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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English

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newspaper ( marcgt )

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Covers qTMO Like The Sunshine"

Vol. VI, No. 58 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 14 August 1954


Marines Conduct

Instructor Training

For two weeks now, a group of four officers, seven chiefs, and 14 petty officers from Naval Station, Naval Air Station, and VU-10 have been undergoing a three weeks' course which will prepare them to be instructors for the Naval Emergency Ground Defense Force. In addition to the training which will be given-by these future instruetors-to personnel of the three commands, these men have also been tutored in the "whys" and "ways" of instructing.
Upon completion of this course
-being given by the staff officers and staff NCOs of the Marine Barracks-the new instructors will take over two separate groups for training. The first will consist of 80 percent of the three commands for a one week period, and the second will be a two week class for 25 percent of the normal compliment for the commands.
Each command-with the officers and petty officers now attending instructions acting as the staff officers and staff NCOs-will form a rifle platoon, the three platoons
making up the Naval Emergency Ground Defense Force for Guantanamo Bay.
In the event of an emergency,
this defense force would assist the Marine Barracks in their tactical and guard duties until Marine replacements arrived.
The first week of the three weeks course now In progress was an intensfied training period in the subjects of Technique of Instruction, Interior Guard Duty, Ceremonies, Preliminary Marksmanship Training, and Small Arms Instruction--the M-1 Garand rlfle and the Carbine.
Beginning the second week, the class took to the field as they went out to the rifle range for firing and then on to the open field for instruction in the tactics of squads and platoons.
To complete the instructor's course, after a rough week in the field, the students will take over as instructors of their own classes, and each man will have a period of instruction, preparing him to take over any phase of the instruction assigned to him by his command3rd Navy Super Carrier

Is Named USS Ranger

Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has named its third super aircraft carrier the USS Ranger. This marks the eighth U.S. ship to be called "Ranger," dating back to the Revolutionary War days.
The new Ranger, being built at Newport News, Va., is a 60,000-ton floating base. It is designed to provide the striking power of more than 100 carrierbase aircraft.


Robert Blazek Receives

$1046 Enlistment Bonus


Robert E. Blazek, HN, of the Naval Hospital here, happily contemplates how his bank book will grow with the addition of the $1046.68 he received in the form of a re-enlistment bonus, travel, and mustering out pay. Blazek, who hails from Cleveland, Ohio, was one of the first men here to re-enlist under the new bonus bill, and by. so doing received over $250 more than he would have under the old bill. Upon leaving the disbursing office, Blazek, smiled and said, "It's just about enough for a good weekend's liberty."


. NavBase Personnel Tested


Men of the Naval Base of Pay examinations for Pay Grade E-4 hel Enlisted Men's Club. Over 430 men Pay Grade E-5 will be held Tuesday, will be held on 24 August.


600 Students Start School Aug 23


One Day Registration Period 19 Aug

Over 600 students will have a last fling at summer vacation next week, and almost as many parents will breathe a sigh or relief on Monday, 23 August as the Naval Base School opens it doors for another semester.
The enrollment this year is expected to total about 630 for all Dependents Scheduled grades (nursery through 12th
grade), or about 50 more than were enrolled last year, according to For New 10 Cards Mr. T. G. Scarborough, Principal
of the school.
Registration for all students will In accordance with a recent take place on Thursday 19 August SecNav instruction, a new type of in the following rooms at the dependent's identification card is school: being issued to all dependents on Grade 1 Room 18 Grade 7 Room 26 the Naval Base. Grade 2 Room 16 Grade 8 Room 8
The new card-the DD Form Grade 3 Room 2 Grade 9 Room 9 720-is established primarily to Grade 4 Room 11 Grade 10 Room 6 identify dependents of Navy and Grade 5 Room 14 Grade 11 Room 5 Marine Corps personnel, and ac- Grade 6 Room 21 Grade 12 Room 20 cording to the instruction, the new Kindergarten enrollment is limitcard is established for an experi- ed to children who will reach the mental period of one year. If it age of five (5) on or before 1 proves successful, it will be con- January 1955. Age limit for the tinued. . first grade is six (6) on or before
This new card, however, will 1 January.
replace the eligibility cards now in Children may be entered in the use for base entry, commissary nursery school any time during the
stores, ship's stores ashore, ex- school year after they have reached changes, and medical services. Non- the age of 21/2. Mr. Scarborough appropriated funds activities, such stressed the importance of presentas clubs, golf courses, swimming ing written proof of age for chilpools, which currently issue and dren entering either the nursery, require varying types of identifica- kindergarten or the first grade for tion cards, are enjoined to make all the first time. The child's birth practicable use of the DD Form 720 certificate is desirable, but if the identification card. certificate is not available sworn
Issuing of these cards here at affadavit, obtainable at the Legal the Naval Base has been progress- Office of the base administration
(Continued on Page Three) building, is acceptable.
Charges for the nursery school A~hunnA ~ and the kindergarten, which are
For Rating Advancement na self-sufficient, are $15.00
a month for the nursery and $10.00 a month for the kindergarten.
It will be necessary for all pupils to bring their immunization papers in order that the school may verify immunization against small-pox, tetanus, typhoid and diptheria at the time of registration.
Information about daily schedules, bus schedules, etc. will be given to parents at the time of registration.
This year 12 new tachers have been added to the school staff as replacements for former teachers who have been transferred and to supplement the regular teaching staff. In the first grade, Mrs. Peggy Lee and Mrs. June Beiland have been added to join Mrs. Amelia Dunmire and Mrs. Dale Ward. The second grade has the addition of Mrs. Eloise Grant along with Mrs. Darlene Shuller, Mr. Fay Yarbro and Mrs. Alfreda Syvinski. Mrs. Jo Ann Morgan and Mrs. Edith Savage have been assigned to the third grade along with Mrs. Ettie Usey. In the fourth grade Mrs. Freddie Morphis is a new addition to supplement Mrs. Jessie Penner. Mrs. Vivian Lawrence returns to Grade E-3, begin the service-wide teach the fifth grade in addition d last Tuesday in the Naval Station to Miss Dorothy Bush who reported
d lst uesay n te NvalStaion from the States last night. Mrs. took the test. The examination for Wava Hummel continues in the 17 Auguet, and the E-6 examinations sixth grade along with the addition (Continued on Page Three)


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Saturday, 14 August 1954


~gudiai
The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9-615
Saturday, 14 August 1954
U. S. NAVAL BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sandness----------Officer-Advisor
H. E. Davis, JOC ------------------Editor
H. L. Sisson, J03 ------------------- News
Jerry Lewis, j03----------------- Features
Pierce Lehmbeck ------------------ Sports
F. L. Cannon, JOSN----Photographer 'IHE INDIAN is published weekly at th, Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-5, Raevised Nov. 1945, and finance with non-appropriated fuods. THE INDIAN is a member of the Arme" Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. No photos unless otherwise credited.

An Editorial


Leaders of Tomorrow

by Chaplain Sammy Reid, USN
ComDesRon 12

The following story was told to me by an aged father who had raised a large family of nine children in the southern part of the United States. He told me the story to illustrate his own folly in not having complete trust in his children. As judged by the outside world, he was a very good moral man. He was a prominent man in the community and sincere and conscientious in his work. He had built up quite a nice reputation for himself in his particular field of e n d e a v o r. He was respected throughout the state and it seemed that many outsiders loved him. But, his own children did not love him. In fact, his own son told me, after his father died, that he had hated his own dad.
The children of this austere father couldn't be like other "kids.'' They were always being accused of wrongdoing. Sometimes these accusations were false and the father never knew how much suffering he brought onL the children. One day he accused his little boy of stealing some money that had been placed in a jar and put on a shelf in the kitchen. The boy denied having stolen the money. The father was very angry and beat the boy severely. He tried every way to make the boy confess that he had stolen the money. And, as we would say in the Navy, he restricted the ciild for several days. The boy was very unhappy and miserable. Then one day it was learned that it was the boy's mother who had misplaced the money. The money was found! In talking to the boy in later life, his father asked him, "Son, what would you have done if the money had not been found?" The boy replied, "I would have killed myself!"
Children ought to be trusted. They ought to be allowed to share


INDIAN Photo Contest Winners Announced


The winners in the Indian photography contest were announced last week by a judging staff from the Indian editorial committee consisting of CDR V. J. Soballe, Executive Officer, Naval Station, Mr. H. P. McNeal, Industrial Relations Officer, and H. E. Davis, JOC, editor of the Indian.


First prize in the contest was awarded to Dale D. Rose, PH3, of the Atlantic Fleet Party for his photo of a sunset over Guantanamo Bay. First prize in the contest amounted to a $20 merchandise certificate.


Second piize wen't' to Benn S. Jackson, HM1, of the Naval Air Station Dispensary for his pin-up model photo. Second prize was $10 merchandise ceiificate.
Plans are being formed for weekly contest. Details wil be announced as soon as possible.


in many of the decisions in the home. They ought to be treated as human beings. They ought to be respected. Outr "teenagers" for exaimple, are a wonderful lot. And, remember, they are the leaders of tomorrow!


Girl: "Gosh, it's past midnight! You'd better get going.
Guy: "Okay, turn out the lights."

Sixteen: "Have you ever been kissed ?"
Seventeen "Only by a 3-D movie."


Sunday, 15 August 1954

Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930-2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic)


The Chaplain's Corner





If there is any example of incautiousness in our modern life, it is found in the great death-toll taken by our reckless auto-driving. The only way to improve these conditions, is for each driver to make himself more safe, by observing the rules.
Caution is a great good; for it prevents evils. And as natural caution prevents natural evils, so holy caution prevents spiritual evils.
People who care nothing for caution, say: 'Why worry?' If there is no reason to worry, worry is indeed foolish. But when there is real reason, it is wise to worry. Such worry is mental health, such as he has who goes to a physician for an infection or disease. You would certainly call him a fool if instead he said: 'Why worry?' and would let the infection or disease take its course.
Life is full of blessings. But they must be used rightly. You have an auto; it is a great blessing to you in many ways. But unless you use the blessings rightly and with caution, they will be liable to prove your utter curse instead of blessing.
Our Savior wanted us to look ahead and provide against evil. He gave us the parable of the five wise, and five foolish virgins: the first five of whom had provided oil for their lamps, the others no oil. Another point that our Lord laid stress on was this: if there is an occasion which is casing us to fall into evil, we must do all in our power to remove it; otherwise it is going to bring us to destruction. Saint Paul sums it up in this manner when he tells us: "See to it therefore, that you walk with care, not as unwise but as wise, making the most of your time."
W. J. Spinney
LCDR, CHC, USN


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THE INDIAN








Saturday, 14 August 1954


THE INDIAN


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Page Three


Children Awarded

Swimming Certificates

According to the Naval Air Station Special Services department, the recent swimming classes for children were very successful. Of the 15 classes, only two were the advanced lessons for those who already could swim 50 yards.
The classes began early in the summer with over 350 students signed up for instructions. Classes progressed rapidly, and after the ten lessons were completed only a small handful of children could not swim well enough to cross the width of the pool. Certificates of swimming achievement were awarded to those completing the course. For those childern who addresses were on the roster, the certificates were sent out to their homes.
If any child who completed the course satisfactorily has not received his or her certificate yet, it is because no address was given to send them to. Parents may pick up these certificates at the Naval Air Station Special Services Office.


ID Cards. . .
(Continued from Page One)
ing at a reasonable rate. However, dependents of Naval Station personnnel are reminded that these cards must be applied for (application blank is DD Form 719 which sould be filled out completely) by Friday, 20 August.
After the card has been applied for, and the personnel office has completed the card, dependents will be called in by their card number for their signature and finger print on the card, and a photograph if none is available. The cards will then be laminated and delivered to the dependent.
Dependents are asked to cooperate in reporting to the personnel office as soon as they are called in for their signature and photograph and finger print. It dependents will report in on the time assigned to them, it will avoid the confusion of not having the card when it officially goes into effect here on the Naval Base.
This new identification card will be recognized by commands of the Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard when it is determined that existing facilities are adequate to provide service.
Possession of this card alone does not, of itself, authorize any dependent to enter into any classified security area, and it is not intended to replace any security system in any way-past or present.


