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Indian

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Title:
Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English

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-- -- -_--govers qTMO Lke The SUnskine" Vol. VI, No. 56 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 31 July 1954


80 Octane Gas Scheduled


ComTEN Commends


F.


One boat unloads midshipmen and NROTC students at Fleet Landing during the visit of Cruise "Able". Over 15,000 men came ashore from the 15 ships of the cruise.


15,000 Middies, Fleet Sailors


Complete Annual GTMO Visit

Almost 3,000 Midshipmen and NROTC students completed their annual visit to Guantanamo Bay yesterday as Cruise "Able" completed three days of operations in the area and departed for the States this morning.
The middies, augmented by approximately 12,000 Fleet sailors from the 15 ships of the cruise, took full advantage of all the facilities offered to them by the base during their time ashore.
The Fleet Recreation area was a sea of the bobbing blue-striped white hats and the thin gold brai of the upper classmen. All recreational facilities were reserved for the middies for their time ashore. The Petty Officers' Club was open for their exclusive use and an additional beer garden was set up on the lawn in front of the club.
The Navy Exchanges reported near-record sales in all the stores with perfume the largest selling item. Alligator goods followed closely with mahogany in third place. On a percentage basis, the sale of sporting rifles in the Gun Shop far exceeded the sale of anything else. As a Navy Exchange spokesman said, "The only reason we didn't sell more guns was be- F
cause it took time to make out sales slips and record serial numbers."
The Public Works Transportation Department was heavily pressed for additional bus service. Four extra busses were added to the Looking for something to do, a
main line to transport middies be- study the directional sign board at teen the Navy Exchange at the Naval Air Station and the Marine was given priority on the FLAW Corps Exchange. Conducted tours was
of the base were held with Trans- -h
portation proving additional busses. A surprising note at Indian press Busses were also provided for pic- time was that not one injury had nics and beach parties held by the been reported turned in at the middies. be eotdtre na h
Even regular mail call took a hospital.
back seat when Midshipmen mail Capping e visit of the middies


The Navy Exchange Ser tion will sell 80-octane ga its patrons, for a trial peri 3 August thru 12 Augus sive. Patrons will be aske press their preference for 8 gasoline over the present 7 during this period. If, af trial period, indications patrons prefer the highe gasoline, a request will be proper authority for perm handle this product, exclus the Navy Exchange Serv tion. The new selling pric 21
Furlough Fares Ext

The passenger-carrying
of the United States have ed that they will extend lough fare rate to men Armed Forced until 31 1955.
Tax exempt reduced r fares will be granted to Forces personnel while IN UNIFORM and in a liberty status. The tickets elude regular stop-over a gage privileges, and will for 30 days.
The practice of granting
fares on round trip tickets tary personnel on leave w during the last war and
tinted on all major railroad
out interruption.



ECRN A



T ITE H AT C


foLF C




ETBAL


WOLN H


L EE T REST

SO



group of newly--arrived i Fleet Landing.

from Cruise "Able" was given at the Chief Petty Club on Friday night. T were available, one Cuban a Navy orchestra. Hoste dancing partners were on insure an enjoyable eve
the middies.


vice Stasoline to
od, from Upon completion of the inspec, inclu- tion of the Naval Base by the dto ex- Commandant, Tenth Naval District, d otoex- a conference was held at which
2 octane highlights of the inspection were 2 octhis discussed an reviewed. Several deter this partments and commands were reare that commended highly for their part r octane in the inspection. made to
ission to Personnel Inspection
ively, in It was recommended that the ice Sta- commanding officers of all cone will be mands inspected be commended for
the appearance of their enlisted personnel. Without exception, an
deand overall effort towards grooming lU and smartness of uniform was evident to the inspecting officer. As railroads a result, all hands presented a announc- smart and outstanding appearance. the fur- The Commandant and members in the of the inspection party were also January commendatory in their remarks
concerning the cleanliness and exound-trip cellent appearance of the barracks. Armed Ordnance Department
traveling As a result of the remarks of the leave or preliminary report on the inspecwill n tion, the Ordnance department of nd bag- the Naval Station was commended be good for their fine work.
The Ordnance Department mainreduced tains a well rounded and complete to mili- program of instruction and trainas begun ing. All ordnance personnel are has con- enrolled, with one exception, in ds with- Navy Training and Navy Correspondence courses which are under th e continuous supervision of the Assistant Ordnance Officer. These
R tA are supplemented by regularly
scheduled instruction periods, many of which are conducted after working hours upon request of the personnel themselves.
During a thorough and detailed
ispection of 60 of a total of 76 earth covered magazines, no deficiencies could be found in the storage, maintenance and condition of these magazines. The general excellence of these spaces and rigid adherence to many details of proper stowage, safety regulations, supervision and cleanliness is considered
outstanding.
Fleet Training Center
The inspection party was impressed by the general appearance, efficiency and readiness of the Fleet Training Center in carrying out its assigned mission of supporting the Fleet Training Group. In addition, it was also noted that LT D. A. McKee, executive officer of this activity, was also most cooperative in furnishing additional
] communication services to the Naval Air Station on call and in dshipmen emergencies.


a dance
Officers' The Indian's photo contest
wo bands g closes at midnight tonight! band and Because of lack of entries
sses and received there will no further
hand to contests as originally planned.
ning for


For Navy Exchange Trial BamA nn lnmptinn


) '-P







Page Two


Page Two THE INDIAN


0f


Saturday, 31 July 1954


#ghttait

The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; 'to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9-615
Saturday, 31 July 1954
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay,, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Colander
* CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Stafl
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
,CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sandess ----------Officer-Advisor
H. E. Davis, JOC ------------------- Editor
H. L. Sisson, JOg--------------------News
Jerry Lewis, jog ----------------- Features
Pierce Lehmbeck------------------- Sports
F. L. Cannon, JOSN_-.___.____Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavEos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and finance with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Naw photos unless otherwise credited.


WGBY Hi-Lites
by John Hull

WGBY is now back on the air full-time, broadcasting an average of 18 hours a day. Our staff of announcers is near normal again due to the fine cooperation of the Naval Station, Air Station, Marine Barracks, Naval Hospital and Utility Squadron 10. You are already hearing the voices of four new men, two of them attached to WGBY on TAD orders and two working part-time.
George Engle, AC2, comes to us from the Air Station. Now better known as "Congenial Mountain George", he is spinning your requests Monday through Friday at 12:15 P.M. on the "Hillbilly Jamboree". Soon George will also take over the "Morning Caravan", heard Monday through Saturday at 7:00 A.M.
T a k in g o v e r "Requestfully Yours", heard Monday through Friday at 6:45 P.M., is Craig Barnes, HM2, USN. Craig works during the morning in the Physical Therapy Ward at the Naval Hospital. He divides the rest of the day between WGBY and his wife and brand-new baby daughter.
Richard "Dick" Bennett, AK2, ITSN. comes to us from Utility Squadron 10 and brings along his vast knowledge of jazz and popular music gained through playing a mighty good saxaphone himself. Dick will be heard each Saturday afternoon as he presides over the turntable on "Saturday Swing Session" at 12:30 P.M.
T/Sgt Gary Schuler, USMC, joins our announcing staff on a part-time basis from the Marine Barracks Security Section. Gary is enjoying his tour of duty at Guantanamo Bay after serving in Korea where he lead the last rear guard platoon out of the Chosen Reservoir area.
The full-time program schedule may be seen everyday in the "Papoose". Be sure to watch it for your favorite programs and any changes in the shows presented each day over WGBY, 1450 on your dial.


Safe Driving Awards Presented to PW Employees
.. .... -.. -- ---- --Sunday, 1 August 1954


LT Earl Boyd, Assistant Public Works Officer, presents a 4-year Safe Driving award to Mr. Perez, truck driver (heavy) of the Public Works Transportation Division. Looking on are other transportation drivers who received awards of 1 to 3 years each. Left to right: C. Mora, J. Cuza, I. Gonzalez, L. Creach, L. Hechavarria. In the background, left to right, H. L. Broughton, Chief Quarterman (Transportation), H. L. Chapman, Master Mechanic (Public Works), and H. H. Cole, Foreman (Transportatation).
These driving awards were presented recently in the Public Works Field office. In order for a man to qualify for an award he must have completed a full year or more of accident-free driving while assigned as a full time driver. This program was recently reactivated by the Base Safety Office.


Entmyet cktn9s Hospital Notes


by J. H. (Ollie) Olsen, DT2, USN


Another week has passed us by here at the Dental Clinic, but not in vain for in it's flight it has blessed us with two new arrivals. If you have been reading our column, as we hope you have, you know we are ever ready to announce and welcome new personnel or wish Good Luck to our departing shipmates, whichever the case may be. In this case it happens to be a "glad to have you with us" to LCDR J. F. Flood, (DC), USN and Chunn, G. E., DT1, USN. Dr. Flood arrived Friday, 23 July, via a FLAW flight. We hope he enjoys it here as much as the Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, which was his former duty station where he completed a year's course of duty under instruction in oral surgery. We hope it won't be too long before his family is with him. They consist of his wife, Virginia, two boys, Michael and Peter, ages 5 and 4 years respectively and baby Jane who is 2 years old. We're sure all our readers join us in wishing the Flood family a happy stay here in GTMO.
Last but not least on the welcome list is Chunn, G. E., DT1, who also arrived by FLAW Wednesday, 21 July. He reported in from duty aboard the USS Monrdvia (APA 31). South Carolina has a temporary claim on his wife, Anita, his daughter, Linda and his son, Kenneth but they'll be down here with us just as soon as Chunn gets his housing, which will be soon, we hope.
Well, dear readers, I guess that's all 'till our next get together in the Indian.


by Charles L. Brewer, YN3

Heirport News
During the past week the following births were recorded: a son, Steven Wayne, born 21 July to HM2 and Mrs. Robert W. Lundquist; a daughter, Ann Margaret, born 21 July to EN2 and Mrs. John E. Coyle; a son, David Paul, born 23 July to Captain and Mrs. Robert C. Houston; a son, Thomas, born 23 July to LCDR and Mrs. Paul C. Gardner.
Golf
The hospital Ringer Tournament got under way this week with approximately 40 entries teeing off. This is one of the largest fields we have had in our recent tournaments and our golfing committee is pleased to see so many people taking up the game who have never played before. Anyone who has not as yet posted a score are urged to do at their earliest convenience. As you all know the only way to make those "ringers" is to get out on the course and play. So let's see a large turn out over the weekend.
Departures
HM1 Bobby M. Lanier departed via FLAW on the 28th for the Naval School of Hospital Administration at Bethesda, Maryland. Upon completion of this ten month course he will be made available for a normal tour of shore duty. HM3 Donald H. White left on the 29th via the USS Tweedy (DD532) for Newport, Rhode Island and ultimate separation. We wish Don the best of luck in his civilian life.

"I've written an ancient Roman play, and it's a good play, except that the title is too long."
"What's the title?"
"Julius, Grab Her Quick Before She Gets Away and Runs!"
"Why not just call it 'Julius, Caesar'?"


Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic)



*
Te Chplain' C orner



To be even-tempered is to be like Christ. It is a virtue most profitable to him who possesses it and to him who enjoys its effects.
The reason why so many lose their temper is that they are hard to satisfy. They want too much, or want too strongly. They can not bear the idea of losing the least thing. Our Lord warned us of the hankering after the things of this world, and He reminded us that a man's life, that is, his happiness, does not consist in material abundance.
Security of soul is one of the greatest treasures one can possess; it is much greater than pecuniary wealth. Insecurity of soul comes from the fact that people become peeved over little things. Sometimes they worry too much. A person like that can make himself miserable just for nothing. A little more seeking and trusting God would remedy this defect. True happiness consists in knowing that we are on the side of God, and the confidence arising therefrom that He is ours. The heart is made for God, and it cannot rest truly until it rests in Him. All other kinds of rest are only apparent, and sooner or later explode like a bubble.
The serious-minded man will not easily lose his temper; for he realizes how foolish it is. Whereas the lack of seriousness makes fools of us, so that others cannot but laugh behind our backs.
Christian gravity always looks above all at eternity. Time it considers only in passing and in the light of eternity. 'What will God say about this or that ?' This is the question that guides the wise. Hence they never lose their heads over anything, but keep cool.

W. J. SPINNEY


THE INDIAN








Saturday, 31 July 1954


THE INDIAN


T/Sgt Schuler W ins NaySta, NAS Exchanges

Letter Prize Alter Operation Hours

Navy Exchange hours of operation are being modified 1 August to permit the Cuban employees to make the 1700 boats. Changes are as follows:
The following activities will open at 0915 and secure at 1645: NAVAL STATION Retail Store, Sport Shop & Tailor Shop. NAVAL AIR STATION Retal Store, Cobbler Shop & Photo Shop. + The following activities will secure at 1645:
NAVAL AIR STATION Retail Barber Shop & Cobbler Shop. NAVAL AIR STATION Sewing Shop, Tailor Shop & Barber Shop. Uniform Shop will open at 09151300 and 1400-1645, M o n d a y through Saturday, (secured Tuesday), 1245-1645 Sunday.


Beaming happily is T/SGT Garrison Owens Schuler, USMC, after receiving a $25 check in payment for his article entitled "If I Were Commandant" soon to appear in the August issue of "Leatherneck" magazine. Sergeant Schuler, known to friends as Gary, is one of the latest additions to the staff of Radio Station WGBY in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and can claim the honor of being the first Marine to join the staff.



