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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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- qoyers CTMO Like ThIe Sanshine

Vol. VI, No. 54 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 17 July 1954



Little Theatre Closes ComTon Inspects Station Crow Organizations Thank


Successful 5-Day Hit Base Contributors


In Tonite's Performance

The Guantanamo Bay Little Theatre closes its doors tonight on vn extremely successful 5-day run of the broadway hit, "Out of the Frying Pan."
With a cast of 12 headed by Alan Wagner, the comedy played to over 1,000 customers during the first four days. Tonighit's final performance is expected to be seen by about 300 people.
Sharing male lead honors with Mr. Wagner are Dan Nash and Gordon Thompson; and on the leading lady side of the spotlight are Anita Sierra, Ruth Groenveld and Shirley Emerson. These six are ably supported by Ethel Beach, Joyce Mickiewicz, Burt Knight, Jim Boyett, Easton Guillory and Ronnie Estafan.
The comedy concerns the plight of six young thespians trying to attract the attention of a theatrical producer. The fact that they have to share the same apartment leads to embarrassing and hysterical situations.
All turns out well in the end, of course, but the intervening three acts provide an evening of laughable enjoyment for the audience.
The play was directed by Betty Radcliffe and David Hume.


.p





- VRADM G. B. H. Hall, Commandant, 10th Naval District, inspects Naval Station personnel during the annual administrative and personnel inspection of the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base held this week. Admiral Hall returned to San Juan Wednesday but the continuing survey board is still making the administrative inspection.


New Officers Installed Barracks Colors Presented to New Commander


At Fleet Reserve

New officers for the fiscal year 1955 were installed at a ceremony and dance held by the Fleet Reserve Association, Branch 100, and the Ladies Auxiliary, Unit 100, at the Naval Air Station Enlisted Men's Club on Wednesday, June 14th.
New Officers of the Fleet Reserve Branch are:
President-D. E. Waltz
Vice-Pres.-J. M. Tarwater Secretary-P. A. Lazos
Treasurer-V. M. Roberts
Corresponding Secretary-W. J. Phillips
Chaplain-R. Rust
Members elected to the Board of Directors: F. A. Mapstone, A. F. Kerslake, R. W. Yale, E. E. Anderson, E. H. Lawrence, W. 1. Hamm and A. Krekman.
New officers of the Ladies' Auxiliary:
President-V. W. Roberts Vice-Pres.-J. W. Dexter
Secretary-S. Hamm Treasurer-B. Collins
Chaplain-V. E. Mapstone
Members elected to the Board of Directors: E. C. Kerslake, V. E. Mapstone V. Lawrence, M. Lisnick and D. Waltz.


Colonel John B. Hill, former commanding officer of the Marine Barracks, hands the Barracks colors to Captain W. E. Kerrigan who in turn presented them to the new commanding officer, Colonel R. E. Fojt. The change of command took place at Marine Site last week.


For Carnival Donations

As reported in The Indian a few weeks ago allocations of funds received from the annual Guantanamo Bay carnival has been completed and toie command has received several letters of thanks and appreciaion from various organizetions.
In reply to the donation of $1.250.00 to the 1954 Heart Fund General Mark Clark wrote, in part, "I am proud of the ever-increasing support for the Heart Fund by the Armed Forces and am particularly grateful to the men and women overseas for their help in combating heart disease."
Mr. Basil O'Connor, president of the National Foundation for Inf antile Paralysis wrote, "The heartwarming response to our fund raising appeal by the Armed Forces, and the civilians working with them, is most gratifying. . . . Please convey my personal thanks to all of them."
Mr. Elmer H. Bobst, Chairman of the American Cancer Society's National Campaign Committee, said, "We deeply appreciate your support of the work being done by the American Cancer Society. Your contribution will help immeasurably in the continuation and expansion of this important life saving
prgam."
Mr. Henry W. Stevens, Business Manager of the National Tuberculosis Association, wrote, "Please be assured that these hundreds of contributions represented by this check will be spent in the fight to control Tuberculosis in the same sense of trust placed in us by some 14,000.000 contributors to our work."
These were only a few of the many letters received by RADM E. B. Taylor, ComNavBase, in acknowledgement of the donations sent out by this command. Letters came from The Salvation Army, both in Cuba and the national headquarters in New York, from the Archbishop of Santiago de Cuba, from the Episcopal Church of All Saints in Guantanamo.
A total of $17,250.00 was sent out as donations for charitable organizations. Included in the list, but not mentioned above, are the Navy Relief Society, the American National Red Cross and various Cuban charities.