School . . . P
(Continued from Page One) of Mrs. Madelon Schwartz.
The High School has added four new teachers, Mr. Ralph Jones, Mrs. Iraida Davis, Mrs. Ruth Liveakos and Mrs. Carmen Ward. Returning for another year are Mrs. Lydia Stagnaro, Mrs. Dorothy Campbell, Mrs. Lonita McGill, Mr. William McGill and Mrs. Lillian Armbruster.
Mrs. Louse McNeal remains in the nursery school and in kindergarten Mrs. Ruth Groenevald and Mrs. Myra Wilkinson have been added while Mrs. Luclille Burke and Mrs. Edrie Becker are returnees from last year.


NSD Stock Control Serves Fleet, Naval Base

With Over 80,000 Different Items


in


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Seciton of the issue desk showing clerk Rafael Blanco checking requisitions for fleet and base personnel.


What'll it be, mate? A needle? Sure thing. May I help you sir? An anchor? Yes sir. From a needle to an anchor in five minutes. That's routine for the Stock Control Branch at the Naval Supply Depot. Here the stock records are maintained for over 80,000 different items ranging not only from a needle to an anchor but from bean pots to battle lanterns, from catsup to carburetors and from ice to coal.
Stock Control is a busy place servicing all base activities as well as the various fleet units by processing over 1,000 of these item requests daily. With over 80,000 items to choose from you would think that everyone could be satisfied but is far from true. Daily special orders go out to supply activities in Norfolk, Mechnicsburg, Pa., Portsniouth, N. H., and Miami for items not stocked in Gtmo.
Stock replenishment is handled by an eight man team and this is probably the most ticklish job in the branch. A miscalculation or a mistake in a stock number could easily result in loading a warehouse in Gtmo with an item more appropriate to Argentia. The whole branch still shudders when the word


"bellows" is used-a handy device for a New England fireplace, but of limited demand here in Gtmo. For some unknown reason a pallet load of them appeared in the waiehouse and i was many a grey hair and furrowed brow later before tney got shipped back to Norfolk.
More serious, however, to the Ptock Control Branch than the material which is here and shouldn't 1e is the material which should be iere and isn't This can happen for many reasons, unavailability of the Item in the world-wide system, delays in transporting the item to Gtmo, or an abnormal run on the item at tne issuing level resulting in the stock being temporarily exhausted. Have you ever tried to explain unavailability, transportaLion difficulties or abnormal issue rates to the engineer of a destroyer? That sometimes gets to he quite a task.
Stock Control is here to serve you and takes pride in doing it's very best. We try never to say "No" but often we're forced to say "Not yet, but we're still trying." Drop in on us sometime. You'll see wnat a great improvement on the old fashioned crystal ball well kept stock records can be.


Stock batteries in action on a typical (ay in the depot.


The former Miss Myrna Jeaneen Hummel a n d Marcus Adrian Kinchen prepare to leave the church after their wedding at the Naval Base Chapel last Saturday.

Jeaneen Hummel Weds

Marcus Kinchen Here


One of the rarest of all events in Guantanamo Bay - a wedding took place last Saturday in the Naval Base Chapel when Myrna Jeaneen Hummel and Marcus Adrian Kinchen were married by Chaplain M. 0. Stephenson in a double ring ceremony.
Miss Hummel, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. HummelMr. Hummel is a civil engineer for the Naval Base-was given in marriage by her father. Her gown of chantilly lace featured a diagonally pleated bodice with a sheer yoke, accented with appliques, sequins, and seed pearls. The bouffant skirt ended in a chapel train.
Her fingertip veil of French illusion fell from a lace crown. She carried a bridal bouquet of lillies of the valley centered with white orchids.
Miss Hummel borrowed the traditional Delta Gamma pearls and wore heirloom diamond earrings for something old.
Mrs. Phillip H. Dunmire, matron of honor, wore a saphire blue tulle gown with strapless bodice, fitted lace jacket and matching picture hat. Her flowers were red roses.
Attendants Shiela Cormack, Boston, Mass., and Barbara Burke were in identically styled light blue tulle.
Martha Gordon, flower girl, wore embrordered scalloped blue organza.
The bridegroom, son of Mr. and Mrs. Cleo P. Kinchen, Keystone Heights, Fla., asked his father to be best man. Ushers were LT T. H. Cushman, Jr., and Elliot Cormack.
The bride and bridegroom will spend a honeymoon in Havana, and will then take up residence in Gainesville, Fla., w h e r e Mr. Kinchen is office manager of Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company.
The former Miss Hummel first took up residence in Guantanamo Bay in 1945 and went on to graduate from the Naval Base High School. Both Mr. and Mrs. Kinchen graduated from the University of Folrida where Mrs. Kinchen majored in elementary education and was a member of the Glee Club, Florida Players, and Delta Gamma Sorority. Mr. Kinchen majored in engineering.







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Page Four THE INDIAN


'Just Luck!' He Calls It... M


Saturday, 14 August 1954


Pictured with a prize catch of D.D. Huffman, DCC, who fought for 25 minutes before he landed the 76-pound, 8-ounce Tarpon at the mouth of the Guantanamo River last Monday night while boat fishing with rod and reel, is W.I. Jones, at left and Cheif Andrews at right


by Jerry Lewis
Glenn Abbott, civilian employee and veteran spear-fisherman, dove to get a glimpse of the scuttled hulk of the USS MERRIMAC buried deep in the slime of Santiago de Cuba harbor last month and ran into a bit of "luck" that weighed in at over 200-pounds!
On the afternoon of July 7, Glenn
boated to about 250-yards off Morro cavity. The jewfish, slightly anCastle with two Cuban boys. The noyed, headed for deep water like object of the trip was to attempt a slow freight pulling out of the to locate the remains of the MER- yards, dragging Glenn along after RIMAC scuttled by U. S. Naval him as though he never existed.
forces during the Spanish-Amer- The strain proved too much for the ican War in order to block the spear however, and it came loose, mouth of the harbor, thereby slightly bent but still serviceable. bottling the Spanish armada up Abbott followed the course of the
within the confines of the bay. fish as it swam slowly away and
Abbott, aided by duckfins and watched it come to rest. Surfacing mask and armed with an Arbolette, to recoup, Glenn dove once again intended to ward off any curious with the taut bands of the spearpiscatorial guardians of the bay, gun straining to be unleashed at dove through the choppy water and the slightest squeeze of the trigger. descended into the crystal world Another shot, and another failure. of aquamarine blue. This thnie, the barbs struck soft
At six fathoms, he stopped short flesh and stayed closed. Again the and rubbed his hand over the thick spear fell idly away from the now glass of his mask to be sure it was fully-aroused monster. no shadow he saw. The black hulk started for shal-


"I saw a huge, dark, fat cigarshaped object lying motionless on the bottom. After investigating it, I found it to be a giant Jewfish," Glenn said later.
After properly surveying the situation, Glenn surfaced for a short breather, checked his gun and made ready for battle, which, judging from the immensity of the fish, was going to be a guerra grande"a helluva tussle!"
The first dive brought Glenn within yards of the big fish and he let go his only spear at the gill


low water with Glenn in full pursuit. At 40 feet, Glenn dived again. He swam within three feet of the irritated fish, squeezed the hairtrigger and let go the spear for the third time. With a smooth metallic 'swish', it flashed through the clear water and found its mark just aft of the large left eye, burying itself deep in the brain of the jewfish. Barbs sprung open and the six-foot, frayed nylon line took the strain well.
The giant mouth opened and closed one-and then was still. But


only half the battle was won. The fish provided no further fight but boating the huge prize, longer 7n feet than it's captor was tall, was another problem to be dealt with.
Glenn surfaced, repeatedly stabbing the fish in the soft areas of the gill to further insure the victory. A stream of deep claret flowed from the fresh wounds "like smoke from a locomotive" and attracted a curious visitor.
Following Glenn and the huge jewfish close behind, was a 10 -foot hammerhead shark, swimming pedantically, its huge, ugly head swaying from side to side like some creature from the forbidden depths of the sea!
Breaking the surface, Glenn breathed deeply, filling his lungs with good, clean air. The water was choppy and he gulped mouthfulls as he searched for the boat-in vain! It was nowhere to be seen.
The situation grew quite uncomfortable as Glenn once again made a careful observation of his predicament. The boat was gone. Attached to his thin line was over 200-pounds of dead weight. Scarcely more than a few yards behind him lolled a huge hammerhead, curiously intent on the white-limbed swimmer and his bloody catch.
Abbott started for shore, towing his strange caravan behind him for over 45 minutes! S w i m m i n g through choppy waves yelling "Shark! Shark!" on top of his lungs in hopes of being heard and tugging at the jewfish that seemed to smile sarcastically in death, proved no easy task. Adding to his burden, Mister Hammerhead followed close beihnd, never hinting what his next move might be.
After what seemed an eternity, Glenn discovered the small boat and called for help. The craft came alongside and took the tired swimmer aboard.

4


"The shark didn't worry me but I didn't want to lose that big fish", he said later.
Glenn has met up with al-no4t every concievable species of shark in the course of his years of spearfishing. Ever since his encounter with a playful Blue shark that he sent on its way with a solid kick in the snoot, he is convinced of their meekness.
The big hammerhead suddenly disappeared, his curiousity having been satisfied. The weight of the jewfish proved too much for the small boat. They could not take it aboard for fear of capsizing.
The dilemma came to a welcome end when a passing motor launch threw them a line and towed the entire party to shore.
Prior to the capture of the record-breaking jewfish, (Garrupa nigrita) Glenn amassed, singlehandedly, ovr 150-pounds of other assorted species which brought the day's total to a figure exceeding 350 pounds! After being offered a mere 10-cents a pound at the market that evening in Santiago, Glenn decided to distribute all but three pounds, which he kept for himself, among the needy folk and friends in town.
Glenn insists the whole caper was purely 'luck'. "That's all it was
-just luck!' he repeated. The idea of tying into a giant jewfish with no other ties than a six-foot frayed line seemed ridiculous after the whole thing was over. "Just luck" he added.
This reporter wonders if it was luck, too, that sent Glenn Abbott's spear deep into the body of a record-breaking Hogfish the very morning of the day the preceding story was related.
P.S.-He didn't find the Merrimac.










Saturday. 14 Augutst 1954


THE INDIAN


Fishing Contest




Latest Fishing Entries


LAND DIVISION
Barracuda
Plath, C. W. ----------- 18 lbs.
Hackert, A. ---------- 14 lbs., 10 oz.
Dean, W. L.- ----- -----12 lbs., 8 ozs.
Flbel, E.G ---------- 31 lbs.
Grouper
Sims, Michael --------_ 6 lbs., 8 ozs. Hanlin, John Paul 1-- lb., 14 ozs.
Gardes. G. S - ---------- lb., 2% ozs.
Hise, N . L - ------ 9 ozs.


MacAnanny, R. Simmons, Cecil Raymond, Sam Nixon. w. G. -Fimbel, E. C. __


Jacks E. ____


19 15 14 12 14


lbs., 8 ozs.

lbs., 81., ozs. lbs., 8 ozs. lbs., 15% ozs.


Mackerel (King)
Howerton, R. D. -------5 lbs., 10 ozs.


FRlley, C. L. Henry, R. L. Kelley, C. L. Fath, L. A. -Bonds, George Homner, T. A.

Bunda, George Scott, W. H. Dedlword, Kennel Bedward, K. D. Collins, R. R. -.
Mackerel Dean, W. V. Cardes, George-


Snapper
------- 60 lbs., % oz.
--._--_ 24 lbs.
-39 lbs.
----.__ 15 lbs., 8 ozs. Snook
------- 10 lbs., 4 ozs.
- lbs. Tarpon
_______ 28 lbs., 8 ozs.
__-_-__ 23 lbs., 8 ozs.
- -- - 21 lbs.
---- - 17 lbs.
--_---- 16 lbs.
(Spanish/Common)
-7 lbs.
9 ozs.