NAS PW Employees


Receive Awards


CAPT R. R. McCracken, Commanding Officer, Naval Air Station held appropriate ceremonies in his office at 1000 Wednesday at which time he presented the following awards to civilian employees of the station:
Mr. Louis C. Serig, Supervisory Administration Assistant, Administration Department, was presented a $10.00 check for his adopted beneficial suggestion on traffic improvements on McCalla Hill Road.
Mr. Leonard Thomas. Fiscal Accounting Clerk, Supply Department and Mr. Oscar Mallo, Leadingman Auto Mechanic, Public Works Department were presented Certificates of Meritorious Civilian Service to the U.S. Navy, together with the appropriate lapel buttons. These awards were in recognition of their obtaining "Outstanding" performance ratings for the year
1 April 1953 to 31 March 1954.
Mr. Standford Young, Leadingman Laborer, and Mv. Leonard C. Ford, Leadingman Truck Driver, both of Public Works Department, were presented the Department of the Navy Certificate of Commendation for FIVE CONSECUTIVE YEARS of Accident-Free Supervision. These certificates were signed by RADM A. Soucek, Chief of the Bureau of Aeronautics and countersigned by the commanding officer and were in recognition of outstanding accomplishment in the prevention of lost-time accidents with the resultant saving of lives and property.
In a few well chosen remarks, each employee was congratulated and thanked personally by the commanding officer for his individual accomplishment and for his personal interest in the betterment of the Naval Service and the Naval Air Station.


What D' Ya' Say?

The INDIAN will award a certificate good for $1.00 worth of merchandise at the Navy Exchange for each question accepted and used. Submit your questions to Editor, The Indian, Box 19.)

The question: Who is your favorite recording star?

The place: Naval Station.


'0' Club Waiters

Get New Uniforms


Tommy Cofield, MU2, NavBase Band
"For never failing to produce excellent results, I'll have to choose the Les Brown band."


George Harrow, headwaiter at the Guantanamo Bay Officers' Club, models one of the oew uniforms presented to the waiters at the "0" Club.
The white jacket is decorated with gold stripes and blue and gold insignia.


Plan Home Loans


For Career Men

Washington (A F P S) - Career Servicemen will soon be eligible for home loan benefits similar to those given to WWII and Korean vets returning to civilian life. The National Housing Act of 1954 containing this provision has been approved by Congress and sent to the White House where quick approval is expected. To qualify, a serviceman must get a certificate from the Secretary of Defense indicating that he requires housing, that he currently is on active duty and that he has been for more than two years.


Mrs. _Sylvia _DiMaggio,_ Central Bargo
"Perry Como. He sings like my husband sings, with a relaxed voice."


"Isn't this a stupid party" the sailor asked the young girl.
"Yes, I'm afraid it is," she replied.
"Well, then, how about letting me take you home ?" he asked.
"Can't," she aswered. "I live
here." A. Dale Bruning, MUSN, NavBase
*** Band
Marriage is like a mushroom. "Any progressive jazz group.
You never know whether it's the Why? Well, my ov, jazz enthureal thin 0til it's too late! siasm." 9


Mrs. Laverne Stavidg, Caimanera
"I'd pick Julius LaRosa. He sounds as if he sings from the heart and he can sing any type of song."


Jack Sullivan, TE3, USS Gainard
"Joni James-she can really put a sony over."


Al Walter, ICFN, USS Gainard
"Doris Day for me; she's a sweet kid, and I like the emotion in her voice."


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Page Three


40






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Page Four


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TIlH INDIAN


Saturday, 31 July 1954


Base -Wide Fishing Tournament Nears Deadline Ladies' Golf Shots


Midnight, August 15 Deadline

There are only two weeks left before the annual Guantanamo Bay Fishing tournament comes to a close. Midnight, Aug. 5th is the deadline for entries to be registered.
Prizes have been received by the Naval Station Special Services Department and they will be awarded as soon after the tournament ends as possible. Award dates will be published in "The Indian" later.
The largest fish caught so far is a 59 lb.-4 oz. tarpon landed by J. W. Andrews in the Boat Division. The Land Division boasts a 39 lb. snapper caught by . L. Kelley, and the Special Division has recorded a 44 lb.-8 oz. shark tagged by Dale Davenport. The Spearfishing Division, to date, shows a 56 lb. grouper leading the entries and brought in by L. D. Elwood.
These are not records by any means. Last year's tournament showed a 43 lb. snapper, a 200 lb. shark and a 67 lb. grouper leading the entries. This year's tarpon caught by J. W. Andrews betters by several pounds last years 47pounder.
All of which means that there are still plenty of record breakers left in the waters and everybody has an equal chance to share in the valuable prizes. $1,000 worth of prizes will be awarded this year.
Women and children have just as good a chance as men in the tournament. There wil be special prizes to both women and children in each division with the largest fish, and souvenir prize will be awarded to all children under 16 competing.
The editor of The Indian would appreciate a call at the editorial offices, 9615, if there should be a good catch. A photographer will be dispatched immediately to the Harbor Police weighing station.
Just as a reminder: the tournament is divided into four (4) divisions with certain classes of fish in each division. The Afloat Division covers fish caught from ships or boats; the Land Division covers fish caught from docks, land, wharves, islands or other objects secured to land; the Special Division covers fish caught either from afloat or ashore; and the Spear Fishing Division takes care of fish caught by swimmers.
In the Afloat Division and the Land Division only the following fish are eligible to be entered: barracuda, jacks, snappers, snook, mackerel, grouper, wahoo and tarpon. Entries into the Special Division are limited to: albacore bonefish dolphin, ladyfish, parrot fish, sail fish, trigger fish, bonito, croakers, hog fish, marlin, pompano, shark and tuna. Spear Fishing entries are limited to: jacks, snapper, barracuda, grouper, mackerel and hog fish.
Further and full details may be obtained from the Naval Station Special Services Department in the form of a booklet of rules governing the fishing tournament .


Latest Fishing Entries
LAND DIVISION
Barracuda
Plath, C. W. --------- 18% lbs.
Hackert, A.- -------------14 lbs., 10
Dean, W. L.-----------12 lbs., 8
Fimbel, E.C .------------31 lbs.
Grouper
Hanlin, John Paul ---- 1 lb., 14
Gardes, G. S. ---------- 1 lb., 214
Hise, N. L. .--____--- 9
Jacks
MacAnanny, R. E H __ 10 lbs., 8 Raymond, Sam --------14 lbs., 8
Nixon, W. G. ------- ---12 lbs.. 8


S.

oZs. oZs. oZs.


oZs. Ms5.


Fimbel, E. C. ----------- 14 lbs., 151/ ozs.
Mackerel (King)
Howerton, R. D. ------- 5 lbs., 10 ozs.
Snapper
Kelley, C. L. ----------- 39 lbs.
Heinandez, J. M. -___-12 lbs. Naegele, w. L. --------- 5 lbs., I s.
Snook
Bunda, George -------- 10 lbs., 4 ozs. Horner, T. A. -----------3 lbs.
Tarpon


Scott, W. H.- -----------23 1
Bedward, K. D - -------- l
Collins, R. R. --------- 16 1
Mackerel (Spanish/Com Dean, W. V.- ------------7 1
Cards, George --BOAT DIVISION


bs., bs. bs. mon bs.


Barracuda
Carroll, J. C.- ---------- 24 lbs.
Cunningham, J. H. __ 17 lbs.,
Davenport, Sid----------t6 lbs.,
wahoo
Smouse, J. H. ---------- 24 lbs.
Jacks
Karstens, R. L. - -------- 12 lbs.,
Snapper
Roberts, V. A. - --------- 50 lbs.
Johnson, D ------------ 40 lbs.
Carroll, J. C.------------10 lbs.,
Snook
Emverso, Epifanio -- 15 lbs., Carrington, Laurie _ 12 lbs., Wilson, W. H.- ---------- lbs.,
Tarpon
Andrews, J. W.--------159 lbs.,
Davis, N. Q.------------20 ibs.,
Swanson, G. A. --------- 13 lbs.,
SPECIAL DIVISION
Bonefish


Wenslaff, . C---------3
Wind, Marion A.----- 2
Emverzo, Epifanio --- 2
* Croakers
Morales, Edith -_-Sanborn, Jim ----Dalton, Kathryn-Ladyfish
Smouse, J. H. ----------s4
Parrotfish
Clark, DL. ----------- 8
Pompano
Bedward, Kenneth -- 20
Giggy, G. K. ----------- 16
Romano, Sam --------- 8
Shark
Davenport, Dale ---- 44 Meredith, Fred -------- 41 Choate, E. J. ----------- 25
Triggerfish
Lee, G. A. ------------- 4


lbs., lbs., lbs.,



lbs..
lbs., lbs. lbs., lbs.,

lbs., lbs., lbs. lbs..


SPEARFISHING DIVISION


Ellxvood' L. D. Nichols, E. M. Dean w. v. Andrews,* R. M. Scheibel, K. E. ward, G. F. __Nichols, E. M. Plath, C. w. Pace, Robert Andrews, R. M. Ward, G. F. -


Grouper
- _---- -- 16
Jacks
_- 14 Mackerel
Snappers 14
---- - 14


lbs. lbs. lbs., lbs. lbs., lbs., lbs.


Barracuda
---- --18/2 lbs.
-12 lbs.
------ 10 lbs.
Hogfish
------- lbs.,


by Miriam Hoy

A very successful Scotch Foursarme was played Sunday July 25th with 26 couples participating. A lot of fun was had by all, and the following players were winners of new golf balls.
1st Low Gross-Grego & Grego
2nd Low GrossBrough & Gentry


8 ozs- 3rd Low Gross-McCracken & McCracken
1st Low Net-Buurke & Bush 9 ozs. 2nd Low Net-Scott & Gentry
3rd Low NetWhitman & Roberts Closest to the pin on No. 3 for
oz- the men was Tony Grego and Red O ocs. Fauth had the longest drive on
No. 16.
14 ozs. Corky Henning came closes to the
pin on No. 6, and Betsy Manning had the longest drive on No. 17. 8 ozs. The second shot closest to the
pin on No. 18 was won by Tony 2 ozs- Grego. Manuel had the longest
4 ozm
O os: put on No. 9 for men or women.
For the first time they held a putt4 ing contest with Jane Gentry and 8 ozs. LCDR Vanderhoef having the fewest putts.
Everyone thoroughly enjoyed 10 Os- themselves and all the credit goes 2% 2zs to the committee.
This week ladies played the back 8 ozs. nine for low gross and low net. O 055. The winners were:
O ozs. 1st Flight
Gross-Corky Henning
1 oz. Net-two way tie
Edna Edwards
4 ozs. Polly Herring
13' ozs. 2nd Flight
Gross-Fran Dykeman 8 ozs. Net-Betty Lou Tipler O zs. 3rd Flight
Gross-Billie Nelson
8 ozs. Net-two way tie
Toni Winslow Evelyn Leach
We wish to welcome Nancy 8 ozs. Greenfield as a new member in the
club. Wiht the game she is playing, it won't be long before she will be 11 ozs. winning herself some new golf 13 .s. balls.
We are sorry to be losing one of
our most enthusiastic players, Fran Dykemna. She is leaving August the 5th for the States and we all 15 0. wish her the very best of luck.


Elmer Nichols (left) Civilian supervisor at the Transit Shed at the Naval Supply Depot and Bobby Bear AC3 (right) of NAS Aerology display victory smiles after winning the First All-Base Tennis Tournament, sponsored by NAS. Nichols eliminated LT Whitman to capture the "A" c 4, while Bear defeated Cipriani for the "B tle.


Final Leaders

TOP FIVE BATTERS
AB H
Felak Marines 122 51
Pace Marines 123 49
Dotson MCB-8 132 52
Morgan NavSta 131 51
Wood Marines 81 28
HOMERUN LEADERS Dotson MCB-8 12
Felak Marines 11
Androvich Marines 10
Pace Marines 7
Mason Marines 7


Dotson

RBI LEADERS
Dotson MCB-8 42
Pace Marines 36
Felak Marines 35
Young NavSta 34
Layman MCB-8 27
TOP FIVE PITCHERS W L
Smith Marines 12 1
Bigbie MCB-8 9 4
Shackleton MCB-8 8 3 Huber VU-10 5 2
Harrison NAS 5 4


AV .417 .398
.394 .389
.345


PCT .923 .693 .728
.714 .555


Smith


Little League Standings
TEAM WON LOST GB
Bears 15 5
Tigers 13 5 1
Colts 7 12 7%
Hawks 3 16 11


Little League Schedule
Saturday, 31 July
Bears vs Tigers
Sunday, 1 August
Hawks vs Colts
END OF SCHEDULE

These photographs don't do me justice.
"Really, madam! It isn't justice you need - it's niercy."







C.