The Old Timers

vs
The Indigos
(See Sport Page for details)






et
Page Two


em


e
Saturday, 17 July 1954


THE INDIAN


Deadline Nearing for INDIAN Photo Contest


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Station
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615
Saturday, 17 July 1954
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sandness--.--- Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis. JOC-------------------Editor
H. L. Sisson, JO3--------------------News
Jerry Lewis, J3-------- --------Features
Pierce Lehmbecl{------------------- Sports
F. L. Cannon, JOSN - Photographer
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


An Editorial....

House - Apes

by Jack Engstrom
Children, sometimes dubbed as House-Apes, Crumb-Crushers, Curtain-Climbers, Brats, etc., are the prime cause of parents getting old before their time and also a helper in bringing out those grey hairs.
The Naval Base and the various commands attached to the base devote a great deal of time to safety at work, at home and at play. The traffic laws set up for the base are adequate along with the Base Police Force, whose job it is to see that these laws are carried out.
All the safety rules and protective forces in the world aren't of any use to the public unless there is wholehearted cooperation.
This brings to mind one point that concerns the base directly. No one likes to run over a child or hear of neighbor's child that has been struck by a car. It is well known that there are many small children on the Naval Base and when driving in the housing areas, special, caution should be taken. Most drivers are well aware of the fact, but children that play in the roads and children that taunt the drivers by seeing how long they can wait and then run across the street in front of an oncoming car need to be taken in hand by the parents. These small tricks, like pushing a stick under the wheels of a moving car, and seeing if they can touch a passing car, are shortcuts to trouble. A driver couldn't be blamed directly for an accident which might occur because of these tricks, but it would hang heavy on him or her and on the parents on the child.
So parents, if you will take a few minutes time and stop and explain the dangers to children you might see playing in the streets and impress the situation on your own family it could save a lot of misery for everyone. Everyone loves kids so lets keep them alive.


Only two weeks left to get in on the Indian's photo contest!
To date, only three entries have been received in the Indian office
-one a pin-up, another a harbor scene, and the third had to be disqualified because it did not meet the minimum size requirement of
4 x 4 inches.
So, your chances of winning a merchandise certificate are good. But the first contest closes midnight, July 31st!
The contest is open to:
(1) Naval personnel stationed on board the Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay and the dependents of these personnel.
(2) U.S. civilians employed at the base and their dependents. (Personnel of the 4th Division, Naval Station, are not eligible to participate in the contest.)
First prize in each of the three contests will be a $20 merchandise certificate good at the Navy Exchange; second prize will be a $10 certificate; and third prize will be a $5 certificate.
As mentioned before the first contest closes on July 31st; the second commences on August 1st and runs through September 30th; and the third commences on October 1st and ends November 30th. Deadline for entries is midnight of the closing dates.
All entries submitted must be no smaller than 4 x 5 inches and no larger than 8 x 10 inches; either glossy or matte paper will qualify, but the photos must not be mounted.
Negatives are not required, but all photos submitted become the property of the Indian. Winning entries will be printed in the Indian.
Color'photographs are not acceptable.
On the back of each entry the following identification is required; Name, rate or rank, service number, department or division attached to and the command.
The number of entries per person is unlimited. You can submit as many as you wish.
The entries will be judged by a panel of judges from the Indian staff and/or the Indian advisory committee, and winners will be announced the week following the deadline.
So, this is your chance to make that camera pay off. Send or bring your photos to the Indian office in the Fleet Recreation area or send them to Box 19.