BOAT DIVISION Mackeral (King) Smouse . H. - ----------14
Smouse, J. H.- -----------11
Barracuda
Carroll, J. C. ----------- 24
Cunningham . H. 17
Davenport, Sid----------16
Wahoo
Smouse, J. H. ---------- 24
Jacks
Karstens, R. L. - -------- 12
Snapper
Roberts, V. A. ---------- 50
Johnson, D. ------------ 46
Johnson, D. ------------ 40
Snook
Eroverso, Epifanio _-_- 15 Tiaba, S --------------- 12
Carrington, Laurie 12
Wilson, W. H.- ---------6
Tarpon
Andrews, J. w -------59 Fimbel, . C. ----------- 40
Davis, N. Q.- -----------20


lbs.
lbs., 8

lbs.
lbs., / lbs., 8

lbs.

lbs., 14

lbs.
lbs.
lbs.

lbs., 2 lbs., 4 lbs., 4 lbs., 8

lbs., 4 lbs.
lbs., 4


SPEARFISHING DIVISION Elwood, J. D.------------56 lbs.
Nichols, . M.- ----------16 lbs.
Jacks
Dean. W.V ----------- 18 lbs., 8
Andrews, R. M ---------14 lbs.
Mackerel
Scheibel, K. E. - -------- 8 lbs., 11
Snappers
Ward, G. F. ------------ 14 lbs., 13
Nichols, E. M. ------- 14 lbs.
Barracuda
Plath, C. W. -----------d18 lbs.
Pace, Robert ---------- 12 lbs.
Andrews, R. M. - ------- 10 lbs.
Hogiab
Ballard, L. F. ---------- 7 lbs., 12
Ward, G. F. ----------- 5 lbs., 15


The Angle(R)
by Jerry Lewis

In picking up where we left off before, let's look into some of the characteristics of individual members of the infamous shark tribe.
Among the many species that come under the heading 'Shark' are a couple of smaller fellows you are more likely to come across just off-shore or hiding under pierpilings. They have earned nasty reputations with net fishermen because of their destructive nature. One of them is called the dogfish and swims alongside his brother the sand shark.
Both are the most common of the smaller sharks, especially the dogfish which is known to Californians as the greyfish. He is the fisherman's headache and pet peeve because of his habit of driving away mackerel, cod, herring and other commercial food fishes. They have large sharp spikes just in front of each dorsal fin with which they tear and destroy fish nets. They steal bait and devour hooked fish as they struggle on the hook. The cost of their deviltry annually is estimated to exceed $400,000 off the Massachusetts coast alone!
The dogfish is generally from three to four feet long, slate colored with a rounded head and flattened snout. Trawls with 1500 hooks have been brought up with a struggling dogfish, some as large as six feet long, on every hook!
The sand shark is almost as numerous as his pesty brother and averages from five to six feet in length, gray colored and spotted with brown. He is sluggish in contrast with his more aqua-dynamically designed cousins but is still fast enough to destroy great numbers of smaller fish such as flounder, mackerel and butterfish.
Both nuisances are considered harmless but are slak-like enough to throw an unhealthy scare into a swimmer who happens to be in their feeding area. The sharp spikes of the dogfish are to be respected too. They can inflict a nasty cut.
These two yellows are less likely to strike a swimmer as are the bigger members of the clan. They are bothersome and dogged in their attempts at securing a good meal.
It need not be mentioned more than once that it is poor policy to swim between any member of the shark family and his dinner!


Beaming After Beaning


C. L Kelley Snags Prize Snapper


C. L. Kelly, SHC, displays the 60-pound-8-ounce snapper he caught at AATC area. The fish was entered in the Naval Base Fishing Tournment and, so far, is the leader in the Land Division. The tournament closes at mightnight tomorrow night.


ozs. ozs. ozs.





ozs. ozs.


Definition of a golfer: A man who blames fate for accidents, but feels personally responsible for a hole in one.

A woman columnist proudly points out that there are 30 per cent more men in mental hospitals than women. Okay, okay. But who put them there?


"I'm okay," signals Joe Adcock, Milwaukee Braves first baseman, after being beaned by Brooklyn Dodger hurler Clem Labine at Ebbets Field. Fortunately the Braves star was wearing a plastic helmet and escaped serious injury. The beaning occurred the day after Adcock had tied a major league record by hitting four home runs in one game.


Ladies' Golf Shots

by Miriam Hoy


Last Wednseday the ladies played the back nine for low gross and low net scores. It was a hot morning but those who came through with winning scores were:

First Flight
Gross-Alma McCracken
Net-Sue Scott

Second Flight
Gross-Nita Roberts
Net-Billie Nelson

Third Flight
Gross-Evelyn Leach
Net-Emma Hutton

It's nice having Val Evans back


Overheard on a Main Street Bus: "My husband will never chase another woman . . . he's too fine . . . too decent . . . too old!"


Overheard at a faculty meeting: "He's the dumbest student I've ever seen. Most of them don't know anything, but this guy doesn't even suspect!"

with us again and she seems to have fully recupereated.
We missed B. L. Sutherling, one of our regular players this week, who has undergone an operation. We wish you a speedy recovery and hope to see you on the links soon.

Next Wednesday we are playing the front nine for low gross and low net score.


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Page Five


SPECIAL DIVISION
Bonefish
wenzlaff, D. C. --------- 3 lbs., 10 ozs.
Wind, Marion A. -_---- 2 lbs., 8 ozs.
Emverzo, Epifanio --_- 2 lbs., 214 ozs.
Albacore
Smouse, J. H. ---------- 6 lbs., 4 ozs.
Croakers
Morales, Edith ---- 8 ozs.
Sanborn, Jim -_______ 8 ozs.
Dalton, Kathryn - 2 ozs.
Ladyfish
Smouse, J. H. ---------- 4 lbs., 8 ozs.
Parrotfish
Clark, D. L. ----------- 8 lbs., 1 oz.
Pompano
Bedward. Kenneth - 20 lbs. Giggy, G. K. ----------- 16 lbs., 4 ozs.
Romano, Sam --------- 8 lbs., 131/1 ozs.
Shark
Fimbel, E. C. ----------- 76 lbs.
Davenport, Dale ----_- 44 lbs., 8 ozs. Meredith, Fred -------- 41 lbs., 8 ozs.
Triggerfish
Lee, G. A.- --------------4 lbs., 6 ozs.


Sa d, 1Au st95







THE INDIAN


Saturday, 14 August 1954


- FTG Bulletin


LITTLE LEAGUE CHAMPIONS . . . . The Bears, winners of the 1954 Little League championship and strong contenders for the postseason play-offs being conducted on the Villamar diamond. Front row, left to right: Mickie Wickstrom, Ronnie Moseley, Robert Sanborn, Frank Kiefer, Donald McCoy, Rusty Magarrity and Mike Sanborn. Back row, left to right: Larry Smith, Tommy Mallia, Jim Sanborn, Manager Richard J. Modrow, Fred Meredith, Ramie Morales and Corky Wickstrom.














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Action occurs at home plate as Taft Albright slides in for a Tiger score as Bear Fred Meredith, covering home, drops the ball. The Bears won the play-off game, 7 to 4.







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Tiger Bob Tanner slides in under Bear 3rd baseman Tommy Mallia during the Tiger-Bear play-off game. Bears gave Tigers their first defeat in the tournament, 7 to 4.
05tNNN<


by Jack Engstrom
LCDR M. Gewertz, FTG Communications Officer, will depart Guantanamo Bay, Monday, 16 August via FLAW for the States. He will report to the Naval Communication Station at San Francisco, California where he will complete his last tour of duty, having completed 30 years service on the 11th of October 1956.
LCDR Gewertz entered the Naval Service on 12 October 1926 receiving his initial training at NTC San Diego. During World War II he served aboard the USS MASSACHUSETTS until 1943. He then served with the 3rd Amphib Force, in the South Pacific and aboard the USS TICONDEROGA.
Upon completing his last tour of duty, LCDR Gewertz will make his home in Santa Rosa, California.
A farewell party was given for Mr. Gewertz last Thursday evening by the Communications Department Personnel at the Lighthouse on Windward Point.

We wish to extend our best wishes to Mrs. F. L. Tedder, who is in the Hospital here. We hope you have a speedy recovery.

The FTG Softball Team, which has recently been organized, has been holding practice sessions twice a week at the Fleet Recreation Field.
There is still plenty of time to try out for the team. It is intnded to hold practice sessions twice a week with the possibility of a practice game a week, if conditions
mit. All FTG personnel who a-e interested in coming out for the team and ones who have been out already should c o n t a c t D-n Markham, the team manager, or LTJG Varty the Assistant Recreation Officer, concerning coming practices, games, equipment, etc.
Practice sessions have been scheduled for next Tuesday and Thursday evenings, from 5:00 to 7:00. All members are requested to be at Softball Diamond One in time so that a full practice session may be held.


Puttin' Around
by wright North

On the tournament side of play, NAS has completed their annual 36 hole tournament with Chief Rogers winning the tittle for gross honors with a 72-73=145 and Acree's 159 with a 15 handicap totaled 144 for net honors.
The next scheduled tournament will be the two-ball with partners having a combined handicap of 16 or more. No dates have been set for the annual Handican Championship since the tournament chairman is waiting some word on the ComTEN tournament as to whether it will be held here again this year or in Puerto Rico. The annual challenge match between Santiago Golf and Country Club and Gtmo Bay will probably be nlayed in November since their additional nine holes will be ready for play by then. Other off-station tournaments will include Chainpionship play this weekend at Mandeville, Jamaica.
Much interest has been shown in the Naval Station golf ladder and positions change every day, especially when a player with a 13 handicap goes out and scores a five over par 75. The handicap system will probably be changed in September when all score cards will he turned in, and your handicaps figured from the scores on the cards. 4


Mleqoc 0 NUSuMS

by CIl Joe Androvich, USMC

There were no departures for the states this past week from the Marine Barracks nor were there any new arrivals. The only departure was that of the Marine Parracks Baseball team to Marine Corps Air Station, Miami Florida, for a four day stay to engage the West Palm Beach Air Force team in a two game series August 11-12.
Cpl Bob Gatti and Pfc Plante are still trying to par the local golf course during their spare time. Last time out both men shot in the sixty's. . . . The first nine that is. . . . Cpl Felak just missed getting a 'birdie' by inches on the 19th hole.
Weekend anglers leaving from the Marine Boat Shed had very unsuccessful fishing as many of the boats returned empty. The only fish caught was a ten pound Grouper by Sgt. Jones . . . Should have seen the big ones that got away!
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Leach were the proud parents of a bouncing baby girl weighing 5 lbs 11 oz, born Sunday, 8 August. The parents have named the new arrival "Corlean Sue.' "Congratulations" from all of us here at the Marine Barracks!
Baseball Bunts
The Marine Baseball team ended the 1954 Naval Base season by adding another championship to their previously won league title. r rThe Leathernecks swept the post-season tournament by winning their first three games. . . . In the opening game against the VU10 Mallards, the combined pitching of Capt. "Smitty" Smith and the 6th inning home run by second ha-eman Jim Pace proved the deciding margin in the 5-4 victory. . . . The second game saw the
slugging Leathernecks overwhelm the Naval Station "Indians" by a score of 9-0. . . . The "Indians" were held to but two hits by Wayne No Hit Straw as he went on to win his third game of the season for the Marines. . . . The tournament final brought the Leathernecks and Naval Station "Indians" back against each other in a one sided game which proved to be no contest for the hard hitting Leathernecks as they scored at will. . . . Final score . .. 20-7 ....
Capt. "Smitty" Smith was the winning pitcher for the Marines gaining his 14th triumph of the season.
- . ..Wayne No-Hit Straw finished up in the late innings and was banged for three runs. . . . 1st baseman Larry Adams was the batting star of the game as he hit safely 5 out of his 6 times at bat. . . . Larry banged out the first grand slam of the season for the Marines .Final averages show Tom Felak as the leagues batting champ with a .417 average. . . . Capt. "Smitty" Smith emerged as the leagues top won and loss pitcher compiling a record of 12-1. . . . 4 of the top 5 home run hitters were Marines as the team total reached 48 for the 32 games. . . . Top Marine hitters are Felak .417 .... Pace .389. . . . Wood .345 . . . . Androvich .325. . . . and Adams .323. . . . The high scoring leathernecks scored a total of 278 runs for an average of 8 runs per ball game. . . . Opposition scored 149 for a 4 run average per game. . . . Only one shutout was registered against the Marines. "Congratulations" to the Leathernecks for one of the finest baseball seasons at Gtmo Bay, Cuba. . . . All loyal supporters of the team were more than appreciated by the team and a note of thanks is expressed from them.


