Citation
Indian

Material Information

Title:
Indian
Added title page title:
The Indian
Creator:
U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Publisher:
U.S. Naval Base
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright, The Indian. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Sunday Supplement
Related Item:
Gitmo Review
Related Item:
Gitmo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Bay Gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text








Q 1,e ."?


V_. NoQes qTMO LNk Tie Sunshine"u y J 1

Vol. VI, No. 55 Ui. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 24 July 1954


Rhodes Scholarship


Open to Navy Officers

The Bureau of Naval Personnel has announced the competition dates for participation of all Navy and Marine Corps officers in the 1954 Rhodes Scholarship selection.
The competition will be held in December of this year, and to be eligible a candidate must meet the following requirements:
(a) Be a male citizen of the United States with at least 5 years domicile and unmarried.
(b) Be between the ages of 19 and 25 on 1 October 1955.
(c) He must have completed at least his sophomore year by the time of application.
(d) Receive official endorsement of his college.
Male commissioned officers of the U. S. Navy or the U. S. Marine Corps now on active duty who are graduates of the U. S. Naval Academy or an accredited civilian education:)l institution are eligible for the participation.
Applications from commissioned officers desiring Navy sponsorship must be submitted through official channels along with a signed agreement not to resign from the service during the period of the scholarship and to serve two years in the service for each year of tenure of the scholarship. The application must also be accompanied by an essay of approximately 1,000 words giving the reasons for making the application.
Further and more complete details for the application will be found in BuPers Notice 1520.


Re-Up Bonus Passed; Rup. Cu[ for Mifthinm n ViiI


Awaiting Signature

The new Armed Forces reenliscment bonus bill has been passed by both the Senate and the House, and as the "Indian" goes to press is on the President's desk awaiting his signature.
The bill is slanted towards retention of career men in the armed services. It pays a larger bonus for first reenlistments and correspondingly lesser amounts for future re-ups. It also adds incentive to men on their first cruise to advance themselves since the bonus is based on the man's daily pay at the time he reenlists. For men reenlisting for the first time the new bill will authorize a months pay (30 days) for each year he elects to reenlist. For second re-ups the bill authorizes 20 days for each year of the reenlistment, and for the third reenlistment 10 days pay is granted. Additional reenlistnients will be awarded 5 days pay for each year of the enlistment. For instance: a man who makes second class petty officer on his first cruise and reenlists for a period of six years will be given six months pay at the second class rate, or $963.12! On the other hand, a chief petty officer with 16 years service shipping over for the fourth and last time would receive approximately $265.00.


This is the Season For Hayrides ,I II


IT'S WIENER ROASTING TIME again for local teen-agers as they gather around an old fashioned bon-fire on a hayride excursion to Windmill Beach last Saturday night. This is just one of the many recreational outlets offered to the Base's younger set through the Teen-Age Club each year


First of Three Groups Duo Tues.


*


7V~~


This was the scene at Fleet Landing three weeks ago wnen the reservists visited GTMO. The same scene will be duplicated many times over when the Midshipmen and NROTC's land next Tuesday.
The annual influx of Naval Academy Midshipmen will begin next Tuesday, 27 July, when Cruise "A", consisting of 15 major ships of the line, pulls into Guantanamo Bay for a 4-day visit.
- _2,935 Middies will pour ashore
iron the ships as they make their
Pay I crea e Bi l s t op of a summer training
Pay Increase Bills cr0u0ise".- eimr
Led by the USS Missouri flying
the flag of RADM R. E. Libby,
G o to Congress CoinBatCruLant, Cruise Able has
visi -ed western European ports inIdentical bills introduced into (-ladng Cadiz, Lisbon, Antwerp, both Houses of Congress last week wowtcroam, Cherbourg and Le
call for a flat 10% increase in base Havre. The group departed from pay, subsistence and basic allow- che States June 7 this year. ance for quarter (BAQ), according In company with the Missouri
to an article in the recent issue a-e the USS Macon, carrying of "Navy Times." PADM Arleigh A. Burke, ComCruThe Senate bill was sponsored by Div G, the USS New Jersey, USS Sen. Kilgore (D., W. Va.) and Sen. Des Moines, the carrier USS Kefauver (D., Tenn.) while Rep: Siboney and 10 destroyers.
resentative Van Zandt (D. Pa.) Of the 2,935 Midshipmen, 1,690
introduced the bill into the House. are from the USS Naval Academy
The article pointed out that at Annapolis and the remaining neither bill has the approval of the 1,295 are NROTC Middies. Defense Department and, there- On these annual cruises the Midfore, has a very slim chance of shimmen are divided into groups being approved before Congress and given training in gunnery,
adjourns. The bills were introduced ergineeriing, navigation and deck at the request of the Reserve Offi- !aimnship. The major part of cers Association. ' gunnery exercises will take
nlace in the Guantanamo Bay trainCruise Able is the first of three
BE E ga e as.i t e n xt f v w e s
such groups to visit the Naval
S E E Base within the next five weeks.
Cruise Charlie is expected to arrive
T d Tabout August 20, and Cruise Baker 1The Old-Timer will arrive about August 26.
The Naval Ease will extend the
alay The IndianS usual welcome to the Middie groups.
lt recreation activities will be held Next Friday N'ight (Con iaed on Page Three)


Q


I


Fil av
IR

:d. K.- 'n Y:..
JAZ:


i








Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 24 JuW


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Sp Ial Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9-615
Saturday, 24 July 1954
Ul. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Halley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT william R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sadness ----------Officer-Advisor
H. E. navis, JOC ------------------- Editor
H. L. Sisson, JOS -------------- News
Jerry Lewis, J03-----------------Features
Pierce Lehmbeck-------------------Sports
F. L. Cannon, JOSN_--____-_Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 195,an finance with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local nes may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.

An Editorial....


Just a Second

If you've noticed the grass lately, you've seen it turn from a bright green to a chalky brown.
If you've noticed the wind lately, you've felt it change from almost nothing to a brisk breeze.
And if you've noticed sirens lately, it's the fire engines racing to quell a grass fire.
This is the dry season in the semi-tropics. The dryness, coupled with the strong breeze, presents a hazard that, given a chance, could cause incalculable damage.
Most fires are caused by human carelessness and/or thoughtlessness. Only one fire in a hundred is a result of natural sources.
It's a must to be careful about any kind of a fire the whole year 'round, but it's especially a must during this particular time of year. Just a second's thought might prevent a tremendous amount of damage. For instance, when you're driving along in the car and you take that last drag on the cigarette, the normal reaction for seven out of ten people is to toss it out the window. Just a second! It might land in the dry grass along the side of the road, and awa-a-a-a-y we go.
Or the match that just lit the cigarette-is it out when you throw it away? Takes just a second to check it.
Or, maybe, that beach fire that made the hot dogs taste so good. Is it all out when you leave? Takes just a second to make sure.
Or how about the kids playing in the back yard? Are they playing with anything that could start a fire? Takes just a second to make sure and correct them if they are.
And it takes just a second to turn a quiet patch of grass into a blazing bonfire. Whip quickly with a strong breeze and you have the recipe for the thing that dramatic writers like to call "blazing inferno" or "holacust."
Our own Base Fire Department


A Story About . . . .


The Wayward Guagwa

by Dick Friz
(with apologies to John Steinbeck)

It was one of those days . . . the sun unchallenged by filtering cloud flurries, bore down in earnest intensity on a gray Navy bus as it chugged up a Sherman Avenue hill.
The Cuban driver addressed bilingual oaths at the straining engine, as if it were stubborn ... the occupants, some standing and bobbing, some vibrating against hot leather seats, found nowhere to turn for comfort. A Fleet sailor and an airdale questioned each others ancestry in terse angry phrases, the rest bore their discomfort quietly but impatiently.
The driver flipped back his cap, and one of the Bay's surprise breezes cooled his sleek black head. . . So soothing was it, that he ground a gear, and skidded a good twenty yards from the regular bus stop, the brakes squealing like a factory whistle.
A group of school children entered, sweaty and chattering in short winded gasps-and you suddenly noticed that one was no child. She was a tall angular girl, moving gracefully-displaying none of the coltish awkwardness of those her age. She had long, light brown hair, the kind the models were always running their hands through in the slick ads of "Vogue" and "Vanity Fair." A thin trickle of perspiration glistened on her upper lip, and with one deft sweep, she erased it, pausing to tuck a stray wisp of hair. Her eyes, gazing frankly ahead, were as everyone later agreed, the same blue of the Bay, in one of its better moments.
Imagine the cross-currents of feeling and recollection, as each male in the bus silently appraised, and en masse emitted an almost audible sigh. A long low whistle from the back of the bus was stifled by a well directed elbow, and the girl averted her glance to her thin hands, clasped in her lap.
Could she, still in the tender years differentiate the honest appreciative glance of those who associated her with someone important they had left behind in the states from the mental disrobing typical of half-men? Perhaps years of traveling from base to base, some as confining as this, could foster that compassion sometimes void in women many years her senior.
The bus neared a housing area and the girl exited, walking proudlv and erect unmindful of a hundred probing glances. A chattering maid entered and in her haste to grab the vacated seat, plopped her ample posterior and wedged an underfed seaman apprentice against the window . . . a roar of laughter, and the passengers were back to normal on the wayward guagwa.
An old timer, with four hashmarks ,leaned over to his neighbor and confided, "Ya, know for a minute, there, I almost felt like a man again"

has some of the best modern equipment available. It's well trained and efficient. But the best department in the world cannot put out a fire in a second.
So how about you taking that second to make sure that fire doesn't start. If it's too much trouble, well, just a second, then, let me off here.


FTG Bulletin

by Jack Engstrom
Several members of the Training Group departed this past week. Lieutenant Paul H. Hall of the Communications Department was ordered to the Naval Communication Station, Washington, D. C. He left via FLAW flight last Wednesday.
Also from the Communications Department, Tom "Good-Papers" Shute, RM3, departed last Wednesday for Jacksonville, Florida. He will be released to inactive duty.
W. E. Yarbrough, EN2, formerly of the Engineering Department and more recently of the Base Police Force left for duty aboard the USS Latimer, APA-152.
An informal gathering at the ASW Office Wednesday morning saw the departure of T. A. Horner, SOC, of the ASW department. Horner was presented with a pen and pencil set by the men of the ASW Department as a token of outstanding service and friendship while attached here. He departed via FLAW for transfer to the USS Thomas DDE-764 for duty. Good bye and good hunting Tom.

Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. Don Shackel, ET2. The Mrs. presented Don with a baby girl on the fifteenth. Susan Elizabeth weighed in at seven pounds fifteen ounces. Don is with the Fleet Training Center.

Chief A. Andrews, FTG Engineering Department, has been transferred to the Base Police. He will be one of the Duty Chief's in organization.

Lieutenant Commander Dave Scott, FTG Air Department, will report to NAS Jacksonville to undergo jet check-out and training. Good flying.

Lieutenant Commander, K. E. Skadowski has relieved Lieutenant Commander M. Gewertz as Conmunications Officer. LCDR Gewertz is due to depart GTMO in the middle of August.
LCDR Skadowski, formerly with the ASW Department has been relieved of his duties there. He will continue his collateral duties as FTG Welfare and Recreation Officer as well as FTG Public Information Officer.


m1 0 0S(NtS


by Cpl. Guy Stephens, U.S. Marine Corps Arrivals
The only arrival this week was that of HM3 Norman M. Nilsen. Nilsen joined the USNH on 2 July and was transferred here this week. Before coming to Gtmo he was stationed at the Philadelphia Naval Hospital, Philadelphia Pa. Glad to have you with us 'Norm.'
Departures
Only one departure this week, HN John Canning. John joined us only a few weeks ago and during the short time here did a wonderful job as Corpsman. John will be transferred to MSTS, Brooklyn, N. Y. the 4th of August. We've enjoyed having him with us, and we wish him the best of luck in Brooklyn.
The Marine Guard Detachment, Leeward Point under the direction of 2dLT D. L. Bell enjoyed a recreation trip in the Back Bay area last Sunday. There was plenty of beer and chicken, and everyone reported a wonderful time.


C


Sunday, 18 July 1954

Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930-2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic)


The Chaplain's Corner

The high majestic mountain leaned against the sky and rested its head on a pillow of clouds.
An artist gazed intently at the mountain with its graceful lines, its multicolored vegetation, its rugged rock formations, its turbulent stream singing its way toward the valley, and was stirred by the desire to capture its beauty in oils on a canvas.
An engineer gazed at the mountain and a smile of satisfaction came to his face as he thought of the profits that would come his way when he succeeded in harnessing the mighty rushing waters of the stream to the wheels of his industry.
An old prospector gazing at the mountain saw the rugged rock formations which indicated to his trained eye the presence of valuaable ore, and with quickened step he hurried on toward the spot that promised the goal of his search.
A vulture gazing at the mountain as he circled lazily in the sky saw the decaying body of a dead beast, and changed his course toward that thing which is so distasteful to us but which is so attractive to him.
It was the same mountain but each observer saw only that part of it vhich he wished to see. The eves always manage to focus on those objects that satisfy the deep yearnings of the heart.
The person who is hungry for beauty can find it revealed in all the relationships of life and in all the material creations of God. The person who is interested in scientific development can see opportunities for improvements in all that goes on round about him. The person who is dominated by the desire for wealth can find means of making a profit in the most unlikely situations. The person with the vulture mind can find ugliness and evil on every hand and in everything.
Since it is true that man finds those things for which he is seeking, you should train yourselves to look for the beautiful and to seek to find the true. If you do God and the beautiful will dwell im you.
M. 0. Stephenson CDR, CHC, USN


C


Page Two


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 24 JuIy o







Saturday, 24 July 1954 THE INDIAN


What D'Ya' Say? \'/,

The INDIAN will award a certificate good for $1.00 worth of merchandise at the Navy Exchange for each question accepted and used. Submit your questions to Editor, The Indian, Box 19.)

