department, Naval Supply Depot. How much money was spent for the maintenance and operation of the Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay during the month of June 1954? Approximately one million dollars. Where did this information come from? From the Fiscal Department, Naval Supply Depot. How did they know this? The Fiscal Department performs the accounting functions for all the base activities except for the Naval Hospital, Dental Clinic and the Marine Barracks. Because of this responsibility they are advised of all authorizations for the expenditure of appropriated funds that are made available for the maintenance, operation, expansion, renovation and construction of Naval Base activities. It is in this department, also, where money expended is recorded as an expenditure for labor or material. Ih connection with this responsibility the Fiscal Department keeps records of funds made available and expenditures against these funds in a manner similar to a checking account in a commercial bank. Funds are made available in the form of allotment authorizations and these provide the Fiscal Department with the authority to open individual activity allotment records and establish the amount available for expenditure. Within a basic allotment or osdes cost records are posted by authorization, base activities desire bookkeeping machines. In 1953 the to accumulate cost information for Buseau of Supplies and Accounts a particular job. This is called a made available four National Cash job order. These job orders are Reiste Bookkeeping Machines to used to accumulate expenditure data which is used in the preparaply Depot tion of the various cost reports to local activities and management bureaus of offices.Supieand Acn -Weekly, status of allotment reports are furnished allotment administrators showing the total obligations incurred, value of unliquidated obligations, unobligated and unexpended balances of each allotment. Similar monthly reports are made to the bureaus or offices which granted the allotments. In addition each commanding officer is also furnished a consolidated status of allotment report listing all the allotments and project orders granted to his command as well as their status as of the end of the month. The reports that are submitted to the cognizant bureaus and offices of the Navy Department provide them with the necessary data to support their annual budget requests. The expenditure cost information submitted to the Comptroller of the Navy thru the cognizant Navy Regional Accounts Offices provides the information required for the preparation of the publication "Annual Navy Ependitures" which is actually an annual balance sheet and operating statement of the Navy. This publication besides supporting the annual budget requests to Congress also provides tax payers with a statement of the cost of operations of the United States Navy. (Continued from Page One) will be admitted free and the admission price for adults and children over 12 is 25(,. The number on the admission ticket will determine the winner of the door prize, valued at $50.00. To show personnel of the Naval Base what the scouts have accomplished during the past year there will be two featured exhibitions. One will be a model Boy Scout camp showing all the facilities necessary in their camp activities. The other will be an Indian exhibit, and to make the exhibit even more real, an authentic Indian war dance will be presented. Cotton candy, "snowballs," ice cream and cookies will be sold in the several booths and the everpopular cake booth will be present with cakes baked by the mothers of the scouts and selling for 10( a cut. First cannibal: "The chief has hay fever." Second cannibal: "I told him not to eat that grass widow. Overheard at a faculty meeting "He's the dumbest student I've ever seen. Most of them don't know a ng, but this guy doesn't ei uspect!" by J. H. (Ollie) Olsen, DT2. USN We're sorry for missing our write up last issue, readers, but we got sort of busy at the Dental Clinic and our column just seemed to slip by us. We'll try to do better from now on. Incidentally, beginning next issue the "Enamel Etchings" will be written by Robert Quiat, DN, USN. We here at the Clinic have decided to bring to our readers a "personality of the week", a write up each week of a person who works in the Dental Clinic. We will give you some of his background, hobbies, etc. so keep reading, our next personality may turn out to be someone you know. This week we will deal with your new reporter. His name is Robert M. Quiat, is 23 years old and hails frohi New Jersey (originally from the Bronx). He attended Jersey City Junior College, Seaton Hall University and Fairleigh Dickinson College where he majored in chemistry. He was trying for a B.S. Degree but was delayed because of his entry into the service in February, 1952. To keep in line with his aspiration to become a dentist he became a dental technician. Before his arrival in GTMO he