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Saturday, 14 August 1954


Saturday, 14 August 1054 THE INDIAN Page Seven


TEENAGE-BOUND-UP VU-10 Prop Blast
by Bill Graves & Staff


by Judy Yost

The get- to- gethers at the Teenage Hut after the movies, have been lots of fun. Quite a few of the gang have been dropping by.
If most of the people thought we'd had a small quake last Saturday nite, it was only the kats jitter-bugging and a few brave ones shagging at the Community Building. What jumping! ! Even Pierce couldn't resist it! Some of the more active ones were taking it sort of slow-after being at the Villamar dance on Friday night, too.
Some of the kids have been going down to the Skating Rink on Tuesday nites, and having a real cool time. Goodness, they're even learning to skate backwards! So, if you haven't anything else to do, why not go down? It's loads of fun!
DID YA'LL HAPPEN TO SEE
-how pur- feet- ly bee- u- ti- ful Barbara B. looked as a bridesmaid
-Neil, Phil, Stanly, and Ronnie at the Little League play- off s- Art McGowan at the exchange trying to decide between comic books and balloons-All the boys discussing the new gals, (Filing your claim, boys ?)-One of the gals trying to get the formula from another for that bee-u-ti-ful-hair, (Gtmo sunshine, I guess.)-the kids really squirming when they saw "Them" at the movies-and caught in the act of stomping all the ants they've seen since-Ralph A. in his regular chair at Villamar movies-His receord of attendance is really somethin-Jimmy B.'s new girl-Edgar counting his toes to see if they were all there at the dance Saturday nite-Sharon K. and Babs P. strolling down second street, (RRRR-UFF)Two of our most popular teenagers left last week for the good ol' U.S.A. They were Don and Roxey Moore. Man, we really hated to see them go! Eveah-bodies leaving us!
Seriously, now, you know, the best place to meet people is the Sunday School or Church-We have some wonderful teachers and somehow, it makes our Sundays so much nicer if we've attended church What ever your faith, try it next Sunday and see for yourselves. There's a place for all of us at our Naval Base Chapel.


150 Supply Une


CDR E. W. Sutherling, Commanding Officer and LCDR W. J. Sheehan, Planning Officer recently returned from TAD in Norfolk, Va. and Washington, D. C.
Mr. and Mrs. William F. Griffin, Sr. recently flew to St. Petersburg, Florida to spend their annual vacation.
Mr. Robert Pendleton, Supervisory Storekeeper, GS-6 has returned to work after a month's leave. Mr. and Mrs. Pendleton, Bobby, Anna and Allan visited Mrs. Pendleton's family in Santiago and Mr. Pendleton's family in Mt. Airy, North Carolina.
Miss Laverne Knight was presented with a going-away gift by the girls of the Depot last Friday. Miss Knight is accepting a position at the Naval Hosptial.
We join LT K. C. Deere, Disbui' ing Officer and LT P. D. Larson, Material Division Officer, in welcoming their families to Gtmo. Mrs. Deere and daughter, Kathleen Ann came in on the THOMAS during its last trip. The Deeres are residing in OP-4. Mrs. Larson, Margaret,


LT Ed Henning has received orders to Glenview, Ill. for his next shore duty. Ed claims that he doesn' t have any influential friends, but you'll never convince me of that. Corky has been very active on the golf course and we are going to miss them at our squadron getto-gethers. They plan to leave around the first of the month.
Chief Pennel has been appointed one of the Game Wardens for this squadron. Mr. Pennell likes to hunt, and any man in the squadron that would like to go hunting, don't hesitate to contact him and he will be more than glad to go with you. But first, make sure that you have your own ammunition, gun, and transportation. This you must do by yourself.
IT Sam and Billie Hanlin left Wednesday for Pensacola where Sam will be a Basic Instructor. Good luck Sam and his family.
LCDR Bill Racette reported aboard Sunday night from Washington, D. C. Bill hails from Brooklyn, N.Y., and is a graduate of Annapolis, class of '42. He is married to the former Miss Frances Harding Church of Norfolk, Va. They have two children: William A. Jr., 3, and Theresa Elizabeth, 18 months.
The following men are leaving this wonderful squadron: Lybeck, Gemberling, Chief Carroll, Emerson, and Vicari. Good luck men.
VU-10 is of this date is very poorly represented in the Base Fishing Tournament. It appears that the Lind-Pound-HollingsheadCowley quartet picked up all the big ones before the starting date. For those interested in fishing, we offer you advice on the best time to angle. Taking into consideration basic factors such as high tide and good clear moon, drop in your hook between the hours of midnight and four AM, relax and be patient. A good heavy duty reel and rod together with 72 to 100 lb test line are prime requisites for a good battle, but, our Cuban friends never miss out with their hand lines.
The pushbutton age is here alright. So says Chief Hamilton, on observing the ability of the engine analyzer compared with the human ability of the squadron AD's. Ham says that its been overdue that the mechs be replaced with a machine anyway; it puts aviation ahead five years or so. Perhaps transitors or univacs will replace the electronics personnel just to get even. A good friend unmentioned here is the only man I know who brought spirits to Cuba. Reminds one of the "Coals to Newcastle" bit, or a sandwich to a banquet, etc. The crew of number two maintain that every meal is a feast. Every day's a holiday too, I suppose.

Peter and Amy arrived via FLAW last Wednesday evening. The Larsons are living in Quarters N325 B.
Welcome to the following new arrivals at the depot: Richard E. Kidd, BM3, from the USS Trathen (DD-530), Kidd's hometown is St. Albans, West Virginia. Leslie L. Schwerdtfeger, SK3, hometown, Tampa, F 1 o r i d a; William J. Devaney, Jr., SKSN, Carrollton, Michigan; James N. Deveraux, EN3, Savannah, Goergia; Anthony W. Bell, SK2, Somerville, Mass. all renorted from ComSub Group THREE, Green Cove Springs, Fla. Hope you will enjoy tour of duty nere.
LT and Mrs. William Karchere flew to Santiago last weekend.


4


What D' Ya' Say?

The INDIAN will award a certificate good for $1.00 worth of merchandise at the Navy Exchange for each question accepted and used. Submit your questions to Editor, The Indian, Box 19.)

The question: What do you think would be a good question of the week?

The place: Navy Exchange store.


William F. Doerner, SN, Harbor Police
"Why don't you try 'What's your opinion of having USO dances for enlisted personnel on the base?"


Leonard Nevin, CP, MCB-8
"You could ask 'What do you think is the ,most enjoyable thing down here ?'


Dennis Borowski, SN, Commissary Store
"'Do you think that the transportation facilities for men going on leave could be improved?'"


Mrs. Virginia Wertly, Villamar
"How about 'What do you like about being here?'"


G. M. Bailey, FTC, Fleet Training Group
"'What ball club do you think is the most improved this season ?' "


H. N. Bogin, AG3, N.A.S. "Why not 'How do you feel about being in the Navy?'"


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THE INDIAN


Page Seven






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THE INDIAN


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Saturday, 14 August 1954


MOVIES


Saturday, 14 August
THE UNTAMED HIERESS
Judy Canova Don Barry
Orphan's gratitude toward old prospector who wants to share his secret hoard with her gets into slapstick battle with a trio of crooks.
Sunday, 15 August TOP BANNANA
Phil Silvers Rose Marie
A TV funny man falls in love with a department store model. He signs ner for his show, but amid complications she falls in love with the show's tenor.
Monday, 16 August NAKED JUNGLE
Eleanor Parker Charlton Heston
Heston builds a home in the Amazon and reclaims much jungle, then he marries Eleanor Parker by proxy. All goes well until the entire plantation is destroyed when a dam is blown up to stop the advance of an army of ants. In color.
Tuesday, 17 August
DANGEROUS MISSION
Victor Mature Piper Laurie
A man is killed in a New York night club. The only witness, Piper Laurie, flees. Her refuge is discovered by the murderer and the D. A. Each sends an emissary, one to kill her, the other to bring her back to New York. In color.
Wednesday, 18 August
JOHNNY GUITAR
Joan Crawford Sterling Hayden
Female gambling-house owner is aided in her murderous war against the anti-railroad ranchers by a guitar-playing man. She hopes to make a million by building a town in the path of the proposed railroad.
Thursday, 19 August
TAZA, SON OF COCHISE
Rock Hudson Barbara Rush
When his father dies, Taza takes over and against all sorts of odds manages to keep peace between the Indians and the whites.
Friday, 20 August
RIDERS TO THE STARS William Lundigan
Herbert Marshall
Technician recovers rocket fragments in the desert. The rocket was hurled into the air at 18,000 miles per hour and has completely cuptallizized by cosmic rays. Scientists attempt to devise a shield against t1is.


As well as making her talents as a professional model pay off in South Bend, nd. (horne of Notre Dame) "Bobby Jane" Dixon dabbles as an intI erior decorator. She's just the sort of girl we'd like to have decorating our quarters-in more ways than one.


Hospital N otes 'Kismet,' 'Pyjama' Music


by Charles L. Brewer, YN3


Heirport News
During the past week the girls dominated the births here at the hospital. A daughter, Jane Denise Foster, born 7 August to AL3 and Mrs. Frederick D. Foster, a daughter, Corlene Sue Leach, born 9 August to Sgt. and Mrs. Ronald F. Leach.
Golf
Every leader in the individual flights last week has maintained their leadership this week. Although they still lead they are being pressed in every flight. As we round the half-way mark we again want to remind all participants that the only way you can get those "Ringers" is to get out on the course and play. The more you play the better chance you have to catch the leaders.
Departures
It was with regret that the Hospital saw the departure of CDR J. J. Timmes and family on the THOMAS last week. Dr. Times was our Chief of Surgery and also


Banned Far Overseas Play


Word has been received at Armed Forces Radio Station WGBY concerning the music from "Kismet" and "Pyjama Game" which was banned three weeks ago.
The copyright owners of the music have restricted it from being played overseas.
Among the more popular melodies from the two Broadway shows are: "Stranger in Paradise," "Hernando's H i d e a w a y," "Hey, There," and "Steam Heat."

our acting executive officer for almost a year. He was an active member in sports on the base as well as Assistant Coach of the Hospital Basketball Team last year. Dr. Times will report to the U. S. Naval Hospital, St. Albans, Long Island, New York for duty under instruction in residency training.


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NAS Crosswinds
by Dick Friz

WHO'S WHO AT NAS
Don Emory, who completes his four year hitch next month, has had the dubious distinction of having the ship he served on, reported sunk by the enemy. It goes something like this.
Don graduated from Milford High School in Delaware . . . he was president of the senior class and captain of the basketball team. He went to work for Dupont as a textile machine operator.... Then came the Korean episode and he enlisted in the Navy. After boot training at Great Lakes, Emory was assigned to the USS JAMES C. OWENS DD776, serving as a "deck ape." Later he assumed the role of yeoman . . . went to Naval Justice School at Newport, and returned to duty as court martial yeoman, working also as Public Information man for the destroyer. The OWENS left Norfolk for a world cruise in January in '52 . . routing through the Panama Canal and to the trouble spot of the Korean seas. For four month consecutively the screws were never silent. At Sangin harbor, they spotted a supply train . . . began picking it off, car by car . . . until the shore batteries retaliated with fierce bombarding, killing three men, and seriously wounding 6 more. The OWENS limped out of the harbor and headed for Yokasuka for repairs, unloading its dead and wounded at Pusan. It was then that the OWENS received the message that the enemy had reported them sunk.
The OWENS continued on its tour, hitting Signapore, Istanbul, Saudi Arabia (where Arabian Oil gave them a huge banquet, and where it was so hot, that they had to spray the batteries with water to keep them from eploding.) Then came a pleasant Med reprieve . . . the glories of Naples, Athens, Cannes, Gibraltar-and finally the States again.
Emory stayed with the Owens until May of '53, when he was then transferred to Guantanamo Bay.
Don is married to Margaret, a girl from his own home town, and they have a two year old daughter, Mary Ellen. Don extended for one year, but plans to open up a package liquor store back home when his tie is up.
Dots and Dashes
Mrs. Dean Clark, and Vernon Molusky sponsored a farewell gathering for Mr. and Mrs. Bob Heywang at Windmill Beach last Saturday. Members of the group who indulged in the picnic and swimming festivities, were William J. Lamson, John Dogan Jr.,
Frederick J. Green, of Personnel, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Allan Kemp, Edward Jones, and Frederick Butkowski. Mr. and Mrs. Heywang will depart for Key West soon. Bob was a member of VU-10 squadron and Jane worked in Central Office. Farewell and Good luck . . . as John Gay once said, "We only part to meet again."
The following men bid Bon Voyage . . . this past week . . .
Dave Galoney, AD1-to fighter squadron 172 . . . Claude Skyles AKAN, Squadron 62-Jacksonville, Robert Gillen AN-USS MIDWAY, Theodore Wilson BM2-VALLEY FORGE, and Robert Olsen, AKANFleet Air Wing, Quonset Point.
A member of visiting Squadron 85 solved the ice lump problem in the chow hall recently. Not able to get the huge piece in his glass, he improvised with the huge hunting knife, he had strapped to his belt.