The question: If you had your choice of any duty station in the Navy, which one would you pick? r
The place: Sherman Ave. Shopping Center.


Willie Chambers, TN, BOQ 3
"Well, in a few days I'll be transferred to the Test Center at Point Mugu, Cal., so I guess I'll name that."


Michael Sramko, SN, USS Isherwood, DD 520
"Philadelphia Navy Yard. It's near a lot of big cities and it's near home for me."


Joe F. Morris, CSC, USS Carpellotti, APD-136
"The Naval Station at San Diego, Cal. I have my home in Chula Vista and I've been trying to get duty there for years."


Richard Thorpe, ANAM, VF-13
"London, England, for me. It's choice duty."


Hospital Notes Puttin' Around


by Charles L. Brewer, YN3
Heirport News
From 15 July to 19 July, the following births were recorded; a daughter, Susan Elizabeth, born 15 July to ET2 and Mrs. Donald J. Schackel; a daughter, Susan Virginia, born 18 July to AD1 and Mrs. James L. Hobson, a daughter, Debora Kay, born 19 July to ADI and Mrs. James F. Puettman.
Your Hospital
Whether it be a baseball game or doubles in a ping pong tournament the team is the thing. Everywhere team work is important and in the Operating Room of the hospital, one observes a team plan which functions smoothly and effectively at all times.
At present there are six surgeons, one of whom is responsible for the dependent surgery. There are seven corpsmen who have received special training for operating duty and a nurse anesthetist who gives the anesthetics. In addition to the operative patients who receive care, this department is responsible for the cast work, for the oxygen therapy and for all of the sterile suppiles that are used in the hospital and at the various dispensaries on the base. With the exception of the weekend there is an operative schedule every day. During this week seven emergency patients have received care which as the golfers would say is "par for the course". Usually within ten minutes after the surgeon's decision to operate things are being made ready to receive the patient.
There is a phrase frequency repeated by the operating room crew: "If you ever need a good, free operation just call on us". In truth, if you do ever need an operation you may be certain that you will receive excellent care and attention but it is our hope that our readers will remain in good health.
In the first softball game of the season, the Special Department's played the Ward Corpsmen at the Fleet Recreation Diamond No. 2. I imagine there has never been a game played there to match this one. It was a close pitcher's battle until the top of the first when the Special Department's scored nine runs on four hits and five strikeouts. The Ward Corpsmen battled back in the fifth inning scoring six runs on three hits. One would imagine that the losing pitchers comment of lack of support would be appropriate. But a good time was had by all with the Special Department's edging by the Ward Corpsmen 19 to 6.


Middies


(Continued from Page One) open for them, and the Petty Officers Club in the Fleet Recreation area will be reserved for their exclusive use. It is expected that Navy Exchange stores and other facilities will remain open beyond the usual closing hours for the benefit of the Middies.
When the various groups leave Guantanamo Bay they will head back to the States and the Naval Academy, or, as in the case of the NROTC students, back to their colleges to prepare for the Fall
- - - term.
Anyone residing on the base who desires to entertain any of the visiting Middies in their home may make arrangement by calling LCDR J. W. Richmond, the admiral's aide, at 8441.
J. R. Cash, SHSN, USS Maloy, EDE-791 Jury Foreman: "We find the
"Well, I'd take the Philadelphia Paul G. If ski, SKSN, USS Hopi, defendant gorgeous ath-taking, Navy Yard. I think Philly is a ATF-71 sweet, lovable, ant a yes, not
great city." "Brookli, N. Y. would look good. guilty!"


by Wright North
Professional in Charge GTMO Bay Golf Club
The monthly Scotch foursome will swing underway at 1300 tomorrow with some 20-odd couples vieing for the prizes of golf balls. All contestants are requested to check at the Pro Shop for pairings and starting times. And, again, the Ladies' Golf Committee will have refreshments on hand.
The Naval Station golf ladder competition goes into its second month week and sitting on top is the 1954 Base Champion LT Grego, followed by H. Broughton, Tony Totillo, LT Dempsey, Lactara Figueroa, CAPT Caruthers, Cofield, Harper and Corliss for the first ten places.
All challange matches are played by handicap. This competition is expected to end sometime in September with prizes for the first three places.
In the rules of golf etiquette there is one that is priority on the course: (1) In the absence of special rules, singles, threesomes and foursomes should have precedence and be entitled to pass any other kind of match. A single player has no standing and should give way to a match of any kind.
If a match of any kind fails to keep its place on the course and loses more than one clear hole to any players in front, it should allow any following players to pass the match and, having done so, should not continue. to play until those players are out of range.
NAS will hold its annual 36-hole Medal play Handicap tournament this week-end with 36 contestants teeing off this morning in the 1st round. Chief Rodgers with a 4 handicap, Manueles with 5 and LCDR Vanderhoef with a 7 will be the strong favorites for the gross prize. CAPT McCracken's 13 and Sims' 12 will very likely be in the running for net honors. Congratulations are in order at this time to the NAS golf team tournament
committee for your easy arrangement of rules, pairing and scores chart which can be seen on the score board in the Pro Shop.


Meetings ...

Time & Place

Fleet Reserve Association
2000 ; 2nd & 4th Tuesday each month.
Community Auditorium
Ladies' Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association
2000 ; 2nd Tuesday each month Girl Scout
Room, Community Auditorium Little Theatre Group
2000; 2nd Tuesday each month Marina
Point
Hospital Service Volunteers
1000 ; 2nd Tuesday each month Hospital
Medical Library
American Legion Auxiliary, Unit One
190; 3rd Tuesday each month Girl Scout
Hut, Marina Point
Toastmasters Club 92
1930 each Thursday, Officers Club dining
room.
American Legion, Guantanamo Bay Post 1
1930; 3rd Tuesday each month; Comnmunity Auditorium, Marina Point Parent-Teachers Association
1930 ; 1st Tuesday of each month Naval
Base School
Fellowcraft Club No. 1078
2000 each Thursday, Practice, Business
Meeting, 1st Thursday - Community
Hall
National Supervisors Association
1900 ; 1st Monday each month, Civilian
Training Conference Room. Toastmasters Club No. 113
1000 each Thursday in the Flamingo
Room, Fleet Recreation Center. New
members welcome.
Bachelor: "A guy who enjoys life, liberty and the happiness of pursuit."

Some people have too great an appreciation of their own strength to wrestle with temptation.


aW


a


Page Three


J






00


Old-Timers - Indians


Game Postponed

The baseball game scheduled for last night between the Naval Station Indians and the Old-Timers will be played next Friday night instead because of schedule committments of the Indians.
In the absence of Phil Dunmire, Jerry Morgan will manage the Indians for the one game. Dunmire will be roaming the outer pastures for the Old-Timers. John F. X. O'Connor, chief umpire of the Naval Base League, will guide the oldsters through the game front behind the plate in the catcher's box.
The Old Tiners game has grown to be an annual affair at the Naval Base and always draws an appreciative audience who comes to see the "old folks" teach the youngsters a few tricks.
Next Friday's game is a reschedule of a game begun last month which was called because of rain. At the time the game was called, the Old Timers were proving their point with a 3 to 1 advantage over the Indians in the fifth inning.
Game time will be 7 P.M. under the lights of diamond number one in the Fleet Recreation area.


Ladies' Golf Shots


by Miriam Hoy
This week the ladies completed in the skillful art of putting on the front nine. Mighty hot morning, but the winners who proved they could putt when the heat was on were:
1st Flight-Corky Henning and
Marion Gentry (18)
2nd Flight-Marge Sheehan (18)
Fran Dykeman (22)
3rd Flight-Nita Roberts (19)
B. J. Sutherling (20)
We would like to say "welcome" to Polly Herring who arrived recently in GTMO. Understand she plays a beautiful game of golf and we wish her the best of luck.
Val Evans, one of the top contenders in the 3rd Flgiht, has been hospitalized this past week. We all wish her a very speedy recovery and hope that she will be back playing an even better game soon.
Next Wednesday we'll play the back nine for gross and net.
Don't forget the Scotch foursome tomorrow. Pick a partner and the committee will make up the foursome.


Fishing Contest
LAND DIVISION
Barracuda
Plath, C. W.------------18/ lbs.
Hackert, A. --------- 14 lbs., 10 ozs.
Dean, W. L. - -------- 12 lbs., 8 ozs.


Grouper
Hanlin, John Paul r--Gardes, G. S. ---------Hise N. L. --------- -


1 lb., 14 ozs. 1 lb., 21/ ozs.
9 ozs.


Jac k
MacAnanny, R. E. ____ 19 lbs., 8 ozs.
Raymond, Sam -------- 14 lbs., 5,/ ozs.
Nixon, W. G -----------12 lbs., 8 oz3.
Mackerel (King)
Howerton, R. D. _-._-_ 5 lbs., 10 ozs.
Snapper
Kelley, C. L.- -----------39 lbs.
Heinandez, J. M.---12 lbs.
Naegele, w. L. - -------- 5 lbs., 3 ozs.
Wahoo
Smouse, J. H. - --------- 24 lbs.
Snook
Bunda, George -------- 10 lbs., 4 ozs. Horner, T. A. - --------- lbs.
Tarpon
Scott, W. H. ------ 23 lbs., 8 ozs.
Bedward, K. D. ____-__17 lbs. Collins, R. R. ---------- 16 lbs.
Mackerel (Spanish/Common) nean, W V ----------- 7 lbs.
Gardes, George -----i oass.


BOAT DIVISION
Barracuda
Carroll, J. C. - -- ------ 24 lbs.
Cunningham, J. H. ___17 lbs., 1/
Davenport, Sid ---------16 lbs., 8
Jacks
Karstens, R. L. --------- 12 lbs., 14
Snapper
Roberts, V. A. ----------50 lbs.
Johnson, D. ------------ 40 lbs.
Carroll, J. C. ----------- 30 lbs., 8
Snook
Emverso, Epifanio - 15 lbs., 2 Carrington, Laurie ---- 12 lbs., 4 Wilson, W. H. - -------- lbs., 8
Tarpon
Andrews, J. W. ---------59 lbs., 4
Davis, N. Q. ----------20 lbs., 4
Swanson, G. A.----------13 lbs., 8
SPECIAL DIVISION
Bonefish
Wenzlaff, D. C. --------- 3 lbs., 10
Wind, Marion A. --_ 2 lbs., 8
Emverzo, Epifanio __-_ 2 lbs., 2 ,
Croakers
Morales, Edith _Cr--ker 8
Sanborn, Jim ____ 8
Dalton, Kathryn ______ 2
Ladyfish
Smouse, J. H. - --------- 4 lbs., 8
Parrotfish
Clark D L. 8 lbs. 1


Pompano
Bedward, Kenneth ----n20 Giggy, G. K. ----------- 16
Romano, Sam ---------_ -S kahr
Shark


OZ. os.
ozs.


ozs.
ozs. oZs. ozs.
oZs. ozs. oZs.

ozs.
ozs. ozs.
oZs. ozs. ozs.
ozs.
OZ.


Robert Sanborn of the Bears sits solidly on home plate as both he and Hawk catcher Philip Crouch look questioningly at the plate umpire for the decision. Action took place in a Bears - Hawks Little League game at Villamar over the week-end.


lbs.
lbs., 4 ozs. lbs., 131/ ozs.


Davenport, Dale - 44 lbs., 8 ozs.
Meredith, Fred -------- 41 lbs., 8 ozs. Choate, E. J. rgger--s 25 lbs.
Triggerfish
Lee, G. A. - ------------ 4 lbs., 8 ozs.
SPEARFISHING DIVISION
Grouper
Ellwood, L. D.---------56 lbs.
Nichols, E. M.- ----------16 lbs.
Jacks
Dean, W. V. - -----------18 lbs., 8 ozs.
Andrews, R. M. -------- 14 lbs.
Mackerel
Scheibel, K. E. ----------8 lbs., 11 ozs.
Snappers
Ward, G. F -------------14 lbs., 13 ozs.
Nichols, E. M.- ---------14 lbs.
Barracuda
Plath, C. W -----------18/, lbs.
Pace, Robe ----------12 lbs.
Andrews, K. M.- --------10 lbs.
Hogfish
Ward, G. F - ---------- 5 lbs., 15 ozs.


-- - - ~~


U,


The Hawks' Davis Herold safely hooks third base as Bear third-sacker Tommy Mallia crouches down for the throw during the Bears - Hawks game last weekend. Bears won.

Little League Standings


Bears Tigers Colts Hawks


WON LOST 13 5
12 5
7 11 3 14


GB


6
9/2


Little League Schedule

SATURDAY, 24 July
Bears vs Hawks
SUNDAY, 25 July
Tigers vs Colts
TUESDAY, 27 July
Colts vs Bears
THURSDAY, 29 July
Hawks vs Tigers


(Left)
The newest addition to the Naval Station sailboat fleet are those three Cape Cod Bullseye fiber glass boats tied up at the sailboat landing. The 16-footers have a 51/2-foot beam and a 3-foot draft. They will be fitted out with sails and rigging and will be made available to sailing enthusiasts as soon as possible ... another increase in the service offered to Guantanamo Bay personnel by the Naval Station Spe - Services Department.


SCUTTLEBUTT












SUBMARINE
Di i SION
f.oop two




This baby has its father's nose ndl its mother's eyes.
Yes, and if Grandpa doesn't stop leaning over the crib, it's going to have his teeth.
*, * :1
The doctor had called on the patient five times. On the last visit, the patient announced he had called in another doctor.
Doctor: "Is that so? Well, the aitmvy will show who is right."