Saturday, 31 July 1954


THE INDIAN


Mallards Cinch 3rd Place F1ish



Marines Cop Majority of Honors
by Pierce Lehmbeck

With the VU-10 Mallards winning over the NAS Flyers Wednesday night, the most spectacular of all Naval Base League pennant races come to an abrupt halt. For the first time in its history the fate of the flag was decided almost five full weeks before its end as the record V
bound Marine Leathernecks went all out in an attempt to sweep everything. As a team they led the


League in every major statistical department establishing a new mark for team production of roundtrippers with 56. The final individual statistics were almost overwhelmingly captured by Leathernecks as catcher Tom Felak established a new record for season

.:....U:


Felak

batting with an unprecedented .417 average. Their season's efforts were polished off during the dying days of play one of their hurlers, Wayne
























Straw

Straw, a virtual unknown, notched the League's first and only no-hitter in the form of a 15-0 triumph over the NAS Flyers. After the Leathernecks snatched the pennant so early in the season, the spotlight on play narrowed down to position battles between the struggling four with the 'Bees of MCB-8 edging the VU-10 Mallards out of second place and the Mallards in turn fighting the Naval Station Indians off for possession of third place right up to the last game of the season. The only team definitely out of the heat of battle was the Naval Air Station as they finished a full 20 games behind the pennant-winners.


'Bees, Braves Win
Over Week-End
The MCB-8 'Bees and the Naval Station Indians picked up decisive wins last week-end when they defeated the VU-10 Mallards and the NAS Flyers respectively as circuit bats rang for nine roundtrippers.
Saturday afternoon, the 'Bees marched to their eighth straight as they chased three Mallard hurlers for a total of 15 safeties to Defeat VU-10 easily, 12-2.
After scoring two in the bottom of the lead frame, the 'Bees beat out a steady flow of hits for the rest of the afternoon as Shackleton showed up nicely in notching his eighth win, giving the Mallards only eight hits. His shut-out was spoiled when Morris homered in the sixth with one aboard. For the 'Bees, Dotson rapped out his eleventh of the season in the form of a center-field drive which sailed about 370 feet and Brown and Robinson both hit their first of the year.
While Shackleton was winning his eighth against three setbacks, Delongchamp was charged with his second loss in as Inany appearances. He relieved Breske in the second and later gave way to Marlin.
MCB-8 12 15 0
VU-10 2 8 3
Sunday, the Naval. Station Indians, with their eyes still glued firmly on third place, capitalized on the Mallard loss to outhit the NAS Flyers 17-10 and move to 14-9 win.
After trailing for the first five frames, the Braves came up with a big five run sixth inning to provide a winning margin. They were paced at the plate by Baries and Logsdon as the duo accounted for six of the Brave's 14 runs. Baries homered twice and singled once in five trips to notch four RBI's while Logsdon homered, doubled and singled twice in five trips. Sherlacker and Kaestler each hit circuit clouts for the losing Flyers.
Fidler was credited -with the win for the Indians after relieving Wood in the fourth and giving the reins over to Mandis in the seventh. Sutherland took the loss after he relieved starter Rothenburg in the fourth.
NavSta 14 17 2
NAS 9 10 5

Marines Stop 'Bees
Tuesday night, the champion Marine Leathernecks rapped out a total of 19 hits to defeat easily the upstart 'Bees of MCB-8 in a three hour scoring spree, 16-6. This was the last game of the regular season for both teams and was the decisive game in the deciding of the fate of some of the major individual statistic's departments.
The Leathernecks sent Wayne Straw, the possessor of the Naval Base League's only no-hitter, to the mound and ably supported his nine-hit performance by running four 'Bee servers around the park. Bigbie was their first prey and they got rid of him in fine form by notching six runs in the first two fra Shackleton was his
relief an fared somewhat bet-


"Rebel" Jim Dotson of the Bees. elongated by the camera, moves across plate to score a SeaBee tally as Cabral, Mallard catcher, takes a throw from the field. Bees won it, 12 to 2. Later in the game Dotson hit his 11th home run of the year.



Bees Favored in Tournament


ter as he lasted until the sixth frame only to give way to Dotson after another Marine uprising. Dotson, who was the big gun at the plate for MCB-8, seemed to have found the right touch in holding the Leathernecks back, but he was forced to leave the mound in the ninth due to an injured foot. Stewart came on and the little short stop was promptly pasted for six final runs.
Adams homered and proved to be the big bat for the Marines, while Dotson and Meyer homered for eight. Dotson's was his 12th of the season and gave him the nod for honors in the round-tripper department over the Marines Tom Felak who finished with 11.
Straw was credited with the win while Bigbie, the first of the 'Bee parade, was charged with the loss.
Marines 16 19 0
MCB-8 6 9 2

Mallards Defeat Flyers
The VU-10 Mallards closed out the regular season of play Wednesday night by easily defeating the cellar-dwelling NAS Flyers, 14-4, and firmly clinching third place.
Huber was the elected Mallard starter and he finished the game in fine form by limiting the hapless Flyers to only three hits. The four NAS runs were scored due to six free passes and a single Mallard miscue. Ferris and Edgar were the big guns for VU-10 as Edgar chased across four runs and scored three himself while Ferris batted in three. Deere, Sutherland and Sherlacker collected the only hits off Huber as each one singled.
For Huber, the win was number five against only two setbacks. Harrison was the loser, his fourth against five wins. He was relieved by Woren in the sixth.
VU-10 14 10 1
NAS 4 3 9


Final League Standings
W L GB
Marines 27 5
MCB-8 19 13 8
VU-10 24 18 13
NavSta 19 14
NAS 6 25 20


With the 1954 Naval Base League safely tucked away in the history books and the Marine Leathernecks wearing the base crown, sports eyes turn toward the annual post-season tournament scheduled to start tomorrow on the Fleet Recreation diamond number 1.
The tournament will be a doubleelimination type in which each team must be defeated twice before being eliminated.
Last year the Naval Station Indians won both the league championship and the post-season tournament, the first time in the history of Guantanamo Bay organized baseball that such a feat had been accomplished.
This year the Bees from MCB-8 are the odds-on favorites to take the contest although the devasting fire-power displayed by the champion Marines Tuesday night over the Bees has lowered the odds somewhat. In that game the Marines came up with 19 solid hits, eight of them good for extra bases, to down the contenders, 16 to 6.
On the other hand, the Naval Station Indians have come up very fast in the past few games of the regular season, winning seven out of their last nine games.
So, this 1954 tournament shapes up as a contest to watch with each team displaying a top brand of baseball.
All games this year will be played on the Fleet Recreation lighted diamond number 1. Games scheduled during the week will commence promptly at 1900, and games played on week-ends (Saturdays and Sunday will begin at 1400, still on diamond number 1.

The schedule of games to ;e played in the tournament is as follows:
1st Game-Marines vs VU-10 2nd Game-MCB-8 vs Indians 3rd Game-Winner of 1st vs winner
of 2nd.
4th Game-Loser of 1st vs Loser of
2nd.
5th Game-Winner of 4th vs loser
of 3rd.
6th Game-Winner of 3rd winner
of 5th.


a"


age Pive








THE INDIAN


Saturday, 31 July 1954


NSD Fuel Division Stems From Coal Station

Fifty years ago the U. S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba was primarily a coaling station for the fleet. At that time coal was received from the United States in colliers. Large bucket cranes unloaded these colliers into barges of 250 ton capacity; which were unloaded at Hospital Cay by bucket crane. By this method it took forty to one hundred men five days to unload one collier.


Typical scene at Pier "C", the main fueling pier at Guantanamo Bay. Tanker USNS Mission San Francisco is about to discharge her fuel oil cargo.


In the early days, it was necessary to keep 30,000 tons of coal on hand. Issues from Hospital Cay, ranging from 1500 tons to 2400 tons depending on ship size, were made by barge to the ships
With the advent of oil burning propulsion units in ships, the space formerly used for coal now be used as fuel oil storage space with an increase of 14%1r heac power. Not only was there a saving in space, but oil was cleaner and easier to handle. Fueling operations became faster and more efficient.
Modern tankers coming to Guantanamo ale mainly of two types, the 30,000 barrel P1 class and 100,000 P2 class. It takes nine about sixteen hours of continuous pumping to discharge a large tanker. Present expanded facilities at NSD allow the storage of five bulk fuel products which are transported to Guantanamo by means of these tankers. The products are Navy Special Fuel Oil, Diesel Oil, Aviation Gasoline, Motor Gasoline and Jet Fuel.
Happy Valley Tank Farm and Lassiter Tank Farm are the two largest storage areas on the base. Here is stored primarily Navy Special Fuel Oil which is used in ship propulsion units. A pipeline connecting these two farms may be observed along Sherman Avenue. By means of this pipeline Navy Special Fuel Oil may be pumped in either direction to furnish fuel to ships at BB-1 or Pier C, or to consolidate quantities in order to make room for tanker cargos.
Diksel oil, in extensive use at Guantanamo Bay, is used in all the local power plants for generating electric power. Diesel also has many consumers from the fleet as well as heavy equipment and galleys.
Aviation gasoline is used for the standard propeller driven air craft, as well as blimps. This product is stored at both Leeward Point and at McCalla Field.
Motor gasoline which is used for Naval Base vehicles, as well as private automobiles, is supplied by tankers in bulk. Forthcoming experiments to be conducted at the Navy Exchange Garage will deter-


Popular off-shore fueling station here at one tine.

mine whether NSD will bring in more 80 octane gas which it is hoped will help to reduce the "ping" in engines.
Jet fuel is the newest addition at Guantanamo Bay. Presently it is used for the F9F Panthers and Cougars and F2H Banshees at Leeward Point. This fuel is especially designed for jet engines. It is cheaper than aviation gasoline, but is also more dangerous. When turbo jet aircraft engines were invented, various fuels were developed ranging from kerosene to JP-4 and 5. JP-4 is a dense fuel with very low vapor pressure. This characteristic makes it a most dangerous product to store and handled because the mixture of air and vapor above the fuel at most temperatures is in the proper proportion to explode easily. JP-4 also is a toxic liquid which should not be permitted to touch the skin nor should its vapors be inhaled. Aviation gasoline mixed with lubricating oil can be burned in jet planes, but jet fuel is more economical than AvGas since a smaller quantity is burned per hour. Large quantities of jet fuel must be stored inasmuch as a jet plane generally burns about 5 times as much fuel as a reciprocating engine plane.
Employees* f the Naval Supply Depot FueDivision are busy


Cub Scout N
by Millie Jamieson

The Guantanamo Bay ( held their monthly Pac on Tuesday evening at Hall. Following the the month gifts made by the given to the fathers, and were subiaitted by Cubs and prizes were awarde best entries. Entries we on appearance only an samples (to assure n aches) and then all were off at a profit to the Cub The first prize being wor W. J. Laden, and son, Ji ond prize, LT W. H. Shav Billy; third prize, LC Herold, and son, John. C tions to all boys and f their varied efforts!
Bobcat Pins were given Crough, Arthur Roberts, Cooper; Wolf Badges wer to Jimmy Laden, Eric We a Gold Arrow was earne Sentz. A One-year Servic given to Reggie Morales
Special Awards from t al Council were prese LCDR M. C. Herold, Master, had the honor o them to the Cub Flag. T Awards are Functioning Increasing Membership Program, and National R for 1954. These can be n added attraction to a group.


at BB-1. Six ships


can


ews


ub Scouts Meeting NAS Mess me of the sons were "goodies" and Dads d for the re judged d not by o tummy auctioned treasury. by HMC mmy; sec, and son, )R M. C. ongratulaathers for


Pilot Killed In Jet Crash

ENS C. F. Compton of VF-82 (off the LAKE CHAMPLAIN) piloting an F2H Banshee crashed into the sea at 1507 Tuesday. He was making his turn around the base to land at the Leeward Point air-strip, when the plane lost control, did two complete rolls, spun to the right into the sea, hitting the water nose first with belly-up. A rescue helicopter reached the wreckage soon after the crash but sighted only two tip tanks. Submarine 3111 joined the search and dispatched boats in the immediate area, but the pilot was not located.


FTG Bulletin


to Tommy by Jack Engstrom
and Frank Captain Iouston, FTG Gunnery
e awarded Officer, and Lieutenant Commander land, and Gardner, Asistant FTG Gunnery d by J. D. Officer, were both presented with e Star was seven pound boys by their wives . N a week-ago Friday, 23 July.
he Nation- David Paul is the third boy for nted and Captain Houston. Thomas is Lieupast Cb tenant Commander Gardners sec)f pinning end son. he Special odsn
manpower, Russ Krewson, FP1, of the FTG
I Quality Damage Control Department, deecognition parted last week. He will attend the noted as an Class "C" Welders School in San
thriving Diego and then be reassigned. Replacing Krewson on the Recreation Committee will be Fred Paul, BM2.
Three men arrived on the USNS
Thomas Wednesday. Hershel P.
Payne, FPC, reported aboard from the USS Amphion (AR-13) and will be assigned to the Damage Control Department. Walter F.
MacDonald, RDC, who will be assigned to the Fleet Training Center, reported aboard from the USS Mount Olympus, (AGC-8). William H. Hausser, CS3, who will be transferred to Culebra for duty, reported aboard form Amphibious Construction Battallion TWO, at Little
Creek, Virginia. Welcome aboard.
Personnel of FTG and FTC, who
are interested in playing on the FTG Trainers Softball Team, please contact Markham, SO1, of the ASW Department so that the necessary
. preparations may be made for the be fueled coming season.


facilitated by a new covered trench where


ever, they are never too busy to forget about maintaining a constant vigilance against man's treacherous ally, fire.