had duty the U.S. Naval Hospital, St. Albans. While at St. Albans, Bob left the bachelors list and is now happily married to his wife, Gladys. His hobbies are photography, sports and pipes, the latter of which he has quite a collection. That's all the information I was able to get from him (he's quite modest). We hope he uses his background when he starts writing the column next week. We're sure he'll do a good job. CDR and Mrs. Vogel returned Monday morning after spending a very pleasant week end in Port au Prince, Haiti. Our personnel officer, Mr. Dote, is either becoming a master at the game of golf or was just slightly unconscious last Sunday morning. At any rate, he came off 18 holes with a score of 83 and rushed home immediately to frame his score card. CDR Nealon and his family departed GTMO 5 August aboard the USNS THOMAS for 20 days leave with relatives and friends in Pennsylvania prior to CDR Nealon's reporting for duty at the Naval Dental Technicians School in Bainbridge, Md. We all miss the Nealons but sincerely hope they enjoy their tour of duty in Maryland. The golf course will probably never be the same since George "Red" Fauth left Cuba for Brooklyn, N.Y. and subsequent discharge Red planned to return to his home in Detroit, Mich. upon release from the Navy but, knowing him, nobody would be too surprised to hear of him heading for South of the Mason-Dixon line so as to spend more months of the year hitting that little white pill. Assembly Hall. (Continued from Page One) affairs. Before, such events as the Holiday Ball, the Junior-Senior Prom, the Senior Play, square dances, etc. had to be held in the Community Hall, at the EM Clubs, or at any place made available to the teen-agers. The new auditorium also eliminates this problem giving the school and the teen-agers a building of their own. It is also planned to use the assembly hall for night meetings for the Parent Teshers Association as well as oth se organizations. Puerto Ricans Claim Actor -Son Jose Ferrar by Dick Friz Last week, while visiting the University of Puerto Rico at Rio Piedras, we heard some murdered misgivings from a group of students. They were referring to their most brilliant native son. their idolatrado, Jose Ferrar, who has returned to his San Juan only once in the past twenty-odd earsr. That was back in '49 when Chancellor Jaime Benitez conferred an honorary degree on the great actor. Jose had previously received a degree at Princeton, and a Masters in Architecture at Columbia, University. His designs were of a dramatic nature however. In '50, he won the coveted Academy Award for his performance in "Cyrano de Bergerac." Many expected him to repeat, when he projected himself as Toulouse Latree in "Moulin Rouge." He portrayed a psalmsinger in "Miss Sadie Thompson" but perhaps the sternest trial awaits him in the "Caine Mutiny." Ferrar has the role of Greenwald the lawyer, but another Oscar winner, Humphrey Bogart, as Captain Queeg, has a commensurate opportunity to excel. The famous court martial scene in which both appear should decide something more than the fictional fate of the Captain. Ferrar is ready; he has met the critical glare of Broadway's footlights both as actor and director ("The Shrike," "The Fourposter". and "Othello") which enamored him with the John Mason Browns and Woolcott Gibbs. His performances, they say, "always refills the audience's glass before it is empty." He and his crooning partner, wife Rosemary Clooney, have also invaded the recording game. Their latest waxing is, "A Bunch of Bananas and a Bottle of Gin," a lyric written by Ogden Nash, immortalizing the plane crash of Ernest Hemingway. This protagonist of the entertainment world, might have pursued an architectural career were it not for a Mrs. Hobart, a thespian in her own right, who visited Jose's father, Don Rafael in the summer of '33. She recognized 'a flint from which the spark had not yet been struck' and it was through her insistent, almost hysterical demands that young Jose was given the opportunity to travel to New York and study. The elder Ferrar has since passed away, but he lived long enough to hear a glowing tribute from an old family friend, Jorge Bird Arias. Arias had just returned from a stateside visit, and he told Don Manuel, "I saw your son in New York," and I could have killed him. ..If I'd had a revolver, I think I'd have done so." Don Rafael sat stunned, until Arias explained that Jose had so completely identified himself as the villainous lago in "Othello" that it wasn't until the curtain went up for the encore that he realised it was the young Puerto Rican artist who had arroused his homicidal rage. -And so the very fact that Jose has not returned to Puerto Rico has proven the measure of his success, his very preeminance, verifies their faith in him. To paraphrase an old quote from "Letters and Social Arts." "Artists must be sacrificed to their art. ...Like bees they must put their lives into the sting they give."