1'age Foul'


m


T1it INDIAN


Page Pout


Saturday, 24 July 1954








Saturday, 24 July 1954


THE INDIAN


Naval Base League Closes Wednesday


by Pierce Lehmbeck

This past week of play was one that will long be remembered in the Naval Base League annals as, under the pressure of a fast dying season, the first no-hitter in the circuit's history was thrown by a virtual unknown in the form of the champion Marine's Wayne Straw. Straw's flawless performance came last Saturday afternoon to seemingly snap the Leathernecks out of a slump for a while only to have them finish and winning over the VU-10 Mallards. Meanwhile, the Indians kept their hopes high as they came out of this week with a bare fingernail dug into the seat of the third place Mallards.


Straw, Marines, Notch League's
First No-Hitter in Flyer Swamp Wayne Straw, a pitcher who had been action only in batting practice, climbed onto the Naval Base League's previously empty pedestal of local baseball immortality last Saturday afternoon when he hurled the League's first no-hit, no-run game in a 15-0 Flyer swamp.
Straw made his first appearance on the local scene as a pitcher quite by accident as, before game time, he was going through his usual paces as a batting practice hurler when the Leatherneck mentors decided to throw him in at the last minute. Straw entered the contest and turned in a performance that will long be remembered in the League annals. For the full nine he kept the ball bobbing, weaving and hopping until at the game's end the official scorer's book read no runs, no hits and only one miscue, that by short stop Joe Androvico who's sensational performance through-out over-shadowed the mistake. Straw showed almost perfect control as he walked but two men.
While the twenty year old Pennsylvanian was handling himself so well on the mound, the Leathernrck power was in its old forn supplying the offensive punch. Of their total of fifteen safeties, eight went for extra bases with third sacker Louis Romano leading the pack with a homer, a double and a triple in five trips. Wood doubled twice in two trips while Androvich homered and Pace and Felak both doubled.
For Straw, it was his first win in as many appearances while Woren took the loss for the Flyers. Woren went the first full six giving up nine tallies on ten hits. Deery was his relief and was no more successful as the pennant winners hit him five times for six runs.
Marines 15 15 1
NAS 0 0 4
'Bees Take Fifth Straight
In NavSta Win
The 'Bees of MCB-8 moved to their fifth straight win Sunday tfcernoon when they nudged out the Indians of the Naval Station, 8-5, to shake off all hope of a third place finish by the latter.
The Indians clubbed starter Bigbie for three runs in the bottom of the first and then chased him off the mound in the fifth when they pushed him for one more. Shackleton came on the relieve and take the win as lie finished the last four and one thirds innings giving the Braves only one run. The 'Bees scored their eight run total off Indian work - horse Mandy Mandis by belting the little-manwith-the-big-arm for one in the top of the second, one in the fourth, two in the fifth with a final big four in the sixth.
Shackleton was credited with the win, his seventh against three setbacks while Mandis took his sixth loss against six wins.
MCB-8 8 10 4
NavSta 5 7 6


Wayne Straw, 20-year-old Pennsylvania PFC, of the Marine baseball squad, who hurled the first no-hitter ever thrown in organized Guantanamo Bay baseball last week against the Naval Air Station Flyers.

Marines Take Mallards
The Marine Leathernecks, led by short stop Joe Androvich, showed up strong Monday night after a brief slump to defeat the VU-10 Mallards, 6-4, in a wild tilt of sensational catches and long balls.
The pennant-winners were paced by the bat of short-stop Joe Androvich who homered twice in two trips to the plate while playlag his usual good genie afield. This pair ran his total for the year to 10.
Androvich's first round-tripper provided the Marines with a none too stable 1-0 lead in the bottom of the first as Mallard spinner Harry Breske limited then to just one hit in the first two-and-a-third frames until he had to give way to a sore arni. Delongehanp and Radulski followed in order, but neither could stave off the surging Leatherneck tide as the Marines came up with one more in the fourth, three in the sixth and a final one in the seventh. The Mallards notched their four runs off Marine hurler Chuck Sniith by scoring two in the fourth and two in the eighth. They were lead by Dutch Huber who hoiiered and singled in four trips.
Smith was credited with his 12th win against one setback while Delongehamp took the loss for the Mallards, his first in as many appearances.
Marines 6 7 3
VU-10 4 7 4

'Bees Take Sixth Straight
The firmly second-seated 'Bees of MCB-8 noved to their sixth straight win Tuesday night behind the three-hit shutout hurling of Ed Bigbie as they defeated the NAS Flyers, 5-0.
The big "crooked-arni", who was for the major part of the season, the staff ace, showed signs of hav-


ing completely recovered from a partial slump as he had the hapless Flyers coming and going notching thirteen strikeouts in the two hour and thirty-five minute foray.
The up and coming 'Bees were paced at the plate by their four and five batting combination of Dotson and Mayer. Together, the duo accounted for all five of the 'Bee RBIs as both hit round-trippers and Dotson added a double and a single to give him a three for four night to boost his already towering average. MCB-8 scored their five run total off Flyer trickster Harrison by hitting him safely 12 times to score twice in the second, twice in the fifth with their final tally coming in the eighth.
The win was number nine for Bigbie against three losses while Harrison took his third loss against five wins.
A PASSING COMMENT: With Bigbie seemingly finally back on his stride again the 'Bees, for all practical purposes, look to be the team to beat in the coming Post Season Play-offs elated to start somewhere around the first of August. With three potential starting hurlers in the forms of Bigbie (9-3), Shackleton (7-3) and Dotson (3-1), they certainly have the defensive power and they are obviously not lacking in offensive punch as they have average better than nine safeties a game for their last six outings.
Reportedly, this stretching squad in its present form looks better than the nine which Eight sent to the ComServLant Tournament from Argentia, Newfoundland last year. That team went all the way into the finals and with Bigbie on the bill, lost a 1-0 decision in ten innings with the winning run scoring on an error. This year's ConServLant is being held in Norfolk on 2 August. Personally, we'd like to see the 'Bees get another crack.

Braves Defeat Marines
An unexpected splurge of interest was thrown into the fast dying Naval Base League season Thursday night when the Naval Station Indians moved to within a game and a half of the third place VU10 Mallards when the whipped the Marine Leathernecks, 12-9.
The Braves put together a total of 10 hits to score their 12 runs and aid knuckleballer Richard Todd in notching his first win in as many outings. Todd scattered the Marines six hit total and allowed them no extra base blows, while on the Indian side of the fence the big blows came in the form of a triple by Jerry Morgan and a double by Sy Young. This combine in the top of the third sparked the frame which produced six runs and broke the Leatherneck's back.
With Todd notching his first win, Bill Wood, usual right fielder for the Marines, took his first loss. Wood started and went the first four frames until he gave way to Schreck in the fifth. Schreck followed suit and later gave way to Smith in the seventh.
This game left the Indians with hopeful eyes pinned on the outcome of the Mallard-'Bee game which will be played at Marine Site this afternoon. Should the Mallards lose that one and then drop their last game ot the NAS Flyers next Wednesday night, the Indians can gain a tie for third by defeating the Flyers tomorrow.
NavSta 12 10 2
Marines 9 6 4


Ma M( VU
Na NA


Fel Pa Do Mo Ad


League Standings
LEAGUE STANDINGS

(As of Thursday, 22 July)
W L GB
rines 24 5
13-8 18 12 6%
-10 13 17 11%/
vSta 12 19 13
S 7 23 16%

TOP FIVE BATTERS (As of Wednesday, 21 July) ak AB H AV
ce Marines 116 47 .406
tson Marines 114 46 .103 rgan MCB-8 123 48 .390 ams NavSta 124 17 .380
Marines 126 40 .320


HOMERUN LEADERS
(As of Wednesday, 21 July) Felak Marines 12
Dotson MCB-8 10
Androvich Marines 10
Pace Marines 8
Mason Marines 6

RBI LEADERS
(As of Wednesday, 21 July) Dotson MCB-8 38
Pace Marines 34
Young NavSta 31
Felak Marines 30
Layman MCB-8 26

TOP FIVE PITCHERS
(As of Wednesday, 21 July)
W L PCT
Smith Marines 12 1 .923
Bigbie MCB-8 9 3 .750
Shackleton MCB-8 7 3 .700
Harrison NAS 5 3 .625


Base League Schedule
Saturday, 24 July MCB-8 vs VU-10 Sunday, 25 July
Air Station vs Naval Station
Monday, 26 July
Open
Tuesday, 27 July MCB-8 vs Marines Wednesday, 28 July Air Station vs VU-10
END OF SEASON


Langostas 1


Alton Smith, SN, of the 4th Division, Naval Station Special Service, displays two langostas that weighed in at about eight pounds apiece. This crustaceon, close cousin to the lobster, is prized as one of the finest sea-food diishes availalle.


9


a


Page Five






a"


THE INDIAN


So You're Going To Move?.

(This is the first of a series of articles describing the Naval Supply Depot in action. This article covers the operations of the Household Goods Section.)
Moving Day! Ugh! Unpleasantness always seems to be associated with moving but, really, it isn't tedious or confusing if the correct steps are taken. This article is written primarily to assist prospective customers of the Household Goods Section of the Naval Supply Depot.
The first step, and a very important one, is the personal interview at the NSD Transit Shed located on Wharf Baker. All asepcts of your shipment are discussed and dates are assigned for pickup and packing t
a
s
s


s
v
e
u
b
d

t
I
t

a
c
p
d


M. W. White, DCC, in charge of the snipping and packing operations of the Household Goods section, watches as shipping tags are nailed to a crate ready for shipment.
articles of extraordinary value such
of your goods. It is emphasized as sterling silver and jewelry be that as much advance notice as
possible should be given of the shipped by express. Excess valuadesired packing dates. You will tion must be declared or the carneed six (6) certified copies of your ries liability is only fifty cents per orders for shipment of household pound. In consigning excess valuagoods, and all necessary paper work tion express shipments, the name can be completed at this interview. of an individual and not that of e da Naval activity must be listed as One day is assigned for packig consignee. Excess valuation charges glassware, china, lnen, kitchen will be checked against the shipvare, books and fragile items In per's (your) pay record. These inbarrels and boxes at your home. creased valuation charges at the Those items plus heavier items rate of ten cents per $100.00 are (such as furniture which will be well worth while as insurance packed and crated at the Naval lalnst damage or loss. Insurance
Supply Depot) will be picked up policies may be taken otit to the same day if possible. achieve similar coverage.
Household goods are given prior- ai r .
ity for shipment in first available In cases of freight shipment, Government cargo vessels enroute household goods, upon arrival in to United States ports. the United States, may be combined
for Packing Day with goods of other personnel goTips aing to the same area so as to make
Make available all household ef- up a carload lot. The consolidation fects to be packed. benefits the Government in keeping
Please refrain from instructing costs down and benefits the custhe packers. They are efficient and tomer by assuring that no stops will carefully follow instructions given be made by the car enroute to by the Household Goods Section. destination. Time involved in shipAdded instructions, though well ment from Guantanamo Bay natmeant, may inadvertently result in urally depends on shipping availpoorer packing. If special instruc- able. Household effects receive tions or information are required, priority handling and every effort contact the Officer - in - Charge, is made to speed up shipment. Household Goods Section, exten- Sufficient advance notice will help sion 8608. the Household Goods Section in
Have the owner or representative expediting your shipment.
stay in the house all the time pack- Commercial Storage at Government ing is in progress. Expense
Give the packers nothing strong- Under permanent change of staor than coke to drink. timn orriers you are entitled to 6
Check and sign the inventory lisc. months Government storage orPackers have been instructed to oa ve
be courteous and polite. Any in opneThsicuespyetb
stanes t thecontary houl the Gov'ernment of all necessary in be ieporterd immediately to the and otit labor handling charges. Officer-in-Charge, Household Goods Storage may be taken at either Section.


Methods of Shipment
You may ship up the 500 pounds of your authorized weight allowance by Railway Express at Government expense when there is immediate need for such articles in carrying out your assigned duties. It is strongly suggested that


origin or destination or a Comb-Iination of both. In the event your goods remain in commercial storage beyond the authorized period, the account will be transferred to your name and you then become liable for storage charges and the necessary labor ot ages \vhen your
goods are 1.i i0 d.


...Well, Here's How


You may also take advantage of his storage when you are detached rom a permanent duty station and directed to report to the nearest Naval district in Continental U.S . or further assignment. If in this nstance you desire to store your ousehold goods, contact the Offier-in-Charge, Household Goods ection for more detailed informaion. He will have available for you
list of storage activities and p e c i a 1 instructions concerning torage.
Hold Luggage
Hold luggage is that which is hipped in the hold of a transport essel in which the owners are embarked. Hold luggage cannot be tilized during the voyage and must e handled by the owner at the estination point in the U. S. It oust be taken through Customs ii he same manner as other luggage. Hold luggage should be delivered o the Household Goods Section, NSD, Transit Shed by 1400 on the fternoon prior to sailing date. A laim check will be given for each iece of luggage. The claim check oust be available for claiming at estination.


. . 0 .


Shipment of Automobiles
An application for shipment plus two (2) certified copies of your orders must be filed with the Officer-in-Charge, Household Goods Section designating the desired vessel for shipment. The date on the application will be utilized to determine priority of loading on board ship. Cars will be shipped as expeditiously as possible in available ships. Application for transportation of automobiles must show who will deliver the automobile and who will claim the car upon offloading at the destination. Generally, automobiles cannot be stored at Naval activities at destination ports and will be commercially stored if not claimed upon offloading. Gasoline will be drianed and batteries disconnected by the Household Goods Section prior to shipment. Upon arrival in the United States, two gallons of gasoline will be furnished free of charge by the Naval activity concerned.
It is hoped that this article will benefit everyone. It is suggested that you clip it out and save it for future reference.