Fueling at Wharf Baker is hose is stored until needed.


around the clock, fueling vessels, discharging tankers and issuing fuel in wholesale lots to supply our trucks and auto^ ies. How-


Page Six


"D


E








Saturday, 31 July 1954


a


THE INDIAN


Page Seveni


NAS Crosswinds VU-10 Prop Blast Night Swimming Another Feature
yBilGrnves &- SnfT


by Dick Friz

THE FLAW CREW
This week, we'll take the first of a series of informal trips around McCalla Field. Our first stop is the FLAW Terminal at the bottom of Administration Hill.
FLAW of course means Fleet Logistic Air Wing, a support group to outlying bases for Uncle Sam. To the crew of eight, it means plenty of sweat and toil, unloading the giant silver 4D's and "Connies," which bring cargo and dependents, and often gives a leave-bound sailor a head start on those 30 days.
Jesse Stokes, ACC leads the group, "Jim" Whitehead, AD1, and Jim "Curly" Jamison do the weighing and paper-work. The 'shock troops' consist of Leo "Duck" Clerk, Elmer Hicks, Andrew Davis, Carl "Animal" Pittler, Ken Schultz, and Gerald "Cobra" Kirby.
. . . And so our Flaw Crew
working all hours of the day or night, accommodate the needs not only the Naval Air Station, but the entire base as well. . . . a bouquet is in order . . . and four roses will do.
THIS AND THAT FROM HERE AND THERE
Gerald Fuller S/N of Personnel is heading for the States this week, and the reason for his haste is a gal named Joan Walker of Buffalo, New York. They will be married the 8th of August.
J. T. Carrol, (Yo-Yo) tried his hand at spear-fishing the other day, but neglected to take a spear gun or knife 'down under' with him. It wasn't long before Carroll had a 'visitor', a rather large size barracuda. There is still much conjecture as to who 'high tailed it' the fastest.
After becoming rather disappointed with the current crop of movies shown at the lyceum recently, some of the AV-50 gents have ben displaying their own photography on the barrack's bulkhead. Last week, Joe Garrity presented views of the Caribbean in a two hour program. Other color slide enthusiasts are Sparks, Woods, and Sokol, the three 'tin benders' who specialize in sunsets and fireworks. It is a amazing how beautiful this place looks in Kodachrome.
Edward Buchwalter III, skeet shooter, outfielder, and raconteur, is back for a brief visit. "Buck" was transferred from Gtmo a few months ago, and is now with VP-85 out of Oceana, and will be here until Aug. 30.
In answer to frequent inquires concerning the relationship between CDR Winslow, the "Exec" and Don Winslow of the Navy (the comic strip hero) we impart the following info: CDR Winslow was Public Information Officer for CNATRA in Pensacola a few years back when Frank Martinek, Vice Precident of Standard Oil in Indiana, happened to make a tour with other VIP's. Martinek also was script writer for the Don Winslow comic strip, and CDR Winslow, suggested the possibility of his fictional counterpart going through flight training and receiving his wings.
And so for several months, the comic strip hero went through training, plagued now and then by his old foe, the Phantom, who, at one time, was devising a poison gas that was to exterminate all cadets.
Speaking of Cadets, their recruiting program received a big boost the other day, when it was announced that they served as escorts at Long Beach to Miss Universe, Miriam Stevenson and the other girls in the contest.


CAPT James was given a wellrounded indoctrination into the workings of VU-10 (Servicio a la flota). He participated in a Marinetype Landing Force Inspection, tour of the shops and spaces, flight in the jump seat of an F7F, trip to Caimanera, and a dove shoot. He didn't break out his golf clubs this time and neglected to ride in a PBM or fly an F8F but he had to hold something back for the next inspection. CAPT James stated that he did not give out standings but we all heard him say that we had the best looking crew he had seen in the last ten years.
Mrs. Val Evans is all right now. She was really "hooping it up" at the get-together last Wednesday night.
Mrs. Christine Guyer and two boys, Nike and Randall, reported aboard this week, welcome aboard.
The Marine, NAS, and VU-10 wives will hold their weekly bridge ineeting at the Marine restaurant Tuesday, 3 August at 1230. All wives are asked to the there on time.
Sure is good to see Bob and Marie Aslin back off leave. Bob states that the leave was nice, but the calluses are really sore from driving.
The Mallards lost the services of Dutch Kleinhans and Snyder for the coming play off. The team would appreciate it if more people would attend the play off s and give a little more support. Lets all turn out and help them win the trophy.
Notice to all officers and family, don't forget the Covered Dish DinPer at the AOQ Patio on 31 July at 1800. The hostesses will he Mrs. Val Evans and Mrs. Sue Ferris.
LT Tom Drace just reported in from So. Weymouth, Mass. Tom's wife and three children are staying in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. until housing is available.
Its a simple matter to tell when an aircraft is headed for Miami and not at all a piece of far reaching intelligence. On the Appointed Day our Miami commuters wear long pants. Its as simple as that. Of course, the steady traffic to and from the operations office and the abundance of special liberty chits has some bearing too. By and large our chiefs Brotherson, Schwartzetal find the Miami duty a soft touch except for the short tours of duty here in Gtmo.
SOUNDS AND SIGHTS: The growing suspicion that of our PBM's (otherwise known as Mobile Air Canteens), number two is the best feeder. Jim Mauldin in a new flight suit, a dead ringer for the Fisk Ad. You know, the little boy with candle who says it's time to re-tyre. Thats a joke, son. LCDR Jim Goldammer and his "one spade" bids, then fails to make it. In fact, he went down two.

Air Mail Postcard Stamp

Makes Appearance Sept, 3

Washington (AFPS) -A fourcent air mail stamp will make its appearance Sept. 3, Postmaster General Arthur E. Summerfield has announced.
The new stamp has been designed for air mailing postcards, although it can be used in combination with other stamps on any other air mail matter.
The stamp is the first fourcenter used for air mailing although the Post Office Department earlier issued four-cent cards with the stamp imprinted on them.


Of Nav Sta Special Services
by Jerry Lewis
Greatly appreciated by all hands throughout the year of high temperatures is the Enlisted Men's swimming pool located behind the Petty Officer's Club in the heart of Naval Station's Recreation Center.


The Naval Station pool offers night swimming with both top-side and underwater lights. The volleyball net, seen in the picture, is used in the shallow end.


TEENAGE- ROUND-UP
by Judy Yost
Those of you who weren't present at the Teenage meeting Saturday night, will be pleased to learn that there's big plans ahead for uslots of fun and entertainment to take care of some of our leisure time. Let's all cooperate and help to make this new program a success. It's up to us, ya know, so, lets show them how much we appreciate their efforts.
Didja ever realize that there's quite a large group of us here, and most of them were really "hep" at the dance at the Comunity building last Saturday night. They could be seen coming via bus, cars, or swinging in on a vine-in their dancing shoes - zoot suits - and swing skirts. It was bound to turn into a grand evening. Everyone was so proud of our new jukebox, and those wonderful, bee-utiful records! ! Just what we needed, yes sir!
Goodness, just eveah - body's leaving us! Jeannie A. and Bob G. are real, real "short-timers". Hear they're to meet up with with some of the kids that were here (Sandy, Wally, Freddy Murphy, and more that are in Norfolk now) in front of City Hall at a certain hour after their ship docks. Bet that- will be some reunion! ! Give them our regards and best wishes to all of you!
HAVE Y'ALL SEEN-Pat W. and Neil. . . . Jimmy D'S. new flame (Wow! !) Pat S. and some of the others digging through the shelves at the library, trying to find something to keep them awake. . . . Man! Did ya dig that crazymixed-up jitterbugging that Jimmy D. was doing. . . . Betty D. at the sewing-shop.... Norman makinglike Romeo? ? ? ?
Note to the visiting Teenagers...
Come on down to the Hut to our regular meeting on Saturday Evening at seven o'clock, You'll be


The pool is another recreational facility of the 4th Division, Special Services and is indeed a welcome sight for those who wish to escape the heat of a typical Gtmo day outdoors.
Because of the extensive use of the pool, Special Services saw the need for remodelling the entire structure and adding various features so that night swimming could be made a permanent thing. The culmination of much planning came about in December of 1952 when complete modernization to the tune of $25, 928 came about.
Smooth-surfaced tile now lines the pool, non-slip cement walks for easier walking around the sides, under-water lights and stanchion lights for night swimming and a hurricane fence are a few of the additions.
The 300,000 gallon capacity pool measures up to 100 by 50 feet and is chemically treated to ward off any fungus that might find it's way into the water.
Open to all enlisted personnel, with special hours set aside for family and dependents, the pool accommodates thousands of visiting Fleet personnel yearly. Also provided are showers and checking facilities for clothes and valuables which has proven highly successful and efficient since it's conception.
Hours are 0900 to 2100 daily. Family hours are Monday until Noon and Thursday from Noon until closing.

. "Ho, Pedro, why are you looking so happy?"
"Ahh, it is because Lolita has promised to be mine."
"Oh, Pedro! not Lolita. Every man in Tasco has made love to that one!"
"Ye-es, but. Tasco is such a beetle town."

Teenage Roundup (Cont'd).
real welcome. We're there 'till seven-thirty, so there's plenty of time to make the movies-We'll be looking for you.






en
ltavy-1~lpPjo-tmO.4690


a


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 31 July 1954


MOVIES


Saturday, 31 July
BATTLE OF ROGUE RIVER George Montgomery
Richard Denning
Young Army major is sent to Rogue River settlement and fort to settle savage Indian wars of Oregon. Trouble is caused by ruthless warrior-chief who refuses to come to terms. In color.
Sunday, 1 August
BECAUSE YOU'RE MINE
Mario Lanza Doretta Morrow
A $5,000 per week opera star is drafted into the Army as a private. He falls in love with tough sergeant's sister, which bring many complications. In color.
Monday, 2 August
NIGHT WITHOUT SLEEP
Linda Darnell Gary Merrill
A trilliant young composer awakens in his wife's Long Island home after a drunken night on the town, in which he thinks he killed someone. He frantically tries to reconstruct the events of the proceeding 24 hours.
Tuesday, 3 August
JACK SLADE
Mark Stevens Dorothy Malone
A young boy grows up to be a killer after his father is murdered by stagecoach holdup men. He usually works on the side of the law, but not always.
Wednesday, 4 August TANGIER INCIDENT
George Brent Dorothy Patrick
Three atomic scientists plan to meet in Tangiers, pool their secrets, and then sell the results to the communists. A U.S. agent poses as black market operator to block their plans.

A man wandered into a tennis tournament, and arrived in the middle of a match. As he sat down on the bench he asked, "Whose game?"
A shy young thing in front of him turned around hopefully, and blushed: "I am."

Marriage is an institution-some want to get in and some want to get out.

No matter how handsome oi
how homely you are, you still look better when you snile.
-Quoted in a speech by William M.
Allen, President, Boeing Airplane Co.


N F










Take an impish face, a classy chassis and pour them into a bathing suit, sprinkle liberally with water, and you have the typical pin-up. In this case the imp with the chassis is lovely Broadway star, Betsy von Furstenburg, currently starring in the hit production, "Oh, Men! Oh, Women!" Uh, two down front please.


Music from 'Kismet,'


Pyjama Game' Banned

If regular listeners to the local Armed Forces Radio station, WGBY, have missed several of the more popular tunes on the music shows lately, it's the result of an official banning.
Early this week BuPers sent a dispatch to all Navy operated Armed Forces Radio stations directing that all music from the Broadway plays "Kismet" and "Pyjama Game" be banned from the air.
Some of the music includes the popular "Stranger in Paradise," "And This is My Beloved." "Steam Heat," and "Hernando's Hideaway."
No reason for the banning was given in the dispatch, but full details were reported to be in the mail from Armed Forces Radio headquarters in New York.


J. J. Clayton: When ever I get to feeling indispensable, I take another look at the old saddle hanging in the garage.

Isn't it odd that a girl who is afraid of a mouse will go out with a wolf ?


BOOK- NOOK
by Francis L. Cannon, JOSN
A HUNDRED YEARS OF WAR
by Cyril Falls
The story of the past century of warfare with a commentary and interpretation. The author, professor of the history of war at Oxford, is concerned with the strategic aspects of war not the political or moral issues. However, he points out the deadly menace of modern warfare and states that, while earlier times were able to absorb several small wars, the scale on which wars are now conducted may very well prove disasterous to economic structures.
THE ARTS OF LIVING
A collection of various essays which have appeared in Vogue magazine during the past four years. All concern the arts of life: co-existance with others; curiosity; adventure; discontentment and accepting oneself.
THE END OF INNOCENCE
by Jonathan Daniels
Jonanthan D a n i e 1 s, son of Josephus Daniels, Secretary of the Navy under Wilson, has drawn on his fathers' diaries and his own vivid recollections to paint a picture of the era when America matured overnight and gilded itself a world role. The Wilson years brought big government, big business and a big war. He relates how this has affected succeeding decades.
MY DIARY NORTH AND SOUTH
by William Howard Russell
W. H. Russell, an Englishman, was the first and one of the greatest war correspondents. He was already famous for his reporting of the Crimean War when he came to Washington on the eve of the Civil War. His diary provides an extraordinary and lucid view of America as it was then. For Your Entertainment . . .
MARY ANNE
by Dapnne DuMaurier
A novel about a woman who rocked the House of Commons with scandal. Mary Anne's childhood was spent in London's Fleet Street where she dodged the advance of men and learned about life the hard way. She married a young rake, had children, left him and earned a living the only way she knew how. She eventually became the mistress of the Duke of York and enlivened London society quite a bit.
YANKEE WHALERS IN THE SOUTH SEAS by A.B.C. Whipple
Mr. Whipple has collected the whaling lore of the greatest period of American whalers and put together an exciting book, through which march some sea captains with extraordinary personalities.
THE RELAXED SELL
by Thomas Whitside
A tongue-in-check account of what goes to make up a TV commercial The author tells of the fantastic world of merchandisers and advertisers and how high pressure merchandisers ram products down your throat in a most relaxed manner.
In Passing . . .
The Memoirs of Marshall Mannerheim, tran-lated by Count Eric Lewenhaupt-Personal story of the great Finnish soldier who fought the Russians and amazed the world.
Jaguar and the Golden Stag, by Dexter Allen-Love and conquest in Mexico before the Spaniards came.
The Royal Box, by F r a n c e s Parkinson Keyes - An American consul in London wages love on the daughter of an impoverished and widowed noblewoman.




