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Indian
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-- - _ 0Goyecs CTMO Like Tke &nsktne"- - -


U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba


Vol. VI, No. 57


Saturday, 7 August 1954


RAOM B. W. Hogan Inspects

Medical, Dental Facilities


This last week, RADM B.W. Hogan, Deputy Surgeon of the U.S. Navy and Assistant Chief, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, arrived in Guantanamo Bay to inspect medical and dental facilities of the entire Naval Base.
First on his schedule after his arrival Monday morning was an inspection of the Naval Air Station Dispensary and the Leeward Point medical and dental facilities.
On Monday night, an informal buffet supper was given at the Officer's Club for RADM Hogan with the staff officers of the Hospital and Dental Clinic attending.
Tuesday morning, Admiral Hogan continued his inspection as he looked over the facilities at Marine Site and the Naval Station dispensary in the morning. In the afternoon, he went on to inspect both the Naval Hospital and Naval Dental Clhcic here.
Included in the admiral's tour of toe hospital was a trip to the undergiound hospital here and a visit to Carvella Point where the new hospital is to be located.
Finally, on Wednesday morning, Admiral Hogan, accompanied by his aide, LT Harry B. Sinclair of the medical Service Corps, departed for San Juan, Roosevelt Roads to continue his inspection tour of medical and dental facilities in the Caribbean area.


CDR J. B. Stoll

New Dental Exec


Commander John B. Stoll, the new executive officer and prosthetic dental officer of the Naval Dental Clinic, arrived at GTMO on the USNS THOMAS and reported for duty 28 July 1954. His previous duty station was U.S. Naval Dental Clinic, Naval Gun Factory, Washington 25, D.C. where he was Consultant Instructor, Advanced Prosthodontic Training Program and head of the Prosthodontic Department.
CDR Stoll is a graduate of the University of Minnesota and was commissioned in the Navy Dental Corps September 1941. During the war he served in the USS Cowpens (CVL-25). He completed the specialized course in Prosthodontia at the Naval Dental School, NNMC, Bethesda, Md. and his membership in the various Dental societies includes the American Denture Society, Diplomat of the American Board of Prosthodontics and a Fellow in the International College of Dentistry.
Arriving with CDR Stoll was his wife, Mary Stoll, and two children, Styphanie, 10% years, and Philip, age 3. They are presently living in temporary quarters 310 A, Radio Point Road.


New US Emblem


UNITED STATES OF AMERICA






This iewv insignia, identifying the U.S. Government, will be placed on all foreign aid shipments moving through, or under the control of, Army ports of embarkation, replacing the many special country embleis and foreign language narkings previously required. This new emblem will not be used on any aid shipments under United Nations sponsored programs. Purpose of the emblem is to show that the aid shipments have come from the U.S.


Jerry Brennaic, CD3 of MCB-8, and Bill Wheeler, CD2 of MCB-4 know exactly what they're doing when they claip oin a pair of roller skates.
Boch Brennan and Wheeler have been skatig competitively in amateur circles (no pulc intended) for over three years and have been active members of figure skating clubs for 10 years.
Brennan cones front Mineola, Long Island, which, among other things, is faiccous for its huge Mineola Skating Rink. Wheeler hails from the heart of New York City and is a iceiber of the Skating Cluc of Mo, -i Vernon, N.Y.

It


Base Begins PO Exams Tuesday


Tests Given On 10, 17, 24 August


Scout Circus Here Soon

The Circus is coming' to Guantananco Bay!
On Saturday, 21 August from 1300 to 1800, the Boy Scouts, the Cub Scouts, the Girl Scouts, and Brownies of Guantanamo Bay will stage their annual circus at the Naval Air Station sea plane ramp.
This yearly gala event which is staged to provide funds for the purchase of scout equipment and the furthering of scout activities here, will feature amusement booths, novelty sales booth, a cake and goodies booth, cold drinks and sandwiches, and the VU-10 Choo Choo as well as a drawing for a $50.00 door prize.
Admission for the circus will be 25i, and tickets will be sold throughout the base by the four scout organizations. The drawing for the door prize will be held about 1730, and the lucky ticket holder must be present to win.
(Continued on Page Three)


It's that time of the year again, and in the next three weeks, 968 men of the Naval Base will take the semi-annual examinations for advancement in rating to pay grades E-4, E-5, and E-6.
All examinations for all rates in all commands will be held in the Naval Station Enlisted Men's Club. Candidates are required to report not later than 0745 so that preliminaries can be done away with and the actual testing can begin promptly at 0800.
The first test-for Pay Grade E-4-will be taken by approximately 430 men on 10 August. The following Tuesday, 17 August, 335 men will try for the 2nd Class "crow", and the final test for Pay Grade E-6 wil be held on 24 August for around 200 men. The morning examinations should be completed by 1100, and in the afternoon, professional exams will be given to those requiring such.
The examiner-in the explanation before the morning test-will inform those concerned as to where they will take their professional tests. The afternoon tests will begin at 1300 and should be completed by 1630.
The typing examinations for Yeoman, Personnelmen, Journalists, Storekeepers, Disbursing Clerks, and Hospital Corpsmen will be held in the Naval Station Personnel Office. At the same time, the professional exams for Telemen and Radiomen will be held in the Naval Base Communiications Office. The Visual Signals test will be held at the Naval Air Station Signal Tower.
There are no exams for Chief Petty Officer in August.

Base Begs Establish

Internal Security Unit

Recently al addition was made to the Naval Base Regulations. This new addition covers new security measures to protect property of the U.S. Government here, and also establishes a new section in the Base Police.
The new unic, to be known as the Internal Security Unit, is to be part of the Base Police and has the primary mission of prevention of theft of government property on the Naval Base. This unit, and members of the Marine Guard of the Day will have the authority to stop and search all vehicles on the Naval Base at any time for theft of government property, and to detain and search any person suspectd of theft.
Prior to any search of a vehicle or a person, ucencbers of the Internal Security Unit - who will not necessarily be dressed in Base Police uniforms - will properly identify themselves by showing a special identification card signed Ly tie Base Provost Marshal.


P rencican placed first in Lhe jUicr division of the New York State daicce-skating championship in 1950 while Wheeler placed third in the Intermediate class. Brennan went oic to the National Championships the same year and was awarded fifth place in the Pasadena, Calif. competition. Wheeler placed 11th in the same contest.
The two skating SeaBees have volunteered to instruct any person oic Tuesday nights at the Naval Station Skating Rink, and they can be found there almost every night practising their fancy cuts and willing to extend tips to other enthusiasts.


SeaBee Figure Skaters Offer Skating Instructions







rn


Saturday, 7 Auguto4


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Offce, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9-615
Saturday, 7 August 1954
U. S. NAVAL BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sandness-----------Oficer-Advisor
H. E. navis, JOC ------------------- Editor
H. L. Sisson, J03 ------------------- Ness
Jerry Lewis, JO13-----------------Features
Pierce Lehmbeck-------------------Sports
F. L. Cannon, JOSN_-__-____Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and finance with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Naphotos unless otherwise credited.


WG BY Hi-Lites
by George Engle

A new studio musical show rides the airwaves these (lays from WGBY. Currently Martin Block-ing on STARTIME from 11:00 'til 11:30 is Dick Bennett, a new addition to the staff at WGBY. The first of this series sounded fine to our critical ear and we're sure you'll enjoy this new show, which each day takes you thru the files and singles out one star in the galaxy of music.
Several of outr standard tranacribed shows have been replaced this past week. The most notable of tnese being:
The Martin Block Show replacing Bob and Ray. The "King of D.J.s" interviews the finest recording artists, previews and predicts the future of new releases, reviews the hits of the proceeding year, and reminisces over a few "oldies".
Front and Center, taking the Vaughn Monroe spot, presents the music of the U.S. Army Band und-I' the direction of Maj. Hugh Curry, U.S.A. with the chorus directed by Capt. Sam Loboda Dixieland jazz will be featured with the vocal talents of Joyce Carr and Lindsley Bergan.
Dude Martin gives way to Tex Williams and his western aggregation featuring Smokey Rogers, Tetrea Lea, Jimmy Widenor, and the Colwell Brothers Trio, all for the pleasure of Western and folk music fans.
And the last of the replacements is the Jack Wagner show for Don Cotrnell. In two fifteen minute shows weekly Jack will spin some coice placters and interview a few top recording artists in his easygoing style.
There has been no new infortmation released on the surprise banning of the musical scores of The Pyjama Game and Kismet, both hit Broadway musicals. However, as soon as the information is received it will be announced.
Be sure to watch the daily program schedule in the "Papoose" for your favorite programs and any changes in the schedule presented each (lay over WGBY, 1450 on your radio dial.


Upc'n completion of the inspection of Utility Squadron TEN, a squadron party was given in honor of CAPT James, the new commanding officer of COMUTWING. CAPT James just reported in from Pensacola where he was on the staff of Admiral Price, Chief of Naval Training. Pictured above, left ot right, CDR Stamm, CAPT James, CDR McCoy and
CDR Tetley.


VU-10 Prop Blast Hospital Notes


by BMl Graves & Stanf
The AOQ Patio was the setting for a very entertaining get-totogether Saturday evening. Food was wonderful and plenty of refieshments. Everyone had a wonderful time, even if the music was very unusual.
"Notice". There will be a bridge party August 10th at the Plaittacion Room. Mrs. Rose Bennett and Mrs. Billie Nelson are the sponsors. If you can't attend, give one of these nice ladies a call and let her know that you can't make it this time.
"Extra". Boo Ferris became the father of seven, three blacks and four browns. He stated that he was going to cut their tails off today. Where's the cigars? I was told that if you want your outboard motor fixed, just let Eric Weiland help you. He'll really fix it up.
The parachute loft gave a party Saturday afternoon at Kittery Beach. A good time must have been enjoyed by all, as no one seems to be able to remember what happened. No one hurt, no one lost, and no beer left.
Mrs. Joye Graves felt very lucky last Wednesday night at BingoSure enough, she won a set of Revere Ware. Congratulations. Now she charges her husband every time she cooks.
Larry Larimore and Mary departed on FLAW last Wednesday morning. Sure hated to see them go. They were transferred to Pensacola.
These fellows are leaving the "Rock" very shortly: Twigg, Wade, Wilber, Bachmann, Adams, McWilson, Doherty, Meyer, Lybeck, Clean, Heywang, Lindeman, Huber, and Thompson. Good luck at your new duty stations men.
Rumors: Stanovich has sent to the Governor of Texas for permissions to take out citizenship pepers. Now that's a smart boy for ya!
At long last, Mike Moore has the paper he's been looking for. Going by his house Saturday nite made one think of New Year Eve. Some party!
Chief Pugh, ADC (AP) has been promised full membership into the COP coffee mess, that is when he pays his peso. Happy to have you with us.
Our boy Birotherson is an author-


by Charles L. Brewer, YN3

Heirport News
During the past week the following births were recorded: a son, William O'Bradley Warnock, II. born 29 July to Mr. and Mrs. Harry E. Warnock; a son, Michael Harold Ciriello, born 28 July to SA and Mrs. Edmund R. Ciriello; a daughter, Ann Louise Mustard, born 30 July to AD1 and Mrs. Andrew D. Mustard.
Golf
As we go into the third week of the Hospital Ringer Tournament we find T. G. Byrne, HMC leading the field in the first flight. The second flight is all tied up between Captain Moe and HM1 Mayernick. HN Filer is in command of the third flight and HN Connors heads the parade in the fourth flight. The special women's division is headed by Mrs. W. North.
Softball
The Special Departments made it two in a row over the Ward Corpsmen Sunday as they beat them 15 to 6. It was a tight ball game until the fourth inning when Halluim homered with two men aboard. A costly walk and error and another homerun by Harvey proved to be the end for the Ward Corpsmen. Hallum led the Special Departments with two homeruns and a double. For the Ward Corpsmen the fielding plays by Sparks at shortstop and the heavy hitting of Erdington kept the Ward Corpsmen in the game until the disastrous fourth.
Departures
HN John Canning departed via FLAW on the 4th for duty at M S T S Headquarters, Brooklyn, New Yorks, John is one of the old tigers here at the Hospital and will be nissed by all his friends.
HM1 William "Sam" Poulton departed via the Thomas on the 5th for duty at BuMed. We wish"Sam" lots of luck at his new duty station and hope that he will remember all his friends here in the Hospital and on the base.

-Ly on the base housing problem. He can tell you at what hour a nouse in Villamar will become vacant. If you're interested in knowing who has orders, see the old boy.


Sunday, 8 August 1954

Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 17301800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic)


The Chaplain's Corner

Have you ever heard this old saying: "Scratch a Christian and you find a pagan?"




Let's try a little experiment this week. Take your New Testament reverently in your hands. gently turn the pages to the 22nd and 23rd chapters of the Gospel according to St. Luke, and read carefully the account of the trial and crucifixion of Jesus. Then close your eyes and permit your imagination to create mental pictures of those great moments. See Jesus as they acuse Him falsely and convict Him unjustly. Observe Jesus as they mock Him as they spit on Him, as they press the painful crown of thorns on His head, as they scar His back with the lash, and as they force Him to carry the heavy across until He falls exhausted. Hear the sound of the hammer at it drives the nails thru His hands and feet. Watch His parched lips as they begin to move. Listen attentively to His words in this amazing traver; "Father, forgive them for they know not .vhat they do." Watch Him as His great love and deep concern for others enable Him to pusi' aside His agony as He arranges for the care of His mother and as He speaks peace into the heart of the believing thief on the other cross. Hear the note of triumph in His voice as He utters His last words, "Father, into thy hands I commend my Spirit."
Now as you remain relaxed and quiet with your thoughts centered on Jesus, you will come to the realization that no other man has ever drunk so deeply of the bitter dregs of physical suffering, has ever walked farther down the dark corsidor of mental anguish, has ever labored under a heavier burden of spiritual responsibility. Yet, no paganism was found in Him, and He has promised the same victory to His followers who by faith and devotions become new creatures worthy of the name Christian.
Scratch a true Christian and you will find the transforming love of God revealed in all its power and loveliness.
21. 0. Stephenson


THE INDIAN


61 w o








Saturday, 7 August 1954


ao


THE INDIAN


a


P T .


AFRS Conducts

Letter Contest

Freedoms Foundation of Valley Forge, through the Armed Forces Radio Service, is now conducting the 1954 "What America Means To Me" contest among service men all over the world. A principal award of $1,000 cash and anl Honor Medal will be given for the best letter in the opinion of the Freedoms Foundation Awards Jury. Twenty awards of $100 and George Washington Honor Medals will be given second place winners, and third prizes will be 20 Honor Medals.
The subject of the letter must be "Wnat America Means To Me". Letters must not exceed 500 words in length and must be postmarked not later than November 11, 1954. They must also bear the signature, tank, service number and organization of the entrant. Only one letter per person will be judged. Send your letters to the Awards Editor, Armed Forces Radio and Television Service, Los Angeles 38, California.
The Awards Jury, which will judge your letter, is composed of Congressional Medal of Honor winners. Will you be one of the prizewinners this year?


LTJ McMahon Leaves

GTMO For Separation


Yesterday, LTJG John McMahon departed from Guantanmo Bay on board the USNS Pvt. William H. Thomas for the United States and release to inactive duty around 15 August. Mr. McMahon, who has been the Naval Station Information, Education, and Training Officer since his arrival here, is being relieved by LT E. A. Toczko who is taking the job on as a collateral duty.
Thile here in Guantanamo Bay, Mr. McMahon made many outstanding improvements in the Information and Education Office. He brought the Training Department up to "tip-top" shape to where a man can draw a book on almost any of the Navy's 64 ratings with numerous books for supplemental reading.
Along with this, LTJG McMahon has also increased the number of USAFI texts and manuals on hand. At une last inventory, there were over 1200 USAFI books alone at the I & E Office.
Also, through Mr. McMahon, numerous off duty classes have been initiated. The most recent ones (already completed) were courses in High Schooi Algebra, Plane Geometry, and Physics.
Upon his release to inactive duty, Mr. MeMahon will take up residence in Deer Lodge, Montana and will teach History, Social Sciences, and English as well as working as a track and basketball coach.