Chief White cuts a piece of water-resistant packing articles of value are wrapped before being crated.


paper in which


One of the Cuban employees of tie Household Goods section cuts a piece of \vood to exactasure. Individual crates are made to order for various pieces of ho old articles.


Page Six


Saturday, 24 July 1954


%






4 A T I 195A


THE INDIAN


m


Page qeven


U - uay, uy


VU-1O Prop Blast TEENAGE-ROUND-UP WGBY Hi-Lites EinameyycEtehings


by Bill Graves & Staff
Orders keep coming at a steady rate. Latest casualty being Buzz Brostrom, alias "Bubbles". Remember the dance he performed leading to that monicker?
Want to see some experts at the game of baseball? Take in a Little League game and eyeball the actions of the adults. Also their comments. Casey Stengel and fraternity have nothing on these birds, believe me. Which brings to mind the pleasant fact that John Emerson's team of Tigers are just that. A fine contribution to Little League, John.
Since the return of Heywang, Magarity and a few others from last weeks Jamaica trip, it's apparent that it's nice down there. Magarity more or less advises that a knowledge of pounds and dollars, crown, quid and pence be a part of your baggage if you go. . . .
The Squadron is glad to see LT Jack Hawkins back. Jack's promotion was presented to him upon his return from a rather lengthy ferry flight.
Captain James, our new C.O. of COMUTWING paid us a short visit last Wednesday. He and his staff will be back this week for a (surprise inspection).
Chief Beriry is passing around the story about the first time ble was in Gtmo they were using steam boats as ferry boats across the bay. He isn't giving out how many years ago that has been, must have been around the turn of the century.
"Handsome" Hobson is the proud father of a little girl, 4 lbs 13 oz. Muriel is doing wonderful. Congratulations to you both.
Hohman, E. A., AKI, from Jeanett, Pa., just reported in from Patuxent.
"Greetings" to Mrs. Laverne (Chick) Draving, Mrs. Dorothey (Dot) Dailey, and Marvin James & Charles, Mrs. Nora Zaborski , and Bobby, Mildred Cyrus and William, Faith Winkler and Wendy, Mrs. Wayne Blair and Cynthia. Their husbands are- running around the Squadron like different men; just can't understand the reason why? The regular VU-10 Bridge club will meet at the Officer's Club plantation room at 1300 on Tuesday July 27. The hostess will be Mrs. Millie Jamieson and Mrs. Betty Herold. Those who can't attend, please contact one of the hostess.
Mrs. Val Evans will enter the hospital this week for a major operation. More news about how The is getting along later.
The big $62.00 question is: what has Slick Loggins (Golf pro) stashed away in Miami? Just can't get him back to the "Rock".
Bob White is one of the best hearted guys in the Squadron. Just gives $25.00 foi almost any little old thing.
Vince Fucci, Joe Strilich, and John Sebastian were issued invitations to return to a certain home in Mlami by a little girl's father. Seems they were involved in a big poker game.


A small lad appearing on Art Linkletter's radio show gave the following diagnosis of hiccups and their cause:
"You eat too fast and the food gets into your stomach and forms bubbles. The bubbles bust -'n hiccups."

If at first you don't succeed, try second base!


by Judy Yost
The Teenage hayride Saturday night was a howling success. With that big ol' moon and the harmonizing of some of our favorite tunes, everyone had a swell time!
Lately, we've seen several of our group "poking" up the hoss trail-just hoping that they would make it to the top of the mountain- and when you do get up that far, you can relax, for then, it's "down-hill all the way". Quote from some of them, "Just call me saddle-sores!" unquoteNot too many of the kids have ventured out into the hot sun for ,he past few days-Guess since there're new comics, crossword puzzle books, etc., you might find them in the shade somewhere catching up on their reading-Still, there are some who get up before breakfast and go golfing, or are still trying to get that Gtmo tan that somehow always peels-or maybe they're somewhere listening to some of those new Glenn Miller records that just came in-they're grirt-eat! !
Speaking of records--didja know that our host on "Requestfully Yours"- just played one record too many-and she finally said "Yes"-Congrats, John Hull, and our best wishes to you.
If any of you feel like doing a lot of yelling, how about coming on down to the Little League games-Those kids could use some cheering, and we're just the ones to do it-Come on, kats, lets go!
DID YA DIGJean C., Judy B., and Melba. struggling through a game of monopoly. . . . Irma "trudging" after her brother. . . . Barbara D. trying desperately to find Pat and Ellen R. . . . the gang at the bowling alley.... Tom B. at N.O.B.

Those who are versed in the niceties of old custom and usage always remove their caps when passing through the crew's quarters at meal tines,


by John Hull
After 20 years as the nation's top disk-jockey at independent station WNEW in New York City, Martin Block has moved his "Make Believe Ballroom" to the American Broadcasting Company nationwide network. To his millions of fans throughout the country, Martin now adds the 90 million listeners of the Armed Forces Radio Service all over the world. Locally, the "Make Believe Ballroom" will be heard five times weekly beginning Monday, 26 July, in the 5:30 to 6:00 time slot.
Besides spinning the top recordings of today and yesterday, Martin will interview the "greats" of the music business. During the first week of shows, You'll hear from such stars as Richard Hayes, Perry Como, the Four Lads, Paul Whiteman and Sunny Gale.
John Lund and Viveca, Lindfors will be starred in the "Theatre Guild" production of R o b e r t Nathan's heart - warming novel, "The Sea Gull Cry", Monday, 26 July at 9:00 P.M. Eleven year old Brandon de Wilde will be featured in the cast.
The Nathan novel tells the story of two refugees from war-torn Europe, a young girl and her brother, who seek sanctuary on Cape Cod. There they meet a college professor who is trying to get away from life, while the brother and sister are trying to find their place in it. The boy builds a raft and sets out to sea to rescue his friends in Europe and the professor and the girl find their love for each other in their anxiety over the child.
Be sure to watch the daily program schedule in the 'Papoose" for your favorite programs and any changes in the schedule presented each day over WGBY, 1450 on your dial.


The Naval Station Archery Range


Gets a Workout on Week-ends











"d.

















Two sailors better their archery skills dui-ing their spare c int by bagging a few well-placed bulls-eyes on the Naval Station Range


9


lby John H. Olsen, DT2
We would like to inform our readers about our new commanding officer of the Dental Clinic. CAPT William D. F. Stagner, USN, was born in Toledo, Ohio, joined the U. S. Naval Reserves in 1921 and was commissioned in the Dental Corps in 1931. He attended the University of Toledo and received his Doctor's Degree in Dentistry from the University of Colorado. During the war he served in the USS Quincy and the Hospital Ship, IJSS Sanctuary. Prior to reporting here for duty, CAPT Stagner was District Dental Officer, Eighth, Naval District. At the annual meeting of the American Dental Association last year at Cleveland, Ohio, CAPT Stagner was awarded a F.I.C.D. Fellow in the International College of Dentists for conspicious services rendered in the Arts and Science of Dentistry. His wife's name is Jo Stagner, who formerly resided in Nebraska. Bill Stagner, the Captain's son, is vacationing here for the summer prior to returning to enter his junior year at Southeastern Louisiana College. Vacating with him is his college roommate, Ronnie Sperier. The Captain's opinion of the base is a favorable one and he states that the GTMO weather is a welcome relief from the heat and humidity of New Orleans, La. We all appreciate having CAPT Stagner and his family here with us.
CWO Dote, Captain of the CabMarDen Bowling Team, is to be congratulated for leading his team to victory in the Officers' Summer Bowling League. The CabMarDen five of the National League defeated Hospital Team No. 1 of the American League Wednesday night on the Officers' Club maple lanes 2 to 1 in a best out of five game series for the championship. Kelly Marabella of the CabMarDen five rolled a high game of 212. All games were closely contested with the Hospital Team taking their only game by 3 pins.
CDR Overton, District Dental Officer, Tenth Naval District, is reported to play a mighty fine game of golf, but this reporter learned that he dropped a few nickles to some of the Clinic Officers in a Bingo Bongo Bungo game. It's adios to Rex Hall, DT3, UISN, 1VICB-8, who is departing Saturday for CLUSA and subsequent life. Good Luck, Rex, it's been swell having you here with is. Jeff Fawcett, DN, USN, has started on the bottom rung of the golf ladder. Your reporter learned "nat he broke 90 a week ago and io has an eye for the top rung.


Grand opera-a place where a y gets stabbed in the back and istpad of bleeding he sings.

Husband (in bed with his golf dlubs.) "Well, you said I had to cnoose, didn't you?

The civil service applicant applied for a position in the diplomatic corps.
'What makes you think you're
qualified ?" be was asked.
"I've been married 20 years,"
he answered modestly, "and my wife still thinks I have a sick
friend."

Employer: "Why did you leave
your last job?"
Cute Applicant: "Because the
boss kept after me too much."


90






ay
Navy-iNDPP-0,Gtm.s4O2O


Saturday, 24 July 1954


THE INDIAN


NAS Crosswinds


WHO's WHO AT NAS
LT Eugene Ordway: (new) Engineering and Maintenance Officer at Leeward Point. LT Ordway was born and raised in Chicago . . . attended Pulaski Academy. Served in the regular Navy as apprentice seaman up to chief aviation pilot from 1936 to 1943. Was commissioned an ensign in August of '43.
His earlier duties included deckhand on the USS Canopus, Ass't Plane Captain on the USS Augusta, plane captain on the USS Texas, plane captain striker with VP-55, and also duty in China from '37 - '39.
After receiving his wings he served at the Naval Air Experimentation Station in Philadelpnia, c9 test pilot and liason Officer. In '47 he served on the USS Midway. in '48 was a student officer und r instruction at the U. of Pennsylvania. In '49 attended general line school at Newport, R. I. Saw duty with Patrol Squadron 8, station-,d at such points as Argentia, Newfoundland. and Iceland. His last duty station was with Aviation SuPply Office in Philadelphia.
He married Clementine Kozak of Philadelphia in 1944, and has a girl, Keren, and two boys, Eugene and David. It is anticipated they will arrive on the Pvt. Thomas 28 July 1954.
NEWS BRIEFS
Two new officers reported aboard this week. LT Earnest L. Guirev. reported on 14 July via FLAW and has been assigned duties as engineering and maintenance officer at McCalla. He reported from NATTC, Memphis, Tenn. and has a wife and two children awaiting availability of quarters here in Guantanamo. LT Guirey is coauthor of a new book, "Laughter in Hell" dealing with his experiences as prisoner of war in a Japanese 'bunsho' or prison camp.
LT Everrett Pierce (new Photographic Officer) reported aboard last week. LT Pierce has a wife and four children in Arlington, Va. anxiously awainting quarters here.
ENS Jerry Earts new B.O.Q. officer is now LTJG Earts as of July 12, 1954. . . . Congratulations Jerry.
A party was held for LTs Sanders and Bostwick at the NAS BOQ patio Monday night. LT Sanders departed Wednesday to his new duty station in Washington, and LT Bostwick leaves today for new assignment with NABTC in Pensacola.
Three enlisted men departed for the States and civilian life this week. The happy trio were, Edward Joyner, AKAN, Paul Kelley AC3, and Russel Gooding A/N.
Alton Sparks AM3, the Texas cow puncher saw "Wicked Woman" at the local lyceum the other night and after w a t c h i n g Beverly Michaels famous walk, commented "Shucks, our bronc riders can walk better than that after they're just been thrown-!"
There is a current rumor that "Duck" Clark of Flaw Crew, the famous Mexican hat dancer, is considering entering college when he's discharged in November.
Elmer Nichols, a civilian supervisor at the Transit Shed of the Naval Supply Depot was the first winner of the Naval Air Station sponsored All-Base Tennis tournament, "A" Division. He accomplished it by defeating A. Vogel, Dick Friz, John Page, Chief Penoso, and then taking two sets of three from LT Whitman.


Tlh beautiful little doll not only She's Martha Hyer, one of today's this were only a sound picture! I

Mr. Nichols was the runnerup in the last tennis tournament held at Guantanamo Bay three years ago. He was defeated in the finals by LT Bob Burns.
Bobby Bear, AC3, of the Aerology Department of McCalla, was the winner of the novice "B" Division defeating Richard Cipriani in the finals. Bob had previously defeated Jim Thorley, Fred Butowski, and Fred Shimonek before facing Cipriani.
A tennis ladder is being planned sometime soon: for further information contact Dick Friz at 8543 or 8520.

Raymond Duncan: The best substitute for experience is being 16.
-corydon, Iowa, Times-Republican

Torvald Gahlin: He who believes
that the past cannot be changed has not yet written his memoirs.
--Quoted in Stockholm Dagens Nyheter


looks good, she sings just as well. up and coming recording stars. If


MOVIES


No Movie Schedule Available at Press Time.


m1 HONtv- NUTS TO MIM - BR2ZZ0FF LElTO S0 7. HOW ABOUT LETS$TARV SALTY. S TmE USHE$ TAIN* OPF CZUlSiN FO' E ANPSETTLE ThVS
WITH 'TWiS AUnULJ 15 011 AB














9


BOOK-NOWOK
by Francis L. Cannon, JOSN
For Your Information . . . .
AS IT HAPPENED
by Clement Atlee
The autobiography of Britain's first leader of a majority Labour party. Mr. Atlee gives a picture of contemporary British life, of politics and of Parliament in action. He was educated at Oxford, did social work in London's teeming Limehouse district. He worked for the Socialist labour movement and was thus drawn into politics.
A REPORTER IN SEARCH
OF GOD
by Howard Whitman
An ever-curious j o u r n a 1 i s t. Howard Whitman went out to find what the real feelings of people were about God. He probed the beleifs of people of every major religion in the U.S. where they found God, and their concept of Him.
THE REAL AMERICANS
by Hyatt Verrill
This book undertakes to convey a better knowledge and understanding of the American Indians; to Point out the debt our culture owes them. There are pictures of typical Indian types of many tribes. For Your Entertainment . . . .
CELL 2455, DEATH ROW
by Caryl Chessman
Caryl Chessman wrote this powerful book as he waited to be executed at San Quentin. He analyzed what brought him there, tells of unjust, almost inhuman treatment that some prisoners receive at some penal institutions. Chessman is a direct descendant of John Greenleaf Whittier. He has spent a third of his 33 years in prison.
THE UNKNOWN CHEKHOV translated by Avrahm Yarmolinsky
A collection of writings by the great Russian storyteller of the last century, translated into English for the first time. There are 20 stories, 5 essays.
A TIME TO LIVE AND A
TIME TO DIE
by Erich Maria Remarque
The story of a young German soldier in the last war, who had fought through France, Africa and Russia, became thoroughly sick of war and wanted only the peace of his home city. He obtains leave, finds the place completely changed by war and finds solace in newfound love for a woman. In Passing . . . .
Spin Fishing, by Hal SharpA new method of catching gamefish.
The Third Bullet, by John Dickson Carr-A freed prisoner and a dead judge.
Your Washington, by Tristram Coffin-Pictures and stories about the nation's capitol.
The Cokesbury Shower Book, by Katherine Fite-Showers for all seasons.