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60 mf --_ overs QTMO Like The Sunshine" Vol. VI, No. 56 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 31 July 1954 80 Octane Gas Scheduled ComTEN Commends For Navy Exchange Trial Base On lnsnectin One boat unloads midshipmen and NROTC students at Fleet Landing during the visit of Cruise "Able". Over 15,000 men came ashore from the 15 ships of the cruise. 15,000 Middies, Fleet Sailors Complete Annual GTMO Visit Almost 3,000 Midshipmen and NROTC students completed their annual visit to Guantanamo Bay yesterday as Cruise "Able" completed three days of operations in the area and departed for the States this morning. The middies, augmented by approximately 12,000 Fleet sailors from the 15 ships of the cruise, took full advantage of all the facilities offered to them hy the base durn their time ashore. .. The Fleet Recreation area was a sea of the bobbing blue-striped white hats and the thin gold braid of the upper classmen. All recrea, tional facilities were reserved for the middies for their time ashore. The Petty Officers' Club was open for their exclusive use and an additional beer garden was set up on the lawn in front of the club. The Navy Exchanges reported near-record sales in all the stores with perfume the largest selling item. Alligator goods followed closely with mahogany in third place. On a percentage basis, the sale of sporting rifles in the Gun Shop far exceeded the sale of anything else. As a Navy Exchange spokesman said, "The only reason we didn't sell more guns was because it took time to make out sales slips and record serial numbers." The Public Works Transportation Department was heavily pressed for additional bus service. Four extra busses were added to the Looking for something to do, a main line to transport middies bestudy the directional sign board at tween the Navy Exchange at the Naval Air Station and the Marine Corps Exchange. Conducted tours wasg of the base were held with Transfihs portation proving additional busses. A surprising note at Indian press Busses were also provided for pictime was that not one injury ad nics and beach parties held by the middies. been reported turned in at the Even regular mail call took a hospital. back seat when Midshipmen mail Caine visit of the middies The Navy Exchange Service Station will sell 80-octane gasoline to its patrons, for a trial period, from 3 August thru 12 August, inclusive. Patrons will be asked to express their preference for 80 octane gasoline over the present 72 octane, during this period. If, after this trial period, indications are that patrons prefer the higher octane gasoline, a request will be made to proper authority for permission to handle this product, exclusively, in the Navy Exchange Service Station. The new selling price will be 21 /gallon. Furlough Fares Extended The passenger-carrying railroads of the United States have announced that they will extend the furlough fare rate to men in the Armed Forced until 31 January 1955. Tax exempt reduced round-trip fares will be granted to Armed Forces personnel while traveling IN UNIFORM and in a leave or liberty status. The tickets will include regular stop-over and baggage privileges, and will be good for 30 days. The practice of granting reduced fares on round trip tickets to military personnel on leave was begun during the last war and has continued on all major railroads without interruption. group of newly-arrived midshipmen Fleet Landing. from Cruise "Able" was a dance given at the Chief Petty Officers' Club on Friday night. Two bands were available, one Cuban band and a Navy orchestra. Hostesses and dancing partners were on hand to insure an enjoyable evening for the middies. Upon completion of the inspection of the Naval Base by the Commandant, Tenth Naval District, a conference was held at which highlights of the inspection were discussed an reviewed. Several departments and commands were recommended highly for their part in the inspection. Personnel Inspection It was recommended that the commanding officers of all commands inspected be commended for the appearance of their enlisted personnel. Without exception, an overall effort towards grooming and smartness of uniform was evident to the inspecting officer. As a result, all hands presented a smart and outstanding appearance. The Commandant and members of the inspection party were also commendatory in their remarks concerning the cleanliness and excellent appearance of the barracks. Ordnance Department As a result of the remarks of the preliminary report on the inspection, the Ordnance department of the Naval Station was commended for their fine work. The Ordnance Department maintains a well rounded and complete program of instruction and training. All ordnance personnel are enrolled, with one exception, in Navy Training and Navy Correspondence courses which are under the continuous supervision of the Assistant Ordnance Officer. These are supplemented by regularly scheduled instruction periods, many of which are conducted after working hours upon request of the personnel themselves. During a thorough and detailed inspection of 60 of a total of 76 earth covered magazines, no deficiencies could be found in the storage, maintenance and condition of these magazines. The general excellence of these spaces and rigid adherence to many details of proper stowage, safety regulations, supervision and cleanliness is considered outstanding. Fleet Training Center The inspection party was impressed by the general appearance, efficiency and readiness of the Fleet Training Center in carrying out its assigned mission of supporting the Fleet Training Group. In addition, it was also noted that LT D. A. McKee, executive officer of this activity, was also most cooperative in furnishing additional communication services to the Naval Air Station on call and in emergencies. The Indian's photo contest closes at midnight tonight! Because of lack of entries received there will no further contests as originally planned. I

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Saturday, 31 July 1954 Page Two 99i/uhda/L, The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; 'to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9-615 Saturday, 31 July 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba .CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sandness---------Officer-Advisor N. E. Davis, JOC ---------------Editor H. L. Sisson, JOL -------------News Jerry Lewis, J03--Features Pierce LehmbecS---Sports F. L. Cannon, JOsH----Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and Scoance with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permisson. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Nav photos unless otherwise credited. WGBY Hi-Lites by John Hull WGBY is now back on the air full-time, broadcasting an average of 18 hours a day. Our staff of announcers is near normal again due to the fine cooperation of the Naval Station, Air Station, Marine Barracks, Naval Hospital and Utility Squadron 10. You are already hearing the voices of four new men, two of them attached to WGBY on TAD orders and two working part-time. George Engle, AC2, comes to us from the Air Station. Now better known as "Congenial Mountain George", he is spinning your requests Monday through Friday at 12:15 P.M. on the "Hillbilly Jamboree". Soon George will also take over the "Morning Caravan", heard Monday through Saturday at 7:00 A.M. Taking over "Requestfully Yours", heard Monday through Friday at 6:45 P.M., is Craig Barnes, HM2, USN. Craig works during the morning in the Physical Therany Ward at the Naval Hospital. He divides the rest of the day between WGBY and his wife and brand-new baby daughter. Richard "Dick" Bennett, AK2, TTSN. comes to us from Utility Squadron 10 and brings along his vast knowledge of jazz and popular music gained through playing a mighty good saxaphone himself. Dick will be heard each Saturday afternoon as he presides over the turntable on "Saturday Swing Session" at 12:30 P.M. T/Sgt Gary Schuler, USMC, joins our announcing staff on a part-time basis from the Marine Barracks Security Section. Gary is enjoying his tour of duty at Guantanamo Bay after serving in Korea where he lead the last rear guard platoon out of the Chosen Reservoir area. The full-time program schedule may be seen everyday in the "Papoose". Be sure to watch it for your favorite programs and any changes in the shows presented each day over WGBY, 1450 on your dial. Safe Driving Awards Presented to PW Employees Sunday, 1 August 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 LT Earl Boyd, Assistant Public Works Officer, presents a 4-year Safe Driving award to Mr. Perez, truck driver (heavy) of the Public Works Transportation Division. Looking on are other transportation drivers who received awards of 1 to 3 years each. Left to right: C. Mora, J. Cuza, I. Gonzalez, L. Creach, L. Hechavarria. In the background, left to right, H. L. Broughton, Chief Quarterman (Transportation), H. L. Chapman, Master Mechanic (Public Works), and H. H. Cole, Foreman (Transportatation). These driving awards were presented recently in the Public Works Field office. In order for a man to qualify for an award he must have completed a full year or more of accident-free driving while assigned as a full time driver. This program was recently reactivated by the Base Safety Office. Ename Etckrings Hospital Notes by J. H. (Ollie) Olsen, DT2, USN Another week has passed us by here at the Dental Clinic, but not in vain for in it's flight it has blessed us with two new arrivals. If you have been reading our column, as we hope you have, you know we are ever ready to announce and welcome new personnel or wish Good Luck to our departing shipmates, whichever the case may be. In this case it happens to be a "glad to have you with us" to LCDR J. F. Flood, (DC), USN and Chunn, G. E., DT1, USN. Dr. Flood arrived Friday, 23 July, via a FLAW flight. We hope he enjoys it here as much as the Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, which was his former duty station where he completed a year's course of duty under instruction in oral surgery. We hope it won't be too long before his family is with him. They consist of his wife, Virginia, two boys, Michael and Peter, ages 5 and 4 years respectively and baby Jane who is 2 years old. We're sure all our readers join us in wishing the Flood family a happy stay here in GTMO. Last but not least on the welcome list is Chunn, G. E., DT1, who also arrived by FLAW Wednesday, 21 July. He reported in from duty aboard the USS Monrovia (APA 31). South Carolina has a temporary claim on his wife, Anita, his daughter, Linda and his son, Kenneth but they'll be down here with us just as soon as Chunn gets his housing, which will be soon, we hope. Well, dear readers, I guess that's all 'till our next get together in the Indian. by Charles L. Brewer, YN3 Heirport News During the past week the following births were recorded: a son, Steven Wayne, born 21 July to HM2 and Mrs. Robert W. Lundquist; a daughter, Ann Margaret, born 21 July to EN2 and Mrs. John E. Coyle; a son, David Paul, born 23 July to Captain and Mrs. Robert C. Houston; a son, Thomas, born 23 July to LCDR and Mrs. Paul C. Gardner. Golf The hospital Ringer Tournament got under way this week with approximately 40 entries teeing off. This is one of the largest fields we have had in our recent tournaments and our golfing committee is pleased to see so many people taking up the game who have never played before. Anyone who has not as yet posted a score are urged to do at their earliest convenience. As you all know the only way to make those "ringers" is to get out on the course and play. So let's see a large turn out over the weekend. Departures HM1 Bobby M. Lanier departed via FLAW on the 28th for the Naval School of Hospital Administration at Bethesda, Maryland. Upon completion of this ten month course he will be made available for a normal tour of shore duty. HM3 Donald H. White left on the 29th via the USS Tweedy (DD532) for Newport, Rhode Island and ultimate separation. We wish Don the best of luck in his civilian life. "I've written an ancient Roman play, and it's a good play, except that the title is too long." "What's the title?" "Julius, Grab Her Quick Before She Gets Away and Runs!" "Why not just call it 'Julius, Caesar'?" Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) The Chaplain's Corner To be even-tempered is to be like Christ. It is a virtue most profitable to him who possesses it and to him who enjoys its effects. The reason why so many lose their temper is that they are hard to satisfy. They want too much, or want too strongly. They can not bear the idea of losing the least thing. Our Lord warned us of the hankering after the things of this world, and He reminded us that a man's life, that is, his happiness, does not consist in material abundance. Security of soul is one of the greatest treasures one can possess; it is much greater than pecuniary wealth. Insecurity of soul comes from the fact that people become peeved over little things. Sometimes they worry too much. A person like that can make himself miserable just for nothing. A little more seeking and trusting God would remedy this defect. True happiness consists in knowing that we are on the side of God, and the confidence arising therefrom that He is ours. The heart is made for God, and it cannot rest truly until it rests in Him. All other kinds of rest are only apparent, and sooner or later explode like a bubble. The serious-minded man will not easily lose his temper; for he realizes how foolish it is. Whereas the lack of seriousness makes fools of us, so that others cannot but laugh behind our backs. Christian gravity always looks above all at eternity. Time it considers only in passing and in the light of eternity. 'What will God say about this or that?' This is the question that guides the wise. Hence they never lose their heads over anything, but keep cool. W. J. SPINNEY THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 31 July 1954 4m Page Three T/Sgt Schuler W ins NavSta, NAS Exchanges Letter Prize Alter Operation Hours Navy Exchange hours of operation are being modified 1 August to permit the Cuban employees to make the 1700 boats. Changes are as follows: The following activities will open at 0915 and secure at 1645: NAVAL STATION Retail Store, Sport Shop & Tailor Shop. NAVAL AIR STATION Retal Store, Cobbler Shop & Photo Shop. The following activities will secure at 1645: NAVAL AIR STATION Retail Barber Shop & Cobbler Shop. NAVAL AIR STATION Sewing Shop, Tailor Shop & Barber Shop. Tlniform Shop will open at 09151300 and 1400-1645, Monda y through Saturday, (secured Tuesday), 1245-1645 Sunday. What D' Ya' Say? The INDIAN will award a certificate good for $1.00 worth of merchandise at the Navy Exchange for each question accepted and used. Submit your questions to Editor, The Indian, Box 19.) The question: Who is your favorite recording star? The place: Naval Station. Beaming happily is T/SGT Garrison Owens Schuler, USMC, after receiving a $25 check in payrient for his article entitled "If I Were Commandant" soon to appear in the August issue of "Leatherneck" magazine. Sergeant Schuler, known to friends as Gary, is one of the latest additions to the staff of Radio Station WGBY in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and can claim the honor of being the first Marine to join the staff. NAS PW Employees Receive Awards CAPT R. R. McCracken, Commanding Officer, Naval Air Station held appropriate ceremonies in his office at 1000 Wednesday at which time he presented the following awards to civilian employees of the station: Mr. Louis C. Serig, Supervisory Administration Assistant, Administration Department, was presented a $10.00 check for his adopted beneficial suggestion on traffic improvements on McCalla Hill Road. Mr. Leonard Thomas. Fiscal Accounting Clerk, Supply Department and Mr. Oscar Mallo, Leadingman Auto Mechanic, Public Works Department were presented Certificates of Meritorious Civilian Service to the U.S. Navy, together with the appropriate lapel buttons. These awards were in recognition of their obtaining "Outstanding" performance ratings for the year 1 April 1953 to 31 March 1954. Mr. Standford Young, Leadingman Laborer, and Mr. Leonard C. Ford, Leadingman Truck Driver, both of Public Works Department, were presented the Department of the Navy Certificate of Commendation for FIVE CONSECUTIVE YEARS of Accident-Free Supervision. These certificates were signed by RADM A. Soucek, Chief of the Bureau of Aeronautics and countersigned by the commanding officer and were in recognition of outstanding accomplishment in the prevention of lost-time accidents with the resultant saving of lives and property. In a few well chosen remarks, each employee was congratulated and thanked personally by the commanding officer for his individual accomplishment and for his personal interest in the betterment of the Naval Service and the Naval Air Station. 'O' Club Waiters Get New Uniforms Tommy Cofield, MU2, NavBase Band "For never failing to produce excellent results, I'll have to choose the Les Brown band." George Harrow, headwaiter at the Guantanamo Bay Officers' Club, models one of the Vew uniforms presented to the waiters at the "0" Club. The white jacket is decorated with gold stripes and blue and gold insignia. Plan Home Loans For Career Men Washington (A F P S) -Career Servicemen will soon be eligible for home loan benefits similar to those given to WWII and Korean vets returning to civilian life. The National Housing Act of 1954 containing this provision has been approved by Congress and sent to the White House where quick approval is expected. To qualify, a serviceman must get a certificate from the Secretary of Defense indicating that he requires housing, that he currently is on active duty and that he has been for more than two years. "Isn't this a stupid party" the sailor asked the young girl. "Yes, I'm afraid it is," she replied. "Well, then, how about letting me take you home?" he asked. "Can't," she aswered. "I live here." Marriage is like a mushroom. You never know whether it's the real thin til it's too late! Mrs. -Sylvia DiMaggio,_ Central Bargo "Perry Como. He sings like my husband sings, with a relaxed voice." Mrs. Laverne Stavidg, Caimanera "I'd pick Julius LaRosa. He sounds as if he sings from the heart and he can sing any type of song." Jack Sullivan, TE3, USS Gainard "Joni James-she can really put a song over." A. Dale Bruning, MUSN, NavBase Band Al Walter, ICFN, USS Gainard "Any progressive jazz group. "Doris Day for me; she's a sweet Why? Well, my ov; jazz enthukid, and I like the emotion in her siasm." voice." THE INDIAN e