Scout Circus. . .
(ContLnued from Page One)
Besides the booths and the drawing, there will be a display of scout activities to show Mr. and Mrs. Guantanamo Bay that the scouts here have had a busy year. Included in the scout exhibits will be a model Boy Scout camp, and an Indian exhibit-complete with teepee and war dance.


USN, Marine Units

Awarded Korean Medals


It was recently announced by the Bureau of Naval Personnel, in accordance with Public Law 354, that members and former members of the Navy and Marine Corps may accept Foreign awards for service in Korea provided they meet the qualifications.
To be eligible for these awards, a man must have served within the continental limits of Korea or in waters immediately adjacent thereto during the period of hostilities in which the United States was engaged and also for one year after the end of hostilities.
Unit Citations
Authorization has also been granted for several Navy and Marine Corps units to wear the Presidential Unit Citation, providing that they served in the particular unit during the dates specified for the citation. If a man has served in more than one of these units that were cited, he is authorized to wear an oak leaf cluster for each additional one that he served with during the time of their citation.
Units listed in the Bureau of Personnel instruction are as follows:
The Seventh Fleet
July 1950 to July 1952 Task Force NINETY July t50 to March 5951
Task Force NINETY-FIVE 12 Sep. 195t to 3 Aug. 1951
Fleet Air wing SIX July 1950 to June 1951
Fleet Activities INCHON
12 Sep. 1950 to 5 Jan. 19151
25 Mar. l95t to 31 Aug. 1151
Surgical Team TWO
15 Sep. 1950 to 15 Aug. 1950
Fleet Activities wONSON 21 Oct. 1950 to 10 Dec. 1950
Surgical Team THREE
15 Sep. 1950 to 15 Oct. 1950
Fleet Activities CHINNAMPO
17 Nov. 1950 to 5 Dec. 1950
Surgical Team FOUR
15 Sep. 1950 to 15 Oct. 1950 Fleet Activities HUNGNAM 22 Nov. 1950 to 9 Dec 1950
First Provisional Marine Brigade
2 Aug. 1950 to 6 Sep. 1950 Fleet Activities PUSAN
16i July 1950 to 31 Aug. 1951 First Marine Aircraft Wing 1 Aug. 1950 to 26 Feb . 1951
First Marine Division
26 Oct. 1951 to 27 July 1941 U.S. Naval Advisory Group
Feb. 52 to Feb. 53
First Marine Division
3 Aug. 1950 to 26 Feb. 1951
USS LSIL 1091
7 Mar. 1951 to 14 Aug. 1951
USS CONSOLATION (AH-lI: 11 Aug. 150 to 31 Aug. 1151 First Marine Aircraft Wing 27 Feb. 1951 to 11 June 1953
USS HAVEN (AH-12)
18 Oct. 1950 to 11 Aug. 1951 First Korean Marine Corps
Regimental Combat Team and U.S. Marine Corps Advisory
Group Attached
30 Oct. 1952 to 1 Nov. 1952
USS REPOSE (AH-16)
16 Sep. 1950 to 31 July 1951


Old Warships Saved


The President has signed a bill to restore three old warships, the frigates Constitution (Old Ironsides) and Constellation, built before 1800 to fight the Barbary pirates, and the Hartford, which fought in the Civil War. The Consticution is now in Boston and is 90 percent restored. It will be kept there. The Constellation, also in Boston, will be patched up and transferred to Baltimore. The Hartford, now in Norfolk, Va.,
will be sent to Mobile, Ala., when repaired.


Re-Up Bonus Bill Now Law;


Raises Total Payment $600

Washington (AFPS)-The new Re-enlistment Bonus Bill was signed into law by President Eisenhower July 16 and became effective immediately.
The bill-now Public Law 506-amends the Career Compensation Act of 1949 to increase the average re-enlistment bonus payment from about $250 to more than $500. It also raises the maximum total payment to an individual from about $1400 to $2000.
The purpose of the new law is to increase re-enlistments among EM

Re-enlistment I Column (1) Column (2)
involved I Take Multiply by

First --------------- Monthly basic pay to which the i Number of years specified in remember was entitled at the I enlistment contract, or six, if time of discharge.2 I none specified.:!
Second ------------ Two-thirds of the monthly basic I Number of years specified in repay to which the member was enlistment contract, or six, if entitled at the time of dis- none specified.:: charge. 1,
Third ------------- One-third of the monthly basic Number of years specified in repay to which the member was enlistment contract, or six, if entitled at the time of dis- none specified.: charge..5
Fourth (and subse- One-sixth of the monthly basic Number of years specified in requent). pay to which the member was enlistment contract, or six, if
I entitled at the time of dis- none specified.: charge.5

'Any re-enlistment when a bonus was not authorized is not counted. "Two-thirds of the monthly basic pay in the case of a member in pay grade E-1 at the time of discharge.
IOn the sixth anniversary of an indefinite re-enlistment, and on each anniversary thereafter. the member is entitled to a bonus equal to one-third of the monthly basic pay to which he is entitled on that anniversary date. 4No bonus may be paid to a member in pay grade E-1 or E-2 at the time of discharge. 5No bonus may be paid to a member in pay grade E-1, E-2 or E-3 at the time of discharge.
serving their initial tours of duty. The amounts to be paid are determined by a sliding scale by which the largest payments go to those re-enlisting for the first time. Both the Defense Department and Congress believe that the plan will pay for itself by eliminating a large part of the training costs for replacements.
The bonus payable to a member who re-enlists before completing a total of 20 years of active Federal service, but under that re-enlistment will complete more than 20 years of such service, is computed on the following basis: The multiplier used is the number of years which, when added to his previous service, totals 20 years.
However, old timers who would stand to gain more under the old re-enlistment law may elect that law until they have received a total of $1400.
Officers being released from active duty are entitled to receive a re-up bonus if they served as EM in the same service immediately before
accepting a commission. Their bonus will be computed on the monthly EM basic pay at time of re-enlistment.


Ugh ...


No Gettum Pictures









too

















Due to circumstances beyond the control of THE INDIAN, the usual number of pictures are not seen in this issue. The shipment of engravings was not received in time for publication, but every effort will be made to bring you news in pictures in all forthcoming i s


Good Taste Reccommended

In Summer Attire

During the h1ot sunmer months when the sun is pouring down its heat, the natural impulse is to get as cool as possible, and it is a common practice to wear shorts and bathing suits whenever possible.
However, it should be remembered that it is in poor taste, for women especially, to wear scanty attire in public gathering places such as the commissary store, the Navy Exchange, the movie lyceums, and such. Actually the commissary store does not permit patrons to enter in shorts.
The proper place for shorts and hathing suits is at the beach and in participating in athletic events. Even then, it is recommended that the so-called "short" shorts not be worn.
Traveling to and from the beaches should be done with sport shirts Over swimming suits.


Servicemen's Deposits

The Armed Forces now have a new uniform law governing enlisted personnel deposits. EM in all branches no-w are able to withdraw deposits in cases of emergency instead of only at the time of discharge. The Army and Air Force had temporary authority to allow this while the Navy and Marine Corps did not. There were no other basic changes in the law.







"a
Page Four


a


Saturday, 7 August 1954


THE INDIAN


SI'or/ts


Marines, NavSta End Playotfs;



SeaBees Fall To Indians


by Pierce Lehmbeck

At the time of this writing the Marine Leathernecks and the Naval Station Indians were converging in the finals of the 1954 Naval Base League Post Season Play-offs with the Leathernecks having a slight edge after having moved into the final tilt losing none while the Indians had suffered an earlier setback by the Marines in the form of a 9-0 shutout courtesy of Wayne Straw. This meant that the Leathernecks needed but one win while the Indians needed to take two in succession. If the Leathernecks took that one win, the Play-offs came to end last


Marines 5 4 3
VU-10 4 8 3
Braves In With Win
Over 'Bees
The Naval Station Indians surprised just about everybody but themselves Monday night as they overcame and early 2-0 deficit to win over the 'Bees of MCB-8 4-2 and thus move into the semi-finals with the Marines.
Utilizing an infield error, a wilA pitch and a well-timed single by Mayer, the 'Bees nabbed two runs in the bottom of the first to begin the tilt in a style that gave P1 pretenses of turning into a runaway. However, the Brave defense tightened up and their offensive unit began pounding away at 'Bee starter Shackleton until they finally chased across their first run in the fifth when Mathieu tripled and. scored on a single by Logsdon. TheNT added two more to move ahead in the seventh on singles by Baries and Phillips and a double by Mathieu, who proved to be the spark plug at the plate. Their final run came in the eight when Young singled and, after being worked around ,scored on Baries's second safety of the evening.
Mandis went the distance to take the win while Shackleton stuck out the full nine to take the loss for MCB-8.


Av>J/YA-e1V25~


Baseball Banquet Postponed

The baseball banquet, originally planned for Monday night, Augu-t 9, has been postponed. The new date for the banquet will be announced when set.

"Your grandfather's a little deaf, isn't he?" one man asked another.
"A little deaf?" the other man said. "Yesterday, he conducted family prayers kneeling on the cat."

University Barber: "You sav you've been here before. I don't remember your face."
Student: "Probably not. It's healed up now."
"M my,
Mommy, why is it Daddy doesn't have much hair?"
"He thinks a great deal, dear."
"But, Mommy, then why is it you have so much hair?"
"Finish your breakfast, dear."

ed the game away. The 'Bees followed with two more in the seventh and eighth innings to notch the win and move into the consolation semi-finals against te Nava1


Mallard second sacker Johnny Clark is narrowly in and under Leatherneck third baseman Louie Romano as the latter looks towards the umpire for a decision after taking a throw from the outfield. Clark was declared safe only to die on the sack at the frame's end with the Marines taking a 5-4 win in the first gane of Post Season Play-off s.


night with the victors copping both the League title and the Play-offs. However, if the Indians came through, the final and deciding clash will take place this afternoon on Fleet Recreation Dianond number one.
These 1954 Play-offs will go down in the League annals as one of the most exciting yet. The Leathernecks, who just about everyone counted out because of a devastating blow to their mound staff in the form of the loss of strikeout ace Rollie Santos, came through to move into the finals in fine form, their most trying moment being a 5-4 edge of the VU-10 Mallards in the opener Sunday afternoon. The team favored, as called by this reporter, was MCB-8 who lost in the first round to the Naval Station Indians 4-2, won in the consolation game over the Mallards 12-3 and lost to the Indians again in the seni-finals by an 8-7 margin, was hampered by injuries through-out the tournament. Their biggest loss to the casualty list was initial sacker Jin Dotson who came out of hiding in their final bid for top honors to assume a hero's role and hit two round-trippers while bringing forth his best efforts on the nound only to take the loss in the Indian clash Thursday night.


Marines Into Semi-Finals
With Mallard Edge
The Champion Marine Leathernecks opened up 1954's edition of the Post Season Play-offs last Sunday afternoon on Fleet Recreation Diamond number one and promptly noved into the semi-finals with a 5-4 edge of the third-finishing Mallards of VU-10.
The Mallards, paced by playermanager and short-stop Boo Ferris, outhit the pennant-winners 8-4 and were leading by a 4-2 margin until the top of the seventh when Marine second sacker Jimmy Pace stepped into a pitch that was good for about 340 feet and three runs to send his club into the lead and they were never headed. Catcher Tom Felak supported Pace's big blow for the Leathernecks by collecting a double and a single in three trips while Ferris doubled and singled twice in four trips for the losing Mallards.
Smith went the distance to take the win for the base champions giving up eight hits. For the Mallards, Breske took the loss after relieving starter Presutti in the fourth. Both Mallard servers limited the winners to only two hits each, but Pace's round-tripper in the seventh off Breske was the decisive blow.


NavSta
MCB-8
Straw, Mar
Naval S
Cruising behin pitching of their p baller' Wayne St Leathernecks mov as they shut-out t Indians, 9-0, Tue
The possessor o League's lone no Braves completely trol as he kept hi and weaving to meager two-hit his second shut-ou Spoiling his seco perfect game were Young* and his Dale Buss.
While the 20 y vanian was keel offenses clogged, t scoring unit was i as it chased thre for a ten hit tot going for extra b pack was Jim Pa three doubles in f
Straw notched t out six while wa Todd, the first of t was charged with way to Buss in later gave way t seventh. Together, nine and walked 1
Marines NavSta
Errors,
Defeat MN
The VU-10 Mal about everything down Wednesday to the MCB-8 'Be thus eliminated f play. They commi
It was a storm
Mallard contingent beginning as thei bles proved costly. came in the fifth v of six miscues gav unearned runs whi


4 10 1
2 6 1
ines Take tation
d the two-hit henominal 'slowraw, the Marine ed into the finals he Naval Station sday night. f the Naval Base
-hitter had the under his cons serves bobbing
scatter their total and notch t in three starts.


Station Indians.
Huber was the starter for the Mallards and although he gave up but four hits in the first six frames, he was forced to weather the storm mnd take the loss. Dieden relieved hin in the seventh .
Taking the win for the SeaBees was Ed Bigbie who showed up well in limiting the Mallards to eight safeties. Mayer ably supported him at the plate as the big fellow blasted a drive which was good for about 360 feet and all four bases in the seventh.
MCB-8 12 9 4
VU-10 3 8 15


nd bid for the Braves Edge 'Bees
right-fielder Cy Thursday night, the surprising opposing hurler Naval Station Indians narrowly edged the Bees of Eight in as exear old Pennsyl- citing a contest as has been witing the Brave nessed on the local scene this year, he Leathernecks 8-7. This tilt sent the Indians with n its usual form the League Champion Marine e Brave hurlers Leathernecks. al, six of them Call it that Mandis charm or
ases. Pacing the whatever you like but it was the ce who collected little fellow with the big arm once our trips, again that seemed to turn the trick.
e win and struck Although he gave up a total of Iking only one. nine hits, he had the Bees, with he Brave parade, the exception of relief hurler Jim the loss. He gave Dotson, hitting the ball pretty much the second wh' where he wanted it. He added to o Fidler in the his own cause by chasing in two they struck out runs.
0. Dotson, who came in to relieve
9 10 2 Shackleton after the latter was
0 2 2 touched for six runs in a big Brave
'Bees second frame, was once again, deallards spite an injured right foot, the big
lards booted just gun as he homered twice and was tatsn'totied ust intentionally walked in his third that wasn't tied trip. Mayer of the 'Bees and Todd

es 12-3 and were of the Braves also were at their es t2-3rnamwe best as each collected a three for rom tournament four total. tted 15 errors. furta.
y night for the Mandis chalked the win, his secfrom the game's ond in tournament lay while frmtega'sb Dotson was charged with the loss r numerous bob- while being touched for only two The biggest blow of the Brave's eight run total. lhen a succession
e the 'Bees seven NavSta 8 10 3
ch virtually salt- MCB-8 7 10 3


9







Saturday, 7 August 1954


a41111111


THE INDIAN


a


Pa sFIve


fishing Contest Ends Aug. 15th


Harbor Police Report Heavy Load of Last-Minute Entrants


The Guantanamo Bay Fishing Tournament, sponsored by the Naval Base, is closing very rapidly. Next Saturday, August 15th, at midnight will be the last opportunity to register a fish.
The Harbor Police weighing stations at Leeward Point and Mainside have reported a flurry of "lastminute" entries during the past Nveek.
There has been some confusion regarding prizes for women and children in the tournament. In the first place it should be known that men, women and children are all in direct competition with each other, and prizes will be awarded for the largest fish in each class, regardless of who catches it.
BUT, there are also special prizes for women and children. Among women only there will be a prize for the largest fish caught in EACH DIVISION (LAND, AFLOAT, SPEARFISHING, SPECIAL). For instance, if Mrs. Bos'un registers a 60-pound snapper in the Land Division and Mrs. Mech registers a 50-pound tarpon, also in the Land Division, Mrs. Bos'un will get the prize because her catch was bigger for the Land Division. In other words, there will not be a prize for the women for each type of fish caught; only for the largest in each division.
For the children, there will be a souvenir prize awarded to every child (under 16) registering a fish in the tournament. And there will also be a prize awarded for the largest fish in each division, same as for the women.
Don't forget-next Saturday at midnight is the deadline!
All children entering fish in the tournament are requested to write their age after their name on the entry form, and all contestants are requested to indicate on the entry form whether the fish was caught in the Land, Afloat, Spearfishing or Special Division.