9




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E3D51JMLB_UCTL53 INGEST_TIME 2015-10-27T21:19:25Z PACKAGE AA00031277_00296
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

a "V ovs C TMO Lke The Sunskine" Vol. VI, No. 55 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 24 July 1954 Rhodes Scholarship Re-Up Bonus Passed; Base Cears fr Midshipmen V On to Navy Offirers Awaiting Signature The Bureau of Naval Personnel has announced the competition dates for participation of all Navy and Marine Corps officers in the 1954 Rhodes Scholarship selection. The competition will be held in December of this year, and to be eligible a candidate must meet the following requirements: (a) Be a male citizen of the United States with at least 5 years domicile and unmarried. (b) Be between the ages of 19 and 25 on 1 October 1955. (c) He must have completed at least his sophomore year by the time of application. (d) Receive official endorsement of his college. Male commissioned officers of the U. S. Navy or the U. S. Marine Corps now on active duty who are graduates of the U. S. Naval Academy or an accredited civilian educational institution are eligible for the participation. Applications from commissioned officers desiring Navy sponsorship must be submitted through official channels along with a signed agreement not to resign from the service during the period of the scholarship and to serve two years in the service for each year of tenure of the scholarship. The application must also be accompanied by an essay of approximately 1,000 words giving the reasons for making the application. Further and more complete details for the application will be found in BuPers Notice 1520. The new Armed Forces reenlistment bonus bill has been passed by both the Senate and the House, and as the "Indian" goes to press is on the President's desk awaiting his signature. The bill is slanted towards retention of career men in the armed services. It pays a larger bonus for first reenlistments and correspondingly lesser amounts for future re-ups. It also adds incentive to men on their first cruise to advance themselves since the bonus is based on the man's daily pay at the time he reenlists. For men reenlisting for the first time the new bill will authorize a months pay (30 days) for each year he elects to reenlist. For second re-ups the bill authorizes 20 days for each year of the reenlistment, and for the third reenlistment 10 days pay is granted. Additional reenlistments will be awarded 5 days pay for each year of the enlistment. For instance: a man who makes second class petty officer on his first cruise and reenlists for a period of six years will be given six months pay at the second class rate, or $963.12! On the other hand, a chief petty officer with 16 years service shipping over for the fourth and last time would receive approximately $265.00. This is the Season For Hayrides ,,,, IT'S WIENER ROASTING TIME again for local teen-agers as they gather around an old fashioned bon-fire on a hayride excursion to Windmill Beach last Saturday night. This is just one of the many recreational outlets offered to the Base's younger set through the Teen-Age Club each year 90 FiSI 01 DO IffOUps UB IUBS. This was the scene at Fleet Landing three weeks ago when the reservists visited GTMO. The same scene will be duplicated many times over when the Midshipmen and NROTC's land next Tuesday. The annual influx of Naval Academy Midshipmen will begin next Tuesday, 27 July, when Cruise "A", consisting of 15 major ships of the line, pulls into Guantanamo Bay for a 4-day visit. 2,935 Middies will pour ashore from the ships as they make their Pay Increase Bills lt stop of a summer training Led by the USS Missousi flying r tue flag of RADM R. E. Libby, G o to Congress ComBatCruLant Ciuist Able has _________visited western Eusopean posts inIdentical bills introduced into eluddig Cadiz Lisbon Antwerp, both Houses of Congress last week tterdai, Chrbouig and Le call for a flat 10% increase in base Have. The gioup departed from pay, subsistence and basic allowthe States June 7 this year. ance for quarter (BAQ), according In company with the Missouri to an article in the recent issue ic the USS Macai, carrying of "Navy Times." RADM Arleigh A Buikt ComCruThe Senate bill was sponsored by Div 6, the US5 Now fersoy USS Sen. Kilgore (D., W. Va.) and Sen. Des Moines, the curier USS Kefauver (D., Tenn.) while RepSiboney and 10 destroyes resentative Van Zandt (D. Pa.) Of the 935 Midshipmen, 1,690 introduced the bill into the House. aie fiom toe USS Naval Academy The article pointed out that at Annaiolis and the remaining neither bill has the approval of the 1,295 are NROTC Middies. Defense Department and, thereOh ese a l divie t ips fore, has a very slim chance of being approved before Congress a iven training in gunnery, adjourns. The bills were introduced en"'neering navigation and deck at the request of the Reserve Offieaieenship The major part of cers Assoation. ise runner exercises will take lat sn oe ouantanamo Bay traininsareas. Cis Able is the first of three S cni group to visit the Naval it ed within the next five weeks. Cisumng Charlie is expected to arrive T he 0 Cihme rS aeout August 20, and Cruise Baker I ~will airrive abaoit Atuguist 26. Play The IndHians The Naval Base will extend the uual welcome to the Midde groups. All recreation activities will ho held NRext Friday Night ComruSibontiuand on Pestoyers. Ofte295Mdsimn9,9

PAGE 2

a Page Two Saturday, 24 JulyW The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9-615 Saturday, 24 July 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sandness--Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC---------------Editor H. L. Sisson, JO3 ----News Jeery Leads, J03----Featarea Pierce Leheebeck-----------Sparts F. L. Cannon, JOSNPhotographer THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and finance with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearingwherein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. An Editorial. Just a Second If you've noticed the grass lately, you've seen it turn from a bright green to a chalky brown. If you've noticed the wind lately, you've felt it change from almost nothing to a brisk breeze. And if you've noticed sirens lately, it's the fire engines racing to quell a grass fire. This is the dry season in the semi-tropics. The dryness, coupled with the strong breeze, presents a hazard that, given a chance, could cause incalculable damage. Most fires are caused by human carelessness and/or thoughtlessness. Only one fire in a hundred is a result of natural sources. It's a must to be careful about any kind of a fire the whole year 'round, but it's especially a must during this particular time of year. Just a second's thought might prevent a tremendous amount of damage. For instance, when you're driving along in the car and you take that last drag on the cigarette, the normal reaction for seven out of ten people is to toss it out the window. Just a second! It might land in the dry grass along the side of the road, and awa-a-a-a-y we go. Or the match that just lit the cigarette-is it out when you throw it away? Takes just a second to check it. Or, maybe, that beach fire that made the hot dogs taste so good. Is it all out when you leave? Takes just a second to make sure. Or how about the kids playing in the back yard ? Are they playing with anything that could start a fire? Takes just a second to make sure and correct them if they are. And it takes just a second to turn a quiet patch of grass into a blazing bonfire. Whip quickly with a strong breeze and you have the recipe for the thing that dramatic writers like to call "blazing inferno" or "holacust." Our own Base Fire Department A Story About .. The Wayward Guagwa by Dick Friz (with apologies to John Steinbeck) It was one of those days the sun unchallenged by filtering cloud flurries, bore down in earnest intensity on a gray Navy bus as it chugged up a Sherman Avenue hill. The Cuban driver addressed bilingual oaths at the straining engine, as if it were stubborn the occupants, some standing and bobbing, some vibrating against hot leather seats, found nowhere to turn for comfort. A Fleet sailor and an airdale questioned each others ancestry in terse angry phrases, the rest bore their discomfort quietly but impatiently. The driver flipped back his cap, and one of the Bay's surprise breezes cooled his sleek black head. ...So soothing was it, that he ground a gear, and skidded a good twenty yards from the regular bus stop, the brakes squealing like a factory whistle. A group of school children entered, sweaty and chattering in short winded gasps-and you suddenly noticed that one was no child. She was a tall angular girl, moving gracefully-displaying none of the coltish awkwardness of those her age. She had long, light brown hair, the kind the models were always running their hands through in the slick ads of "Vogue" and "Vanity Fair." A thin trickle of perspiration glistened on her upper lip, and with one deft sweep, she erased it, pausing to tuck a stray wisp of hair. Her eyes, gazing frankly ahead, were as everyone later agreed, the same blue of the Bay, in one of its better moments. Imagine the cross-currents of feeling and recollection, as each male in the bus silently appraised, and en masse emitted an almost audible sigh. A long low whistle from the back of the bus was stifled by a well directed elbow, and the girl averted her glance to her thin hands, clasped in her lap. Could she, still in the tender years differentiate the honest appreciative glance of those who associated her with someone important they had left behind in the states from the mental disrobing typical of half-men? Perhaps years of traveling from base to base, some as confining as this, could foster that compassion sometimes void in women many years her senior. The bus neared a housing area and the girl exited, walking proudly and erect unmindful of a hundred probing glances. A chattering maid entered and in her haste to grab the vacated seat, plopped her ample posterier and wedged an underfed seaman apprentice against the window ...a roar of laughter, and the passengers were back to normal on the wayward guagwa. An old timer, with four hashmarks ,leaned over to his neighbor and confided, "Ya, know for a minute, there, I almost felt like a man again!" has some of the best modern equipment available. It's well trained and efficient. But the best department in the world cannot put out a fire in a second. So how about you taking that second to make sure that fire doesn't start. If it's too much trouble, well, just a second, then, let me off here. FTG Bulletin by Jack Engstrom Several members of the Training Group departed this past week. Lieutenant Paul H. Hall of the Communications Department was ordered to the Naval Communication Station, Washington, D. C. He left via FLAW flight last Wednesday. Also from the Communications Department, Tom "Good-Papers" Shute, RM3, departed last Wednesday for Jacksonville, Florida. He will be released to inactive duty. W. E. Yarbrough, EN2, formerly of the Engineering Department and more recently of the Base Police Force left for duty aboard the USS Latimer, APA-152. An informal gathering at the ASW Office Wednesday morning saw the departure of T. A. Horner, SOC, of the ASW department. Horner was presented with a pen and pencil set by the men of the ASW Department as a token of out-tanding service and friendship while attached here. He departed via FLAW for transfer to the USS Thomas DDE-764 for duty. Good bye and good hunting Tom. Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. Don Shackel, ET2. The Mrs. presented Don with a baby girl on the fifteenth. Susan Elizabeth weighed in at seven pounds fifteen ounces. Don is with the Fleet Training Center. Chief A. Andrews, FTG Engineering Department, has been transferred to the Base Police. He will be one of the Duty Chief's in organization. Lieutenant Commander Dave Scott, FTG Air Department, will report to NAS Jacksonville to undergo jet check-out and training. Good flying. Lieutenant Commander, K. E. Skadowski has relieved Lieutenant Commander M. Gewertz as Coinmulnications Officer. LCDR Gewertz is due to depart GTMO in the middle of August. LCDR Skadowski, formerly with the ASW Department has been relieved of his duties there. He will continue his collateral duties as FTG Welfare and Recreation Officer as well as FTG Public Information Officer. MAQNc0 MOSINGS by Cpl. Guy Stephens, U.S. Marine Corps Arrivals The only arrival this week was that of HM3 Norman M. Nilsen. Nilsen joined the USNH on 2 July and was transferred here this week. Before coming to Gtmo he was stationed at the Philadelphia Naval Hospital, Philadelphia Pa. Glad to have you with us "Norm." Departures Only one departure this week, HN John Canning. John joined us only a few weeks ago and during the short time here did a wonderful job as Corpsman. John will be transferred to MSTS, Brooklyn, N. Y. the 4th of August. We've enjoyed having him with us, and we wish him the best of luck in Brooklyn. The Marine Guard Detachment, Leeward Point under the direction of 2dLT D. L. Bell enjoyed a recreation trip in the Back Bay area last Sunday. There was plenty of beer and chicken, and everyone reported a wonderful time. 9 Sunday, 18 July 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) The Chaplain's Corner The high majestic mountain leaned against the sky and rested its head on a pillow of clouds. An artist gazed intently at the mountain with its graceful lines, its multicolored vegetation, its rugged rock formations, its turbulent stream singing its way toward the valley, and was stirred by the desire to capture its beauty in oils on a canvas. An engineer gazed at the mountain and a smile of satisfaction came to his face as he thought of the profits that would come his way when he succeeded in harnessing the mighty rushing waters of the stream to the wheels of his industry. An old prospector gazing at the mountain saw the rugged rock formations which indicated to his trained eye the presence of valuaable ore, and with quickened step he hurried on toward the spot that promised the goal of his search. A vulture gazing at the mountain as he circled lazily in the sky saw the decaying body of a dead beast, and changed his course toward that thing which is so distasteful to us but which is so attractive to him. It was the same mountain but each observer saw only that part of it which he wished to see. The eves always manage to focus on those objects that satisfy the deep yearnings of the heart. The person who is hungry for beauty can find it revealed in all the relationships of life and in all the material creations of God. The person who is interested in scientific development can see opportunities for improvements in all that goes on round about him. The person who is dominated by the desire for wealth can find means of making a profit in the most unlikely situations. The person with the vulture mind can find ugliness and evil on every hand and in everything. Since it is true that man finds those things for which he is seeking, you should train yourselves to look for the beautiful and to seek to find the true. If you do. God and the beautiful will dwell in you. M. 0. Stephenson CDR, CHC, USN THE INDIAN