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Navy-DPPO-10ND-Gtmi24 Ne r 05'PO seND-Ct a 0124 THS INDIAN Saturday, 21 August 1954 MOVIES Saturday, 21 August SPACEWAY Howard Duff Eva Bartok A U.S. scientist is working on a new rocket for war purposes in an experimental station in England. When he finishes the model, he and his wife disappear. The story revolves around the search for them. Sunday, 22 August RHAPSODY Elizabeth Taylor Vittorio Gasmann Society girl falls in love with young violinist and leaves her wealthy home to see if they can find happiness together. She is too possessive so he leaves her for another woman. She finds consolation with a pianist, whom she marries. But then many complications set in. In color. Monday, 23 August THE BLACK GLOVE Alex Nicol Eleanor Summerfield A famous trumpet player is suspected of murdering a blues player. There are many fights and threats of violence, including poison placed on his trumpet mouthpiece before the whole thing is cleared up. Tuesday, 24 August THE SHANGHAI STORY Ruth Roman Edmund O'Brien American doctor and a Tangierborn beauty risk their lives to help a group of less experienced folk survive Communist police spy-hunt. Wednesday, 25 August TERROR STREET Dan Duryea Elsy Abliin A U.S. Air Force pilot has just 36 hours to clear himself of charge of murdering his wife. A mission worker helps him escape authorities while he gathers evidence to clear himself Thursday, 26 August PHANTOM OF THE RUE MORGUE Karl Malden Claude Dauphin Pretty French girls are being murdered in Paris at the turn of the century. The two main suspects are a zoologist and a psychologist. The police would like to place the blame on the psychologist. In color. Friday, 27 August CASANOVA'S BIG NIGHT Bob Hope Joan Fontaine A tailor's apprentice is mistaken for the great lover, Casanova, and is sent by a duchess to test the love of her prospective daughter-in-law. In color. Blonde and dazzling Peggy Maley is rapidly making a name for herself in filmland. The Pottsville, Pa., miss has seen her name rise from the ranks of the unknown to top billing. She appeared in Columiba Pictures' FTG Bulletin by Jack Engstrom Albert Satter, FP3, FTG Transportation Dispatcher, will leave on the USNS THOMAS next Thursday, 26 August for state-side shore duty. He will report to the Commander, New York Group, LantResFlt, NSD, Bayonne, New Jersey, where he will be stationed for two years. ...Richard Cousins, Fleet Training Center, has been advanced to Chief Electronics Technician. He put the Chief's hat on last Monday, 16 August. Congratulations. ...Back in a duty status, after hospitalization, are Donald Hansen, RDC, FTG CIC Department, and Leonard Briggs, YN2, FTG Navigation Office. ...Glad to see you back with us again. ... LT Williams, FTG Gunnery Department, wife and two son's arrived on the THOMAS Wednesday, just in time to start a new school year. LT Williams has been assigned quarters on Oil Point. ...Welcome aboard, we hope you enjoy your stay in Gtmo. .. The softball team has been holding practices regularly, and is shaping up in pretty good fashion. Those of you who still wish to play softball this season are urged to attend the practice sessions. Information concerning practices, games, etc. will be posted as needed. For further information contact Don Markham, the team manager, in the ASW Department, or LTJG Varty, in the Gunnery Department. SHIP ARRIVALS USS Rushmore LSD-14 23 Aug USS Bronson DD-668 23 Aug USS Sperry DD-697 23 Aug USS Massey DD-778 23 Aug Hospital Notes by Charles L. Brewer, YN3 Heirport News Apparently the stork wishes to give our obstetrician a well earned rest. During the past week only one child was born: a son, Thomas Howard Lotterman, born 10 August to MR3 and Mrs. Howard E. Lotterman. Golf With three weeks remaining in the Hospital Ringer Tournament, the leaders in the individual flights are as