Latest Fishing Entries
LAND DIVISION


Plath, C. W. Hackert, A. Dean, w. L. Fimbel, E.C.


Barracuda .-_--_ _ 18%1/ lbs. .___-_--_ 14 lbs., 10 ozs. ._----___ 12 lbs., 8 ozs.
-31 lbs.


1 lb., 14 ozs. 1 lb., 21/ ozs.
9 ozs.


Grouper
Hanlin, John Paul _Gardes, G. S. ---------Hise, N. L. _


Jacks
MacAnanny, R. E.__ks 19 lbs., 8 ozs.
Raymond, Sam ---------14 lbs., 81/ ozs.
Nixon. w. G. -----------12 lbs., 8 ozs.
Fimbel, E. C. -----------14 lbs., 151% ozs.
Mackerel (King)
Howerton, R. D. -------5 lbs., 10 ozs.
Snapper
Henry, R. L. - ---------- 24 lbs.
Kelley, C. L. ----------- 39 lbs.
Fath, L. A. ------------- 15 lbs., 8 ozs.
Snook
Hunda, George -------- 10 lbs., 4 ozs. Horner, T. A. ---------- 3 lbs.
Tarpon
Scott, w. H. ----------- 23 lbs., 8 ozs.
Bedward, K. D. --------- 17 lbs.
Collins, R. K.- ----------16 lbs.
Mackerel (Spanish/Common) Dean, w. V. ----------- 7 lbs.
Gardes, George 0------- 9 ozs.
BOAT DIVISION Mackeral (King)
Smouse, J. H. ---------- 11 lbs., 8 ozs.
Barracuda
Carroll, J. C. - ---------- 24 lbs.
Cunningham, J. H. --- 17 lbs., 1 o z. Davenport, Sid -------- 16 lbs., 8 ozs.
Wahoo
Smouse, J. H. ---------- 24 lbs.
Jacks
Karstens, R. L. - -------- 12 lbs., 14 ozs.
Snapper


.U
Ladies' Golf Shots

by Miriam Hoy

-Last Wednesday we played a Blind Five Tournament on the Front Nine, with holes number 1 5, 6, 7, and 8 being drawn to total +1 the individual scores. New golf balls were awarded to the following winners:


First Flight
1st Place-Alma McCracken
2nd Place-two way tie:
Corky Henning
Polly Herring
Second Flight
1st Place-two way tie:
Marie Aslin
Sue Scott
2nd Place-Marge Sheehan
Third Flight
1st Place-Evelyn Leach 2nd Place-Miriam Hoy
Next week we will play the Back Nine for gross and net scores. Hope to see a lot of you golfers out there teeing off bright and early.

"Would you come to my aid in distress, soldier?"
"Honey, I'd come to you in any old dress."

"My son just graduated from agricultural college.."
"Did he win any honors ?"
"Yes, he was voted the most likely to sack seed."

For Sale: Second hand tombstone. Excellent buy for family named Floogle.

They parted at the corner,
She whispered with a sigh:
"I'll be home tomorrow night."'
He answered, "So will I!"

Roberts, V. A. - --------- 50 lbs.
Johnson, D. ------------ 46 lbs.
Johnson, D. ------------ 40 lbs.
Snook
Enverso, Epifanio --___ 15 lbs., 2 ozs. Carrington, Laurie __ 12 lbs., 4 os. IVilson, W. H.--------6 lbs., 8 sos.
Tarpon
Andrews. J. W. ------- 59 lbs., 4 ozs.
Fimbel, E. C. ----------- 40 lbs.
Davis, N. Q. - _- ____- 20 lbs., 4 ozs.
SPECIAL DIVISION
Bonefish
Wenzlaff, D. C. --------- 3 lbs., 10 ozs.
Wind, Marion A. -_--__2 lbs., 8 ozs. Emverzo, Epifanio --__ 2 lbs., 2 ozs.
Albacore
Smouse, J. H. - --------- -6 lbs., 4 ozs.
Croakers
Morales, Edith ___---__ s.
Sanborn. Jim n 2 ozs.
Dalton, Kathryn ---- 2 orzs.


Ladyfish
Smouse, J. H. - --------- 4 lbs., 8 o-s
Parrotfish
Clark, D. L. - ---------- 8 lbs., 1 oz.
Pompano
Bedward. Kenneth 20 lbs.
Giggy, G. K. ----------- 16 lbs., 4 so.
Romano, Sam --------- 8 lbs., 131/% ozs.
Shark
Fimbel, E. C. ----------- 76 lbs.
Davenport, Dale -._-__ 44 lbs., 8 ozs. Meredith, Fred -------- 41 lbs., 8 ozs.
Triggerfish
Lee, G. A. ______ _- 4 lbs., 8 ozs.
SPEkRFISHING DIVISION Elwood, J. D. - ---------- 56 lbs.
Nichols, E. M. ---------- 16 lbs.
Jacks
Dean, W. V. - ----------- 15 lbs., 8 ozs.
Andrews, R. M. --------14 lbs.
Mackerel
Scheibel, K.E ---------- 8 lbs., 11 ozs.
Snappers
Ward, G. F. - ----------- 14 lbs., 13 ozs.
Nichols, E. M -------- 14 lbs.
Barracuda
Plath, C. W. ------------ 18 lbs.
Pace, Robert ---------- 12 lbs.
Andrews, R. M. --------10 lbs.
Hogish G
Ward, 0. F.._----- 0 5 lbs., 15 os.

9


-


Many happy Bears and parents group around Meredith winning pitcher, as the Bears won the Little League Championship last week.


.:





LS


Charlie Figueroe, Tiger 3rd baseman slides into third under Bear Tommy Mallia in the championship-deciding game. Bears won, 5 to 4.


-A.


Bears Nose Out Tigers:,


Win Little League


Championship


The Little League baseball teams are winding up the post-season tournament on the Villamar diamond. Last Tuesday the Bears, 1954 league champions, beat the Colts in the first game of the tourney, and on Wednesday the Tigers, 1954 runners-up, downed the Hawks.
The tournament is a double elimination contest, each team being defeated twice before it is eliminated from the tourney.

Moe: "What would you do if there were no women? Who would sew your buttons on?"
Joe: "If there were no women we wouldn't need any buttoms."


I


Taft Albright of the Tigers slides safely into third base during the Tiger-Bear game at Little League last Saturday. The Bears won, 5 to 4. giving them the championship.








age Six


Saturday, 7 August 1954


Safety In Guantanamo Bay


The following article appears in the TNDIAN through the courtesey of J. A. McGowan, Naval Base Safety Engineer. Safety in Glantnamo Bay was written for and appeared in the Safety Review.
by A. J. McGowan

Safety Training At the Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, is designed principally to meet the language and cultural differences existing between American supervisors and native workmen. The formal Safety program was starte] only in 1948, and is still in short pants as compared in years with stateside activities. Although much of the Base work is performed Ioccupationally employed military personnel aided by SeaBee and Cargo Handling battalions, the safety training of such personnel presents no unusual difficulty, and will not receive mole than passing comment. It will suffice to say that a regular curriculum has been prepaired for such groups and weekly classes are held in the Training Division class rooms on Industrial and ora' Vehicle Accident Prevention.
The unique features of safety training at the Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba are applicable to the native and alien employees
--some 2600 of them in Civil Service jobs and an additional 600 in jobs compensated from naonappropriated funds. These employees inelude Cubans, Chinese, Indians, Spaniards, Jamaicans, Haitians, and former inhabitants of other West Indian islands who have been attracted to the Base as a source of steady employment. Obviously, their safety training must take into account the differences between their backgrounds and cultures and those of the average U.S. citizen
To generalize concerning the average Cuban employee (and most Base employees are Cubans), he is a product of the Latin American environment. He is proud, sometimes quick-tempered, and never quite adjusts himeslf to the crazy American habit of taking only one bean' off for' lunch. He mnay under'stand some English, bat may mu'met', "Si, Si," in response to instructions from a supervisor, when "No, no" is the correct reply. This leads to frazzled nerves in both English and Spanish.
As the driver of a Navy motor vehicle, it has been difficult for him to abandon the driving practices he learned in his own home town where ia is customary for everyone to drive at breakneck speed with horn blaring. Nevertheless, as a Navy employee he must observe the most minute traffic regulations of a congested base, or risk the loss of his job.
The first job of the Safety staff ic to make this employee safetyconscious. He may be closely supervis.ecl in the shops, but much of the wvork is performed in the field whee a constant supervision is impossible. Whether he is working at the rock crusher, at the cargo wharf, in the magazine area, at the fuel pier, or on the moorings in the bay, there are hundreds of unsupervised operations daily which could prove his undoing. In order to protect him while he is not closely supervised, it is necessary to make him want to work safely, and to convince him of the folly of unsafe acts.
One way in which this has been done is through appeal to the


Cuban's strong love for his children. The suggestion that failure to wear goggles might cause the employe to lose forever the sight of his beloved hijos did more to in-mre compliance than any threat of disciplinary action.
The second phase, teaching the a"rrect and safe way, requires understanding. Our work methods Ore foreign to Cuban workers, who tend to carry their more gracious way of living on the job. In keepi- with their easy going naturies, they are frequently not inclined 1o go to any trouble to obtain equipment or tools which are not inmediately available. Fingers can be lost. for instance, when a mitrebox is not handy but a wood chisel is.
The first and most consistent attack to promote safety-consciousness was effected in the Employee Development Program, as it was believed we must first indoctrinate supervisors and impress upon them their responsibility to relay the message to those for whose safety they are responsible. They were taught the theory of unsafe acts and conditions, the necessity of adequate investigations and timely reporting, and were informed of the requirements and provisions of the amended compensation act.
Extensive use has been made of visual aids. As no films were readily available with Spanish sound tracks, it was necessary to delete the English sound after which personnel of the Training Division translated the English dialogue into Snanish, so that it would be concurrent with the film. Then at each showing the Spanish translation was "dubbed" in by use of a public address system. In this manner it has been possible to show not only Navy films but also many produced by insurance companies, fire protection organizations, and manufacturers of industrial equipment. Filns of great personal impact such as "A Closed Book," "To Live In Darkness," and "It's Wanton Murder" are shown on an activity basis: that is, all workers in all commands are scheduled. In addition, the films are shown at night -to Base dependents in the six local movie lyceums.
Contact with the worker to train him in proper work habits is made tliough Safety Committees, by Safety inspectors during visits to various jobs, and by use of safety literature. There are fifteen Shop Safety Committees spread throughout the seven local commands. Preference has been given to Shop Committees over Supervisors' Committees as it was believed that supervisors receive adequate safety training in the EDP class and that problems of great importance could be handled by the Base Safety Policy Committee or the Base Safe Driving Council as necessary. In addition to the usual agenda
-reports of accidents, hazards, etc.-some time in each meeting is devoted to ai instruction period on a prepared subject given in Spanish by a member of the Safety staff. As each committee in includes an average of 10 journeymen, and membership is on a rotating basis,, all workmen receive formal instruction at some time during the year.
Field instruction is given by the inspectors who set aside a definite period each day to visit one or more projects for the purpose of closely observing work practices and giving on-the-job instruction. As this procedure - resulted in the noting


President Urges Defense;

Warns 'Keep Peace'

Washington (AFPS)-President Eisenhower has approved the swift retaliation by U.S. Navy planes against the Communist Chinese fiP'o*:ers that attacked them, but said he does not want to see the incident enlarged into a threat to chp peace.
Three Navy planes searching for survivors of a British airliner downed by the Communists returned the fire of two Red fighters, shooting them down.
At his weekly news conference, the President said the U.S. would defend its rights, but that it did not mean to be impulsive or threatenig.
He denied Communist charges that the U.S. planes had been over Chinese territory. He said that since Americans had been aboard the British airliner, a U.S. aircraft c-rier task force had been sent into the area, not to provoke any incident, but to do what it could to find and rescue the survivors.
He added that the carriers-the Hornet and the Philippine Seawould soon leave the area.

Coo! Message

Sedalia, Mo. (AFPS)-During a hot spell a Methodist Church bullotin board carried this message: "You. think it's hot here? Well. .

and correction of many unsafe practices, it has been given precedence over routine shop inspections which are scheduled to fit in the remaining time. The spot to be visited is selected each day from the master list of job orders in each activity so that no job will be effected without some observation by Safety personnel.
The safety literature used is conmosed principally of material received from 0IR, Washington, e-nd the National Safety Council, plus that which is compiled locally. The magazines and periodicals received are useful only to those supervisors who read English. However, a weekly safety message is written in Spanish and displayed over each time clock. The subjcer, of the condensed message may be an item from Safety Review. The Industrial Supervisor, or it may be occasioned by a discrepancy revealed by a study of first-aid injuries. Because of the workers' limited educational background, unusual emphasis has been placed on the use of cartoons and posters. The Safety Division alone services 60 special poster boards upon which Pil displayed National Safety Council posters and those made by the Safety staff. Stateside posters are altered to fit the local scene by inking in the message in Spanish under the English title.
One cannot change a man's mode of living overnight, and progress has not been rapid. Howver, the general basic indoctrination is complete and accepted, our problem now is to smooth it out and make it stick. It is felt the local Safety Training Program has done much to effect a better understanding between the nationalities represented on the Base, and that both Base and workers will benefit from that understanding.


Meetings ...

Time & Place
Fleet Reserve Association 2000 ; 2nd & 4th Tuesday each month. Community Auditorium Ladies' Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association 2000 ; 2nd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Room, Community Auditorium Little Theatre Group 2000: 2nd Tuemday each month Marina Point
Hospital Service Volunteers 1000 : 2nd Tuesday each month Hospital Medical Lihrary
American Legion Auxiliary, Unit One 1930 ; 3rd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Hut, Marina Point Toastmasters Club 92 1930 each Thursday, Officers Club dining room.
American Legion, Guantanamo Bay Post 1 1930 : 3rd Tuesday each month ; Community Auditorium, Marina Point National Supervisors Association 1900: 1st Monday each month, Civilian Training Conference Room. Toe.'masters Club No. 113 1900 each Thursday in the Flamingo Room, Fleet Recreation Center. New
members welcome.
Felloweraft Club No. 1078 2000 each Thursday, Practice. Business Meeting, 1st Thursday - Community
Hall

Cuban Traffic Rules Outlined

Traffic signs in Cuba conform to the same size and shape as those in the United States. Spanish English
Pare Stop
Despacio Go Slow
Desvio Detour
Precaucion Caution
Peligro Danger
No Hay Paso No Tnoroughfare
No Pase Do Not Pass
No Pase Used to indicate
No Trespassing Derecha Right
Izquierda Left
Conserve su Keep Right
Derecha
Conserve su Keep Left
Izquierla
Cruce Cross
Crucero Railroad Crossing
Ferrocarril
Entrada Enter
Salida Exit
No Parquear No Parking
No Auto No Parking
Velocidad ? ? Speed Limit ? ? Auto Particular Reserved Parkine Auto Officiales Official Parking Piquera Taxi Parking
Silencio Silence
Nifnos Children
Peaton Pedestrian
Sem-aforo Tr ific Siptial
Cuidado Be Careful
Trafico Traffic
Transito Traffic
Arrow useal One-Way Traffic alone or with
TR \NSITO
Thoroughfare traffic has right of way (1er side street traffic.
Blow your horn at all intersections. Car arriving first has right of way.
Report all accidents in the same manner as in the United States.
a. Give immediate assistance to anyone injured and call Tony Civit as soon as possible, telephone 670 or 789 in Guantanamo City.
b. Notify the police.
c. Do not leave the scene of the accident.
d. Notify the local insurance ngent and be familiar with the information required for their accident reports.
Do not leave loose articles in aour car even though it is locked. It is good practice to give a boy a few cents to watch your car nnleos you are parked where policeman or reliable people are watching it.
Cars in Guantanamo City are parked on one side of the street one day, and on the opposite side the next day. If automobiles are perked in the street over night they must be moved to the opposite side 'f -e street the next day.