PAGE 3

Saturday, 24 July 1954 What D' Ya' Say? The INDIAN will award a certificate good for $1.00 worth of merchandise at the Navy Exchange for each question accepted and used. Submit your questions to Editor, The Indian, Box 19.) The question: If you had your choice of any duty station in the Navy, which one would you pick? The place: Sherman Ave. Shopping Center. / Willie Chambers, TN, BOQ 3 "Well, in a few days I'll be transferred to the Test Center at Point Mugu, Cal., so I guess I'll name that." Michael Sramko, SN, USS Isherwood, DD 520 "Philadelphia Navy Yard. It's near a lot of big cities and it's near home for me." Joe F. Morris, CSC, USS Carpellotti, APD-136 "The Naval Station at San Diego, Cal. I have my home in Chula Vista and I've been trying to get duty there for years." J. R. Cash, SHSN, USS Maloy, EDE-791 "Well, I'd take the Philadelphia Navy Yard. I think Philly is a great city." Richard Thorpe, ANAM, VF-13 "London, England, for me. It's choice duty." Hospital Notes Puttin' Around by Charles L. Brewer, YN3 Heirport News From 15 July to 19 July, the following births were recorded; a daughter, Susan Elizabeth, born 15 July to ET2 and Mrs. Donald J. Schackel; a daughter, Susan Virginia, born 18 July to AD1 and Mrs. James L. Hobson, a daughter, Debora Kay, born 19 July to AD1 and Mrs. James F. Puettman. Your Hospital Whether it be a baseball game or doubles in a ping pong tournament the team is the thing. Everywhere team work is important and in the Operating Room of the hospital, one observes a team plan which functions smoothly and effectively at all times. At present there are six surgeons, one of whom is responsible for the dependent surgery. There are seven corpsmen who have received special training for operating duty and a nurse anesthetist who gives the anesthetics. In addition to the operative patients who receive care, this department is responsible for the cast work, for the oxygen therapy and for all of the sterile suppiles that are used in the hospital and at the various dispensaries on the base. With the exception of the weekend there is an operative schedule every day. During this week seven emergency patients have received care which as the golfers would say is "par for the course". Usually within ten minutes after the surgeon's decision to operate things are being made ready to receive the patient. There is a phrase frequency repeated by the operating room crew: "If you ever need a good, free operation just call on us". In truth, if you do ever need an operation you may be certain that you will receive excellent care and attention but it is our hope that our readers will remain in good health. In the first softball game of the season, the Special Department's played the Ward Corpsmen at the Fleet Recreation Diamond No. 2. I imagine there has never been a game played there to match this one. It was a close pitcher's battle until the top of the first when the Special Department's scored nine runs on four hits and five strikeouts. The Ward Corpsmen battled back in the fifth inning scoring six runs on three hits. One would imagine that the losing pitchers comment of lack of support would be appropriate. But a good time was had by all with the Special Department's edging by the Ward Corpsmen 19 to 6. Middies .. (Continued from Page One) open for them, and the Petty Officers Club in the Fleet Recreation area will be reserved for their exclusive use. It is expected that Navy Exchange stores and other facilities will remain open beyond the usual closing hours for the benefit of the Middies. When the various groups leave Guantanamo Bay they will head back to the States and the Naval Academy, or, as in the case of the NROTC students, back to their colleges to prepare for the Fall 1term. Anyone residing on the base who desires to entertain any of the visiting Middies in their home may make arrangement by calling LCDR J. W. Richmond, the admiral's aide, at 8441. ATF-71 Jury Foreman: "We find the Pmull G. I ski, SKSN, USS Hopi, defendant gorgeous ath-taking, ATF-71 W .sweet, lovable, ant 1 yes, not "Brook1 N. Y. would look good. guilty!" by Wright North Professional in Charge GTMO Bay Golf Club The monthly Scotch foursome will swing underway at 1300 tomorrow with some 20-odd couples vieing for the prizes of golf balls. All contestants are requested to check at the Pro Shop for pairings and starting times. And, again, the Ladies' Golf Committee will have refreshments on hand. The Naval Station golf ladder competition goes into its second month week and sitting on top is the 1954 Base Champion LT Grego, followed by H. Broughton, Tony Totillo, LT Dempsey, Lactara Figueroa, CAPT Caruthers, Cofield, Harper and Corliss for the first ten places. All challange matches are played by handicap. This competition is expected to end sometime in September with prizes for the first three places. In the rules of golf etiquette there is one that is priority on the course: (1) In the absence of special rules, singles, threesomes and foursomes should have precedence and be entitled to pass any other kind of match. A single player has no standing and should give way to a match of any kind. If a match of any kind fails to keep its place on the course and loses more than one clear hole to any players in front, it should allow any following players to pass the match and, having done so, should not continue to play until those players are out of range. NAS will hold its annual 36-hole Medal play Handicap tournament this week-end with 36 contestants teeing off this morning in the 1st round. Chief Rodgers with a 4 handicap, Manueles with 5 and LCDR Vanderhoef with a 7 will be the strong favorites for the gross prize. CAPT McCracken's 13 and Sims' 12 will very likely be in the running for net honors. Congratulations are in order at this time to the NAS golf team tournament committee for your easy arrangement of rules, pairing and scores chart which can be seen on the score board in the Pro Shop. Meetings Time & Place Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd & 4th Tuesday each month. Community Auditorium Ladies' Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Room, Community Auditorium Little Theatre Group 2000; 2nd Tuesday each month Marina Point Hospital Service Volunteers Ho00a 2nd Tuesday eals month Hospital Medical Library American Legion Auxiliary, Unit One 1930; 3rd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Hut, Marina Point Toastmasters Club 92 1930 each Thursday, Officers Club dining American Legion. Guantanamo Bay Post 1 1930; 3rd Tuesday each month; Community Auditorium, Marina Point Parent-Teachers Association 1930; 1st Tuesday of each month Naval Base School Fellowceraft Club No. 1078 2000 each Thursday, Practice, Business Meeting, 1st Thursday -Community Hall National Supervisors Association 1900: 1st Monday each month, Civilian Training Conference Room. Toastmasters Club No. 113 1900 each Thursday in the Flamingo Room, Fleet Recreation Center. New members welcome. Bachelor: "A guy who enjoys life, liberty and the happiness of pursuit." Some people have too great an appreciation of their own strength to wrestle with temptation. mf THE INDIAN Page Three

PAGE 4

m1 Old-Timers -Indians Game Postponed The baseball game scheduled for last night between the Naval Station Indians and the Old-Timers will be played next Friday night instead because of schedule comlittments of the Indians. In the absence of Phil Dunmire, Jerry Morgan will manage the Indians for the one game. Dunmire will be roaming the outer pastures for the Old-Timers. John F. X. O'Connor, chief umpire of the Naval Base League, will guide the oldsters through the game from behind the plate in the catcher's box. The Old Timers game has grown to be an1 annual affair at the Naval Base and always draws an appreciative audience who comes to see the "old folks" teach the youngsters a few tricks. Next Friday's game is a reschedule of a game begun last month which was called because of rain. At the time the game was called, the Old Timers were proving their point with a 3 to 1 advantage over the Indians in the fifth inning. Game time will be 7 P.M. under the lights of diamond number one in the Fleet Recreation area. Ladies' Golf Shots by Miriam Hoy This week the ladies completed in the skillful art of putting on the front nine. Mighty hot morning, but the winners who proved they could putt when the heat was on were: 1st Flight-Corky Henning and Marion Gentry (18) 2nd Flight-Marge Sheehan (18) Fran Dykeman (22) 3rd Flight-Nita Roberts (19) B. J. Sutherling (20) We would like to say "welcome" to Polly Herring who arrived recently in GTMO. Understand she plays a beautiful game of golf ad we wish her the best of luck. Val Evans, one of the top contenders in the 3rd Flgiht, has been hospitalized this past week. We all wish her a very speedy recovery and hope that she will be back playing an even better game soon. Next Wednesday we'll play the back nine for gross and net. Don't forget the Scotch foursome tomorrow. Pick a partner and the committee will make up the foursome. Fishing Contest LAND DIVISION Barracuda Plasth, C. W. -___-----1s50 lbs. Hackert, A. ----14 lbs.,1 Dean, W. L. ---12 lbs., 8os Grouper Hanlin, John Paul 1 lb., 14 ozs. Gardes, G. S. --1 lb., 2 oz Hise, N. L.---o Jacks MacAnanny, R. E. ___ 19 lbs., 8os Raymsond, Sams--14 lbs. 814 os Nixon, W. GI.--12 lbs., 85 zs Mackerel (King) Howerton, R. D. 5 lbs. 10 ozs. Snapper Kelley, C. L. -39 lbs. Heinandez, J. M. 12 lbs. Naegele, W. L. 5 lbs., 3 ozs. Wahoo Smouse, J. H. 24 lbs. Snook Bunda, George 10 lbs., 4 ozs. Horner, T. A. 3 lbs. Tarpon Scott, W. H. -23 lbs., 8 ozs. Bedward, K. D. 17 lbs. Collins, R. R. 16 lbs. Mackerel (SpanishfCommon) Dean, W. V. 7 lbs. Gardes, George __ __ 9 ozs. BOAT DIVISION Barracuda Carroll, J. C. --24 lbs. Cunningham, J. H. 17 lbs., oz. Davenport, Sid -16 lbs., 8 ozs. Jacks Karstens, R. L. --12 lbs., 14 ozs. Snapper Roberts, V. A.-50 lbs. Johnson, D. ---------40 lbs. Carroll, J. C. -30 lbs., 8 os. Snook Emverso, Epifanio -15 lbs., 2 ozs. Carrington, Laurie 12 lbs., 4 ozs. Wilson, W. H. -6 lbs., 8 ozs. Tarpon Andrews, J. W. -59 lbs., 4 ozs. Davis, N. Q. -----20 lbs., 4 ozs. Swanson, G. A. -13 lbs., 8 ozs. SPECIAL DIVISION Bonefish Wensaff, D. C. 3 lbs., 10 ozs. Wind, Marion A. -2 lbs., 8 oss. Emverzo, Epifanio 2 lbs., 2% ozs. Croakers Morales, Edith 8 ozs. Sanborn, Jim _8 ozs. Dalton, Kathryn 2 ozs. Ladyfish Smouse, J. H. -4 lbs., 8 ozs. Parrotfish Clark, D. L. --8 lbs., 1 oz. Pompano Bedward, Kenneth 20 lbs. Giggy, G. K. 16 lbs., 4 ozs. Romano, Sam 8 lbs., 13 ozs. S kahr Shark Davenport, Dale 44 lbs., S ozs. Meredith, Fred 41 lbs., 8 ozs. Choate, E. J. -25 lbs. Triggerfish Lee, G. A. --4 lbs., 8 ozs. SPEARFISHING DIVISION Grouper Ellwood, L. D. -56 lbs. Nichols, E. M. 16 lbs. Jacks Dean, W. V.--18 lbs., 8 ozs. Andrews, R. M. -14 lbs. Mackerel Scheibel, K. E. -8 lbs., 11 ozs. Snappers Ward, G. F. --14 lbs., 13 ozs. Nichols, E. M. -14 lbs. Barracuda Plath, C. W.181 lbs. Pace, Robert -12 lbs. Andrews, R. M. 10 lbs. Hogfish Ward, G. F. --5 lbs., 15 ozs. Robert Sanborn of the Bears sits solidly on home plate as both he and Hawk catcher Philip Crouch look questioningly at the plate umpire for the decision. Action took place in a Bears -Hawks Little League game at Villamar over the week-end. The Hawks' Davis Herold safely hooks third base as Bear third-sacker Tommy Mallia crouches down for the throw during the Bears -Hawks game last weekend. Bears won. Little League Standings Bears Tigers Colts Hawks WON LOST GB 13 5 12 5 /2 7 11 6 3 14 91/ Little League Schedule SATURDAY, 24 July Bears vs Hawks SUNDAY, 25 July Tigers vs Colts TUESDAY, 27 July Colts vs Bears THURSDAY, 29 July Hawks vs Tigers (Left) The newest addition to the Naval Station sailboat fleet are these three Cape Cod Bullseye fiber glass boats tied up at the sailboat landing. The 16-footers have a 5/s-foot beam and a 3-foot draft. They will be fitted out with sails and rigging and will be made available to sailing enthusiasts as soon as possible .anotner increase im the service offered to Guantanamo Bay personnel by the Naval Station Sp Services Department. SCUTTLEBUTT S SLueMAR1Ne: NIllON This baby has its father's nose rnd its mother's eyes. Yes, and if Grandpa doesn't stop leaning over the crib, it's going to have his teeth. The doctor had called on the patient five times. On the last visit, the patient announced he had called in another doctor. Doctor: "Is that so? Well, the alltnp y w chil ow who is right." Page Fout Saturday, 24 July 1954 THIt INDIAN Page Fout