Full Text

PAGE 1

m m ~seg~ "overs qTMO Like The Sunshine"Vol. VI, No. 58 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 14 August 1954 Marines Conduct Instructor Training For two weeks now, a group of four officers, seven chiefs, and 14 petty officers from Naval Station, Naval Air Station, and VU-10 have been undergoing a three weeks' course which will prepare them to be instructors for the Naval Emergency Ground Defense Force. In addition to the training which will be given-by these future instruetors-to personnel of the three commands, these men have also been tutored in the "whys" and "ways" of instructing. Upon completion of this course -being given by the staff officers and staff NCOs of the Marine Barracks-the new instructors will take over two separate groups for training. The first will consist of 80 percent of the three commands for a one week period, and the second will be a two week class for 25 percent of the normal compliment for the commands. Each command-with the officers and petty officers now attending instructions acting as the staff officers and staff NCOs-will form a rifle platoon, the three platoons making up the Naval Emergency Ground Defense Force for Guantanamo Bay. In the event of an emergency, this defense force would assist the Marine Barracks in their tactical and guard duties until Marine replacements arrived. The first week of the three weeks course now In progress was an intensfied training period in the subjects of Technique of Instruction, Interior Guard Duty, Ceremonies, Preliminary Marksmanship Training, and Small Arms Instruction--the M-1 Garand rifle and the Carbine. Beginning the second week, the class took to the field as they went out to the rifle range for firing and then on to the open field for instruction in the tactics of squads and platoons. To complete the instructor's course, after a rough week in the field, the students will take over as instructors of their own classes, and each man will have a period of instruction, preparing him to take over any phase of the instruction assigned to him by his command. 3rd Navy Super Carrier Is Named USS Ranger Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has named its third super aircraft carrier the USS Ranger. This marks the eighth U.S. ship to be called "Ranger," dating back to the Revolutionary War days. The new Ranger, being built at Newport News, Va., is a 60,000-ton floating base. It is designed to provide the striking power of more than 100 carrierbase aircraft. Robert Blazek Receives $1046 Enlistment Bonus Robert E. Blazek, HN, of the Naval Hospital here, happily contemplates how his bank book will grow with the addition of the $1046.68 he received in the form of a re-enlistment bonus, travel, and mustering out pay. Blazek, who hails from Cleveland, Ohio, was one of the first men here to re-enlist under the snew boiius bill, and by, so doing received over $250 more than he would have under the old bill. Upon leaving the disbursing office, Blazek, smiled and said, "It's just about enough for a good weekend's liberty." .NavBase Personnel Tested Men of the Naval Base of Pay examinations for Pay Grade E-4 hel Enlisted Men's Club. Over 430 men Pay Grade E-5 will be held Tuesday,: will be held on 24 August. 600 Students Start School Aug 23 One Day Registration Period 19 Aug Over 600 students will have a last fling at summer vacation next week, and almost as many parents will breathe a sigh or relief on Monday, 23 August as the Naval Base School opens it doors for another semester. The enrollment this year is expected to total about 630 for all Dependents SCheduled grades (nursery through 12th grade), or about 50 more than were enrolled last year, according to For New IU Cards Mr. T. G. Scarborough, Principal of the school. InRegistration for all students ill in acordncewitha reent take place on Thursday 19 August SecNav instruction, a new type of in the following rooms at the dependent's identification card is school: being issued to all dependents on Grade 1 Room 18 Grade 7 Room 26 the Naval Base. The new card-the DD Form Grade 2 Room 1 Grade 8 Room 8 720-is established primarily to Grade 4 Room 11 Grade 10 Room 6 identify dependents of Navy and Grade 5 Room 14 Grade 11 Room 5 Marine Corps personnel, and acGrade 6 Room 21 Grade 12 Room 20 cording to the instruction, the new Kindergarten enrollment is limitcard is established for an experied to children who will reach the mental period of one year. If it age of five (5) on or before 1 proves successful, it will be conJanuary 1911. Age limit for the tinued. first grade is six (6) on or before This new card, however, will 1 January. replace the eligibility cards now in Children may be entered in the use for base entry, commissary nursery school any time during the stores, ship's stores ashore, exschool year after they have reached changes, and medical services. Nonthe age of 2 Mr. Scarborough appropriated funds activities, such stressed the importance of presentas clubs, golf courses, swimming lug written proof of age for chilpools; which currently isste and dren entering either the nursery, require varying types of identificakindergarten or the first grade for tion cards, are enjoined to make all the first time. The child's birth practicable use of the DD Form 720 certificate is desirable, but if the identification card. certificate is not available sworn Issuing of these cards here at affidavit, obtainable at the Legal the Naval Base has been progressOffice of the base administration (Continued on Page Three) building, is acceptable. Charges for the nursery school For atin Adanceent and the kindergarten, which are F or Rating Advancement entirely self-sufficient, are $15.00 a month for the nursery and $10.00 a month for the kindergarten. It will be necessary for all pupils to bring their immunization papers in order that the school may verify immunization against small-pox, tetanus, typhoid and diptheria at the time of registration. Information about daily schedules, bus schedules, etc. will be given to parents at the time of registration. This year 12 new tachers have been added to the school staff as >f~u#replacements for former teachers who have been transferred and to Knsupplement the regular teaching staff. In the first grade, Mrs. Peggy aLee and Mrs. June Beiland have been added to join Mrs. Amelia Dunmire and Mrs. Dale Ward. The second grade has the addition of Mrs. Eloise Grant along with Mrs. Darlene Shuller, Mr. Fay Yarbro and Mrs. Alfreda Syvinski. Mrs. Jo Ann Morgan and Mrs. Edith Savage have been assigned to the third grade along with Mrs. Ettie Usey. In the fourth grade Mrs. Freddie Morphis is a new addition to supplement Mrs. Jessie Penner. Mrs. Vivian Lawrence returns to indteach the fifth grade in addition Gde E-st buegyin the sevice wtaide to Miss Dorothy Bush who reported too lath tesay inThe Nxaviationo from the States last night. Mrs. teWava Hutmmel continues in the 17 Auguet, and the E-6 examinations sixth grade along with the addition (Continued on Page Three)

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Saturday, 14 August 1954 ,0gadiani The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9-615 Saturday, 14 August 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sandnes ------Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis. JOCt -o -------------Editor H. L. Sisson, JO3-------------News Jerry Lewis, JO3 ------Features Pierce Lelibeeeb --------Sporis F. L. Cannone JOSN----Photogra-pher 1HE INDIAN is published weekly at th, Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and m nae witi nednapperopiated cngdsi TH INoDIAN s arembe a th .A, Forces Pess oerice ardAFPateal appsearingbhrn mu-,stnot be reproduced wi~thout written, permeission. Local news 'may be re-printed pr-ovided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photogeaphs are afficbal U S. Na photos unless otierwise credited. An Editorial Leaders of Tomorrow by Chaplain Sammy Reid, USN ComDesRon 12 The following story was told to me by an aged father who had raised a large family of nine children in the southern part of the United States. He told me the story to illustrate his own folly in not having complete trust in his children. As judged by the outside world, he was a very good moral man. He was a prominent man in the community and sincere and conscientious in his work. He had built up quite a nice reputation for himself in his particular field of endeav o r. He was respected throughout the state and it seemed that many outsiders loved him. But, his own children did not love him. in fact, his own son told me, after his father died, that he had hated his own dad. The children of this austere father couldn't be like other "kids." They were always being accused of wrongdoing. Sometimes these accusations were false and the father never knew how much suffering he brought on the children. One day he accused his little boy of stealing some money that had been placed in a jar and put on a shelf in the kitchen. The boy denied having stolen the money. The father was very angry and beat the boy severely. He tried every way to make the boy confess that he had stolen the money. And, as we would say in the Navy, he restricted the child for several days. The boy was very unhappy and miserable. Then one clay it was learned that it was the boy's mother who had misplaced the money. The money was found! In talking to the boy in later life, his father asked him, "Son, what would you have done if the money had not been found?" The boy replied, "I would have killed myself!" Children ought to be trusted. They ought to be allowed to share INDIAN Photo Contest Winners Announced The winners in the Indian photography contest were announced last week by a judging staff from the Indian editorial committee consisting of CDR V. J. Soballe, Executive Officer, Naval Station, Mr. H. P. McNeal, Industrial Relations Officer, and H. E. Davis, JOC, editor of the Indian. First prize in the contest was awarded to Dale D. Rose, PH3, of the Atlantic Fleet Party for his photo of a sunset over Guantanamo Bay. First prize in the contest amounted to a $20 merchandise certificate. Second prize went to Benn S. Jackson, HM1, of the Naval Air Station Dispensary for his pin-up model photo. Second prize was $10 merchandise certificate. Plans are being formed for weekly contest. Details wil be announced as soon as possible. in many of the decisions in the home. They ought to be treated as human beings. They ought to be respected. Our "teenagers" for example, are a wonderful lot. And, remember, they are the leaders of tomorrow 40 Girl: "Gosh, it's past midnight! You'd better get going. Guy: "Okay, turn out the lights." Sixteen: "Have you ever been kissed?" Seventeen "Only by a 3-D movie." Sunday, 15 August 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: S at u r d a y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) The Chaplain's Corner T If there is any example of incautiousness in our modern life, it is found in the great death-toll taken by our reckless auto-driving. The only way to improve these conditions, is for each driver to make himself more safe, by observing the rules. Caution is a great good; for it prevents evils. And as natural caution prevents natural evils, so holy caution prevents spiritual evils. People who care nothing for caution, say: 'Why worry?' If there is no reason to worry, worry is indeed foolish. But when there is real reason, it is wise to worry. Such worry is mental health, such as he has who goes to a physician for an infection or disease. You would certainly call him a fool if instead he said: 'Why worry?' and would let the infection or disease take its course. Life is full of blessings. But they must be used rightly. You have an auto; it is a great blessing to you in many ways. But unless you use the blessings rightly and with caution, they will be liable to prove your utter curse instead of blessing. Our Savior wanted us to look ahead and provide against evil. He gave us the parable of the five wise, and five foolish virgins: the first five of whom had provided oil for their lamps, the others no oil. Another point that our Lord laid stress on was this: if there is an occasion which is casuing us to fall into evil, we must do all in our power to remove it; otherwise it is going to bring us to destruction. Saint Paul sums it up in this manner when he tells us: "See to it therefore, that you walk with care, not as unwise but as wise, making the most of your time." W. J. Spinney LCDR, CHC, USN b em THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 14 August 1954 Children Awarded Swimming Certificates According to the Naval Air Station Special Services department, the recent swimming classes for children were very successful. Of the 15 classes, only two were the advanced lessons for those who already could swim 50 yards. The classes began early in the summer with over 350 students signed up for instructions. Classes progressed rapidly, and after the ten lessons were completed only a small handful of children could not swim well enough to cross the width of the pool. Certificates of swimming achievement were awarded to those completing the course. For those childern who addresses were on the roster, the certificates were sent out to their homes. If any child who completed the course satisfactorily has not received his or her certificate yet, it is because no address was given to send them to. Parents may pick up these certificates at the Naval Air Station Special Services Office. ID Cards. (Continued from Page One) ing at a reasonable rate. However, dependents of Naval Station personnel are reminded that these cards must be applied for (application blank is DD Form 719 which sould be filled out completely) by Friday, 20 August. After the card has been applied for, and the personnel office has completed the card, dependents will be called in by their card number for their signature and finger print on the card, and a photograph if none is available. The cards will then be laminated and delivered to the dependent. Dependents are asked to cooperate in reporting to the personnel office as soon as they are called in for their signature and photograph and finger print. It dependents will report in on the time assigned to them, it will avoid the confusion of not having the card when it officially goes into effect here on the Naval Base. This new identification card will be recognized by commands of the Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard when it is determined that existing facilities are adequate to provide service. Possession of this card alone does not, of itself, authorize any dependent to enter into any classified security area, and it is not intended to replace any security system in any way-past or present. School. (Continued from Page One) of Mrs. Madelon Schwartz. The High School has added four new teachers, Mr. Ralph Jones, Mrs. Iraida Davis, Mrs. Ruth Liveakos and Mrs. Carmen Ward. Returning for another year are Mrs. Lydia Stagnaro, Mrs. Dorothy Campbell, Mrs. Lonita McGill, Mr. William McGill and Mrs. Lillian Armbruster. Mrs. Louse McNeal remains in the nursery school and in kindergarten Mrs. Ruth Groenevald and Mrs. Myra Wilkinson have been added while Mrs. Luclille Burke and Mrs. Edrie Becker are returnees from last year. NSD Stock Control Serves Fleet, Naval Base With Over 80,000 Different Items Seciton of the issue desk showing clerk Rafael Blanco checking requisitions for fleet and base personnel. What'll it be, mate? A needle? Sure thing. May I help you sir? An anchor? Yes sir. From a needle to an anchor in five minutes. That's routine for the Stock Control Branch at the Naval Supply Depot. Here the stock records are maintained for over 80,000 different items ranging not only from a needle to an anchor but from bean pots to battle lanterns, from catsup to carburetors and from ice to coal. Stock Control is a busy place servicing all base activities as well as the various fleet units by processing over 1,000 of these item requests daily. With over 80,000 items to choose from you would think that everyone could be satisfied but is far from true. Daily special orders go out to supply activities in Norfolk, Mechnicsburg, Pa., Portsmouth, N. H., and Miami for items not stocked in Gtmo. Stock replenishment is handled by an eight man team and this is probably the most ticklish job in the branch. A miscalculation or a mistake in a stock number could easily result in loading a warehouse in Gtmo with an item more appropriate to Argentia. The whole branch still shudders when the word "bellows" is used-a handy device for a New England fireplace, but of limited demand here in Gtmo. For some unknown reason a pallet load of them appeared in the warehouse and it was many a grey hair and furrowed brow later before they got shipped back to Norfolk. More serious, however, to the Stock Control Branch than the material which is here and shouldn't be is the material which should be here and isn't This can happen for many reasons, unavailability of the item in the world-wide system, delays in transporting the item to Gtmo, or an abnormal run on the item at the issuing level resulting in the stock being temporarily exhausted. Have you ever tried to explain unavailability, transportation difficulties or abnormal issue rates to the engineer of a destroyer? That sometimes gets to be quite a task. Stock Control is here to serve you and takes pride in doing it's very best. We try never to say "No" but often we're forced to say "Not yet, but we're still trying." Drop in on us sometime. You'll see what a great improvement on the old fashioned crystal ball well kept stock records can be. Stock batteries in action on a typical day in the depot. The former Miss Myrna Jeaneen Hummel a n d Marcus Adrian Kinchen prepare to leave the church after their wedding at the Naval Base Chapel last Saturday. Jeaneen Hummel Weds Marcus Kinchen Here One of the rarest of all events in Guantanamo Bay -a wedding took place last Saturday in the Naval Base Chapel when Myrna Jeaneen Hummel and Marcus Adrian Kinchen were married by Chaplain M. 0. Stephenson in a double ring ceremony. Miss Hummel, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. HummelMr. Hummel is a civil engineer for the Naval Base-was given in marriage by her father. Her gown of chantilly lace featured a diagonally pleated bodice with a sheer yoke, accented with appliques, sequins, and seed pearls. The bouffant skirt ended in a chapel train. Her fingertip veil of French illusion fell from a lace crown. She carried a bridal bouquet of lillies of the valley centered with white orchids. Miss Hummel borrowed the traditional Delta Gamma pearls and wore heirloom diamond earrings for something old. Mrs. Phillip H. Dunmire, matron of honor, wore a saphire blue tulle gown with strapless bodice, fitted lace jacket and matching picture hat. Her flowers were red roses. Attendants Shiela Cormack, Boston, Mass., and Barbara Burke were in identically styled light blue tulle. Martha Gordon, flower girl, wore embrordered scalloped blue organza. The bridegroom, son of Mr. and Mrs. Cleo P. Kinchen, Keystone Heights, Fla., asked his father to be best man. Ushers were LT T. H. Cushman, Jr., and Elliot Cormack. The bride and bridegroom will spend a honeymoon in Havana, and will then take up residence in Gainesville, Fla., w h e r e Mr. Kinchen is office manager of Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. The former Miss Hummel first took up residence in Guantanamo Bay in 1945 and went on to graduate from the Naval Base High School. Both Mr. and Mrs. Kinchen graduated from the University of Folrida where Mrs. Kinchen majored in elementary education and was a member of the Glee Club, Florida Players, and Delta Gamma Sorority. Mr. Kinchen majored in engineering. THE INDIAN m m Page Thre