THE INDIAN


"D







S7 August 1954


THE INDIAN


Chief Hospitalman Relates


Many Lives to Indian Reporter
by Dick Friz

A white haired Chief and I relaxed in the shadows of the Leeward Point hangar for a few hours this week, and like one of the wedding guests in Coleridge's epic, I listened to the old mariner relate his experiences.
"Now don't muddle up the facts, son," he cautioned, "the last time they did a piece on me, people got the impression I was either 'piped' or trying to deceive the poor reporter."
It is not astounding, that the saga of Earl Cameron, HMC, Serial Number 120-16-00, has been misconstrued-the story of his double life equals a bit of True Detective and "Gulliver's Travels," yet retains the 'gospel truth.'
Earl Barton Cameron enlisted in the Navy at the age of 17, on March 24, 1911, signing his papers on the USS Constellation, sister ship to "Old Ironsides." The latter part of the same year, he made his first visit to Guantanamo Bay.
"You'd never have recognized it," he laughed, "mainside was nothing' more than a sand lot baseball diamond, and Leeward here was a cow pasture. . . . This fellow tail coats." McKinley that's buried at the end Chief Cameron was 48 when
of the jet strip, supposedly jumped World War II broke out, and they


ship and settled here, raisin' cows and a few chickens."
. . . . "the big sport at the time wis racing cutters on the Bay.... each ship would have their own crews, and thousands of dollars would change hands when they'd compete. Those crews were the 'prima donnas' of the fleet, had their own quarters and separate mess. . . . We only saw Caimanera from the deck of the destroyer, but I see it hasn't changed much."
Cameron was aboard the USS Roe in 1912, making a return trip, when a storm hit. The Roe was the fastest ship in the 8th Flotilla, hut couldn't ride out the gale, and Seaman Cameron broke a few ribs in the melee. "I was stove up in Norfolk for quite a spell," Cameron recalled, "and when I finally recovered, they were short of hospital corpsmen and recruited me."
Briefly, the Naval career of Camerons' includes three hitches, the first ending in 1921. He was present at the First landing at Bluefield Nicaragura, seige of Vera Cruz, Mexican Coast Patrol, duty in France in W.W. I, Santa Domingo in '19, and recruiting duty in Texas. (He made Chief just prior to Russian revolution in '17.)
Twenty-five years of Cameron's life have been devoted to law. He received his law degree in the early twenties from Hamilton College in Chicago, and has been admitted to the bar of US District Court of Texas, Cincinnati, US Circuit Court of Appeals, New Orleans. . . . Worked as claims attorney for the Fidelity and Deposit Company of Maryland, and "much of it involved criminal prosecution." The Chief claims he's been eligible to the Bar of the United States Supreme Court, but "never got around to purchasing one of those swallow


were offering commissions to those with law degrees commensurate with experience. "But, It'd just have meant a change of desk jobs to me," he explained, "and I still wanted to see what was on the other side of the horizon."
And so at the age of 52, he was pup-tenting on Okinawa, serving with CVG 7 aboard the TARAWA, and winding up his second hitch sailing on the Duxberry Bay in the Persian Gulf. The chief began his third hitch after hostilities began in Korea. This time, he sailed east on the Bonhomme Richard to the Korean Seas. One of the Richard's air groups knocked out a huge hydroelectric plant, "putting those Commies in the dark for awhile," and earned a recommendation for a Presidential Unit Citation with two stars. Chief Cameron served also on the Bennington in the NATO Fleet, and now is with VF-72(TAD) visiting Leeward for gunnery drill. At 61, and nearing 18 years of longevity, he has shipped over for two more years, to meet the requirements for shore duty in Germany.
Cameron chucked to himself as he remembered another visit to Guantanamo City in '51. "We were just leaving Caimanera by train," he recalled, "when one of the pilots sittin' next to me, seeing the kids beg for coins in the salt flats-sorta joshes me about whether maybe some of 'em aren't rightly mine."
"Whatya mean," I stormed, "the last time I was here was 1911! That shut him up, until both of us noticed this old Uncle Remus-like character, rockin' away on the back porch of one of the shanties. . . .he glanced our way, feebly raised a creakin' arm, and in a barely audible voice, croaked, "Hi-ya Pop!"
"There ya see," (I nudged my startled companion,) "That's my boy."


LT McCann Commissioned USN

Congratulations are again in order for LT Malcolm R. McCann, USN, recently promoted to his present grade. He was the first NAS officer tenderd, and the first to accept, and active duty contract offered him by Chief, BuPers. The contract calls for a term of five years commencing 1 October 1954 and terminating 30 September 1959.


NAS Crosswinds TEENAGE-ROUND-UP


by Dick Friz
WHO',S WHO AT NAS LCDR Albert D. Nelson Jr.: Flight Surgeon, Dispensary
"Doc" Nelson was born and raised in Texas-Carthage, Texas, that is. He atended college at SMU at Dallas and received his B.S. (prelow) there. He was a member of Phi Delta Theta social fraternity. He finished his medical studies at Baylor Medical College and Suothwestern Medical School, and was initiated in the Phi Chi Medical Fraternity.
In 1942 he married Billie Roder of Sweetwater. They have two children, Nancy Lea, 12 and Norman Lee 6.
Dr. Nelson received a LTJG commission in 1945, and was designated Naval Flight Surgeon in 1953. He was released from active duty in '46 and completed one year or residency in internal medicine at V.A.H., McKinney, Texas . . . then engaged in general practice until recalled. He completed his service intership at Naval Hospital. Shoemaker, California in '45 and was assigned to DD 877 . . . Later hety transferred him to NAB 807 in the Marshall Islands and he remainded there until release from active duty.
The doctor has a Sunday school class, golfing, shooting, and of course plenty of patients to keep his days at Guantanamo fully occupied.
News Briefs
A yeoman from Leeward Point while stationed aboard the USS Vermillion, gave the Skipper quite a start one afternoon when he answered the phone, "Chaplains Office, St. John speaking." It was of course, only the very earthy Marshall St. John, TAD to the shin's Chaplain.
In last week's edition, we confused the famous R5D with the R4D, thus actually minimizing the amount of work the Flaw Crew expended. It is the R5D, which holds 4,000 more pounds of cargo than it's junior model, (and has two more engines) that causes the 'sweat to roll.'
It looks as though Pete DiGennaro, who leaves for discharge this week, just can't get away from Navy life. Pete will go to work (in a civilian capacity, he hastens to add,) at the Naval Air Rocket Test Station, Lake Denmark, near Dover, New Jersey.
Did you ever stop to wonder
what they ever wanted with these men whose names are called over the P.A. system during the movies? We checked on one the other night. Jim Swanson was paged, and he discovered that a baby boy had been born to his wife Dorothy in Chicago that morning . . . Jim should be there by now. He was last seen in 'that joyful daze' entering a Coast Guard plane and heading for the U.S.A.
Chief Cecil Callan ENC, leaves for Norfolk this week. He'll be in charge of the local reform school at Barracks "K" of the Receiving Station.
Also departing are: Bill Silcox AE2-NAS Jax, Dave Capron PR3, NAS Atlantic City, Art Sides AD3Key West, Don Wigley A/N-Jax, Dave Doyle ACAN-Discharge, Dave Marsh-Memphis, Bill Krall AT2, Fasron 6, Jax, John Smith ACI, NAF Annapolis, Sam Romano A/N discharge, Francis Spraul, AD3Key Wset, Achille Montalte, A/Ndischarge, Jerrell Terrell AT2-Pax, Joe Gherrity AT1-Key West, John Schmitt PR3-Pax, Bill Hollowell, FAU, Comlant - Norfolk, James Norfolk, James Sadler AK3-VR-1Pax River, John Hamilton CSCNAS Norfolk . . . oB Voyage.


by Judy Yost

Most of the gang is taking advantage of these last few weeks before school starts-the beaches, pools, Snack-Shack, bowling-alley, and other gathering places are "Jumping"! And in the evenings, after the movies, our own Hut is a nice spot to drop by-the Mobile Canteen is there to furnish our refreshments, and wih some cool music and the nice breeze from the Bay, it's a nice ending for our day. Been down yet? ? ? ? Just a rumor at this date-but it's going 'round via the well known grapevine that we'll be having another of those wonderful dances at the Community Building this Saturday nite, after the meeting, of course. So come on down and we'll spin the records again-Lot'sa fun! ! ! !
Funny, that bout this time cvery summer, we begin to look at the school on the hill-some of us with enthusiasm, others, with dread-and when you pass by the stationary counters at the Exchanges and view all of those school supplies, well, it makes that day seem pretty close! (Have ya noticed the twinkle in the mother's eyes, as they pass the school? Wonder why! ! !) Lots of new kids have been coming in, and by the way it looks now, our classrooms will be well filled.
Didja Dig-Stanley and Ronnie going athletic-Peggy and Dex"Cavie" spending his money at N.O.B.-Barbara B. and Eunice on the bus-the gang at the beachEdgar on his "soapbox"-Delores on the opposite side of the counter at Air Station EX-all the gals having a grrreat time at the dance Friday night-a couple of the kats pricing luggage (wheah ya'll goin?)-the usual Saturday and Sunday morning look on most of us (bags under our eyes from staying up so late listening to the Sandman Show - Jimmy Dalton pushing the pedels down Sherman Avenue.
Note to Mrs. Scarborough-We're all so glad to have you back with us and are looking forward to seeing you again. Lots of best wishes to you.


.~~ ~
















~


How long have you the Navy ,soir?"
"All day, Sir."


been in


STATION WAGON: Something a city fellow who moves to the country buys so the country people will know hIe's from the city.


m


Page


"', lay, 7 August 1954


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Saturday, 7 August 1954


THE INDIAN


MOVIES


Saturday, 7 August RIDING SHOTGUN
Randolph Scott Joan Weldon
Scott, riding shotgmii on a stagecoach, is tricked into leaving it t search for an outlaw. He is bound hand and foot. He escapes, goes to town whereupon the townspeople think hhni a gang member.
Sunday, 8 August
KNOCK ON WOOD
Danny Kaye Mai Zetterling
Eccentric ventriloquist is accused of murder of two spies who have stuffed world-destroying plans into heads of his two dummies. In color.
Monday, 9 August
GYPSY COLT
Donald Corcoran Ward Bond
Young girls' love for colt is ended when parents are forced to sell the colt for teh extra money. The horse escapes and returns to the child, to the consternation of the parents.
Tuesday, 10 August
ROB ROY
Richard Todd Glynis Johns
Cattle thief and 18th-century chief tan of the MacGregors is outlawed by George I and is thereafter harried by the Duke of Montrose, who ambushes hin and kills his mother. Disgusted by this, the Duke of Argyll arranges for Rob Roy to see the king and clear himself. In color.
Wednesday, 11 August DIAL M FOR MURDER
Ray Milland Grace Kelley
Playboy husband plans death of his vife after he has married her for her money.
Thursday, 12 August
WHITE FIRE
Scott Brady Mary Castle
A young man invites trouble when he tries to solve the murder of night club owner for which his younger brother is accused and due to die.
Friday, 13 July
THE ROCKET MAN
George Winslow Charles Coburn
In his imagination, George Winslow "acquires" a rocket gun from a "space man" which has extraoidinary powers to do good and put the clinches on evil politicians.

A Hollywood luminary, testifying in a minor breach of contract case was asked to identify himself.
"I am the world's greatest actor," he told the court with simple dignity.
One of his friends chided him the next day.
"Don't you think that boost you gave yourself was a little too thick ?"
"Usually I avoid any kind of self-praise," said the film idol, "but remember, this time they had me under oath."


by J. H. (Ollie) Olsen, DT2


So what can you say about Terry Moore that hasn't already been said in 50,000 words or less? That's just for the benefit of the myopic and near-sighted who contend anything needs to be said at all. For the rest of us with normal 20/40 vision, we won't further distract you with mere words.


FTG Bulletin
by Jack Engstrom

Captain Cushing, accompanied by Lieutenant Commander Minard and Lieutenant Loader from the FTG Gunnery Department, made an ispection tour of Roosevelt Road and Culebra last week to observe firing of ships in training here. The inspection turned out to be a little more than routine and a little more painful than anticipated by LCDR Minard and LT Loader.
While flying by helicopter from Roosevelt Roads to the air strip on Culebra the 'copter' developed motor trouble over Vieques Sound. Being that a Helicopter doesn't have too much gliding abilities they were glad to sot down on "Cactus Cay". a small uninhabited island nearby.
Once the wheels touched the ground they made great haste in evacuating the disabled 'copter' for fear of fire, hence litle regard was given to the terrain and the plant life they scrambled into.
A rescue 'copter was radioed and some time later their own aircraft was repaired and their journey to Culebra was made without further mishap.
Be it known that a cactus patch is not the best place to set down in especially when the occupants are in a hurry to evacuate. It is believed that a sufficient number of cactus needles are still causinegreat discomfort and pain for Mr. Minard and Mr. Loader, enough so that their short and unexpected visit to the island of Cactus Cay will stick in their memories!

Captain Bull, FTG Training Offienr, departed this command last Wednesday for San Diego, California where he will assume his new duties as Chief Staff Officer of the Fleet Training Group there.
Chief Dykeman, FTG Supply Department, departed with his wife and family on the USNS Thomas last Thursday. Chief Dykeman will report to the U.S. Naval Air Station, Corpus Christi, Texas for a normal tour of shore duty.


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CUTTLEBUTT



















"What makes you think I'm a spy from
another planet?"

Coffee Mess in the veryv nea' future


Two new stainless steel coffee This equipment has been provider tables and sinks, of the restaurant for by the FTG Welfare & Rectype have -rrived and will be in- reation Funds. It's the best equipstalled in * Officer's and Enlisted ment so lets give it t O bt of care.


This week our column is going to try to bring to it's readers some information on the workings of the Base Dental Clinic and the people who make it function to bring to you the best possible dental treatment that can be had. I often wonder what goes through a persons head (besides the fear of the drill of course) when he enters one of our offices for an appointment. Maybe if that person knew somethinv about us some of that fear could be aleviated.
First of all, when anyone in our clinic does something, he knows exactly what he is doing and why he is doing it. That is everybody, from the corpsmen to the commanding officer, from the lab man to the repairman. The corpsmen are chosen and sent to one of the many Navy Dental Technicians Schools for a period of six months. During that time they are given courses in anatomy, physiology, X-Ray, first aid, sterile technique and a course in dental materials, just to meniton a few. They are chosen for their neatness, ability to learn and ability to adapt themselves. When you next come to us for an appointment and you step into a clean, neat, air conditioned office, be aware that it was cleaned by the technician in that office. He prepares that room just for your appointment. Every instrument that comes in contact with you has been throughly washed and sterilized, and each replacement that is used on you is the best that money acn buy.
When you next meet your dentist, remember he didn't just happen to get that job. It wasn't given to him. He studied and worked for it. To be a dentist one is required to attend college for six years or more and take courses which are too numerous to begin mentioning. They know all the latest methods and work with the most modern equipment. Nowadays that "fear of a drill" is a thing of the past. You can come to us with confidence that you will get the best dental treatment you can get anywhere in the world. You are being treated by people who know their job.
I hope this has helped to make your dental clinic a little more appealing to you, and that you are as proud of it as I am being a part of it.


5OOK NOOK
by Francis L. Cannon, JOSN

For Your Information . . .
THE NEW FORCE
by Ralph E. Lapp
The story of the growth of atomic power. Dr. Lapp dispels the popular idea that the basic principles of atomic fission are a deeo dark secret ,understood only by the specialist. He tells how the A-bomb was produced (he had a share in it) and of his unique experience on" night in Chicago of being one of the few men in the world who knew that next morning, an A-bomb would fall on Hiroshima. He states his views on the future use of atomic power for peaceful purposes.
GEORGE WASHINGTON'S
AMERICA by John Tebbei
From George Washington's letters, diaries, and a wealth of contemporary accounts, John Trebbel has compounded a superb work. showing Washington as a citizen of the young nation as well as its most ind'efatigable traveler. He ranged all over the known U.S. and understood it as few, if any of his contemporaries did.
A WRITER'S DIARY
by Virginia woolf
An insight into the mind and method of a great writer. Virginia Woolf wrote as did few others; she tells how she planned a book, toiled over it, became frustrated, and finally produced what others regarded as a work of art. In this diary are many portraits of contemporary greats such as Thomas Hardy, T. S_ Eliot, E. M. Forster, Lytton Strachy and many others.
THE SPANISH TEMPER
V.5. Pritcheitt
The story of the people of Spain, their ways of life and thought, the lanscape and its effect on Spaniards The author probes abll snects of Spanish living: the bullfight, sex, politics, religion and economics. For Your Entertainment . . . PICASSO-THE RECENT YEARS
by Harriet and Sidney Janis
Here are 135 plates and photographs of Picasso's work from the period 1937-46. Accompanied by notes explaining technique and meaning.
WINTER DANGER
by William 0. Steele
Prize-winner of the Children's Spring Book Festival of the New York Herald Tribune, Winter Danger is the tale of a woodsman and his son who return to town after years in the woods. The boy has a difficult time adjusting to the new way of life but succeeds. Then the father slips off to the woods again to allow his son to grow up in a normal manner.
GUTENBURG'S FOLLY
by Ira Wallach
High humor marks this one. Wallach has gathered here all the best works of one "Mitchel Hackney" a great American writer .? ? ? ?) Included are such provocative works as "Women: The More Feminine Sex" and "A Praceal Guide to the Fat Life." In Passing . . . .
The Golden Echo, by David Garnett-A biography and portrait of :s literary generation.
Field Guide to American VicLorian Furniture, by Thomas H. Omsbee-complete guide to Victorian pieces.
The New Business Encyclopedia, edited by Harry Marshall-A handy reference book for business law, etc.