Training is Rugged at Leeward Point,,.


by C. A. Wright, Jr.
Lights are out by 2000 in Quonset A-2 where tired officers of VF-101 recoup themselves for another long day. The G-suits hanging on the line outside betray their profession, and the regular breathing within is good evidence that the work they do is not the small boy's dream of aviation. It is a job-taxing both mentally and physically the picked men who fly the Navy's aircraft.
And yet you don't see here the hot-rod, devil-may-care "jet jockeys" that present such a warped picture of the aviator to the public eye. Sit in on an All Pilots Meeting some time. Does the big sleepy-eyed pilot slouched in the corner chair look more or less like your "jet jockey" than the big redfaced veteran with the squinting eyes ? What about the boy over there scratching his head, who doesn't look old enough to support his new moustache? Or the older men with their lines of experience and knowing nods? Some are single, some married, some have their girls at home. Some like their Ron Anejos in the evening and a few their lemonades. The bellingerant and the mild, the athlete and the esthete, the bright and the solemn are all here, but they are all here for the same reason
-whether they love it or just do it-to fly.
Down the line similar Quonsets with similar iron bunks provide a few hours rest for the "Grim Reaper" crew. Long hours of flying time inevitably mean longer hours for those who must keep the Banshee screaming across this lost spit of nothing, keep it performing, keep it fueled, and keep in full of the deadly material that is its reason for being in the air. Who are these men ?
Have you watched the young mech in the red hat straining on a stubborn bolt with sweat trickling down his broad back, well browned in the tropical sun? Have you seen


the third-class with the brand-new crow learning to think in his new responsibility? Have you had the pleasure of being assisted by an able and experienced first-class? Or have you watched the chief handling his men with the easy confidence born of knowing their thoughts because he came from their numbers himself ? Then never make the mistake of type-casting the sailor in any mold.
Not much of the civilization of NAS Guantanamo blows down to Leeward Point to ruffle the whiskers on unshaven faces. Uniforms that would draw a second glance from the inspecting officer attract less attention here. The military organization grinds on unimpaired by the sacrifice of some formality. Perhaps it is the common loneliness of this place of hard work that fosters such a jovial casualness in tired faces of an evening. Perhaps it is the total lack of woman's touch or glance on this barren point that allows such luxuriant bachelor freedom. More likely it is our reason for being here that explains our ways. We are here to work and for no other reason. Here all else is sacrificed
-sleep, civilization, family time, and personal cares-to hours. Flying hours. Hours of time in the air firing at the black crosses on white banners with the same tiresome but tireless technique mean proficiency in weapons, and with luck a few of the coveted individual "E"s. And the scores that win the E"s mean that this month of grueling effort on the part of so many has produced a few more pilots well qualified to defend their country when they return. This is the way of life of Leeward Point, Cuba.
Flight after flight taxis out from the line and roars up the runway, passing the hangar airborne in a bank that carries it high out to sea to the firing area. Each pilot checks his settings and reviews the
(Continued on Page Eight)


Sunday, 18 July 1954

Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930 --2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic)


The Chaplain's Corner




When sucess is viewed through the eyes of the world, it means something quite different than when viewed through the eyes of Christ. Many whom the world praises as very successful have really gone woefully backward if judged according to the norm of Christ's principles. Of Himself it is said, that He was the stone which the builders rejected, but which became the cornerstone of the edifice.
Unless we look through Christ's eyes we also get a false idea of equality. Christ did not see human nature in any other light than its true light, the light of individual need and ability. Socialism inclines to overlook the individual's weakness or ability, and strives to make everyone equal in every fact. The advocates of this theory insist on its power of uniformity; but they fail to realize that this very uniformity turns out to be a boomerang. A moderate amount of uniformity suits man's nature very well; but too much of it sooner or later causes him inquietude and in the end inevitably arouses his revolutionary spirit.
Modern thought seeks to tear life away from religion, saying that religion holds men back. Modern science, in fact, mocks religion. It treats it as if there were no success at all to be expected from its guidance. But are we to hope for progress from cynics, whose desire is to tear down ?
Christians themselves are often infected with false ideas of success. Let them change their opinion about this matter and humbly take Christ's word for it that it is really better to have less of this world's goods with spiritual contentment than more with guilt and misery.
And let us not forget that with all our trying, we can not hope to succeed of ourselves; God must give us the grace, and we must beg this grace of Him by much prayer.
W. J. Spinney
LCDR, CHC, USN