PAGE 5

Saturday, 24 July 1954 Naval Base League Closes Wednesday by Pierce Lehmbeck This past week of play was one that will long be remembered in the Naval Base League annals as, under the pressure of a fast dying season, the first no-hitter in the circuit's history was thrown by a virtual unknown in the form of the champion Marine's Wayne Straw. Straw's flawless performance came last Saturday afternoon to seemingly snap the Leathernecks out of a slump for a while only to have them finish and winning over the VU-10 Mallards. Meanwhile, the Indians kept their hopes high as they came out of this week with a bare fingernail dug into the seat of the third place Mallards. Straw, Marines, Notch League's First No-Hitter in Flyer Swamp Wayne Straw, a pitcher who had been action only in batting practice, climbed onto the Naval Base League's previously empty pedestal of local baseball immortality last Satu rday afternoon when lie hurled the League's first no-hit, no-run game in a 15-0 Flyer swamp. Straw made his first appearance on the local scene as a pitcher quite by accident as, before game time, lie was going through his usual paces as a batting practice burler when the Leatherneck mentors decided to throw him in at the last minute. Etraw entered the contest and turned in a performance that will long be remembered in the League annals. For the full nine he kept the ball bobbing, weaving and hopping until at the game's end the official scorer's book read no runs, no hits and only one miscue, that by short stop Joe Androvich who's sensational performance through-out over-shadowed the mistake. Straw showed almost perfect control as he walked but two men. While the twenty year old Pennsylvanian was handling himself so well on the mound, the Leatherneck power was in its old form supplying the offensive punch. Of their total of fifteen safeties, eight went for extra bases with third sacker Louis Romano leading the pack with a homer, a double and a triple in five trips. Wood doubled twice in two trips while Androvich homered and Pace and Felak both doubled. For Straw, it was his first win in as many appearances while Woren took the loss for the Flyers. Woren went the first full six giving up nine tallies on ten hits. Deerr was his relief and was no iiore successful as the pennant winners hit him five times for six rtuns. Marines 15 15 1 NAS 0 0 4 'Bees Take Fifth Straight In NavSta Win The 'Bees of MCB-8 moved to their fifth straight win Sunday afternoon when they nudged out the Indians of the Naval Station, 8-5, to shake off all hope of a third place finish by the latter. The Indians clubbed starter Bigbie for three runs in the bottom of the first and then chased him off the mound in the fifth when they pushed him for one more. Shackleton came on the relieve and take the win as he finished the last four and one thirds innings giving the Braves only one run. The 'Bees scored their eight run total off Indian work -horse Mandy Mandis by belting the little-manwith-the-big-arm for one in the top of the second, one in the fourth, two in the fifth with a final big four in the sixth. Shackleton was credited with the win, his seventh against three setbacks while Mandis took his sixth loss against six wins. MCB-8 8 10 4 NavSta 5 7 6 Wayne Straw, 20-year-old Pennsylvania PFC, of the Marine baseball squad, who hurled the first no-hitter ever thrown in organized Guantanamo Bay baseball last week against the Naval Air Station Flyers. Marines Take Mallards The Marine Leathernecks, led by short stop Joe Androvich, showed up strong Monday night after a brief slump to defeat the VU-10 Mallards, 6-4, in a wild tilt of sensational catches and long balls. The pennant-winners were paced by the bat of short-stop Joe Androvich who homered twice in two trips to the plate while playing his usual good game afield. This pair ran his total for the year to 10. Androvich's first round-tripper provided the Marines with a none too stable 1-0 lead in the bottom of the first as Mallard spinner Harry Breske limited them to just one hit in the first two-and-a-third frames until he had to give way to a sore arm. Delongchamp and Radulski followed in order, but neither could stave off the surging Leatherneck tide as the Marines cause up with one more in the fourth, three in the sixth and a final one in the seventh. The Mallards notched their four runs off Marine hurler Chuck Smith by scoring two in the fourth and two in the eighth. They were lead by Dutch Huber who homered and singled in four trips. Smith was credited with his 12th win against one setback while Delongchamp took the loss for the Mallards, his first in as many appearances. Marines 6 7 3 VU-10 4 7 4 'Bees Take Sixth Straight The firmly second-seated 'Bees of MCB-8 moved to their sixth straight win Tuesday night behind the three-hit shutout hurling of Ed Bigbie as they defeated the NAS Flyers, 5-0. The big "crooked-arm", who was for the major part of the season, the staff ace, showed signs of hav90 ing completely recovered from a partial slump as he had the hapless Flyers coming and going notching thirteen strikeouts in the two hour and thirty-five minute foray. The up and coming 'Bees were paced at the plate by their four and five batting combination of Dotson and Mayer. Together, the duo accounted for all five of the 'Bee RBIs as both hit round-trippers and Dotson added a double and a single to give him a three for four night to boost his already towering average. MCB-8 scored their five run total off Flyer trickster Harrison by hitting him safely 12 times to score twice in the second, twice in the fifth with their final tally coming in the eighth. The win was number nine for Bigbie against three losses while Harrison took his third loss against five wins. A PASSING COMMENT: With Bigbie seemingly finally back on his stride again the 'Bees, for all practical purposes, look to be the team to beat in the coming Post Season Play-offs slated to start somewhere around the first of August. With three potential starting hurlers in the forms of Bigbie (9-3), Shackleton (7-3) and Dotson (3-1), they certainly have the defensive power and they are obviously not lacking in offensive punch as they have average better than nine safeties a game for their last six outings. Reportedly, this stretching squad in its present form looks better than the nine which Eight sent to the ComServLant Tournament from Argentia, Newfoundland last year. That team went all the way into the finals and with Bigbie on the hill, lost a 1-0 decision in ten innings with the winning run scoring on an error. This year's ComServLant is being held in Norfolk on 2 August. Personally, we'd like to see the 'Bees get another crack. Braves Defeat Marines An unexpected splurge of interest was thrown into the fast dying Naval Base League season Thursday night when the Naval Station Indians moved to within a game and a half of the third place VU10 Mallards when the whipped the Marine Leathernecks, 12-9. The Braves put together a total of 10 hits to score their 12 runs and aid knuckleballer Richard Todd in notching his first win in as many outings. Todd scattered the Marines six hit total and allowed them no extra base blows, while on the Indian side of the fence the big blows came in the form of a triple by Jerry Morgan and a double by Sy Young. This combine in the top of the third sparked the frame which produced six runs and broke the Leatherneck's back. With Todd notching his first win, Bill Wood, usual right fielder for the Marines, took his first loss. Wood started and went the first four frames until he gave way to Schreck in the fifth. Schreck followed suit and later gave way to Smith in the seventh. This game left the Indians with hopeful eyes pinned on the outcome of the Mallard-'Bee game which will be played at Marine Site this afternoon. Should the Mallards lose that one and then drop their last game ot the NAS Flyers next Wednesday night, the Indians can gain a tie for third by defeating the Flyers tomorrow. NavSta 12 10 2 Marines 9 6 4 League Standings LEAGUE STANDINGS (As of Thursday, 22 July) W L GiB Marines 2-1 5 MC13-8 18 12 6/z VU-10 13 17 11 NavSta 12 19 13 NAS 7 23 161/ TOP FIVE BATTERS (As of Wednesday, 21 July) Felak AB H AV Pace Marines 116 47 .406 Dotson Marines 114 46 .403 Morgan MCB-8 123 48 .390 Adams NavSta 124 47 .380 Marines 126 40 .320 HOMERUN LEADERS (As of Wednesday, 21 July) Felak Marines 12 Dotson MCB3-8 10 Androvich Marines 10 Pace Marines 8 Mason Marines 6 RBI LEADERS (As of Wednesday, 21 July) Dotson MCB-8 38 Pace Marines 34 Young NavSta 31 Felak Marines 30 Layman MCB-8 26 TOP FIVE PITCHERS (As of Wednesday, 21 July) W L PCT Smith Marines 12 1 .923 Bigbie MCB-8 9 3 .750 Shackleton MCB-8 7 3 .700 Harrison NAS 5 3 .625 Base League Schedule Saturday, 24 July MCB-8 vs VU-10 Sunday, 25 July Air Station vs Naval Station Monday, 26 July Open Tuesday, 27 July MCB-8 vs Marines Wednesday, 28 July Air Station vs VU-10 END OF SEASON Langostas Alton Smith, SN, of the 4th Division, Naval Station Special Service, displays two langostas that weighed in at about eight pounds apiece. This crustaceon, close cousin to the lobster, is prized as one of the finest sea-food dishes available. me THE INDIAN Page Five

PAGE 6

m So You're Going To Move?. You noI (This is the first of a series of articles describing the Naval Supply Depot in action. this str This article covers the operations of the Household Goods Section.) fs'oia a p Moving Day! Ugh! Unpleasantness always seems to be associated directed with moving but, really, it isn't tedious or confusing if the correct foa fr steps are taken. This article is written primarily to assist prospective customers of the Household Goods Section of the Naval Supply Depot. instance The first step, and a very important one, is the personal interview at cer-in-Cn the NSD Transit Shed located on Wharf Baker. All asepets of your Section f shipment are discussed and dates ate assigned for ptis s a list p direcie torhage. Hold 1 shipped vesselin ::. embarked utilized d he handl e adestinati amlst oe r R ,lthe same to the I 5 NSD, Tr. aftrsnoon claim cbs piece of must 1)e destination emare utlze: Well, Here's How ay also take advantage of age when you are detached permanent duty station and to report to the nearest strict in Continental U.S. er assignment. If in this you desire to store your d goods, contact the Offiarge, Household Goods or more detailed informawill have available for you f storage activities and 1 instructions -concerning Hold Luggage luggage is that which is n the hold of a transport which the owners are .Hold luggage cannot be during the voyage and must ed by the owner at the on point in the U. S. It taken through Customs in manner as other luggage. gage should be delivered household Goods Section, ansit Shed by 1400 on the prior to sailing date. A ck will be given for each luggage. The claim check available for claiming at n. Shipment of Automobiles An application for shipment plus two (2) certified copies of your orders must be filed with the Officer-in-Charge, Household Goods Section designating the desired vessel for shipment. The date on the application will be utilized to determine priority of loading on board ship. Cars will be shipped as expeditiously as possible in available ships. Application for transportation of automobiles must show who will deliver the automobile and who will claim the car upon offloading at the destination. Generally, automobiles cannot be stored at Naval activities at destination ports and will be commercially stored if not claimed upon offloading. Gasoline will be drianed and batteries disconnected by the Household Goods Section prior to shipment. Upon arrival in the United States, two gallons of gasoline will be furnished free of charge by the Naval activity concerned. It is hoped that this article will benefit everyone. It is suggested that you clip it out and save it for future reference. M. W. White, DCC, in charge of the snipping and packing operations of the Household Goods section, watches as shipping tags are nailed to a crate ready for shipment. articles of extraordinary value such of your goods. It is emphasized that as much advance notice as as sterling silver and jewelry he possible should be given of the shipped by express. Excess valuadesired packing dates. You will tion must le declared or the carneed six (6) certified copies of your rie liability is only fifty cents per orders for shipment of household pound. In consigning excess valuagoods, and all necessary paper work L express shipments, the name can be completed at this interview. of ai individual and not that of Onea Naval activity must be listed as glassware, china, linen, kitchen onsinee Excess valuation charges ware, books and fragile items will be checked against the shipbarrels and boxes at your home. peas v iaionchrges ath Those items plus heavier items (a en cen pe $0 are (such as furniture which will be 'ae oe cenwhile as0insure packed and crated at the Naval gainst dama e o s insurance Supply Depot) will be picked up oliies 'a o be stakenoutato the same day if possible. polcie mar ce en Household goods are given priorg ity for shipment in first available In cases of freight shipment, Government cargo vessels enroute household goods, upon arrival in tote United States, may be combined T ips o Sta es n gort y w ith goods of other personnel goTips or Pckin Dal ing to the same area so as to make Make available all household efup a carload lot. The consolidation fects to be packed. benefits the Government in keeping Please refrain from instructing costs down and benefits the custhe packers. They are efficient and tomer by assuring that n0 stops will carefully follow instructions given be made by the car enroute to by the Household Goods Section. destination. Time involved in shipAdded instructions, though well ment from Gtantanamo Bay natmeant, may inadvertently result in rally depends on shipping aviilpoorer packing. If special instrucable. Household effects receive tions or information are required, priority handling ans every effort contact the Officer -in -Charge, is maci to speed tp shipment. Household Goods Section, extenSufficient advance notice will help sion 8608. the Household Goods Section in Have the owner or representative expediting your shipment. stay in the house all the time packCommercial Storage ai Government ing is in progress. Expense Give the packers nothing strongUnder permanent change of staer than coke to drink. tion orders you are entitled to Check and sign the inventory lis. months Goverment storage or Packers have been instructed to ce ciai storage at Government be courteous and polite. Any instances to the contrary should ipe This iilcnudessaymen be reported immediately to the and ott 1abor handling charges. Officer-in-Charge, Household Good. Storage may be taken at either Section. oiim oi destination or a combinaMethods of Shipment non of both. In the event your You may ship up the 500 pounds goods remain in commercial storage of your authorized weight allowbeyond t aitorized period, the ance by Railway Express at Govcounty will be transferred to your ernment expense when there is name aid yot then become liable immediate need for such articles fo store charges and the necesin carrying out your assigned ducir laboi ot~arges when your ties. It is strongly suggested tha l i tods a (is od. Chief White cuts a piece of water-resistant packing paper in which articles of value are wrapped before being crated. One of the Cuban employees of the Household Goods section cuts a piece of wood to exact sure. Individual crates are made to order for various pieces of ho old articles. Page Six rW THE INDIAN a Saturday, 24 July 1954