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m Page yo THE INDIAN sm Saturday, 14 August 1954 'Just Luck!' He Calls It. Pictured with a prize catch of D.D. Huffman, DCC, who fought for 25 minutes before he landed the 76-pound, 8-ounce Tarpon at the mouth of the Guantanamo River last Monday night while boat fishing with rod and reel, is W.I. Jones, at left and Cheif Andrews at right by Jerry Lewis Glenn Abbott, civilian employee and veteran spear-fisherman, dove to get a glimpse of the scuttled hulk of the USS MERRIMAC buried deep in the slime of Santiago de Cuba harbor last month and ran into a bit of "luck" that weighed in at over 200-pounds! On the afternoon of July 7, Glenn boated to about 250-yards off Morro cavity. The jewfish, slihtly anCastle with two Cuban boys. The noyed, headed for deep water like object of the trip was to attempt a slow freight pulling out of the to locate the remains of the MERyards, dragging Glenn along after RIMAC scuttled by U. S. Naval him as though he never existed. forces during the Spanish-AmerThe strain proved too much for the ican War in order to block the spear, however, and it caie loose, mouth of the harbor, thereby slightly bent but still serviceable. bottling the Spanish armada up Abbott followed the course of the within the confines of the bay. fish as it swain slowly away and Abbott, aided by duckfins and watched it come to rest. Surfacing mask and armed with an Arbolette, to recoup, Glenn dove once again intended to ward off any curious with the taut hands of the spearpiscatorial guardians of the bay, gun straining to be unleashed at dove through the choppy water and the slightest squeeze of the trigger. descended into the crystal world Another shot, and another failure. of aquamarine blue. This time, the barbs struck soft At six fathoms, be stopped short flesh and stayed closed. Again the and rubbed his hand over the thick spear fell idly away from the now glass of his mask to be sure it was fully-aroused monster. no shadow he saw. The black htlk started for shal"I saw a huge, dark, fat cigarlow water with Glenn in full purshaped object lying motionless on suit. At 40 feet, Glenn dived again. the bottom. After investigating it, He swam within three feet of the I found it to be a giant Jewfish," irritated fish, squeezed the hairGlenn said later. trigger and let go the spear for After properly surveying the the third time. With a smooth situation, Glenn surfaced for a metallic 'swish', it flashed through short breather, checked his gun and the clear water and found its mark made ready for battle, which, judgjust aft of the large left eye, burying from the immensity of the fish, lug itself deep in the brain of the was going to be a guerra grandejewfish. Barbs sprung open and the a euvtussle!" six-foot, frayed nylon line took the "a helluva tussle!"' The first dive brought Glenn strain well. within yards of the big fish and The giant mouth opened and lie let go isn only spear at the gill closed one-and then was still. But only half the battle was won. The fish provided no further fight but boating the huge prize, longer in feet than it's captor was tall, was another problem to be dealt with. Glenn surfaced, repeatedly stabbing the fish in the soft areas of the gill to further insure the victory. A stream of deep claret flowed from the fresh wounds "like smoke from a locomotive" and attracted a curious visitor. Following Glenn and the huge jewfish close behind, was a 10-foot hammerhead shark, swimming pedantically, its huge, ugly head swaying from side to side like some creature from the forbidden depths of the sea! Breaking the surface, Glenn breathed deeply, filling his lungs with good, clean air. The water was choppy and he gulped mouthfulls as he searched for the boat-in vain! It was nowhere to be seen. The situation grew quite uncomfortable as Glenn once again made a careful observation of his predicament. The boat was gone. Attached to his thin line was over 200-pounds of dead weight. Scarcely more than a few yards behind him lolled a huge hammerhead, curiously intent on the white-limbed swimmer and his bloody catch. Abbott started for shore, towing his strange caravan behind him for over 45 minutes! S w i m m i n g through choppy waves yelling "Shark! Shark!" on top of his lungs in hopes of being heard and tugging at the jewfish that seemed to smile sarcastically in death, proved no easy task. Adding to his burden, Mister Hammerhead followed close beihnd, never hinting what his next move might be. After what seemed an eternity, Glenn discovered the small boat and called for help. The craft came alongside and took the tired swimmer aboard. 6 "The shark didn't worry ine but I didn't want to lose that big fish", he said later. Glenn has met up with alno=t every concievable species of shark in the course of his years of spearfishing. Ever since his encounter with a playful Blue shark that he sent on its way with a solid kick in the snoot, he is convinced of their meekness. The big hammerhead suddenly disappeared, his curiousity having been satisfied. The weight of the jewfish proved too much for the small boat. They could not take it aboard for fear of capsizing. The dilemma came to a welcome end when a passing motor launch threw them a line and towed the entire party to shore. Prior to the capture of the record-breaking jewfish, (Garrupa nigrita) Glenn amassed, singlehandedly, over 150-pounds of other assorted species which brought the day's total to a figure exceeding 350 pounds! After being offered a mere 10-cents a pound at the market that evening in Santiago, Glenn decided to distribute all but three pounds, which he kept for himself, among the needy folk and friends in town. Glenn insists the whole caper was purely 'luck'. "That's all it was -just luck!" he repeated. The idea of tying into a giant jewfish with no other ties than a six-foot frayed line seemed ridiculous after the whole thing was over. "Just luck" he added. This reporter wonders if it was luck, too, that sent Glenn Abbott's spear deep into the body of a record-breaking Hogfish the very morning of the day the preceding story was related. P.S.-He didn't find the MerriDnac. m ur F