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Wage Vout BasO-Wide Fishing Tournament Nears DeadlIne Ladies' Golf Shots Midnight, August 15 Deadline There are only two weeks left before the annual Guantanamo Bay Fishing tournament comes to a close. Midnight, Aug. 5th is the deadline for entries to be registered. Prizes have been received by the Naval Station Special Services Department and they will be awarded as soon after the tournament ends as possible. Award dates will be published in "The Indian" later. The largest fish caught so far is a 59 lb.-4 oz. tarpon landed by J. W. Andrews in the Boat Division. The Land Division boasts a 39 lb. snapper caught by .L. Kelley, and the Special Division has recorded a 44 lb.-8 oz. shark tagged by Dale Davenport. The Spearfishing Division, to date, shows a 56 lb. grouper leading the entries and brought in by L. D. Elwood. These are not records by any means. Last year's tournament showed a 43 lb. snapper, a 200 lb. shark and a 67 lb. grouper leading the entries. This year's tarpon caught by J. W. Andrews betters by several pounds last years 47pounder. All of which means that there are still plenty of record breakers left in the waters and everybody has an equal chance to share in the valuable prizes. $1,000 worth of prizes will be awarded this year. Women and children have just as good a chance as men in the tournament. There wil be special prizes to both women and children in each division with the largest fish, and souvenir prize will be awarded to all children under 16 competing. The editor of The Indian would appreciate a call at the editorial offices, 9615, if there should be a good catch. A photographer will be dispatched immediately to the Harbor Police weighing station. Just as a reminder: the tournament is divided into four (4) divisions with certain classes of fish in each division. The Afloat Division covers fish caught from ships or boats; the Land Division covers fish caught from docks, land, wharves, islands or other objects secured to land; the Special Division covers fish caught either from afloat or ashore; and the Spear Fishing Division takes care of fish caught by swimmers. In the Afloat Division and the Land Division only the following fish are eligible to be entered: barracuda, jacks, snappers, snook, mackerel, grouper, wahoo and tarpon. Entries into the Special Division are limited to: albacore bonefish dolphin, ladyfish, parrot fish, sail fish, trigger fish, bonito, croakers, hog fish, marlin, pompano, shark and tuna. Spear Fishing entries are limited to: jacks, snapper, barracuda, grouper, mackerel and hog fish. Further and full details may be obtained from the Naval Station Special Services Department in the form of a booklet of rules governing the fishing tournament Latest Fishing Entries LAND DIVISION Barracuda Plath, C. W. -18 l Ibs. Hackert, A. --14 lbs., 10 ozs. Dean, W. L. 12 lbs., 8 ozs. Fimbel, E.C. 31 lbs. Grouper Hanlin, John Paul .1 lb., 14 ozs. Gardes, G. S.1 lb., 254 ozs. Hise, N. L. ---9 ozs. Jacks MacAnanny, R. E. 19 lbs., 8 ozs. Raymond, Sam -14 lbs., 81/ ozs. Nixon, W. G. -12 lbs., 8 ozs. Fimbel, E. C. 14 lbs., 151/ ozs. Mackerel (King) Howerton, R. D. 5 lbs., 10 ozs. Snapper Kelley, C. L.39 lbs. Heinandez, J. M. -12 lbs. Naegele, W. L. 5 lbs., 3 mss. Snook Bunda, George 10 lbs., 4 ozs. Horner, T. A. 3 lbs. Tarpon Scott, W. H. 23 lbs., 8 ozs. Bedward, K. D. -17 lbs. Collins, R. R. -16 lbs. Mackerel (Spanish/Common) Dean, W. V.-7 lbs. Gardes, George _--9 os. BOAT DIVISION Barracuda Carroll, J. C. 24 lbs. Cunningham, J. .17 lbs., 54oz. Davenport, Sid 16 lbs., 8 ozs. Wahoo Smouse, J. H. -24 lbs. Jacks Karstens, R. L. 12 lbs., 14 ozs. Snapper Roberts, V. A.50 lbs. Johnson, D. --40 lbs. Carroll, J. C. -30 lbs., 8 ozs. Snook Emverso, Epifanio -15 lbs., 2 ozs. Carrington, Laurie 12 lbs., 4 ozs. Wilson, W. H. -6 lbs., 8 ozs. Tarpon Andrews, J. W. -59 lbs., 4 ozs. Davis, N. Q. 20 lbs., 4 ozs. Swanson, G. A. __ 13 lbs., 8 ozs. SPECIAL DIVISION Bonefish Wenzlaff, D. C. 3 lbs., 10 ozs. Wind, Marion A. 2 lbs., 8 ozs. Emverzo, Epifanio 2 lbs., 21. ozs. Croakers Morales, Edith ---8 ozs. Sanborn, Jim -------8 ozs. Dalton, Kathryn --2 ozs. Ladyfish Smouse, J. H. -4 lbs., 8 ozs. Parrotfish Clark, D. L. --lbs., 1 oz. Pompano Bedward, Kenneth -20 lbs. Giggy, G. K. --16 lbs., 4 ozs. Romano, Sam --8 lbs., 13/} ozs. Shark Davenport, Dale 44 lbs., 8 ozs. Meredith, Fred 41 lbs., 8 ozs. Choate, E. J. 25 lbs. Triggerfish Lee, G. A. --4 lbs., 8 os. SPEARFISHING DIVISION Grouper Ellwood, L. D. -----56 lbs. Nichols, E. M. -16 lbs. Jacks Dean, W. V.--18 lbs., 8 os. Andrews, R. M. -14 lbs. Mackerel Scheibel, K. E. -8 lbs., 11 ozs. Snappers Ward, G. F. 14 lbs., 13 ozs. Nichols, E. M. -14 lbs. Barracuda Plath, C. W. -/ 18y lbs. Pace, Robert 12 lbs. Andrews, R. M. -10 lbs. Hogfish Ward, G. F. --5 lbs., 15 ozs. Final Leaders TOP FIVE BATTERS AB H Felak Marines 122 51 Pace Marines 123 49 Dotson MCB-8 132 52 Morgan NavSta 131 51 Wood Marines 81 28 HOMERUN LEADERS Dotson MCB-8 12 Felak Marines 11 Androvich Marines 10 Pace Marines 7 Mason Marines 7 by Miriam Hoy A very successful Scotch Foursomne was played Sunday July 25th with 26 couples participating. A lot of fun was had by all, and the following players were winners of new golf balls. 1st Low Gross-Grego & Grego 2nd Low GrossBrough & Gentry 3rd Low GrossMcCracken & McCracken 1st Low Net-Buurke & Bush 2nd Low Net-Scott & Gentry 3rd Low NetWhitman & Roberts Closest to the pin on No. 3 for the men was Tony Grego and Red Fauth had the longest drive on No. 16. Corky Henning came closes to the pin on No. 6, and Betsy Manning had the longest drive on No. 17. The second shot closest to the pin on No. 18 was won by Tony Grego. Manuel had the longest put on No. 9 for men or women. For the first time they held a putting contest with Jane Gentry and LCDR Vanderhoef having the fewest putts. Everyone thoroughly enjoyed themselves and all the credit goes to the committee. This week ladies played the back nine for low gross and low net. The winners were: 1st Flight Gross-Corky Henning Net-two way tie Edna Edwards Polly Herring 2nd Flight Gross-Fran Dykeman Net-Betty Lou Tipler 3rd Flight Gross-Billie Nelson Net-two way tie Toni Winslow Evelyn Leach We wish to welcome Nancy Greenfield as a new member in the club. Wiht the game she is playing, it won't be long before she will be winning herself some new golf balls. We are sorry to be losing one of our most enthusiastic players, Fran Dykemna. She is leaving August the 5th for the States and we all wish her the very best of luck. '=9'. sSmith Little League Standings TEAM WON LOST GB Bears 15 5 Tigers 13 5 1 Colts 7 12 7%/ >.::>.::>;; ,,;K .; ?:Hawks 3 16 11%z Little League Schedule Saturday, 31 July Bears vs Tigers Sunday, 1 August Hawks vs Colts Ehner Nichols (left) Civilian supervisor at the Transit Shed at the END OF SCHEDULE Naval Supply Depot and Bohby Bear AC3 (tight) of NAS Aerology These photographs don't do me display victory smiles after winning the First All-Base Tennis Tournajustice. meant, sponsored by NAS. Nichols eliminated LT Whitman to capture "Really, madam! It isn't justice the "A" c n, while Bear defeated Cipriani for the "B' tle. you need -it's mercy." Saturday, 31 July 1954 m THE INDIAN AV .417 .398 .394 .389 .345 PCT .923 .693 .728 .714 .555 Dotson RBI LEADERS Dotson MCB-8 42 Pace Marines 36 Felak Marines 35 Young NavSta 34 Layman MCB-8 27 TOP FIVE PITCHERS W L Smith Marines 12 1 Bigbie MCB-8 9 4 Shackleton MCB-8 8 3 Huber VU-10 5 2 Harrison NAS 5 4