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PAGE 1

91~e --"Govers (QTMO Like The Sunshirce" Vol. VI, No. 57 RADM B. W. Hogan Inspects Medical, Dental Facilities This last week, RADM B.W. Hogan, Deputy Surgeon of the U.S. Navy and Assistant Chief, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, arrived in Guantanamo Bay to inspect medical and dental facilities of the entire Naval Base. First on his schedule after his arrival Monday morning was an inspection of the Naval Air Station Dispensary and the Leeward Point medical and dental facilities. On Monday night, an informal buffet supper was given at the Officer's Club for RADM Hogan with the staff officers of the Hospital and Dental Clinic attending. Tuesday morning, Admiral Hogan continued his inspection as he looked over the facilities at Marine Site and the Naval Station dispensary in the morning. In the afternoon, he went on to inspect both the Naval Hospital and Naval Dental Clinic here. Included in the admiral's tour of the hospital was a trip to the underground hospital here and a visit to Carvella Point where the new hospital is to be located. Finally, on Wednesday morning, Admiral Hogan, accompanied by his aide, LT Harry B. Sinclair of the medical Service Corps, departed for San Juan, Roosevelt Roads to continue his inspection tour of medical and dental facilities in the Caribbean area. CDR J. B. Stoll New Dental Exec Commander John B. Stoll, the new executive officer and prosthetic dental officer of the Naval Dental Clinic, arrived at GTMO on the USNS THOMAS and reported for duty 28 July 1954. His previous duty station was U.S. Naval Dental Clinic, Naval Gun Factory, Washington 25, D.C. where he was Consultant Instructor, Advanced Prosthodontic Training Program and head of the Prosthodontic Department. CDR Stoll is a graduate of the University of Minnesota and was commissioned in the Navy Dental Corps September 1941. During the war he served in the USS Cowpens (CVL-25). He completed the specialized course in Prosthodontia at the Naval Dental School, NNMC, Bethesda, Md. and his membership in the various Dental societies includes the American Denture Society, Diplomat of the American Board of Prosthodontics and a Fellow in the International College of Dentistry. Arriving with CDR Stoll was his wife, Mary Stoll, and two children, Styphanie, 101/ years, and Philip, age 3. They are presently living in temporary quarters 310 A, Radio Point Road. U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 7 August 1954 Base Begins PO Exams Tuesday Tests Given On 10, 17, 24 August This new insignia, identifying the U.S. Government, will be placed on all foreign aid shipments moving through, or under the control of, Army ports of embarkation, replacing the many special country emblexs and foreign language markings previously required. This new emblem will not be used on any aid shipments under United Nations sponsored programs. Purpose of the emblem is to show that the aid shipments have come from the U.S. Scout Circus Here Soon The Circus is coming' to Guantanamo Bay! On Saturday, 21 August from 1300 to 1800, the Boy Scouts, the Cub Scouts, the Girl Scouts, and Brownies of Guantanamo Bay will stage their annual circus at the Naval Air Station sea plane ramp. This yearly gala event which is staged to provide funds for the purchase of scout equipment and the furthering of scout activities here, will feature amusement booths, novelty sales booth, a cake and goodies booth, cold drinks and sandwiches, and the VU-10 Choo Choo as well as a drawing for a $50.00 door prize. Admission for the circus will be 25(', and tickets will be sold throughout the base by the four scout organizations. The drawing for the door prize will be held about 1730, and the lucky ticket holder must be present to win. (Continued on Page Three) SeaBee Figure Skaters Offer Skating Instructions Jerry Brennan, CD3 of MCB-8, and Bill Wheeler, CD2 of MCB-4 know exactly what they're doing when they clamp on a pair of roller skates. Both Brennan and Wheeler have been skating competitively in amateur circles (no pun intended) for over three years and have been active members of figure skating clubs for 10 years. Brennan comes from Mineola, Long Island, which, among other things, is famous for its huge Mineola Skating Rink. Wheeler hails from the heart of New York City and is a member of the Skating Clubi of Mo t Vernon, N.Y. Brennan placed first in the junie division of the New York State dance-skating championship in 1950 while Wheeler placed third in the Intermediate class. Brennan went on to the National Championships the same year and was awarded fifth place in the Pasadena, Calif. competition. Wheeler placed 11th in the same contest. The two skating SeaBees have volunteered to instruct any person on Tuesday nights at the Naval Station Skating Rink, and they can be found there almost every night practising their fancy cuts and willing to extend tips to other enthusiasts. It's that time of the year again, and in the next three weeks, 968 men of the Naval Base will take the semi-annual examinations for advancement in rating to pay grades E-4, E-5, and E-6. All examinations for all rates in all commands will be held in the Naval Station Enlisted Men's Club. Candidates are required to report not later than 0745 so that preliminaries can be done away with and the actual testing can begin promptly at 0800. The first test-for Pay Grade E-4-will be taken by approximately 430 men on 10 August. The following Tuesday, 17 August, 335 men will try for the 2nd Class "crow", and the final test for Pay Grade E-6 wil be held on 24 August for around 200 men. The morning examinations should be completed by 1100, and in the afternoon, professional exams will be given to those requiring such. The examiner-in the explanation before the morning test-will inform those concerned as to where they will take their professional tests. The afternoon tests will begin at 1300 and should be completed by 1630. The typing exminations for Yeoman, Personnelmen, Journalists, Storekeepers, Disbursing Clerks, and Hospital Corpsmen will be held in the Naval Station Personnel Office. At the same time, the professional exams for Telemen and Radiomen will be held in the Naval Base Communications Office. The Visual Signals test will be held at the Naval Air Station Signal Tower. There are no exams for Chief Petty Officer in August. Base Regs Establish Internal Security Unit Recently an addition was made to the Naval Base Regulations. This new addition covers new security measures to protect property of the U.S. Government here, and also establishes a new section in the Base Police. The new unit, to be known as the Internal Security Unit, is to be part of the Base Police and has the primary mission of prevention of theft of government property on the Naval Base. This unit, and members of the Marine Guard of the Day will have the authority to stop and search all vehicles on the Naval Base at any time for theft of government property, and to detain and search any person suspe cted of theft. Prior to any search of a vehicle or a person, members of the Internal Security Unit -who will not necessarily be dressed in Base Police uniforms -will properly identify themselves by showing a special identification card signed by the Base Provost Marshal.

PAGE 2

U. wo Saturday, 7 Augts The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efFiciency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office U. S. Naval Base Special Services ieiartment Feet Recreations Centee Telephone 9-615 Saturday, 7 August 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Stafl U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Stalf LT E. A. Sandness ---Oficer-Advisor H. i. Davis, JOC----------------Editor H. L. Sisson, JOS---s Jerr evcsis, jus3--------------Fests-es Pierce Lehiobeek--is -------Sporis F. iL. Cannon, JOSH---Photograpcher THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and finance with noni-apmropilted funds. THE INDIAN i s snmemeber of the Armsed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced weithouit writien permssin. Local ess may be re-pin~ted provided crediit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Na photos unless otherwise cresied. WGBY Hi-Lites by George Engle A new studio musical show rides the airwaves these lays from WGBY. Currently Martin Block-ing on STARTIME from 11:00 'til 11:30 is Dick Bennett, a new addition to the staff at WGBY. The first of this series sounded fine to our critical ear and we're sure you'll enjoy this new show, which each day takes you thru the files and singles out one star in the galaxy of music. Several of our standard transcribed shows have been replaced this past week. The most notable of these being: The Martin Block Show replacing Bob and Ray. The "King of D.J.s" interviews the finest recording artists, previews and predicts the future of new releases, reviews the hits of the preceeding year, and reminisces over a few "oldies". Front and Center, taking the Vaughn Monroe spot, presents the music of the U.S. Army Band under the direction of Maj. Hugh Curry, U.S.A. with the chorus directed by Capt. Sam Loboda Dixieland jazz will be featured with the vocal talents of Joyce Carr and Lindsley Bergan. Dude Martin gives way to Tex Williams and his western aggregation featuring Smokey Rogers, Terrea Lea, Jimmy Widenor, and the Colwell Brothers Trio, all for the pleasure of Western and folk music fans. And the last of the replacements is the Jack Wagner show for Don orinell. In two fifteen minute shows weekly Jack will spin some choice platters and interview a few top recording artists in his easygoing style. There has been no new information released on the surprise banning of the musical scores of The Pyjama Game and Kismet, both hit Broadway musicals. However, as soon as the information is received it will be announced. Be sure to watch the daily program schedule in the "Papoose" for your favorite programs and any changes in the schedule presented each day over WGBY, 1450 on your radio dial. Upon completion of the inspection of Utility Squadron TEN, a squadron party was given in honor of CAPT James, the new commanding officer of COMUTWING. CAPT James just reported in from Pensacola where he was on the staff of Admiral Price, Chief of Naval Training. Pictured above, left ot right, CDR Stamm, CAPT James, CDR McCoy and CDR Tetley. VU-10 Prop Blast by Bill Graves & Staff The AOQ Patio was the setting for a very entertaining get-totogether Saturday evening. Food was wonderful and plenty of refreshments. Everyone had a wonderful time, even if the music was very unusual. "Notice". There will be a bridge party August 10th at the Plantation Room. Mrs. Rose Bennett and Mrs. Billie Nelson are the sponsors. If you can't attend, give one of these nice ladies a call and let her know that you can't make it this time. "Extra". Boo Ferris became the father of seven, three blacks and four browns. He stated that he was going to cut their tails off today. Where's the cigars? I was told that if you want your outboard motor fixed, just let Eric Weiland help you. He'll really fix it up. The parachute loft gave a party Saturday afternoon at Kittery Beach. A good time must have been enjoyed by all, as no one seems to be able to remember what happened. No one hurt, no one lost, and no beer left. Mrs. Joye Graves felt very lucky last Wednesday night at BingoSure enough, she won a set of Revere Ware. Congratulations. Now she charges her husband every time ise cooks. Larry Larimore and Mary departed on FLAW last Wednesday morning. Sure hated to see them go. They were transferred to Pensacola. These fellows are leaving the "Rock" very shortly: Twigg, Wade, Wilber, Bachimanis, Adams, McWilson, Doherty, Meyer, Lybeck, Clean, Heywaing, Lindeman, Huber, and Thompson. Good luck at your new duty stations men. Rumors: Stanovich has sent to the Governor of Texas for perimissions to take out citizenship pepers. Now that's a smart boy for ya! At long last, Mike Moore has the paper he's been looking for. Going by his house Saturday nite made one think of New Year Eve. Some party! Chief Pugh, ADC (AP) has been promised full membership into the COP coffee mess, that is when he pays his peso. Happy to have you wilt us. Our boy Brotherson is an autlsorHospital Notes by Charles L. Brewer, YN3 Heirport News During the past week the following births were recorded: a son, William O'Bradley Warnock, II. born 29 July to Mr. and Mrs. Harry E. Warnock; a son, Michael Harold Ciriello, born 28 July to SA and Mrs. Edmund R. Ciriello; a daughter, Ann Louise Mustard, born 30 July to ADI and Mrs. Andrew D. Mustard. Golf As we go into the third week of the Hospital Ringer Tournament we find T. G. Byrne, HMC leading the field in the first flight. The second flight is all tied up between Captain Moe and HM1 Mayernick. HN Filer is in command of the third flight and HN Connors heads the parade in the fourth flight. The special women's division is headed by Mrs. W. North. Softball The Special Departments made it two in a row over the Ward Corpsmen Sunday as they beat them 15 to 6. It was a tight ball game until the fourth inning when Hallum homered with two men aboard. A costly walk and error and another homerun by Harvey proved to be the end for the Ward Corpsmen. Hallum led the Special Departments with two homeruns and a double. For the Ward Corpsmen the fielding plays by Sparks at shortstop and the heavy hitting of Erdington kept the Ward Corpsmen in the game until the disastrous fourth. Departures HN John Canning departed via FLAW on the 4th for duty at MS T S Headquarters, Brooklyn, New Yorks, John is one of the old timers here at the Hospital and will be missed by all his friends. HM1 William "Sam" Poulton departed via the Thomas on the 5th for duty at BuMed. We wish"Sam" lots of luck at his new duty station and hope that he will remember all his friends here in the Hospital and on the base. ity on the base housing problem. He can tell you at what hour a house in Villamar will become vacant. If you're interested in knowing who has orders, see the old boy. Sunday, 8 August 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) The Chaplain's Corner Have you ever heard this old saying: "Scratch a Christian and you find a pagan?" Let's try a little experiment this week. Take your New Testament reverently in your hands. gently turn the pages to the 22nd and 23rd chapters of the Gospel according to St. Luke, and read carefully the account of the trial and crucifixion of Jesus. Then close your eyes and permit your imagination to create mental pictures of those great moments. See Jesus as they acuse Him falsely and convict Him unjustly. Observe Jesus as they mock Him as they spit on Him, as they press the painful crown of thorns on His head, as they scar His back with the lash, and as they force Him to carry the heavy across until He falls exhausted. Hear the sound of the hammer at it drives the nails thru His hands and feet. Watch His parched lips as they begin to move. Listen attentively to His words in this amazing uraver; "Father, forgive them for they know not what they do." Watch Him as His great love and deep concern for others enable Him to mush aside His agony as He arranges for the care of His mother and as He speaks peace into the heart of the believing thief on the other cross. Hear the note of triumph in His -oice as He utters His last words, "Father, into thy hands I commend my Spirit." Now as you remain relaxed and quiet with your thoughts centered on Jesus, you will come to the realization that no other man has ever drunk so deeply of the bitter dregs of physical suffering, has ever walked farther down the dark corridor of mental anguish, has ever labored under a heavier burden of spiritual responsibility. Yet, no paganism was found in Him, and He has promised the same victory to His followers who by faith and devotions become new creatures worthy of the name Christian. Scratch a true Christian and you will find the transforming love of God revealed in all its power and loveliness. M. 0. Stephenson THE INDIAN