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Saturday. 14 August 1954 Fishing Contest Latest Fishing Entries LAND DIVISION Barracuda Plst, C. W. -518/2 lbs. Hackent, A. -14 lbs., 10 ozs. Deon. ..12 lbs., 1 ozs. Fiubel. E.C. -C--S3 lbs. Grouper Sis, Miche L -----6 lbs., oz. tanlin, Lobe Paul .-. 1 14 ozs. Hardes, G. .1 lb., 2/4 ozs. Hise, N. L. ---sos.s MacAnannsoy, R. E. ___ 19 lbs. S ezs. Simmsons, Cecil-ro15 lbs. Rsyod, Sam14 lbs. 81/ ozs. Nie. W. .----12 lbs. 8 os. Fisbel, E. C. -14 lbs. 951/ ozs. Mackerel (King) Howertccon, RI. D. --5 lbs., 10 os. Snapper Felley, C. L. ----60 lbs., 1/ o. Sesey, .L. -.-24 lbs. Kellen, C. L. 12 lbs. Fts, L. A. Snp---p15 lbs. 8 os. Snook Bsda, Geoge -10 lbs. 4 os. Hone, T. A. -lbs. Tarpon Baoss, George-____28 lbs., 8 os. Scott. W. H. -------3 lbs., 1 ozs. Widd, M KonAt __ 21 lbs. Emrwazd, K. 2.17 lbs. collins, J. H. -roakr 16 lbs. Mackerel Spaniosh/Common) Dea, W. V. --7 lbs. Code S m --------8 s18 ozs. BOAT DIVISION Mackerel (King) Smose, J. H. ----1---74 lbs. Seos, J. F. 11 lbs., 8 ozs. arracuda Ceeoll, J. C. Tr e 2 s4 lbs. Conniosgbm. J.H. ____,17 lbs., 1_ 6 o. Dsvenport, Sid --16 lbs., 8 os. Wahoo Ssousl, .H. -----24 lbs. Jacks Dastens, R. L. -___ 12 lbs., 14. ozs. Snapper hobets, V. A. ---5 lbs. Jobaso DI. -a--p-46 lbs. Johsos, E. M. -------40 lbs. Snook Envso, Epidansios15 lbs. C os. Tiabs. S. ---_______12 lbs., 8 os. Csrringto, L Barie r 12 lbs., 4 os. Wilson, W. H. -6 lbs., 1 ozs. Tarpon Adw, G. .____ 59 lbs., 4 ozs. Fimsbel, E. C. ---40 lbs. Davis, N. Q. --25 lbs. 4 os. SPECIAL DIVISION Bonefio wonlams ft. C. -o lbs., 10 os. Wind, Marione A. 2 lbs. 8 os. Evero, Epiani 2 lbs., p 4 os. Albacore Soosse, J. H. -II__ lbs., 4 os. Croakers Mocas, Edi m---8 sos. Sanbo men Ji'syoa.-u wos. Doltot Kathrey ?-os. Ladyfisb Smsousc, J. H. ----4 lbs. 8 os. Parrotfish Clork, D. L. ---5 lbs. 1 oz. Pompano Becdward. Kcsnscth __-20 lbs. G~iggy, 0. Kd.--16 lbs., 4 os. Roman,so Sans5-lbs., 13/ os. Shark Fimsbcl, E. C. --76 lbs. Davcenport, Dale---44 lbs. 8 os. Mcredith, Frcd --41 lbs. 8 os. Triggerfisb Lce, G. A. ---4 lbs., 8 os. SPEARFISHING DIVISION Elwcood, J. D. --56 lbs. Nichols, E. M. ----16 lbs. Jacks Deaon, W. V. -----18 lbs. 8 os. Andews. IR. M. -14 lbs. Mackerel Scheibel, K. E. -1____ lbs., 11 ozs. Snappers Ward, G. F.--_____14 lbs. 11 ozs. Nicbols, E. M. --14 lbs. Barracuda Plath, C. W. ---181/2 lbs. Poce, Robcrt ---12 lbs. Andccws, R. M. -____10 lbs. Hagfish allard, L. F. -7 lbs. 12 ozs. Ward, G. F.-------5 lbs., 15 os. Definition of a golfer: A man who blames fate for accident, hut feels personally responsible for a hole in one. A woman columnist proudly points out that there are 30 per cent more 1me01 in mental hospitals than women. Okay, okay. But who put them there? The Angle(R) by Jerry Lewis In picking up where we left off before, let's look into some of the characteristics of individual members of the infamous shark tribe. Among the many species that come under the heading 'Shark' are a couple of smaller fellows you are more likely to come across just off-shore or hiding under pierpilings. They have earned nasty reputations with net fishermen because of their destructive nature. One of them is called the dogfish and swims alongside his brother the sand shark. Both are the most common of the smaller sharks, especially the dogfish which is known to Californians as the greyfish. He is the fisherman's headache and pet peeve because of his habit of driving away mackerel, cod, herring and other commercial food fishes. They have large sharp spikes just in front of each dorsal fin with which they tear and destroy fish nets. They steal bait and devour hooked fish as they struggle on the hook. The cost of their deviltry annually is estimated to exceed $400,000 off the Massachusetts coast alone! The dogfish is generally from three to four feet long, slate colored with a rounded head and flattened snout. Trawls with 1500 hooks have been brought up with a struggling dogfish, some as large as six feet long, on every hook! The sand shark is almost as numerous as his pesty brother and averages from five to six feet in length, gray colored and spotted with brown. He is sluggish in contrast with his more aqua-dynamically designed cousins but is still fast enough to destroy great numbers of smaller fish such as flounder, mackerel and butterfish. Both nuisances are considered harmless but are slak-like enough to throw an unhealthy scare into a swimmer who happens to be in their feeding area. The sharp spikes of the dogfish are to be respected too. They can inflict a nasty cut. These two yellows are less likely to strike a swimmer as are the bigger members of the clan. They are bothersome and dogged in their attempts at securing a good meal. It need not be mentioned more than once that it is poor policy to swim between any member of the shark family and his dinner! Beaming After Beaning C. L. Kelley Snags Prize Snapper C. L. Kelly, SHC, displays the 60-pound-8-ounce snapper he caught at AATC area. The fish was entered in the Naval Base Fishing Tournment and, so far, is the leader in the Land Division. The tournament closes at mightnight tomorrow night. "I'm okay," signals Joe Adcock, Milwaukee Braves first baseman, after being beaned by Brooklyn Dodger hurler Clem Labine at Ebbets Field. Fortunately the Braves star was wearing a plastic helmet and escaped serious injury. The beaning occurred the day after Adcock had tied a major league record by hitting four home runs in one game. 6 Ladies' Golf Shots by Miriam Hoy Last Wednseday the ladies played the back nine for low gross and low net scores. It was a hot morning but those who came through with winning scores were: First Flight Gross-Alma McCracken Net-Sue Scott Second Flight Gross-Nita Roberts Net-Billie Nelson Third Flight Gross-Evelyn Leach Net-Emma Hutton It's nice having Val Evans back Overheard on a Main Street Bus: "My husband will never chase another woman ...be's too fine ... too decent ...too old!" Overheard at a faculty meeting: "He's the dumbest student I've ever seen. Most of them don't know anything, but this guy doesn't even suspect!" with us again and she seems to have fully recupereated. We missed B. L. Sutherling, one of our regular players this week, who has undergone an operation. We wish you a speedy recovery and hope to see you on the links soon. Next Wednesday we are playing the front nine for low gross and low net score. m THE INDIAN a Page Prve ,aura 1Au st95

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m LITTLE LEAGUE CHAMPIONS .The Bears, winners of the 1954 Little League championship and strong contenders for the postseason play-offs being conducted on the Villamar diamond. Front row, left to right: Mickie Wickstrom, Ronnie Moseley, Robert Sanborn, Frank Kiefer, Donald McCoy, Rusty Magarrity and Mike Sanborn. Back row, left to right: Larry Smith, Tommy Mallia, Jim Sanborn, Manager Richard J. Modrow. Fred Meredith, Ramie Morales and Corky Wickstrom. Action occurs at home plate as Taft Albright slides in for a Tiger score as Bear Fred Meredith, covering home, drops the ball. The Bears won the play-off game, 7 to 4. Tiger Bob Tanner slides in under Bear 3rd baseman Tommy Mallia during the Tiger-Bear play-off game. Bears gave Tigers their first defeat in the tournament, 7 to 4. FTG Bulletin by Jack Engstrom LCDR M. Gewertz, FTG Cominunications Officer, will depart Guantanamo Bay, Monday, 16 August via FLAW for the States. He will report to the Naval Communication Station at San Francisco, California where he will complete his last tour of duty, having completed 30 years service on the 11th of October 1956. LCDR Gewertz entered the Naval Service on 12 October 1926 receiving his initial training at NTC San Diego. During World War II he served aboard the USS MASSACHUSETTS until 1943. He then served with the 3rd Amphib Force, in the South Pacific and aboard the USS TICONDEROGA. Upon completing his last tour of duty, LCDR Gewertz will make his home in Santa Rosa, California. A farewell party was given for Mr. Gewertz last Thursday evening by the Communications Department Personnel at the Lighthouse on Windward Point. We wish to extend our best wishes to Mrs. F. L. Tedder, who is in the Hospital here. We hope you have a speedy recovery. The FTG Softball Team, which has recently been organized, has been holding practice sessions twice a week at the Fleet Recreation Field. There is still plenty of time to try out for the team. It is intended to hold practice sessions twice a week with the possibility of a practice game a week, if conditions n"rmit. All FTG personnel who a'e interested in coming out for the team and ones who have been out already should contact D-n Markham, the team manager, or LTJG Varty the Assistant Recreation Officer, concerning coming practices, games, equipment, etc. Practice sessions have been scheduled for next Tuesday and Thursday evenings, from 5:00 to 7:00. All members are requested to be at Softball Diamond One in time so that a full practice session may be held. Puttin' Around by Wright North On the tournament side of play, NAS has completed their annual 36 hole tournament with Chief Rogers winning the tittle for gross honors with a 72-73= 145 and Acree's 159 with a 15 handicap totaled 144 for net honors. The next scheduled tournament will be the two-ball with partners having a combined handicap of 16 or more. No dates have been set for the annual Handicap Championship since the tournament chairman is waiting some word on the ComTEN tournament as to whether it will be held here again this year or in Puerto Rico. The annual challenge match between Santiago Golf and Country Club and Gtmo Bay will probably be played in November since their additional nine holes will be ready for play by then. Other off-station tournaments will include Championship play this weekend at Mande-ille, Jamaica. Much interest has been shown in the Naval Station golf ladder and positions change every day, especially when a player with a 13 handicap goes out and scores a five over par 75. The handicap system will probably be changed in September when all score cards will be turned in, and your handicaps figured from the scores on the cards. 4 by Cpl Joe Androvich, USMC There were no departures for the states this past week from the Marine Barracks nor were there any new arrivals. The only departure was that of the Marine Barracks Baseball team to Marine Corps Air Station, Miami Florida, for a four day stay to engage the West Palm Beach Air Force team in a two game series August 11-12. Cpl Bob Gatti and Pfe Plante are still trying to par the local golf course during their spare time. Last time out both men shot in the sixty's. ...The first nine that is. ...Cpl Felak just missed getting a 'birdie' by inches on the 19th hole. Weekend anglers leaving from the Marine Boat Shed had very unsucceessful fishing as many of the boats returned empty. The only fish caught was a ten pound Grouper by Sgt. Jones ...Should have seen the blg ones that got away! Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Leach were the proud parents of a bouncing baby girl weighing 5 lbs 11 oz, born Sunday, 8 August. The parents have named the new arrival "Corlean Sue.' "Congratulations" from all of us here at the Marine Barracks! Baseball Bunts The Marine Baseball team ended the 1954 Naval Base season by adding another championship to their previously won league title. ...The Leathernecks swept the post-season tournament by winning their first three games. ...In tne opening game against the VU10 Mallards, the combined pitching of Capt. "Smitty" Smith and the 6th inning home run by second b eman Jim Pace proved the deciding margin in the 5-4 victory. The second game saw the slugging Leathernecks overwhelm the Naval Station "Indians" by a score of 9-0. ...The "Indians" were held to but two hits by Wayne No Hit Straw as he went on to win his third game of the season for the Marines. ...The tournament final brought the Leathernecks and Naval Station "Indians" back against each other in a one sided game which proved to be no contest for the hard hitting Leathernecks as they scored at will. ...Final score .20-7 Capt. "Smitty" Smith was the winning pitcher for the Marines gaining his 14th triumph of the season. ...Wayne No-Hit Straw finished up in the late innings and was banged for three runs. ...1st baseman Larry Adams was the batting star of the game as he hit safely 5 out of his 6 times at bat. ...Larry banged out the first grand slam of the season for the Marines .Final averages show Tom Felak as the leagues batting champ with a .417 average. ...Capt. "Smitty" Smith emerged as the leagues top won and loss pitcher compiling a record of 12-1. ...4 of the top 5 home run hitters were Marines as the team total reached 48 for the 32 games. ...Top Marine hitters are Felak .417. Pace .389. .Wood .345 .. Androvich .325. .and Adams .323. ...The high scoring leathernecks scored a total of 278 runs for an average of 8 runs per ball game. ...Opposition scored 149 for a 4 run average per game. .. Only one shutout was registered against the Marines. "Congratulations" to the Leathernecks for one of the finest baseball seasons at Gtmo Bay, Cuba. .All loyal supporters of the team were more than appreciated by the team and a note of thanks is expressed from them. Saturday, 14 August 1954 m THE INDIAN g' i