PAGE 7

-Y 24 Jl 1954 lS THE INDIAN m Page tevert aVU-oay, u yL VU-10 Prop Blast TEENAGE-ROUND-UP WGBY H-i-Lites En-amel Etch ings by Bill Graves & Staff Orders keep coming at a steady rate. Latest casualty being Buzz Brostrom, alias "Bubbles". Remember the dance he performed leading to that monicker? Want to see some experts at the game of baseball? Take in a Little League game and eyeball the actions of the adults. Also their comments. Casey Stengel and fraternity have nothing on these birds, believe me. Which brings to mind the pleasant fact that John Emerson's team of Tigers are just that. A fine contribution to Little League, John. Since the return of Heywang, Magarity and a few others from last weeks Jamaica trip, it's apparent that it's nice clown there. Magarity more or less advises that a knowledge of pounds and dollars, crown, quid and pence be a part of your baggage if you go. ... The Squadron is glad to see LT Jack Hawkins back. Jack's promotion was presented to him upon his return from a rather lengthy ferry flight. Captain James, our new C.O. of COMUTWING paid us a short visit last Wednesday. He and his staff will be back this week for a (surprise inspection). Chief Berry is passing around the story about the first time be was in Gtmo they were using steam boats as ferry boats across the bay. He isn't giving out how many years ago that has been, must have been around the turn of the century."Handsome" Hobson is the proud father of a little girl, 4 lbs 13 oz. Muriel is doing wonderful. Congratulations to you both. Hohman, E. A., AKl, from Jeanett, Pa., just reported in from Patuxent. "Greetings" to Mrs. Laverne (Chick) Draving, Mrs. Dorothey (Dot) Dailey, and Marvin James & Charles, Mrs. Nora Zaborski, and Bobby, Mildred Cyrus and William, Faith Winkler and Wendy, Mrs. Wayne Blair and Cynthia. Their husbands are running around the Squadron like different men; just can't understand the reason why? The regular VU-10 Bridge club will meet at the Officer's Club plantation room at 1300 on Tuesday July 27. The hostess will be Mrs. Millie Jamieson and Mrs. Betty Herold. Those who can't attend, please contact one of the hostess. Mrs. Val Evans will enter the hospital this week for a major operation. More news about how ,he is getting along later. The big $62.00 question is: what has Slick Loggins (Golf pro) stashed away in Miami? Just can't get him back to the "Rock". Bob White is one of the best hearted guys in the Squadron. Just gives $25.00 for almost any little old thing. Vince Fucci, Joe Strilich, and John Sebastian were issued invitations to return to a certain home in Miami by a little girl's father. Seems they were involved in a big poker game. A small lad appearing on Art Linkletter's radio show gave the following diagnosis of hiccups and their cause: "You eat too fast and the food gets into your stomach and forms bubbles. The bubbles bust -'n hiccups." If at first you don't succeed, try second base! by Judy Yost The Teenage hayride Saturday night was a howling success. With that big ol' moon and the harmonizing of some of our favorite tunes, everyone had a swell time! Lately, we've seen several of our group "poking" up the hoss trail-just hoping that they would make it to the top of the mountainand when you do get up that far, you can relax, for then, it's "down-hill all the way". Quote from some of them, "Just call me saddle-sores!" unquoteNot too many of the kids have ventured out into the hot sun for tie past few days-Guess since there're new comics, crossword puzzle books, etc., you might find them in the shade somewhere catching up on their reading-Still, there are some who get up before breakfast and go golfing, or are still trying to get that Gtmo tan that somehow always peels-or maybe they're somewhere listening to some of those new Glenn Miller records that just came in-they're grrr-eat! Speaking of records-didja know that our host on "Requestfully Yours"just played one record too many-and she finally said "Yes"-Congrats, John Hull, and our best wishes to you. If any of you feel like doing a lot of yelling, how about coming on down to the Little League games-Those kids could use some cheering, and we're just the ones to do it-Come on, kats, lets go! DID YA DIGJean C., Judy B., and Melba. struggling through a game of monopoly. ...Irma "trudging" after her brother. ...Barbara D. trying desperately to find Pat and Ellen R. ...the gang at the bowling alley. Tom B. at N.O.B. Those who are versed in the niceties of old custom and usage always remove their caps when passing through the crew's quarters at meal times. by John Hull After 20 years as the nation's top disk-jockey at independent station WNEW in New York City, Martin Block has moved his "Make Believe Ballroom" to the American Broadcasting Company nationwide network. To his millions of fans throughout the country, Martin now adds the 90 million listeners of the Armed Forces Radio Service all over the world. Locally, the "Make Believe Ballroom" will be heard five times weekly beginning Monday, 26 July, in the 5:30 to 6:00 time slot. Besides spinning the top recordings of today and yesterday, Martin will interview the "greats" of the music business. During the first week of shows, You'll hear from such stars as Richard Hayes, Perry Como, the Four Lads, Paul Whiteman and Sunny Gale. John Lund and Viveca, Lindfors will be starred in the "Theatre Guild" production of R o b e r t Nathan's heart -warming novel, "The Sea Gull Cry", Monday, 26 July at 9:00 P.M. Eleven year old Brandon de Wilde will be featured in the cast. The Nathan novel tells the story of two refugees from war-torn Europe, a young girl and her brother, who seek sanctuary on Cape Cod. There they meet a college professor who is trying to get away from life, while the brother and sister are trying to find their place in it. The boy builds a raft and sets out to sea to rescue his friends in Europe and the professor and the girl find their love for each other in their anxiety over the child. Be sure to watch the daily program schedule in the "Papoose" for your favorite programs and any changes in the schedule presented each day over WGBY, 1450 on your dial. The Naval Station Archery Range Gets a Workout on Week-ends Two sailors better their archery skills during their spare time by bagging a few well-placed bulls-eyes on the Naval Station Range. by John H. Olsen, DT2 We would like to inform our readers about our new commanding officer of the Dental Clinic. CAPT William D. F. Stagner, USN, was born in Toledo, Ohio, joined the U. S. Naval Reserves in 1921 and was commissioned in the Dental Corps in 1931. He attended the University of Toledo and received his Doctor's Degree in Dentistry from the University of Colorado. During the war he served in the USS Quincy and the Hospital Ship, USS Sanctuary. Prior to reporting here for duty, CAPT Stagner was District Dental Officer, Eighth, Naval District. At the annual meeting of the American Dental Association last year at Cleveland, Ohio, CAPT Stagner was awarded a F.I.C.D. Fellow in the International College of Dentists for conspicious services rendered in the Arts and Science of Dentistry. His wife's name is Jo Stagner, who formerly resided in Nebraska. Bill Stagner, the Captain's son, is vacationing here for the summer prior to returning to enter his junior year at Southeastern Louisiana College. Vacating with him is his college roommate, Ronnie Sperier. The Captain's opinion of the base is a favorable one and he states that the GTMO weather is a welcome relief from the heat and humidity of New Orleans, La. We all appreciate having CAPT Stagner and his family here with us. CWO Dote, Captain of the CabMarDen Bowling Team, is to be congratulated for leading his team to victory in the Officers' Summer Bowling League. The CabMarDen five of the National League defeated Hospital Team No. 1 of the American League Wednesday night on the Officers' Club maple lanes 2 to 1 in a best out of five game series for the championship. Kelly Marabella of the CabMarDen five rolled a high game of 212. All games were closely contested with the Hospital Team taking their only game by 3 pins. CDR Overton, District Dental Officer, Tenth Naval District, is reported to play a mighty fine game of golf, but this reporter learned that he dropped a few nickles to some of the Clinic Officers in a Bingo Bango Bungo game. It's adios to Rex Hall, DT3, USN, MCB-8, who is departing Saturday for CLUSA and subsequent life. Good Luck, Rex, it's been swell having you here with is. Jeff Fawcett, DN, USN, has started on the bottom rung of the golf ladder. Your reporter learned that he broke 90 a week ago and now has an eye for the top rung. Grand opera-a place where a guy gets stabbed in the back and instead of bleeding he sings. Husband (in bed with his golf clubs.) "Well, you said I had to choose, didn't you?" The civil service applicant applied for a position in the diplomatic corps. "What makes you think you're qualified?" he was asked. "I've been married 20 years," he answered modestly, "and my wife still thinks I have a sick friend." Employer: "Why did you leave your last job?" Cute Applicant: "Because the boss kept after me too much." 9 9

PAGE 8

Nm Navy-iOND1FPO--0nil .1120 m M THE INDIAN Saturday, 24 July 1954 NAS Crosswinds WHO's WHO AT NAS LT Eugene Ordway: (new) Engineering and Maintenance Officer at Leeward Point. LT Ordway was born and raised in Chicago attended Pulaski Academy. Served in the regular Navy as apprentice seaman up to chief aviation pilot from 1936 to 1943. Was commissioned an ensign in August of '43. His earlier duties included deckhand on the USS Canopus, Ass't Plane Captain on the USS Augusta, plane captain on the USS Texas, plane captain striker with VP-55, and also duty in China from '37 -'39. After receiving his wings he served at the Naval Air Experimentation Station in Philadelphia, an test pilot and liason Officer. In '47 he served on the USS Midway, in '48 was a student officer under instruction at the U. of Pennsylvania. In '49 attended general line school at Newport, R. I. Saw duty with Patrol Squadron 8, stationed at such points as Argentia, Newfoundland. and Iceland. His last duty station was with Aviation Supply Office in Philadelphia. He married Clementine Kozak of Philadelphia in 1944, and has a girl, Keren, and two boys, Eugene and David. It is anticipated they will arrive on the Pvt. Thomas 28 July 1954. NEWS BRIEFS Two new officers reported aboard this week. LT Earnest L. Guirey. reported on 14 July via FLAW and has been assigned duties as engineering and maintenance officer at McCalla. He reported from NATTC, Memphis, Tenn. and has a wife and two children awaiting availability of quarters here in Guantanamo. LT Guirey is coauthor of a new book, "Laughter in Hell" dealing with his experiences as prisoner of war in a Japanese 'bunsho' or prison camp. LT Everrett Pierce (new Photographic Officer) reported aboard last week. LT Pierce has a wife and four children in Arlington, Va. anxiously awainting quarters here. ENS Jerry Earts new B.O.Q. officer is now LTJG Earts as of July 12, 1954. ...Congratulations Jerry. A party was held for LTs Sanders and Bostwick at the NAS BOQ patio Monday night. LT Sanders departed Wednesday to his new duty station in Washington, and LT Bostwick leaves today for new assignment with NABTC in Pensacola. Three enlisted men departed for the States and civilian life this week. The happy trio were, Edward Joyner, AKAN, Paul Kelley AC3, and Russel Gooding A/N. Alton Sparks AM3, the Texas cow puncher saw "Wicked Woman" at the local lyceum the other night and after watching Beverly Michaels famous walk, commented "Shucks, our brone riders can walk better than that after they're just been thrown-!" There is a current rumor that "Duck" Clark of Flaw Crew, the famous Mexican hat dancer, is considering entering college when he's discharged in November. Elmer Nichols, a civilian supervisor at the Transit Shed of the Naval Supply Depot was the first winner of the Naval Air Station sponsored All-Base Tennis tournament, "A" Division. He accomplished it by defeating A. Vogel, Dick Friz, John Page, Chief Penoso, and then taking two sets of three from LT Whitman. This beautiful little doll not only She's Martha Hyer, one of today's this were only a sound picture! ! Mr. Nichols was the runnerup in the last tennis tournament held at Guantanamo Bay three years ago. He was defeated in the finals by LT Bob Burns. Bobby Bear, AC3, of the Aerology Department of McCalla, was the winner of the novice "B" Division defeating Richard Cipriani in the finals. Bob had previously defeated Jim Thorley, Fred Butowski, and Fred Shimonek before facing Cipriani. A tennis ladder is being planned sometime soon: for further information contact Dick Friz at 8543 or 8520. Raymond Duncan: The best substitute for experience is being 16. -Corydon, Iowa, Times-Republican Torvald Gahlin: He who believes that the past cannot be changed has not yet written his memoirs. -Quoted in Stockholm Dagens Nyheter looks good, she sings just as well. up and coming recording stars. If MOVIES No Movie Schedule Available at Press Time. BO OK* N OOK by Francis L. Cannon, JOSN For Your Information ... AS IT HAPPENED by Clement Atlee The autobiography of Britain's first leader of a majority Labour party. Mr. Atlee gives a picture of contemporary British life, of politics and of Parliament in action. He was educated at Oxford, did social work in London's teeming Limehouse district. He worked for the Socialist labour movement and was thus drawn into politics. A REPORTER IN SEARCH OF GOD by Howard Whitman An ever-curious journa l is t. Howard Whitman went out to find what the real feelings of people were about God. He probed the beleifs of people of every major religion in the U.S. where they found God, and their concept of Him. THE REAL AMERICANS by Hyatt Verrill This book undertakes to convey a better knowledge and understanding of the American Indians; to noint out the debt our culture owes them. There are pictures of typical Indian types of many tribes. For Your Entertainment CELL 2455, DEATH ROW by Caryl Chessman Caryl Chessman wrote this powerful book as he waited to be executed at San Quentin. He analyzed what brought him there, tells of unjust, almost inhuman treatment that some prisoners receive at some penal institutions. Chessman is a direct descendant of John Greenleaf Whittier. He has spent a third of his 33 years in prison. THE UNKNOWN CHEKHOV translated by Avrahm Yarmolinsky A collection of writings by the great Russian storyteller of the last century, translated into English for the first time. There are 20 stories, 5 essays. A TIME TO LIVE AND A TIME TO DIE by Erich Maria Remarque The story of a young German soldier in the last war, who had fought through France, Africa and Russia, became thoroughly sick of war and wanted only the peace of his home city. He obtains leave, finds the place completely changed by war and finds solace in newfound love for a woman. In Passing Spin Fishing, by Hal SharpA new method of catching gamefish. The Third Bullet, by John Dickson Carr-A freed prisoner and a dead judge. Your Washington, by Tristram Coffin-Pictures and stories about the nation's capitol. The Cokesbury Shower Book, by Katherine Fite-Showers for all seasons. 9 9