PAGE 3

Saturday, 7 August 1954 m Page Three AFRS Conducts Letter Contest Freedoms Foundation of Valley Forge, through the Armed Forces Radio Service, is now conducting the 1954 "What America Means To Me" contest among service men all over the world. A principal award of $1,000 cash and an Honor Medal will be given for the best letter in the opinion of the Freedoms Foundation Awards Jury. Twenty awards of $100 and George Washington Honor Medals will be given second place winners, and third prizes will be 20 Honor Medals. The subject of the letter must be "What America Means To Me". Letters must not exceed 500 words in length and must be postmarked nlot later than November 11, 1954. They must also bear the signature, rank, service number and organization of the entrant. Only one letter per person will be judged. Send your letters to the Awards Editor, Armed Forces Radio and Television Service, Los Angeles 38, California. The Awards Jury, which will judge your letter, is composed of Congressional Medal of Honor winners. Will you be one of the prizewinners this year? LTJG McMahon Leaves GTMO For Separation Yesterday, LTJG John McMahon departed from Guantauno Bay on board the USNS Pvt. William H. Thomas for the United States and release to inactive duty around 15 August. Mr. McMahon, who has been the Naval Station Information, Education, and Training Officer since his arrival here, is being relieved by LT E. A. Toczko who is taking the job on as a collateral duty. While here in Guantanamo Bay, Mr. McMahon made many outstanding imiprovemsents in the Information and Education Office. He brought the Training Department up to "tip-top" shape to where a man can draw a book on almost any of the Navy's 64 ratings with numerous books for supplemental reading. Along with this, LTJG McMahon has also increased the number of USAFI texts and manuals on hand. At the last inventory, there were over 1200 USAFI books alone at the I & E Office. Also, through Mr. McMahon, numerous off duty classes have been initiated. The most recent ones (already completed) were courses in High School Algebra, Plane Geometry, and Physics. Upon his release to inactive duty, Mr. McMahon will take up residence in Deer Lodge, Montana and will teach History, Social Sciences, and English as well as working as a track and basketball coach. Scout Circus. .. (Continued front Page One) Besides the booths and the drawing, there will be a display of scout activities to show Mr. and Mrs. Guantanamo Bay that the scouts here have had a busy year. Included in the scout exhibits will be a model Boy Scout camp, and an Indian exhibit-complete with teepee and war dance. USN, Marine Units Awarded Korean Medals It was recently announced by the Bureau of Naval Personnel, in accordance with Public Law 354, that members and former members of the Navy and Marine Corps may accept Foreign awards for service in Korea provided they meet the qualifications. To be eligible for these awards, a man must have served within the continental limits of Korea or in waters immediately adjacent thereto during the period of hostilities in which the United States was engaged and also for one year after the end of hostilities. Unit Citations Authorization has also been granted for several Navy and Marine Corps units to wear the Presidential Unit Citation, providing that they served in the particular unit during the dates specified for the citation. If a man has served in more than one of these units that were cited, he is authorized to wear an oak leaf cluster for each additional one that he served with (luring the time of their citation. Units listed in the Bureau of Personnel instruction are as follows: The Seventh Fleet July 1950 to July 1952 Task Force NINETY July 1950 to March 1951 Task Force NINETY-FIVE 12 Sep. 1950 to 3 Aug. 1951 Fleet Air Wing SIX July 1950 to June 1951 Fleet Activities INCHON 12 Sep. 1950 to 5 Jan. 1951 25 Mair. 1951 to 31 Aug. 1951 Surgical Team TWO 15 Sep. 1950 to 15 Aug. 1950 Fleet Activities WONSON 21 Oct. 1950 to 10 Dec. 1950 Surgical Team THREE 15 Sep. 1950 to 15 Oct. 1950 Fleet Activities CHINNAMPO 17 Nov. 1950 to 5 Dec. 1950 Surgical Team FOUR 15 Sep. 1950 to 15 Oct. 1950 Fleet Activities HUNGNAM 22 Nov. 1950 to 9 Dec 1950 First Provisional Marine Brigade 2 Aug. 1950 to 6 Sep. 1950 Fleet Acities PUSAN 16 July 1950 to 31 Aug. 1951 First Marine Aircraft Wing 3 Aug. 1950 to 26 Feb .1951 First Marine Division 26 Oct. 1951 to 27 July 195 U.S. Naval Advisory Group Feb. 52 to Feb. 53 First Marine Division 3 Aug. 1950 to 26 Feb. 1951 USS LSIL 1091 7 Mar. 1951 to 14 Aug. 1951 USS CONSOLATION (AH-15) 11 Aug. 1950 to 31 Aug. 1951 First Marine Aircraft Wing 27 Feb. 1951. to 11 June 1953 USS HAVEN (AH-12) 18 Oct. 1950 to 31 Aug. 1951 First Korean Marine Corps Regimental Combat Team and U.S. Marine Corps Advisory Group Attached 30 Oct. 1952 to 1 Nov. 1952 USS REPOSE (AH-16) 16 Sep. 1950 to 31 July 1951 Old Warships Saved The President has signed a bill to restore three old warships, the frigates Constitution (Old Ironsides) and Constellation, built before 1800 to fight the Barbary pirates, and the Hartford, which fought in the Civil War. The Constitution is now in Boston and is 90 percent restored. It will be kept there. The Constellation, also in Boston, will be patched up and transferred to Baltimore. The Hartford, now in Norfolk, Va., will be sent to Mobile, Ala., when repaired. Re-Up Bonus Bill Now Law; Raises Total Payment $600 Washington (AFPS)-The new Re-enlistment Bonus Bill was signed into law by President Eisenhower July 16 and became effective immediately. The bill-now Public Law 506-amends the Career Compensation Act of 1949 to increase the average re-enlistment bonus payment from about $250 to more than $500. It also raises the maximum total payment to an individual from about $1400 to $2000. The purpose of the new law is to increase re-enlistments among EM Re-enlistment Column (1) Column (2) involved 1 Take Multiply by First ---Monthly basic pay to which the Number of years specified in remember was entitled at theI enlistment contract, or six, if time of discharge. I none specified.' Second--Two-thirds of the monthly basic Number of years specified in repay to which the member was enlistment contract, or six, if entitled at the time of disnone specified. charge., Third --One-third of the monthly basic Number of years specified in repay to which the member was enlistment contract, or six, if entitled at the time of disnone specified. : charge.5 Fourth (and subseOne-sixth of the monthly basic Number of years specified in requent). pay to which the member was enlistment contract, or six, if entitled at the time of disnone specified.3 charge.5 lAny re-enlistment when a bonus was not authorized is not counted. tTtwo-thirds of the monthly basic pay in the case of a member in pay grade E-1 at thr time of diocbarge. SOn the sixth anniversary of an indefinite re-enlistment, and on each anniversary thereafter, the member is entitled to a bonus equal to one-third of the monthly basic pay to which he is entitled on that anniversary date. 4No bonus may be paid to a member in pay grade E-1 or E-2 at the time of discharge. dNo bonus may be paid to a member in pay grade E-1, E-2 or E-3 at the time of diochargo. serving their initial tours of duty. The amounts to be paid are determined by a sliding scale by which the largest payments go to those re-enlisting for the first time. Both the Defense Department and Congress believe that the plan will pay for itself by eliminating a large part of the trainig costs for replacements. The bonus payable to a member who re-enlists before completing a total of 20 years of active Federal service, but under that re-enlistment will complete more than 20 years of such service, is computed on the following basis: The multiplier used is the number of years which, when added to his previous service, totals 20 years. However, old timers who would stand to gain more under the old re-enlistment law may elect that law until they have received a total of $1400. Officers being released from active duty are entitled to receive a re-up bonus if they served as EM in the same service immediately before accepting a commission. Their bonus will be computed on the monthly EM basic pay at time of re-enlistment. Ugh No Gettum Pictures Due to circumstances beyond the control of THE INDIAN, the usual number of pictures are not seen in this issue. The shipment of engravings was not received in time for publication, but every effort will be made to bring you news in pictures in all forthcoming i Goad Taste Reccommended In Summer Attire During the hot summer months when the sun is pouring down its heat, the natural impulse is to get as cool as possible, and it is a common practice to wear shorts and bathing suits whenever possible. However, it should be remelmbered that it is in poor taste, for women especially, to wear scanty attire in public gathering places such as the commissary store, the Navy Exchange, the movie lyceums, and such. Actually the comnmissary store does not permit patrons to enter in shorts. The proper place for shorts and bathing suits is at the beach and in participating in athletic events. Even then, it is recommssended that the so-called "short" shorts not be Worn. Traveling to and froms the beaches should be done with sport shirts over swlmin3ltg, suits. Servicemen's Deposits The Armed Forces now have a new uniform law governing enlisted personnel deposits. EM in all branches now are able to withdraw deposits in cases of emergency instead of only at the time of discharge. The Army and Air Force had temporary authority to allow this while the Navy and Marine Corps did not. There were no other basic changes in the law. THE INDIAN

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as Saturday, 7 August 1954 Page Four Marines, NavSta End Payotffs; SeaBees Fall To Indians by Pierce Lehmbeck At the time of this writing the Marine Leathernecks and the Naval Station Indians were converging in the finals of the 1954 Naval Base League Post Season Play-offs with the Leathernecks having a slight edge after having moved into the final tilt losing none while the Indians had suffered an earlier setback by the Marines in the form of a 9-0 shutout courtesy of Wayne Straw. This meant that the Leathernecks needed but one win while the Indians needed to take two in succession. If the Leathernecks took that one win, the Play-offs came to end last Mallard second sacker Johnny Clark is narrowly in and under Leatherneck third baseman Louie Romano as the latter looks towards the umpire for a decision after taking a throw from the outfield. Clark was declared safe only to die on the sack at the frame's end with the Marines taking a 5-4 win in the first game of Post Season Play-offs. night with the victors copping both the League title and the Play-offs. However, if the Indians came through, the final and deciding clash will take place this afternoon on Fleet Recreation Diamond number one. These 1954 Play-offs will go down in the League annals as one of the most exciting yet. The Leathernecks, who just about everyone counted out because of a devastating blow to their mound staff in the form of the loss of strikeout ace Rollie Santos, came through to move into the finals in fine form, their most trying moment being a 5-4 edge of the VU-10 Mallards in the opener Sunday afternoon. The team favored, as called by this reporter, was MCB-8 who lost in the first round to the Naval Station Indians 4-2, won in the consolation game over the Mallards 12-3 and lost to the Indians again in the semi-finals by an 8-7 margin, was hampered by injuries through-out the tournament. Their biggest loss to the casualty list was initial sacker Jim Dotson who came out of hiding in their final bid for top honors to assume a hero's role and hit two round-trippers while bringing forth his best efforts on the mound only to take the loss in the Indian clash Thursday night. Marines Into Semi-Finals With Mallard Edge The Champion Marine Leathernecks opened up 1954's edition of the Post Season Play-offs last Sunday afternoon on Fleet Recreation Diamond number one and promptly moved into the semi-finals with a 5-4 edge of the third-finishing Mallards of VU-10. The Mallards, paced by playermanager and short-stop Boo Ferris, outhit the pennant-winners 8-4 and were leading by a 4-2 margin until the top of the seventh when Marine second sacker Jimmy Pace stepped into a pitch that was good for about 340 feet and three runs to send his club into the lead and they were never headed. Catcher Toni Felak supported Pace's big blow for the Leathernecks by collecting a double and a single in three trips while Ferris doubled and singled twice in four trips for the losing Mallards. Smith went the distance to take the win for the base champions giving up eight hits. For the Mallards, Breske took the loss after relieving starter Presutti in the fourth. Both Mallard servers limited the winners to only two hits each, but Pace's round-tripper in the seventh off Breske was the decisive blow. Marines 5 4 3 VU-10 4 8 3 Braves In With Win Over 'Bees The Naval Station Indians surprised just about everybody but themselves Monday night as they overcame and early 2-0 deficit to win over the 'Bees of MCB-8 4-2 and thus move into the semi-finals with the Marines. Utilizing an infield error, a wilpitch and a well-timed single by Mayer, the 'Bees nabbed two runs in the bottom of the first to begin the tilt in a style that gave i" pretenses of turning into a runaway. However, the Brave defense tightened up and their offensive unit began pounding away ht 'Bee starter Shackleton until they finally chased across their first run in the fifth when Mathieu tripled and scored on a single by Logsdon. The" added two more to move ahead in the seventh on singles by Baries and Phillips and a double by Mathieu, who proved to be the spark plug at the plate. Their final run came in the eight when Young singled and, after being worked around scored on Baries's second safety of the evening. Mandis went the distance to take the win while Shackleton stuck out the full nine to take the loss for MCB-8. NavSta 4 10 1 MCB-8 2 6 1 Straw, Marines Take Naval Station Cruising behind the two-hit pitching of their phenominal 'slowballer' Wayne Straw, the Marine Leathernecks moved into the finals as they shut-out the Naval Station Indians, 9-0, Tuesday night. The possessor of the Naval Base League's lone no-hitter had the Braves completely under his control as he kept his serves bobbing and weaving to scatter their meager two-hit total and notch his second shut-out in three starts. Spoiling his second bid for the perfect game were right-fielder Cy Young and his opposing hurler Dale Buss. While the 20 year old Pennsylvanian was keeping the Brave offenses clogged, the Leathernecks scoring unit was in its usual form as it chased three Brave hurlers for a ten hit total, six of them going for extra bases. Pacing the pack was Jim Pace who collected three doubles in four trips. Straw notched the win and struck out six while walking only one. Todd, the first of the Brave parade, was charged with the loss. He gave way to Buss in the second whlater gave way to Fidler in the seventh. Together, they struck out nine and walked 10. Marines 9 10 2 NavSta 0 2 2 Errors, 'Bees Defeat Mallards The VU-10 Mallards booted just about everything that wasn't tied down Wednesday night as they lost to the MCB-8 'Bees 12-3 and were thus eliminated from tournament play. They committed 15 errors. It was a stormy night for the Mallard contingent from the game's beginning as their numerous bobbles proved costly. The biggest blow came in the fifth when a succession of six miscues gave the 'Bees seven unearned runs which virtually salt9 N' N, Baseball Banquet Postponed The baseball banquet, origin: ly planned for Monday night, Augu t 9, has been postponed. The new date for the banquet will be announced when set. "Your grandfather's a little deaf, isn't he?" one man asked another. "A little deaf?" the other man said. "Yesterday, he conducted family prayers kneeling on the cat." University Barber: "You say you've been here before. I don't remember your face." Student: "Probably not. It's healed up now." "Mommy, why is it Daddy doesn't have much hair?" "He thinks a great deal, dear." "But, Mommy, then why is it you have so much hair?" "Finish your breakfast, dear." ed the game away. The 'Bees followed with two more in the seventh and eighth innings to notch the win and move into the consolation semi-finals against the Naval Station Indians. Huber was the starter for the Mallards and although he gave up but four hits in the first six frames, he was forced to weather the storm and take the loss. Dieden relieved him in the seventh Taking the win for the SeaBees was Ed Bigbie who showed up well in limiting the Mallards to eight safeties. Mayer ably supported him at the plate as the big fellow blasted a drive which was good for about 360 feet and all four bases in the seventh. MCB-8 12 9 4 VU-10 3 8 15 Braves Edge 'Bees Thursday night, the surprising Naval Station Indians narrowly edged the Bees of Eight in as exciting a contest as has been witnessed on the local scene this year, 8-7. This tilt sent the Indians with the League Champion Marine Leatherneeks. Call it that Mandis charm or whatever you like but it was the little fellow with the big arm once again that seemed to turn the trick. Although he gave up a total of nine hits, he had the Bees, with the exception of relief hurler Jim Dotson, hitting the ball pretty much where he wanted it. He added to his own cause by chasing in two runs. Dotson, who came in to relieve Shackleton after the latter was touched for six runs in a big Brave second frame, was once again, despite an injured right foot, the big gun as he homered twice and was intentionally walked in his third trip. Mayer of the 'Bees and Todd of the Braves also were at their best as each collected a three for four total. Mandis chalked the win, his second in tournament play while Dotson was charged with the loss while being touched for only two of the Brave's eight run total. NavSta 8 10 3 MCB-8 7 10 3 THE INDIAN a sp orts