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Saturday, 31 July 1954 THE INDIAN Mallards Cinch 3rd Place Finish Marines Cop Majority of Honors by Pierce Lehmbeck With the VU-10 Mallards winning over the NAS Flyers Wednesday night, the most spectacular of all Naval Base League pennant races come to an abrupt halt. For the first time in its history the fate of the flag was decided almost five full weeks before its end as the record bound Marine Leathernecks went all out in an attempt to sweep everything. As a team they led the League in every major statistical department establishing a new mark for team production of roundtrippers with 56. The final individual statistics were almost overwhelmingly captured by Leathernecks as catcher Tom Felak established a new record for season Felak batting with an unprecedented .417 average. Their season's efforts were polished off during the dying days of play one of their hurlers, Wayne Straw Straw, a virtual unknown, notched the League's first and only no-hitter in the form of a 15-0 triumph over the NAS Flyers. After the Leathernecks snatched the pennant so early in the season, the spotlight on play narrowed down to position battles between the struggling four with the 'Bees of MCB-8 edging the VU-10 Mallards out of second place and the Mallards in turn fighting the Naval Station Indians off for possession of third place right up to the last game of the season. The only team definitely out of the heat of battle was the Naval Air Station as they finished a full 20 games behind the pennant-winners. 'Bees, Braves Win Over Week-End The MCB-8 'Bees and the Naval Station Indians picked up decisive wins last week-end when they defeated the VU-10 Mallards and the NAS Flyers respectively as circuit bats rang for nine roundtrippers. Saturday afternoon, the 'Bees marched to their eighth straight as they chased three Mallard hurlers for a total of 15 safeties to Defeat VU-10 easily, 12-2. After scoring two in the bottom of the lead frame, the 'Bees beat out a steady flow of hits for the rest of the afternoon as Shackleton showed up nicely in notching his eighth win, giving the Mallards only eight hits. His shut-out was spoiled when Morris homered in the sixth with one aboard. For the 'Bees, Dotson rapped out his eleventh of the season in the form of a center-field drive which sailed about 370 feet and Brown' and Robinson both hit their first of the year. While Shackleton was winning his eighth against three setbacks, Delongehamp was charged with his second loss in as Inany appearances. He relieved Breske in the second and later gave way to Marlin. MCB-8 12 15 0 VU-10 2 8 3 Sunday, the Naval. Station Indians, with their eyes still glued firmly on third place, capitalized on the Mallard loss to outhit the NAS Flyers 17-10 and move to 14-9 win. After trailing for the first five frames, the Braves came up with a big five run sixth inning to provide a winning margin. They were paced at the plate by Baries and Logsdon as the duo accounted for six of the Brave's 14 runs. Baries homered twice and singled once in five trips to notch four RBI's while Logsdon homered, doubled and singled twice in five trips. Sherlacker and Kaestler each hit circuit clouts for the losing Flyers. Fidler was credited -with the win for the Indians after relieving Wood in the fourth and giving the reins over to Mandis in the seventh. Sutherland took the loss after he relieved starter Rothenburg in the fourth. NavSta 14 17 2 NAS 9 10 5 Marines Stop 'Bees Tuesday night, the champion Marine Leathernecks rapped out a total of 19 hits to defeat easily the upstart 'Bees of MCB-8 in a three hour scoring spree, 16-6. This was the last game of the regular season for both teams and was the decisive game in the deciding of the fate of some of the major individual statistic's departments. The Leathernecks sent Wayne Straw, the possessor of the Naval Base League's only no-hitter, to the mound and ably supported. his nine-hit performance by running four 'Bee servers around the park. Bigbie was their first prey and they got rid of him in fine form by notching six runs in the first two fra Shackleton was his relief an fared somewhat bet"Rebel" Jim Dotson of the Bees. elongated by the camera, moves across plate to score a SeaBee tally as Cabral, Mallard catcher, takes a throw from the field. Bees won it, 12 to 2. Later in the game Dotson hit his 11th home run of the year. Bees Favored in Tournament ter as he lasted until the sixth frame only to give way to Dotson after another Marine uprising. Dotson, who was the big gun at the plate for MCB-8, seemed to have found the right touch in holding the Leathernecks back, but he was forced to leave the mound in the ninth due to an injured foot. Stewart came on and the little short stop was promptly pasted for six final runs. Adams homered and proved to be the big bat for the Marines, while Dotson and Meyer homered for eight. Dotson's was his 12th of the season and gave him the nod for honors in the round-tripper department over the Marines Tom Felak who finished with 11. Straw was credited with the win while Bigbie, the first of the 'Bee parade, was charged with the loss. Marines 16 19 0 MCB-8 6 9 2 Mallards Defeat Flyers The VU-10 Mallards closed out the regular season of play Wednesday night by easily defeating the cellar-dwelling NAS Flyers, 14-4, and firmly clinching third place. Huber was the elected Mallard starter and he finished the game in fine form by limiting the hapless Flyers to only three hits. The four NAS runs were scored due to six free passes and a single Mallard miscue. Ferris and Edgar were the big guns for VU-10 as Edgar chased across four runs and scored three himself while Ferris batted in three. Deere, Sutherland and Sherlacker collected the only hits off Huber as each one singled. For Huber, the win was number five against only two setbacks. Harrison was the loser, his fourth against five wins. He was relieved by Woren in the sixth. VU-10 14 10 1 NAS 4 3 9 Final League Standings W L GB Marines 27 5 MCB-8 19 13 8 VU-10 4 18 13 NavSta 19 14 NAS 25 20 With the 1954 Naval Base League safely tucked away in the history books and the Marine Leathernecks wearing the base crown, sports eyes turn toward the annual post-season tournament scheduled to start tomorrow on the Fleet Recreation diamond number 1. The tournament will be a doubleelimination type in which each team must be defeated twice before being eliminated. Last year the Naval Station Indians won both the league championship and the post-season tournament, the first time in the history of Guantanamo Bay organized baseball that such a feat had been accomplished. This year the Bees from MCB-8 are the odds-on favorites to take the contest although the devasting fire-power displayed by the champion Marines Tuesday night over the Bees has lowered the odds somewhat. In that game the Marines came up with 19 solid hits, eight of them good for extra bases, to down the contenders, 16 to 6. On the other hand, the Naval Station Indians have come up very fast in the past few games of the regular season, winning seven out of their last nine games. So, this 1954 tournament shapes up as a contest to watch with each team displaying a top brand of baseball. All games this year will be played on the Fleet Recreation lighted diamond number 1. Games scheduled during the week will commence promptly at 1900, and games played on week-ends (Saturdays and Sunday will begin at 1400, still on diamond number 1. The schedule of games to be played in the tournament is as follows: 1st Game-Marines vs VU-10 2nd Game-MCB-8 vs Indians 3rd Game-Winner of 1st vs winner of 2nd. 4th Game-Loser of 1st vs Loser of 2nd. 5th Game-Winner of 4th vs loser of 3rd. 6th Game-Winner of 3rd winner of 5th. am Page Fve

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m1 Page Six Saturday, 31 July 1954 NSD Fuel Division Stems From Coal Station Fifty years ago the U. S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba was primarily a coaling station for the fleet. At that time coal was received from the. United States in colliers. Large bucket cranes unloaded these colliers into barges of 250 toi capacity;.which were unloaded at Hospital Cay by bucket crane. By this method it took forty to one hundred men five days to unload one collier. Typical scene at Pier "C", the main fueling pier at Guantanamo Bay. Tanker USNS Mission San Francisco is about to discharge her fuel oil cargo. In the early days, it was necessary to keep 30,000 tons of coal on hand. Issues from Hospital Cay, ranging from 1500 tons to 2400 tons depending on ship size, were made by barge to the ships With the advent of oil burning propulsion units in ships, the space formerly used for coal now be used as fuel oil storage space with an increase of 14%X heat power. Not only was there a saving in space, but oil was cleaner and easier to handle. Fueling operations became faster and more efficient. Modern tankers coming to Guantanamo are mainly of two types, the 30,000 barrel P1 class and 100,000 P2 class. It takes nine about sixteen hours of continuous pumping to discharge a large tanker. Present expanded facilities at NSD allow the storage of five bulk fuel products which are transported to Guantanamo by means of these tankers. The products are Navy Special Fuel Oil, Diesel Oil, Aviation Gasoline, Motor Gasoline and Jet Fuel. Happy Valley Tank Farm and Lassiter Tank Farm are the two largest storage areas on the base. Here is stored primarily Navy Special Fuel Oil which is used in ship propulsion units. A pipeline connecting these two farms may be observed along Sherman Avenue. By means of this pipeline Navy Special Fuel Oil may be pumped in either direction to furnish fuel to ships at BB-1 or Pier C, or to consolidate quantities in order to make room for tanker cargos. Diesel oil, in extensive use at Guantanamo Bay, is used in all the local power plants for generating electric power. Diesel also has many consumers from the fleet as well as heavy equipment and galleys. Aviation gasoline is used for the standard propeller driven air craft, as well as blimps. This product is stored at both Leeward Point and at McCalla Field. Motor gasoline which is used for Naval Base vehicles, as well as private automobiles, is supplied by tankers in bulk. Forthcoming experiments to be conducted at the Navy Exchange Garage will deterPopular off-shore fueling station here at one time. mine whether NSD will bring in more 80 octane gas which it is hoped will help to reduce the "ping" in engines. Jet fuel is the newest addition at Guantanamo Bay. Presently it is used for the F9F Panthers and Cougars and F2H Banshees at Leeward Point. This fuel is especially designed for jet engines. It is cheaper than aviation gasoline, but is also more dangerous. When turbo jet aircraft engines were invented, various fuels were developed ranging from kerosene to JP-4 and 5. JP-4 is a dense fuel with very low vapor pressure. This characteristic makes it a most dangerous product to store and handled because the mixture of air and vapor above the fuel at most temperatures is in the proper proportion to explode easily. JP-4 also is a toxic liquid which should not be permitted to touch the skin nor should its vapors be inhaled. Aviation gasoline mixed with lubricating oil can be burned in jet planes, but jet fuel is more economical than AvGas since a smaller quantity is burned per hour. Large quantities of jet fuel must be stored inasmuch as a jet plane generally burns about 5 times as much fuel as a reciprocating engine plane. Employees f the Naval Supply Depot Fu ivision are busy Cub Scout News by Millie Jamieson The Guantanamo Bay Cub Scouts held their monthly Pack Meeting on Tuesday evening at NAS Mess Hall. Following the theme of the month gifts made by the sons were given to the fathers, and "goodies" were submitted by Cubs and Dads and prizes were awarded for the best entries. Entries were judged on appearance only and not by samples (to assure no tummy aches) and then all were auctioned off at a profit to the Cub treasury. The first prize being won by HMC W. J. Laden, and son, Jimmy; second prize, LT W. H. Shaw, and son, Billy; third prize, LCDR M. C. Herold, and son, John. Congratulations to all boys and fathers for their varied efforts! Bobcat Pins were given to Tommy Crough, Arthur Roberts, and Frank Cooper; Wolf Badges were awarded to Jimmy Laden, Eric Weiland, and a Gold Arrow was earned by J. D. Sentz. A One-year Service Star was given to Reggie Morales. Special Awards from the National Council were presented and LCDR M. C. Herold, past Cub Master, had the honor of pinning them to the Cub Flag. The Special Awards are Functioning Manpower, Increasing Membership, Quality Program, and National Recognition for 1954. These can be noted as an added attraction to a thriving group. at BB-1. Six ships can be fueled Pilot Killed In Jet Crash ENS C. F. Compton of VF-82 (off the LAKE CHAMPLAIN) piloting an F2H Banshee crashed into the sea at 1507 Tuesday. He was making his turn around the base to land at the Leeward Point air-strip, when the plane lost control, did two complete rolls, spun to the right into the sea, hitting the water nose first with belly-up. A rescue helicopter reached the wreckage soon after the crash but sighted only two tip tanks. Submarine 3111 joined the search and dispatched boats in the immediate area, but the pilot was not located. FTG Bulletin by Jack Engstrom Captain Houston, FTG Gunnery Officer, and Lieutenant Commander Gardner, Asistant FTG Gunnery Officer, were both presented with seven pound boys by their wives a week-ago Friday, 23 July. David Paul is the third boy for Captain Houston. Thomas is Lieutenant Commander Gardners second son. Russ Krewson, FP1, of the FTG Damage Control Department, departed last week. He will attend the Class "C" Welders School in San Diego and then be reassigned. Replacing Krewson on the Recreation Committee will be Fred Paul, BM2. Three men arrived on the USNS Thomas Wednesday. Hershel P. Payne, FPC, reported aboard from the USS Amphion (AR-13) and will be assigned to the Damage Control Department. Walter F. MacDonald, RDC, who will be assigned to the Fleet Training Center, reported aboard from the USS Mount Olympus, (AGC-8). William H. Hausser, CS3, who will be transferred to Culebra for duty, reported aboard form Amphibious Construction Battallion TWO, at Little Creek, Virginia. Welcome aboard. Personnel of FTG and FTC, who are interested in playing on the FTG Trainers Softball Team, please contact Markham, SO1, of the ASW Department so that the necessary preparations may be made for the coming season. Fueling at Wharf Baker is facilitated by a new covered trench where hose is stored until needed. around the clock, fueling vessels, discharging tankers and issuing fuel in wholesale lots to supply our trucks and auto *es. However, they are never too busy to forget about maintaining a constant vigilance against man's treacherous ally, fire. THE INDIAN