follows: 1st Flight, Byrne, HMC being hawked by Kelley, HN; 2nd Flight; CAPT Moe with Mayernick, HM1 and close second; 3rd Flight, Filler, HN followed by Davenport, HM3; 4th Flight, Connors, HN with Brewer, YN3 and Toland, HN tied for second place in this closely contested flight. Mrs. North still leads in the Women's Division. Although there has been no change in the leadership the "Ringers" are rolling in and scores have come down tremendously. New Arrivals We wish to extend a hearty "Welcome Aboard" to LT J. Imburg (MC) USN who reported for duty on 9 August from the U.S. Naval Dispensary, Washington, D. C. Dr. Imburg is a pediatrician and a member of the American Board of Pediatrics. USS Smalley DD-565 23 Aug USS Dealy DE-1006 27 Aug SHIP DEPARTURES USS Mitscher DL-2 24 Aug USS Kirkpatrick DER-318 24 Aug USS McCain DL-3 25 Aug USS Stoddard DD-566 25 Aug USS Sturtevant DE-239 27 Aug USS H. D. Crow DE-252 27 Aug *BOOK-NOOK by Francis L. Cannon, JOSN OUR SECRET ALLIES by Eugene Lyons The one-way relationship which exists between the Kremlin and its subjects is here explained by Mr. Lyons, a distinguished journalist. The book is based on a lifetime study of Soviet affairs by the author. He cuts through the fog of lies and propaganda which has for 35 years blocked and distorted our views of Russia. He demolishes the myth of unity between the Kremlin and subjects and states that these people would be our firmest allies if we could get to them. CHAUCER by Raymond Preston The modern reader needs help to understand the words and forms of Chaucer and this is the book to do it. It attempts to relate Chaucer, a 14th century genius to a 20th century audience, but without modernizing the genius or attempting to archiaze the readers. He does this by quoting units of thought from Chaucer's work, then immediately underneath interpreting the thought-units so that they will hold the readers' interest. COMBAT IN KOREA by Capt. Russell A. Gugeler For the military student this book shows how combat tactics were applied in Korea. For the general reader it shows war stripped of its headlines and of the psychological interpretations of fiction writers. It points up the danger of unpreparedness. CAVES OF THE GREAT HUNTERS by Hans Baumann In 1940, southwestern France, four boys and a dog went exploring in the woods as children often do. But in this case they really found something-a cave with paintings done by Ice Age men, 22,000 years ago. The paintings and sketches were of the animals well-known to the cave men. Some theorize that the pictures were used to teach children the most vulnarable spots in animals, where to shoot an arrow or spear. Although written for young people, this makes excellent and informative reading for adults as well. 4,000 YEARS UNDER THE SEA by Phillipe Diole Before publishing of this book there was no literature on Marine Archaelogy. Phillipe Diole called on technical experts-zoologists, geologists, archaeologists and historians to aid him in this work. He knew that the remnants of great civiliazations were constantly being brought up from the ocean floor. He determined to examine them and attempt to classify similar finds. Through a series of calculations he was able to place relics in their correct historical moments and to reconstruct the stories of their submersions. MADAME DE POMPADOUR by Nancy Mitford A biography of the high-spirited Madame De Pompadour who directed and inspired the artists and great men of her day. She became the mistress of Louis XV of France and reigned for 20 years at Versailles. By far the most influential woman of her time, she played a great role in shaping the destinies of France. The library now has on its magazine racks two new financial magazines: Barron's, the National Business and Financial Weekly, and Changing Times. THE INDIAN Saturday, 21 August 1954


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