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Saturday, 7 August 1954 Fishing Contest Ends Aug. 15th Harbor Police Report Heavy Load of Last-Minute Entrants The Guantanamo Bay Fishing Tournament, sponsored by the Naval Base, is closing very rapidly. Next Saturday, August 15th, at midnight will be the last opportunity to register a fish. The Harbor Police weighing stations at Leeward Point and Mainside have reported a flurry of "lastminute" entries during the past week. There has been some confusion regarding prizes for women and children in the tournament. In the first place it should be known that men, women and Slhildren are all in direct competition with each other, and prizes will be awarded for the largest fish in each class, regardless of who catches it. BUT, there are also special prizes for women and children. Among wonen only there will be a prize for the largest fish caught in EACH DIVISION (LAND, AFLOA T, SPEARFISHING, SPECIAL). For instance, if Mrs. Bos'un registers a 60-pound snapper in the Land Division and Mrs. Mech registers a 50-pound tarpon, also in the Land Division, Mrs. Bos'un will get the prize because her catch was bigger for the Land Division. In other words, there will not be a prize for the women for each type of fish caught; only for the largest in each division. For the children, there will be a souvenir prize awarded to every child (under 16) registering a fish in the tournament. And there will also be a prize awarded for the largest fish in each division, same as for the women. Don't forget-next Saturday at midnight is the deadline! All children entering fish in the tournament are requested to write their age after their name on the entry form, and all contestants are requested to indicate on the entry form whether the fish was caught in the Land, Afloat, Spearfishing or Special Division. Latest Fishing Entries LAND DIVISION Barracuda Plath, C. W. --18, lbs. Hackert, A. 14 lbs., 10 ozs. Dean, W. L. -12 lbs., S ozs. Fimbel, E.C. 31 lbs. Grouper Hanlin, John Paul 1 lb., 14 ozs. Gardes, G. S.1 lb., 21 ozs. Hise, N. L. --9 ozs. Jacks MacAnanny, R. E. ___ 19 lbs., 8 ozs. Raymond, Sam -14 lbs., 81/ ozs. Nixon. W. G. -2 lbs., 8 ozs. Fimbel, E. C. 14 lbs., 151/% ozs. Mackerel (King) Howerton, R. D. 5 lbs., 10 ozs. Snapper Henry, R. L. 24 lbs. Kelly, C. L -39 lbs. Fath, L. A. 15 lbs., S ozs. Snook Bunda, George -0 lbs., 4 ozs. Horner, T. A. -lbs. Tarpon Scott, W. H. 23 lbs., 8 ozs. Bedward, K. D. 17 lbs. Collins, R. R. 16 lbs. Mackerel (Spanish/Common) Dean, W. V. 7 lbs. Gardes, George 9 ozs. BOAT DIVISION Mackerel (King) Smouse, J. H. 11 lbs., 8 ozs. Barracuda Carroll, J. C. 24 lIbs. Cunningham, J. H. 17 lbs., oz. Davenport, Sid -16 lbs., S ozs. Wahoo Smouse, J. H. -24 lbs. Jacks Karstens, R. L. 12 lbs., 14 ozs. Snapper Ladies' Golf Shots by Miriam Hoy Last Wednesday we played a Blind File Tournament on the Front Nine, with holes number 1 5, 6, 7, and 8 being drawn to total the individual scores. New golf balls were awarded to the following winners: First Flight 1st Place-Alma McCracken 2nd Place-two way tie: Corky Henning Polly Herring Second Flight 1st Place-two way tie: Marie Aslin Sue Scott 2nd Place-Marge Sheehan Third Flight 1st Place-Evelyn Leach 2nd Place-Miriam Hoy Next week we will play the Back Nine for gross and net scores. Hope to see a lot of you golfers out there teeing off bright and early. "Would you come to my aid in distress, soldier?" "Honey, I'd come to you in any old dress." "My son just graduated from agricultural college." "Did he win any honors?" "Yes, he was voted the most likely to sack seed." For Sale: Second hand tombstone. Excellent buy for family named Floogle. They parted at the corner, She whispered with a Figh: "I'll be home tomorrow night." He answered, "So will I!" Roberts, V. A. -50 lbs. Johnson, D. -46 lbs. Johnson, D. --40 lbs. Snook Emverso, Epifanio 15 lbs., 2 ozs. Carrington, Laurie 12 lbs., 4 ozs. Wilson, W. H. -5 lbs., 8 ozs. Tarpon Andrews J. W. -59 lbs., 4 ozs. Fimbel. E. C. 40 lbs. Davis, N. Q. 20 lbs., 4 ozs. SPECIAL DIVISION Bonefish Wenlaff, D. C. 3 lbs., 10 ozs. Wind, Marion A. -2 lbs., 8 ozs. Emverzo, Epifanio ._ 2 lbs., 24 ozs. Albacore Smouse, J. H. 6 lbs., 4 ozs. Croakers Morales. Edith 8 ozs. Sanborn. Jim 8 ozs. Dalton, Kathryn 2 ozs. Ladyfish Smouse. J. H. -4 lbs., 8 -s Parrotfish Clark, D. L. 8 lbs., 1 oz. Pompano Bedward. Kenneth 20 lbs. Giggy, G. K. 16 lbs., 4 ozs. Romano, Sam 8 lbs., 13 ozs. Shark Fimbel, E. C. 76 lbs. Davenport, Dale 44 lbs., 8 ozs. Meredith, Fred 41 lbs., 8 ozs. Triggerfish Lee, G. A. --4 lbs., 8 ozs. SPE ARFISHING DIVISION Elwood, J. D. 56 lbs. Nichols, E. M. ---16 lbs. Jacks Dean, W. V. 18 lbs., 8 os. Andrews, R. M. 14 lbs. Mackerel Scheibel, K. E. 8 lbs., 11 ozs. Snappers Ward, G. F. 14 lbs., 13 ozs. Nichols, E. M. -14 lbs. Barracuda Plath, C. W. -181/ lbs. Pace. Robert 12 lbs. Andrews, R. M. 10 lbs. Hogfish Ward, G. F. ----------5 lbs., 15 ozs. 0 Many happy Bears and parents group around Meredith winning pitcher, as the Bears won the Little League Championship last week. Charlie Figueroe, Tiger 3rd baseman slides into third under Bear Tommy Mallia in the championship-deciding game. Bears won, 5 to 4. Bears Nose Out Tigers: Win Little League Championship The Little League baseball teams are winding up the post-season tournament on the Villamar diamond. Last Tuesday the Bears, 1954 league champions, beat the Colts in the first game of the tourney, and on Wednesday the Tigers, 1954 runners-up, downed the Hawks. The tournament is a double elimination contest, each team being defeated twice before it is eliminated from the tourney. Moe: "What would you do if there were no women? Who would sew your buttons on?" Joe: "If there were no women we wouldn't need any buttoms." Taft Albright of the Tigers slides safely into third base during the Tiger-Bear game at Little League last Saturday. The Bears won, 5 to 4. giving them the championship. 0 THE INDIAN m Page Five

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m Satuday, 7August 154 "lx THE INDIAN Safety In Guantanamo Bay The folkuwinn article appears in the TNDIAN through the courtesey of J. A. McGowan, Naval Base Safety Engineer. Safety in Guantanamo Bay was written for and appeared in the Safety Review. by A. J. McGowan Safety Training At the Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, is desi ined principally to meet the language and cultural differences u'isting between American supervisors and native worknen. The formal Safety program was starte( only in 1948, and is still in short pants as compared in years with stateside activities. Although much of the Base work is performed I occupationally employed military personnel aided by SeaBee and Cargo Handling battalions, the safety training of such personnel presents no unusual difficulty, and will not receive more than passing comment. It will suffice to say that a regular curriculum has been prepired for such groups and weekly ,lasses are held in the Training Division class rooms on Industrial an Motor Vehicle Accident Prevention. The unique features of safety training at the Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba are applicable to the native and alien employees -some 2600 of them in Civil Service jobs and an additional 600 in jobs compensated from nonappropriated funds. These employees inelude Cubans, Chinese, IndiansSpaniards, Jamaicans, Haitians, and former inhabitants of other West Indian islands who have been attracted to the Base as a source of steady employment. Obviously, their safety training must take into account the differences between their backgrounds and cultures and those of the average U.S. citizen To generalize concerning the average Cuban employee (and most Base employees are Cubans), he is a product of the Latin American environment. He is proud, sometimes quick-tempered, and never quite adjusts himesif to the crazy American habit of taking only one hour off for lunch. He may understand some English, but may murmer, "Si, si," in response to instructions from a supervisor, when "No, no" is the correct reply. This leads to frazzled nerves in both English and Spanish. As the driver of a Navy motor vehicle, it has been difficult for him to abandon the driving practices he learned in his own home town where it is customary for everyone to drive at breakneck speed with horn blaring. Nevertheless, as a Navy employee he must observe the most minute traffic regulations of a congested base, or risk the loss of his job. The first job of the Safety staff sto make this employee safetyconscious. He may be closely supervised in the shoops, brit much of the work is performed in the fielwheie constant supervision is impossible. Whether he is working at the rock crusher, at the cargo wharf, in the magazine area, at the fuel pier, or on the moorings in the bay, there are hundreds of unsupervised operations daily which could prove his undoing. In order to protect him while le is not closely supervised, it is necessary to make him want to work safely, and to convince him of the folly of unsafe acts. One way in which this has been done is through appeal to the Cuban's strong love for his children. The suggestion that failure to wear goggles might cause the employee to lose forever the sight of his beloved hijos did more to in'7re compliance than any threat of disciplinary action. The second phase, teaching the r-rrect and safe way, requires undersianding. Our work methoris are foreign to Cuban workers, who tend to carry their more gracious way of living on the job. In keepwith their easy going natires. they are frequently not inclined to go to any trouble to obtain equipment or tools which are not immediately available. Fingers can be lost. for instance, when a mitrebox is not handy but a wood chisel is. The first and most consistent attack to promote safety-consciousness was effected in the Employee Development Program, as it was believed we must first indoctrinate supervisors and impress upon them their responsibility to relay the message to those for whose safety they are responsible. They were taught the theory of unsafe acts and conditions, the necessity of adequate investigations and timely reporting, and were informed of the requirements and provisions of the amended compensation act. Extensive use has been made of visual aids. As no films were readily available with Spanish sound tracks, it was necessary to delete the English sound after which personnel of the Training Division translated the English dialogue into Soanish, so that it would be concurrent with the film. Then at each showing the Spanish translation was "dubbed" in by use of a public address system. In this manner it has been possible to show not only Navy films but also many produced by insurance companies, fire protection organizations, and manufacturers of industrial equipment. Films of great personal impact such as "A Closed Bookm," "To Live In Darkness," and "It's Wanton Murder" are shown on an activity basis: that is, all workers in all commands are scheduled. In addition, the films are shown at night to Base dependents in the six local movie lyceums. Contact with the worker to train him in proper work habits is made through Safety Committees, by Saf-ty inspectors during visits to various jobs, and by use of safety literature. There are fifteen Shop Safety Committees spread throughout the seven local commands. Preference has been given to Shop Committees over Supervisors' Committees as it was believed that supervisors receive adequate safety training in the EDP class and that problems of great importance could be handled by the Base Safety Policy Committee or the Base Safe Driving Council as necessary. In addition to the usual agenda -reports of accidents, hazards, etc.-some time in each meeting is devoted to ai instruction period on a prepared subject given in Spanish by a member of the Safety staff. As each committee in includes an average of 10 journeymen, and membership is on a rotating basis, all workmen receive formal instruction at some time during the year. Field instruction is given by the inspectors who set aside a definite period each day to visit one or more projects for the purpose of closely observing work practices and giving on-the-job instruction. As this procedure b resulted in the noting President Urges Defense; Warns 'Keep Peace' Washington (AFPS)-President Eisenhower has approved the swift retaliation by U.S. Navy planes against the Communist Chinese figh-ters that attacked them, but said he does not want to see the incident enlarged into a threat to the peace. Three Navy planes searching for survivors of a British airliner downed by the Communists returned the fire of two Red fighters, shooting them down. At his weekly news conference, the President said the U.S. would defend its rights, but that it did not mean to be impulsive or threaten1ing. He denied Communist charges that the U.S. planes had been over Chinese territory. He said that since Americans had been aboard the British airliner, a U.S. aircraft car-rier task force had been sent into the area, not to provoke any incident, but to do what it could to find and rescue the survivors. He added that the carriers-the Hornet and the Philippine Seawould soon leave the area. Cool Message Sedalia, Mo. (AFPS)-During a hot spell a Methodist Church bull-tin board carried this message: "You. think it's hot here? Well." and correction of many unsafe practices, it has been given precedence over routine shop inspections which are scheduled to fit in the remaining time. The spot to be visited is selected each day from the master list of job orders in each activity so that no job will be effected without some observation by Safety personnel. The safety literature used is comnosed principally of material received from OIR, Washington, and the National Safety Council, plus that which is compiled locally. The magazines and periodicals received are useful only to those supervisors who read English. However, a weekly safety message is written in Spanish and displayed over each time clock. The subject of the condensed message may be an item from Safety Review. The Industrial Supervisor, or it may be occasioned by a discrepancy revealed by a study of first-aid injuries. Because of the workers' limited educational background, unusual emphasis has been placed on the use of cartoons and posters. The Safety Division alone services 60 special poster boards unon which are displayed National Safety Council posters and those made by the Safety staff. Stateside posters are altered to fit the local scene by inking in the message in Spanish under the English title. One cannot change a man's mode of living overnight, and progress has not been rapid. Howyer, the general basic indoctrination is complete and accepted, our problem now is to smooth it out and make it stick. It is felt the local Safety Training Program has done much to effect a better understanding between the nationalities represented on the Base, and that both Base and workers will benefit from that understanding. 9 Meetings Time & Place Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd & 4th Tuesday each month. Community Auditorium Ladies' Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Room, Community Auditorium Little Theatre Group 2000: 2nd Tuesday each month Marina Point Hospital Serie Voluntersmo 1000): 2nd Tusda (eaeh month Hospitai Medical Library American Legion Auxiliary, Unit One 1930 ; 3rd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Hut, Marina Point Toastmasters Club 92 1930 each Thursday, Oflicers Club dining American Legion, Guantanamo Bay Post 1 1930: 3rd Tuesday each month; Community Auditorium, Marina Point National Supervisors Association 1900; 1st Monday each month, Civilian Training Conference Room. Toatmasters Club No. 113 1900 each Thursday in the Flamingo Room, Fleet Recreation Center. New members welcome. Felloweraft Club No. 1078 2000 each Thursday, Practice. Business Meeting, 1st Thursday -Community nill Cuban Traffic Rules Outlined Traffic signs in Cuba conform to the same size and shape as those in the United States. Spanish English Pare Stop Despacio Go Slow Desvio Detour Precaucion Caution Peligro Danger No Hay Paso No Thoroughfare No Pase Do Not Pass No Pase Used to indicate No Trespassing Derecha Right Izquierda Left Conserve su Keep Right Derecha Conserve su Keep Left Izquierda Cruce Cross Crucero Railroad Crossing Ferrocarril Entrada Enter Salida Exit No Parquear No Parking No Auto No Parking Velocidad ? ? Speed Limit ? ? Auto Particular Reserved Parking Auto Officiales Official Parking Piquera Taxi Parking Silencio Silence Nifos Children Peaton Pedestrian Semaforo Treffic Sieinal Cuidado Be Careful Trafico Traffic Transito Traffic Arvow used One-Way Traffic alone or with TR ^ NSITO Thoroughfare traffic has right of way over side street traffic. Blow your horn at all intersections. Car arriving first has right of way. Report all accidents in the same manner as in the United States. a. Give immediate assistance to anyone injured and call Tony Civit as soon as possible, telephone 670 or 789 in Guantanamo City. b. Notify the police. c. Do not leave the scene of the accident. d. Notify the local insurance agent and be familiar with the information required for their accident reports. Do not leave loose articles in your car even though it is locked. It is good practice to give a boy a few cents to watch your car unless you are parked where policeman or reliable people are watching it. Cars in Guantanamo City are parked on one side of the street one day, and on the opposite side the next slay. If automobiles are parked in the street over night they must be moved to the opposite side If -the street the next lay.