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Saturday, 14 August 1954 m Page Seven TEENAGE-ROUND-UP VU-10 Prop Blast by Judy Yost The gettogethers at the Teenage Hut after the movies, have been lots of fun. Quite a few of the gang have been dropping by. If most of the people thought we'd had a small quake last Saturday nite, it was only the kats jitter-bugging and a few brave ones shagging at the Community Building. What jumping! Even Pierce couldn't resist it! Some of the more active ones were taking it sort of slow-after being at the Villamar dance on Friday night, too. Some of the kids have been going down to the Skating Rink on Tuesday nites, and having a real cool time. Goodness, they're even learning to skate backwards! So, if you haven't anything else to do, why not go down? It's loads of fun! DID YA'LL HAPPEN TO SEE -how purfectly beeutiful Barbara B. looked as a bridesmaid -Neil, Phil, Stanly, and Ronnie at the Little League playoffsArt McGowan at the exchange trying to decide between comic books and balloons-All the boys discussing the new gals, (Filing your claim, boys?)-One of the gals trying to get the formula from another for that bee-u-ti-ful-hair, (Gtmo sunshine, I guess.)-the kids really squirming when they saw "Them" at the movies-and caught in the act of stomping all the ants they've seen since-Ralph A. in his regular chair at Villamar movies-His record of attendance is really somethin-Jimmy B.'s new girl-Edgar counting his toes to see if they were all there at the dance Saturday nite-Sharon K. and Babs P. strolling down second street, (RRRR-UFF)Two of our most popular teenagers left last week for the good ol' U.S.A. They were Don and Roxey Moore. Man, we really hated to see them go! Eveah-bodies leaving us! Seriously, now, you know, the best place to meet people is the Sunday School or Church-We have some wonderful teachers and somehow, it makes our Sundays so much nicer if we've attended church What ever your faith, try it next Sunday and see for yourselves. There's a place for all of us at our Naval Base Chapel. NSD Supply Line CDR E. W. Sutherling, Commanding Officer and LCDR W. J. Sheehan, Planning Officer recently returned from TAD in Norfolk, Va. and Washington, D. C. Mr. and Mrs. William F. Griffin, Sr. recently flew to St. Petersburg, Florida to spend their annual vacation. Mr. Robert Pendleton, Supervisory Storekeeper, GS-6 has returned to work after a month's leave. Mr. and Mrs. Pendleton, Bobby, Anna and Allan visited Mrs. Pendleton's family in Santiago and Mr. Pendleton's family in Mt. Airy, North Carolina. Miss Laverne Knight was presented with a going-away gift by the girls of the Depot last Friday. Miss Knight is accepting a position at the Naval Hosptial. We join LT K. C. Deere, Disbur ing Officer and LT P. D. Larson, Material Division Officer, in welcoming their families to Gtmo. Mrs. Deere and daughter, Kathleen Ann came in on the THOMAS during its last trip. The Deeres are residing in OP-4. Mrs. Larson, Margaret, by Bill Graves & Staff LT Ed Henning has received orders to Glenview, Ill. for his next shore duty. Ed claims that he does' t have any influential friends, but you'll never convince me of that. Corky has been very active on the golf course and we are going to miss them at our squadron getto-gethers. They plan to leave around the first of the month. Chief Pennel has been appointed one of the Game Wardens for this squadron. Mr. Pennell likes to hunt, and any man in the squadron that would like to go hunting, don't hesitate to contact him and he will be more than glad to go with you. But first, make sure that you have your own ammunition, gun, and transportation. This you must do by yourself. LT Sam and Billie Hanlin left Wednesday for Pensacola where 'am will be a Basic Instructor. Good luck Sam and his family. LCDR Bill Racette reported aboard Sunday night from Washington, D. C. Bill hails from Brooklyn, N.Y., and is a graduate of Annapolis, class of '42. He is married to the former Miss Frances Harding Church of Norfolk, Va. They have two children: William A. Jr., 3, and Theresa Elizabeth, 18 months. The following men are leaving this wonderful squadron: Lybeck, Gemberling, Chief Carroll, Emerson, and Vicari. Good luck men. VU-10 is of this date is very poorly represented in the Base Fishing Tournament. It appears that the Lind-Pound-HollingsheadCowley quartet picked up all the big ones before the starting date. For those interested in fishing, we offer you advice on the best time to angle. Taking into consideration basic factors such as high tide and good clear moon, drop in your hook between the hours of midnight and four AM, relax and be patient. A good heavy duty reel and rod together with 72 to 100 lb test line are prime requisites for a good battle, but, our Cuban friends never miss out with their hand lines. The pushbutton age is here alright. So says Chief Hamilton, on observing the ability of the engine analyzer compared with the human ability of the squadron AD's. Ham says that its been overdue that the mechs be replaced with a machine anyway; it puts aviation ahead five years or so. Perhaps transitors or univacs will replace the electronics personnel just to get even. A good friend unmentioned here is the only man I know who brought spirits to Cuba. Reminds one of the "Coals to Newcastle" bit, or a sandwich to a banquet, etc. The crew of number two maintain that every meal is a feast. Every day's a holiday too, I suppose. Peter and Amy arrived via FLAW last Wednesday evening. The Larsons are living in Quarters N325 B. Welcome to the following new arrivals at the depot: Richard E. Kidd, BM3, from the USS Trathen (DD-530), Kidd's hometown is St. Albans, West Virginia. Leslie L. Schwerdtfeger, SK3, hometown, Tampa, F 1 orid a; William J. Devaney, Jr., SKSN, Carrollton, Michigan; James N. Deveraux, EN3, Savannah, Goergia; Anthony W. Bell, SK2, Somerville, Mass. all reported from ComSub Group THREE, Green Cove Springs, Fla. Hope you will enjoy tour of duty nere. LT and Mrs. William Karchere flew to Santiago last weekend. i6 What D' Ya' Say? The INDIAN will award a certificate good for $1.00 iworth of merchandise at the Navy Exchange for each question accepted and used. Submit your questions to Editor, The Indian, Box 19.) The question: What do you think would be a good question of the week? The place: Navy Exchange store. William F. Doerner, SN, Harbor Police "Why don't you try 'What's your opinion of having USO dances for enlisted personnel on the base?" Leonard Nevin, CP, MCB-8 "You could ask 'What do you think is the most enjoyable thing down here?' Dennis Borowski, SN, Commissary Store "'Do you think that the transportation facilities for men going on leave could be improved?'" Mrs. Virginia Wertly, Villamar "How about 'What do you like about being here?'" G. M. Bailey, FTC, Fleet Training Group "'What ball club do you think is the most improved this season?'" H. N. Bogin, AG3, N.A.S. "Why not 'How do you feel about being in the Navy?'" THE INDIAN

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m Navy-1oNDPPo-Grino.-0020 m THE INDIAN Saturday, 14 August 1954 MOVIES Saturday, 14 August THE UNTAMED HIERESS Judy Canova Don Barry Orphan's gratitude toward old prospector who wants to share his secret hoard with her gets into slapstick battle with a trio of crooks. Sunday, 15 August TOP BANNANA Phil Silvers Rose Marie A TV funny man falls in love with a department store model. He signs her for his show, but amid complications she falls in love with the show's tenor. Monday, 16 August NAKED JUNGLE Eleanor Parker Charlton Heston Heston builds a home in the Amazon and reclaims much jungle, then he marries Eleanor Parker by proxy. All goes well until the entire plantation is destroyed when a dam is blown up to stop the advance of an army of ants. In color. Tuesday, 17 August DANGEROUS MISSION Victor Mature Piper Laurie A man is killed in a New York night club. The only witness, Piper Laurie, flees. Her refuge is discovered by the murderer and the D. A. Each sends an emissary, one to kill her, the other to bring her back to New York. In color. Wednesday, 18 August JOHNNY GUITAR Joan Crawford Sterling Hayden Female gambling-house owner is aided in her murderous war against the anti-railroad ranchers by a guitar-playing man. She hopes to make a million by building a town in the path of the proposed railroad. Thursday, 19 August TAZA, SON OF COCHISE Rock Hudson Barbara Rush When his father dies, Taza takes over and against all sorts of odds manages to keep peace between the Indians and the whites. Friday, 20 August RIDERS TO THE STARS William Lundigan Herbert Marshall Technician recovers rocket fragments in the desert. The rocket was hurled into the air at 18,000 miles per hour and has completely cuptallizized by cosmic rays. Scientists attempt to devise a shield against this. As well as making her talents as a professional model pay off in South Bend, Ind. (home of Notre Dame) "Bobby Jane" Dixon dabbles as an interior decorator. She's just the sort of girl we'd like to have decorating our quarters-in more ways than one. Hospital Notes 'Kismet,' 'Pyjama' Music byCaeL r Banned For Overseas Play Heirport News During the past week the girls dominated the births here at the hospital. A daughter, Jane Denise Foster, born 7 August to AL3 and Mrs. Frederick D. Foster, a daughter, Corlene Sue Leach, born 9 August to Sgt. and Mrs. Ronald F. Leach. Golf Every leader in the individual flights last week has maintained their leadership this week. Although they still lead they are being pressed in every flight. As we round the half-way mark we again want to remind all participants that the only way you can get those "Ringers" is to get out on the course and play. The more you play the better chance you have to catch the leaders. Departures It was with regret that the Hospital saw the departure of CDR J. J. Timmes and family on the THOMAS last week. Dr. Timmes was our Chief of Surgery and also Word has been received at Armed Forces Radio Station WGBY concerning the music from "Kismet" and "Pyjama Game" which was banned three weeks ago. The copyright owners of the music have restricted it from being played overseas. Among the more popular melodies from the two Broadway shows are: "Stranger in Paradise," "Hernando's H i d e a w a y," "Hey, There," and "Steam Heat." our acting executive officer for almost a year. He was an active member in sports on the base as well as Assistant Coach of the Hospital Basketball Team last year. Dr. Timmes will report to the U. S. Naval Hospital, St. Albans, Long Island, New York for duty under instruction in residency training. NAS Crosswinds by nick Friz WHO'S WHO AT NAS Don Emory, who completes his four year hitch next month, has had the dubious distinction of having the ship he served on, reported sunk by the enemy. It goes something like this. Don graduated from Milford High School in Delaware ...he was president of the senior class and captain of the basketball team. He went to work for Dupont as a textile machine operator. ...Then came the Korean episode and he enlisted in the Navy. After boot training at Great Lakes, Emory was assigned to the USS JAMES C. OWENS DD776, serving as a "deck ape." Later he assumed the role of yeoman ...went to Naval Justice School at Newport, and returned to duty as court martial yeoman, working also as Public Information man for the destroyer. The OWENS left Norfolk for a world cruise in January in '52 routing through the Panama Canal and to the trouble spot of the Korean seas. For four month consecutively the screws were never silent. At Sangin harbor, they spotted a supply train ...began picking it off, car by car ...until the shore batteries retaliated with fierce bombarding, killing three men, and seriously wounding 6 more. The OWENS limped out of the harbor and headed for Yokasuka for repairs, unloading its dead and wounded at Pusan. It was then that the OWENS received the message that the enemy had reported them sunk. The OWENS continued on its tour, hitting Signapore, Istanbul, Saudi Arabia (where Arabian Oil gave them a huge banquet, and where it was so hot, that they had to spray the batteries with water to keep them from eploding.) Then came a pleasant Med reprieve ... the glories of Naples, Athens, Cannes, Gibraltar-and finally the States again. Emory stayed with the Owens until May of '53, when he was then transferred to Guantanamo Bay. Don is married to Margaret, a girl from his own home town, and they have a two year old daughter, Mary Ellen. Don extended for one year, but plans to open up a package liquor store back home when his time is up. Dots and Dashes Mrs. Dean Clark, and Vernon Molusky sponsored a farewell gathering for Mr. and Mrs. Bob Heywang at Windmill Beach last Saturday. Members of the group who indulged in the picnic and swimming festivities, were William J. Lamson, John Dogan Jr., Frederick J. Green, of Personnel, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Allan Kemp, Edward Jones, and Frederick Butkowski. Mr. and Mrs. Heywang will depart for Key West soon. Bob was a member of VU-10 squadron and Jane worked in Central Office. Farewell and Good luck ...as John Gay once said, "We only part to meet again." The following men bid Bon Voyage ...this past week Dave Galoney, AD1-to fighter squadron 172 ...Claude Skyles AKAN, Squadron 62-Jacksonville, Robert Gillen AN-USS MIDWAY, Theodore Wilson BM2-VALLEY FORGE, and Robert Olsen, AKANFleet Air Wing, Quonset Point. A member of visiting Squadron 85 solved the ice lump problem in the chow hall recently. Not able to get the huge piece in his glass, he improvised with the huge hunting knife, he had strapped to his belt.


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