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m Saturday, 31 July 1954 THE INDIAN Page seveii NAS Crosswinds VU-10 Prop Blast Night Swimming Another Feature byBil raes &. Staff by Dick Friz THE FLAW CREW This week, we'll take the first of a series of informal trips around McCalla Field. Our first stop is the FLAW Terminal at the bottom of Administration Hill. FLAW of course means Fleet Logistic Air Wing, a support group to outlying bases for Uncle Sam. To the crew of eight, it means plenty of sweat and toil, unloading the giant silver 4D's and "Connies," which bring cargo and dependents, and often gives a leave-bound sailor a head start on those 30 days. Jesse Stokes, ACC leads the group, "Jim" Whitehead, AD1, and Jim "Curly" Jamison do the weighing and paper-work. The 'shock troops' consist of Leo "Duck" Clerk, Elmer Hicks, Andrew Davis, Carl "Animal" Pittler, Ken Schultz, and Gerald "Cobra" Kirby. And so our Flaw Crew working all hours of the day or night, accommodate the needs not only the Naval Air Station, but the entire base as well. ...a bouquet is in order .and four roses will do. THIS AND THAT FROM HERE AND THERE Gerald Fuller S/N of Personnel is heading for the States this week, and the reason for his haste is a gal named Joan Walker of Buffalo, New York. They will be married the 8th of August. J. T. Carrol, (Yo-Yo) tried his hand at spear-fishing the other day, but neglected to take a spear gun or knife 'down under' with him. It wasn't long before Carroll had a 'visitor', a rather large size barracuda. There is still much conjecture as to who 'high tailed it' the fastest. After becoming rather disappointed with the current crop of movies shown at the lyceum recently, some of the AV-50 gents have ben displaying their own photography on the barrack's bulkhead. Last week, Joe Garrity presented views of the Caribbean in a two hour program. Other color slide enthusiasts are Sparks, Woods, and Sokol, the three 'tin benders' who specialize in sunsets and fireworks. It is a amazing how beautiful this place looks in Kodachrome. Edward Buchwalter III, skeet shooter, outfielder, and raconteur, is back for a brief visit. "Buck" was transferred from Gtmo a few months ago, and is now with VP-85 out of Oceana, and will be here until Aug. 30. In answer to frequent inquires concerning the relationship between CDR Winslow, the "Exec" and Don Winslow of the Navy (the comic strip hero) we impart the following info: CDR Winslow was Public Information Officer for CNATRA in Pensacola a few years back when Frank Martinek, Vice Precident of Standard Oil in Indiana, happened to make a tour with other VIP's. Martinek also was script writer for the Don Winslow comic strip, and CDR Winslow, suggested the possibility of his fictional counterpart going through flight training and receiving his wings. And so for several months, the comic strip hero went through training, plagued now and then by his old foe, the Phantom, who, at one time, was devising a poison gas that was to exterminate all cadets. Speaking of Cadets, their recruiting program received a big boost the other day, when it was announced that they served as escorts at Long Beach to Miss Universe, Miriam Stevenson and the other girls in the contest. CAPT James was given a wellrounded indoctrination into the workings of VU-10 (Servicio a la flota). He participated in a Marinetype Landing Force Inspection, tour of the shops and spaces, flight in the jump seat of an F7F, trip to Caimanera, and a dove shoot. He didn't break out his golf clubs this time and neglected to ride in a PBM or fly an F8F but he had to hold something back for the next inspection. CAPT James stated that he did not give out standings but we all heard him say that we had the best looking crew he had seen in the last ten years. Mrs. Val Evans is all right now. She was really "hooping it up" at the get-together last Wednesday night. Mrs. Christine Guyer and two boys, Nike and Randall, reported aboard this week, welcome aboard. The Marine, NAS, and VU-10 wives will hold their weekly bridge meeting at the Marine restaurant Tuesday, 3 August at 1230. All wives are asked to the there on time. Sure is good to see Bob and Marie Aslin back off leave. Bob states that the leave was nice, but the callouses are really sore from driving. The Mallards lost the services of Dutch Kleinhans and Snyder for the coming play off. The team would appreciate it if more people would attend the play offs and give a little more support. Lets all turn out and help them win the trophy. Notice to all officers and family, don't forget the Covered Dish Dinner at the AOQ Patio on 31 July at 1800. The hostesses will be Mrs. Val Evans and Mrs. Sue Ferris. LT Tom Drace just reported in from So. Weymouth, Mass. Tom's wife and three children are staying in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. until housing is available. Its a simple matter to tell when an aircraft is headed for Miami and not at all a piece of far reaching intelligence. On the Appointed Day our Miami commuters wear long pants. Its as simple as that. Of course, the steady traffic to and from the operations office and the abundance of special liberty chits has some bearing too. By and large our chiefs Brotherson, Schwartzetal find the Miami duty a soft touch except for the short tours of duty here in Gtmo. SOUNDS AND SIGHTS: The growing suspicion that of our PBM's (otherwise known as Mobile Air Canteens), number two is the best feeder. Jim Mauldin in a new flight suit, a dead ringer for the Fisk Ad. You know, the little boy with candle who says it's time to re-tyre. Thats a joke, son. LCDR Jim Goldammer and his "one spade" bids, then fails to make it. In fact, he went down two. Air Mail Postcard Stamp Makes Appearance Sept, 3 Washington (AFPS) -A fourcent air mail stamp will make its appearance Sept. 3, Postmaster General Arthur E. Summerfield has announced. The new stamp has been designed for air mailing postcards, although it can be used in combination with other stamps on any other air mail matter. The stamp is the first fourcenter used for air mailing although the Post Office Department earlier issued four-cent cards with the stamp imprinted on them. Of Nay Sta Special Services by Jerry Lewis Greatly appreciated by all hands throughout the year of high temperatures is the Enlisted Men's swimming pool located behind the Petty Officer's Club in the heart of Naval Station's Recreation Center. The Naval Station pool offers night swimming with both top-side and underwater lights. The volleyball net, seen in the picture, is used in the shallow end. TEENAGEROUND-UP by Judy Yost Those of you who weren't present at the Teenage meeting Saturday night, will be pleased to learn that there's big plans ahead for uslots of fun and entertainment to take care of some of our leisure time. Let's all cooperate and help to make this new program a success. It's up to us, ya know, so, lets show them how much we appreciate their efforts. Didja ever realize that there's quite a large group of us here, and most of them were really "hep" at the dance at the Comunity building last Saturday night. They could be seen coming via bus, cars, or swinging in on a vine-in their dancing shoes -zoot suits -and swing skirts. It was bound to turn into a grand evening. Everyone was so proud of our new jukebox, and those wonderful, bee-utiful records! Just what we needed, yes sir! Goodness, just eveah -body's leaving us! Jeannie A. and Bob G. are real, real "short-timers". Hear they're to meet up with with some of the kids that were here (Sandy, Wally, Freddy Murphy, and more that are in Norfolk now) in front of City Hall at a certain hour after their ship docks. Bet thatwill be some reunion! Give them our regards and best wishes to all of you! HAVE Y'ALL SEEN-Pat W. and Neil. ...Jimmy D'S. new flame (Wow! !) Pat S. and some of the others digging through the shelves at the library, trying to find something to keep them awake. ...Man! Did ya dig that crazymixed-up jitterbugging that Jimmy D. was doing. ...Betty D. at the sewing-shop. Norman makinglike Romeo? ? ? ? Note to the visiting Teenagers. Come on down to the Hut to our regular meeting on Saturday Evening at seven o'clock. You'll be The pool is another recreational facility of the 4th Division, Special Services and is indeed a welcome sight for those who wish to escape the heat of a typical Gtmo day outdoors. Because of the extensive use of the pool, Special Services saw the need for remodelling the entire structure and adding various features so that night swimming could be made a permanent thing. The culmination of much planning came about in December of 1952 when complete modernization to the tune of $25, 928 came about. Smooth-surfaced tile now lines the pool, non-slip cement walks for easier walking around the sides, under-water lights and stanchion lights for night swimming and a hurricane fence are a few of the additions. The 300,000 gallon capacity pool measures up to 100 by 50 feet and is chemically treated to ward off any fungus that might find it's way into the water. Open to all enlisted personnel, with special hours set aside for family and dependents, the pool accommodates thousands of visiting Fleet personnel yearly. Also provided are showers and checking facilities for clothes and valuables which has proven highly successful and efficient since it's conception. Hours are 0900 to 2100 daily. Family hours are Monday until Noon and Thursday from Noon until closing. "Ho, Pedro, why are you looking so happy?" "Ahh, it is because Lolita has promised to be mine." "Oh, Pedro! not Lolita. Every man in Tasco has made love to that one!" "Ye-es, but. Tasco is such a leetle town." Teenage Roundup (Cont'd). real welcome. We're there 'till seven-thirty, so there's plenty of time to make the movies-We'll be looking for you. by Bill Graves & Staff

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m0 THE INDIAN MOVIES Saturday, 31 July BATTLE OF ROGUE RIVER George Montgomery Richard Denning Young Army major is sent to Rogue River settlement and fort to settle savage Indian wars of Oregon. Trouble is caused by ruthless warrior-chief who refuses to come to terms. In color. Sunday, 1 August BECAUSE YOU'RE MINE Mario Lanza Doretta Morrow A $5,000 per week opera star is drafted into the Army as a private. He falls in love with tough sergeant's sister, which bring many complications. In color. Monday, 2 August NIGHT WITHOUT SLEEP Linda Darnell Gary Merrill A Lrilliant young composer awakens in his wife's Long Island home after a drunken night on the town, in which he thinks he killed someone. He frantically tries to reconstruct the events of the preceeding 24 hours. Tuesday, 3 August JACK SLADE Mark Stevens Dorothy Malone A young boy grows up to be a killer after his father is murdered by stagecoach holdup men. He usually works on the side of the law, but not always. Wednesday, 4 August TANGIER INCIDENT George Brent Dorothy Patrick Three atomic scientists plan to meet in Tangiers, pool their secrets, and then sell the results to the communists. A U.S. agent poses as black market operator to block their plans. A man wandered into a tennis tournament, and arrived in the middle of a match. As he sat down on the bench he asked, "Whose game?" A shy young thing in front of him turned around hopefully, and blushed: "I am." Marriage is an institution-some want to get in and some want to get out. No matter how handsome or how homely you are, you still look better when you smile. -Quoted in a speech by William M. Allen, President, Boeing Airplane Co. Take an impish face, a classy chassis and pour them into a bathing suit, sprinkle liberally with water, and you have the typical pin-up. In this case the imp with the chassis is lovely Broadway star, Betsy von Furstenburg, currently starring in the hit production, "Oh, Men! Oh, Women!" Uh, two down front please. Music from 'Kismet,' 'Pyjama Game' Banned If regular listeners to the local Armed Forces Radio station, WGBY, have missed several of the more popular tunes on the music shows lately, it's the result of an official banning. Early this week BuPers sent a dispatch to all Navy operated Armed Forces Radio stations directing that all music from the Broadway plays "Kismet" and "Pyjama Game" be banned from the air. Some of the music includes the popular "Stranger in Paradise," "And This is My Beloved." "Steam Heat," and "Hernando's Hideaway." No reason for the banning was given in the dispatch, but full details were reported to be in the mail from Armed Forces Radio headquarters in New York. J. J. Clayton: When ever I get to feeling indispensable, I take another look at the old saddle hanging in the garage. Isn't it odd that a girl who is afraid of a mouse will go out with a wolf? -BOOK* NO0K by Francis L. Cannon, JOSN A HUNDRED YEARS OF WAR by Cyril Falls The story of the past century of warfare with a commentary and interpretation. The author, professor of the history of war at Oxford, is concerned with the strategic aspects of war not the political or moral issues. However, he points out the deadly menace of modern warfare and states that, while earlier times were able to absorb several small wars, the scale on which wars are now conducted may very well prove disasterous to economic structures. THE ARTS OF LIVING A collection of various essays which have appeared in Vogue magazine during the past four years. All concern the arts of life: co-existance with others; curiosity; adventure; discontentment and accepting oneself. THE END OF INNOCENCE by Jonathan Daniels Jonanthan D a n i e 1 s, son of Josephus Daniels, Secretary of the Navy under Wilson, has drawn on his fathers' diaries and his own vivid recollections to paint a picture of the era when America matured overnight and gilded itself a world role. The Wilson years brought big government, big business and a big war. He relates how this has affected succeeding decades. MY DIARY NORTH AND SOUTH by William Howard Russell W. H. Russell, an Englishman, was the first and one of the greatest war correspondents. He was already famous for his reporting of the Crimean War when he came to Washington on the eve of the Civil War. His diary provides an extraordinary and lucid view of America as it was then. For Your Entertainment .. MARY ANNE by Dapnne DuMaurier A novel about a woman who rocked the House of Commons with scandal. Mary Anne's childhood was spent in London's Fleet Street where she dodged the advance of men and learned about life the hard way. She married a young rake, had children, left him and earned a living the only way she knew how. She eventually became the mistress of the Duke of York and enlivened London society quite a bit. YANKEE WHALERS IN THE SOUTH SEAS by A.B.C. Whipple Mr. Whipple has collected the whaling lore of the greatest period of American whalers and put together an exciting book, through which march some sea captains with extraordinary personalities. THE RELAXED SELL by Thomas Whitside A tongue-in-check account of what goes to make up a TV commercial The author tells of the fantastic world of merchandisers and advertisers and how high pressure merchandisers ram products down your throat in a most relaxed manner. In Passing The Memoirs of Marshall Mannerheim, translated by Count Eric Lewenhaupt-Personal story of the great Finnish soldier who fought the Russians and amazed the world. Jaguar and the Golden Stag, by Dexter Allen-Love and conquest in Mexico before the Spaniards came. The Royal Box, by Frances Parkinson Keyes -An American consul in London wages love on the daughter of an impoverished and widowed noblewoman. Saturday, 31 July 1954 f4avy-10NDPPo-dinid.46e