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y, 7 August 1954 THE IN Chief Hospitalman Relates Many Lives to Indian Reporter by Dick Friz A white haired Chief and I relaxed in the shadows of the Leeward Point hangar for a few hours this week, and like one of the wedding guests in Coleridge's epic, I listened to the old mariner relate his experiences. "Now don't muddle up the facts, son," he cautioned, "the last time they did a piece on me, people got the impression I was either piped' or trying to deceive the poor reporter." It is not astounding, that the saga of Earl Cameron, HMC, Serial Number 120-16-00, has been misconstrued-the story of his double life equals a bit of True Detective and "Gulliver's Travels," yet retains the 'gospel truth.' Earl Barton Cameron enlisted in the Navy at the age of 17, on March 24, 1911, signing his papers on the USS Constellation, sister ship to "Old Ironsides." The latter part of the same year, he made his first visit to Guantanamo Bay. "You'd never have recognized it," he laughed, "mainside was nothin' more than a sand lot baseball diamond, and Leeward here was a cow pasture. ...This fellow McKinley that's buried at the end of the jet strip, supposedly jumped ship and settled here, raisin' cows and a few chickens." ...."the big sport at the time was racing cutters on the Bay. each ship would have their own crews, and thousands of dollars would change hands when they'd compete. Those crews were the 'prima donnas' of the fleet, had their own quarters and separate mess. ...We only saw Caimanera from the deck of the destroyer, but I see it hasn't changed much." Cameron was aboard the USS Roe in 1912, making a return trip, when a storm hit. The Roe was the fastest ship in the 8th Flotilla, but couldn't ride out the gale, and Seaman Cameron broke a few ribs in the melee. "I was stove up in Norfolk for quite a spell," Cameron recalled, "and when I finally recovered, they were short of hospital corpsmen and recruited me." Briefly, the Naval career of Camerons' includes three hitches, the first ending in 1921. He was present at the First landing at Bluefield Nicaragura, seige of Vera Cruz, Mexican Coast Patrol, duty in France in W.W. I, Santa Domingo in '19, and recruiting duty in Texas. (He made Chief just prior to Russian revolution in '17.) Twenty-five years of Cameron's life have been devoted to law. He received his law degree in the early twenties from Hamilton College in Chicago, and has been admitted to the bar of US District Court of Texas, Cincinnati, US Circuit Court of Appeals, New Orleans. Worked as claims attorney for the Fidelity and Deposit Company of Maryland, and "much of it involved criminal prosecution." The Chief claims he's been eligible to the Bar of the United States Supreme Court, but "never got around to purchasing one of those swallow tail coats." Chief Cameron was 48 when World War II broke out, and they were offering commissions to those with law degrees commensurate with experience. "But, It'd just have meant a change of desk jobs to me," he explained, "and I still wanted to see what was on the other side of the horizon." And so at the age of 52, he was pup-tenting on Okinawa, serving with CVG 7 aboard the TARAWA, and winding up his second hitch sailing on the Duxberry Bay in the Persian Gulf. The chief began his third hitch after hostilities began in Korea. This time, he sailed east on the Bonhomme Richard to the Korean Seas. One of the Richard's air groups knocked out a huge hydroelectric plant, "putting those Commies in the dark for awhile," and earned a recommendation for a Presidential Unit Citation with two stars. Chief Cameron served also on the Bennington in the NATO Fleet, and now is with VF-72(TAD) visiting Leeward for gunnery drill. At 61, and nearing 18 years of longevity, he has shipped over for two more years, to meet the requirements for shore duty in Germany. Cameron chucked to himself as he remembered another visit to Guantanamo City in '51. "We were just leaving Caimanera by train," he recalled, "when one of the pilots sittin' next to me, seeing the kids beg for coins in the salt flats-sorta joshes me about whether maybe some of 'em aren't rightly mine." "Whatya mean," I stormed, "the last time I was here was 1911! That shut him up, until both of us noticed this old Uncle Remus-like character, rockin' away on the back porch of one of the shanties. ..he glanced our way, feebly raised a creakin' arm, and in a barely audible voice, croaked, "Hi-ya Pop!" "There ya see," (I nudged my startled companion,) "That's my boy." LT McCann Commissioned USN Congratulations are again in order for LT Malcolm R. McCann, USN, recently promoted to his present grade. He was the first NAS officer tenderd, and the first to accept, and active duty contract offered him by Chief, BuPers. The contract calls for a term of five years commencing 1 October 1954 and terminating 30 September 1959. DIAN Page NAS Crosswinds TEENAGE-ROUND-UP by Dick Friz WHO'S WHO AT NAS LCDR Albert D. Nelson Jr.: Flight Surgeon, Dispensary "Doc" Nelson was born and raised in Texas-Carthage, Texas, that is. He atended college at SMU at Dallas and received his B.S. (prelaw) there. He was a member of Phi Delta Theta social fraternity. He finished his medical studies at Baylor Medical College and Suothwestern Medical School, and was initiated in the Phi Chi Medical Fraternity. In 1942 he married Billie Roder of Sweetwater. They have two children, Nancy Lea, 12 and Norman Lee 6. Dr. Nelson received a LTJG commission in 1945, and was designated Naval Flight Surgeon in 1953. He was released from active duty in '46 and completed one year or residency in internal medicine at V.A.H., McKinney, Texas then engaged in general practice until recalled. He completed his service intership at Naval Hospital. Shoemaker, California in '45 and was assigned to DD 877 ...Later hety transferred him to NAB 807 in the Marshall Islands and he remainded there until release from active duty. The doctor has a Sunday school class, golfing, shooting, and of course plenty of patients to keep his days at Guantanamo fully occupied. News Briefs A yeoman from Leeward Point while stationed aboard the USS Vermillion, gave the Skipper quite a start one afternoon when he answered the phone. "Chaplains Office, St. John speaking." It was of course, only the very earthy Marshall St. John, TAD to the shin's Chaplain. In last week's edition, we confused the famous R5D with the R4D, thus actually minimizing the amount of work the Flaw Crew expended. It is the R5D, which holds 4,000 more pounds of cargo than it's junior model, (and has two more engines) that causes the 'sweat to roll.' It looks as though Pete DiGennaro, who leaves for discharge this week, just can't get away from Navy life. Pete will go to work (in a civilian capacity, he hastens to add,) at the Naval Air Rocket Test Station, Lake Denmark, near Dover, New Jersey. Did you ever stop to wonder what they ever wanted with these men whose names are called over the P.A. system during the movies ? We checked on one the other night. Jim Swanson was paged, and he discovered that a baby boy had been born to his wife Dorothy in Chicago that morning .Jim should be there by now. He was last seen in 'that joyful daze' entering a Coast Guard plane and heading for the U.S.A. Chief Cecil Callan ENC, leaves for Norfolk this week. He'll be in charge of the local reform school at Barracks "K" of the Receiving Station. Also departing are: Bill Silcox AE2-NAS Jax, Dave Capron PR3, NAS Atlantic City, Art Sides AD3Key West, Don Wigley A/N-Jax, Dave Doyle ACAN-Discharge, Dave Marsh-Memphis, Bill Krall AT2,Fasron 6, Jax, John Smith AC1, NAF Annapolis, Sam Romano A/N discharge, Francis Spraul, AD3Key Wset, Achille Montalte, A/Ndischarge, Jerrell Terrell AT2-Pax, Joe Gherrity AT1-Key West, John Schmitt PR3-Pax, Bill Hollowell, FAU, Comlant -Norfolk, James Norfolk, James Sadler AK3-VR-1Pax River, John Hamilton CSCNAS Norfolk ...oBVoyage. by Judy Yost Most of the gang is taking advantage of these last few weeks before school starts-the beaches, pools, Snack-Shack, bowling-alley, and other gathering places are "Jumping"! And in the evenings, after the movies, our own Hut is a nice spot to drop by-the Mobile Canteen is there to furnish our refreshments, and with some cool music and the nice breeze from the Bay, it's a nice ending for our day. Been down yet? ? ? ? Just a rumor at this date-but it's going 'round via the well known grapevine that we'll be having another of those wonderful dances at the Community Building this Saturday nite, after the meeting, of course. So come on down and we'll spin the records again-Lot'sa fun! !! Funny, that bout this time every summer, we begin to look at the school on the hill-some of us with enthusiasm, others, with dread-and when you pass by the stationary counters at the Exchanges and view all of those school supplies, well, it makes that day seem pretty close! (Have ya noticed the twinkle in the mother's eyes, as they pass the school? Wonder why! !) Lots of new kids have been coming in, and by the way it looks now, our classrooms will be well filled. Didja Dig-Stanley and Ronnie going athletic-Peggy and Dex"Cavie" spending his money at N.O.B.-Barbara B. and Eunice on the bus-the gang at the beachEdgar on his "soapbox"-Delores on the opposite side of the counter at Air Station EX-all the gals having a grrreat time at the dance Friday night-a couple of the kats pricing luggage (wheah ya'll goin?)-the usual Saturday and Sunday morning look on most of us (bags under our eyes from staying up so late listening to the Sandman Show -Jimmy Dalton pushing the pedels down Sherman Avenue. Note to Mrs. Scarborough-We're all so glad to have you back with us and are looking forward to seeing you again. Lots of best wishes to you. "How long have you been in the Navy ,son?" "All day, Sir." STATION WAGON: Something a city fellow who moves to the country buys so the country people will know lie's from the city.

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M Saturday, 7 August 1954 av-510NDPP-Gttid.-0020 MOVIES Saturday, 7 August RIDING SHOTGUN Randolph Scott Joan Weldon Scott, riding shotgun on a stagecoach, is tricked into leaving it tsearch for an outlaw. He is bound hand and foot. He escapes, goes to town whereupon the townspeople think him a gang member. Sunday, 8 August KNOCK ON WOOD Danny Kaye Mai Zetterling Eccentric ventriloquist is accused of murder of two spies who have stuffed world-destroying plans into heads of his two dummies. In color. Monday, 9 August GYPSY COLT Donald Corcoran Ward Bond Young girls' love for colt is ended when parents are forced to sell the colt for teh extra money. The horse escapes and returns to the child, to the consternation of the parents. Tuesday, 10 August ROB ROY Richard Todd Glynis Johns Cattle thief and 18th-century chieftan of the MacGregors is outlawed by George I and is thereafter harried by the Duke of Montrose, who ambushes him and kills his mother. Disgusted by this, the Duke of Argyll arranges for Rob Roy to see the king and clear himself. In color. Wednesday, 11 August DIAL M FOR MURDER Ray Milland Grace Kelley Playboy husband plans death of his wife after he has married her for her money. Thursday, 12 August WHITE FIRE Scott Brady Mary Castle A young man invites trouble when he tries to solve the murder of night club owner for which his younger brother is accused and due to die. Friday, 13 July THE ROCKET MAN George Winslow Charles Coburn In his imagination, George Winslow "acquires" a rocket gun from a "space man" which has extraordinary powers to do good and put the clinches on evil politicians. A Hollywood luminary, testifying in a minor breach of contract case was asked to identify himself. "I am the world's greatest actor," he told the court with simple dignity. One of his friends chided him the next day. "Don't you think that boost you gave yourself was a little too thick?" "Usually I avoid any kind of self-praise," said the film idol, "but remember, this time they had me under oath." So what can you say about Terry Moore that hasn't already been said in 50,000 words or less? That's just for the benefit of the myopic and near-sighted who contend anything needs to be said at all. For the rest of us with normal 20/40 vision, we won't further distract you with mere words. FTG Bulletin by Jack Engstrom Captain Cushing, accompanied by Lieutenant Commander Minard and Lieutenant Loader from the FTG Gunnery Department, made an inspection tour of Roosevelt Road and Culebra last week to observe firing of ships in training here. The inspection turned out to be a little more than routine and a little more painful than anticipated by LCDR Minard and LT Loader. While flying by helicopter from Roosevelt Roads to the air strip on Culebra the 'copter' developed motor trouble over Vieques Sound. Being that a Helicopter doesn't have too much gliding abilities they were glad to set down on "Cactus Cay". a small uninhabited island nearby. Once the wheels touched the ground they made great haste in evacuating the disabled 'copter' for fear of fire, hence litle regard was given to the terrain and the plant life they scrambled into. A rescue 'copter was radioed and some time later their own aircraft was repaired and their journey to Culebra was made without further mishap. Be it known that a cactus patch is not the best place to set down in especially when the occupants are in a hurry to evacuate. It is believed that a sufficient number of cactus needles are still causing great discomfort and pain for Mr. Minard and Mr. Loader, enough so that their short and unexpected visit to the island of Cactus Cay will stick in their memories! Captain Bull, FTG Training Offieor, departed this command last Wednesday for San Diego, California where he will assume his new duties as Chief Staff Officer of the Fleet Training Group there. Chief Dykeman, FTG Supply Department, departed with his wife and family on the USNS Thomas last Thursday. Chief Dykeman will report to the U.S. Naval Air Station, Corpus Christi, Texas for a normal tour of shore duty. Enamel Etcktixgs by J. H. (Ollie) Olsen, DT2 This week our column is going to try to bring to it's readers some information on the workings of the Base Dental Clinic and the people who make it function to bring to you the best possible dental treatment that can be had. I often wonder what goes through a persons head (besides the fear of the drill of course) when he enters one of our offices for an appointment. Maybe if that person knew something about us some of that fear could be aleviated. First of all, when anyone in our clinic does something, he knows exactly what he is doing and why he is doing it. That is everybody, from the corpsmen to the commanding officer, from the lab man to the repairman. The corpsmen are chosen and sent to one of the many Navy Dental Technicians Schools for a period of six months. During that time they are given courses in anatomy, physiology, X-Ray, first aid, sterile technique and a course in dental materials, just to meniton a few. They are chosen for their neatness, ability to learn and ability to adapt themselves. When you next come to us for an appointment and you step into a clean, neat, air conditioned office, be aware that it was cleaned by the technician in that office. He prepares that room just for your appointment. Every instrument that comes in contact with you has been throughly washed and sterilized, and each replacement that is used on you is the best that money acen buy. When you next meet your dentist, remember he didn't just happen to get that job. It wasn't given to him. He studied and worked for it. To be a dentist one is required to attend college for six years or more and take courses which are too numerous to begin mentioning. They know all the latest methods and work with the most modern equipment. Nowadays that "fear of a drill" is a thing of the past. You can come to us with confidence that you will get the best dental treatment you can get anywhere in the world. You are being treated by people who know their job. I hope this has helped to make your dental clinic a little more appealing to you, and that you are as proud of it as I am being a part of it. CUTTLEBUTT "What makes you think nm a spy from another planet?" Coffee Mess in the very near future Two new stainless steel coffe" Tsis equipment has beei provideA tables and sinks, of the restaurant for by tse FTG Welfare & Rectype have rived and will be inreaction Fuids. It's ths best equipstalled in Officer's and Enlisted ment so lets give it t est of care. 5BO OK* NOOK by Francis L. Cannon. JOSN For Your Information ... THE NEW FORCE by Ralph E. Lapp The story of the growth of atomic power. Dr. Lapp dispels the popular idea that the basic principles of atomic fission are a dee dark secret understood only by the specialist. He tells how the A-bomb was produced (he had a share in it) and of his unique experience on, night in Chicago of being one of the few men in the world who knew that next morning, an A-bomb would fall on Hiroshima. He states his views on the future use of atomic power for peaceful purposes. GEORGE WASHINGTON'S AMERICA by John Tebbel From George Washington's letters, diaries, and a wealth of contemporary accounts, John Trebbel has compounded a superb work. showing Washington as a citizen of the young nation as well as its most indefatigable traveler. He ranged all over the known U.S. and understood it as few, if any of his contemporaries did. A WRITER'S DIARY by Virginia Woolf An insight into the mind and method of a great writer. Virginia Woolf wrote as did few others; she tells how she planned a book, toiled over it, became frustrated, and finally produced what others regarded as a work of art. In this diary are many portraits of contemporary greats such as Thomas Hardy, T. S. Eliot, E. M. Forster, Lytton Strachy and many others. THE SPANISH TEMPER V.S. Pritchett The story of the people of Spain, their ways of life and thought, the lanscape and its effect on Spaniards The author probes all asnects of Spanish living: the bullfight, sex, politics, religion and economics. For Your Entertainment ... PICASSO-THE RECENT YEARS by Harriet and Sidney Janis Here are 135 plates and photographs of Picasso's work from the period 1937-46. Accompanied by notes explaining technique and meaning. WINTER DANGER by William O. Steele Prize-winner of the Children's Spring Book Festival of the New York Herald Tribune, Winter Danger is the tale of a woodsman and his son who return to town after years in the woods. The boy has a difficult time adjusting to the new way of life but succeeds. Then the father slips off to the woods again to allow his son to grow up in a normal manner. GUTENBURG'S FOLLY by Ira Wallach High humor marks this one. Wallach has gathered here all the best works of one "Mitchel Hackney" a great American writer ( ? ? ? ? ) Included are such provocative works as "Women: The More Feminine Sex" and "A Practical Guide to the Fat Life." In Passing .. The Golden Echo, by David Garnett-A biography and portrait of a literary generation. Field Guide to American Victorian Furniture, by Thomas H. Omsbee-complete guide to Victorian pieces. The New Business Encyclopedia, edited by Harry Marshall-A handy reference book for business law, etc. THE INDIAN