1 u 1
Saturday, 17 July 1954


a4


THE INDIAN


Fleet Recreation Area Hub Of Special Services Activities


by Jerry Lewis
Aside from the various activities that come under the heading of Naval Station Special Services and which extend to the far reaches of the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, is a concentrated area that makes up the main battery of facilities located in the heart of Recreation Center.
The area centers around the 4th Division Special Services Office and offers a vast variety of individual sporting activities that cover almost all sports save for those of colder climates. (-and the 4th has been giving that some serious thought too!)
Contained within the area extending from Sherman Avenue to the outer boundaries of the golf course are the following activities intended for your spare-time recreation:
Three baseball diamonds, regulation size and excellently conditioned. Diamond number one, the only hard-ball diamond equipped with a battery of night-lights, is the scene of many Base League clashes throughout the year and also affords tremendous seating capacity for such events as the annual AllStar game and final play-offs which drawv large crowds.
There are eight softball diamonds, three night-lighted, available to all ship's teams who make reservations with the main office within one week of gamnenme.
Four modern basketball courts offer ample space for local and inter-service competition between ship's teams. The two night-lighted courts are of walk-top surface, the others of concrete surface.
Four tennis courts, two with cork-turf and night-lighted and two with concrete surfaces, the latter


two used during daylight hours. A fully equipped gymnasium with all gymnastic facilities provided for those desiring same is located in the main building. A boxing and wrestling ring, one heavy striking bag, speed bag platforms, lifting weights, speed bags, gloves and ropes, plus other gear available from the Athletic Gear Issue desk can be used.
The Archery Range, located left of the main area, off Magazine Road, offers fine facilities for archery hobbyists or those who wish to learn the age-old art of the bow and arrow.
Located in the recreation building are four bowling alleys available Monday through Friday from 1700 to 2130, and from 1300 to 2130 or weekends and holidays. Nine Pool tables are also available during the same hours and can be checked out at the nominal fee of 20 cents an hour.
Located at the Center near the softball diamonds is the newly constructed cement plastic - covered skating rink. Clamp skates and shoe-skates are available on a rental basis for 30 cents an evening.
Two of the most recent activities added to the long list of Special Service facilities are the baseball batting range located near the swimming pool, equipped with an automatic pitching machine that throws 20 balls for 25 cents and a bicycle rental system by which a niew English style racer can be rented daily from 0900 to 1700 for 25 cents an hour.
These are just a few of the many services offered by the 4th Division Naval Station Special Services and to which you have complete access when aboard the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base.


N
N







a

/


Robert V. Reynolds, SEC "My vife and kids."


Nhh. >r


What D'Ya'


Say?


The INDIAN will award a coti lic .oI for L$1.00 wonth of n'cchandie at the Navy Exchancefor each qustion accepted and used. Submit your quIstions to Editor, The Indian, Box 19.)

The question: What do you miss most from the States?
The place: Bay Hill barracks area.
(This week's question was submitted by Miss Pat Wormwood,
AV-62.)
























James P. DelleMonache, P13, Print
Shop
"Terry D."

, 7th Div.





















John '. Grupe, YN3, 3rd Dii.
Life, liberty and Ithe pursuit of
happiness.


Keith S. Woodward, ll L2, NaviBase Band
"My family; otherwise I enjoy the tropics."


Alton Smich, SN in 4th Division, issues a pair of shoe skates at the Naval Station roller skating rink, one of the latest additions to the recreation area.

Dr. Bobby Brown, brilliant third baseman of the New York Yankees, got his medical degree and served his internship while still a member of the team. He was asked by umpire Red Jones what branch of medicine he intended to specialize in. Always a ballplayer at heart, Dr. Bobby immediately replied: "Vivisection of umpires."
-Arthur Daley in New York Times


James F. Asbell, Al lSN, Narliase Band
"Excitement of people and things to do, which are only slightly lacking on the base, but which are not Gene Connick, SN 3rd Div. nearly the same. Mostly I miss my
"American girls.' girl."


mse


e Page Three







Page Four


e
Saturday, 17 July 1954


THE iNDIAN


The Angle(R)
by Jerry Lewis
Several weeks ago, the topic for one Angler column was the muchfeared yet little known habits of the shark. This week, I'd like to go into a little more detail concerning ceItain characteristics of this reputed 'killer' because of the proximity of thi beast to the surrounding area of Guantanamo Bay.
Aside from the various identifying factors of the shark previously discussed in this column, the shark is endo-wed with the keenest sense


of smell found in any fish. It is estimated that if the thin leaflike olfactory organs of the shark were unfolded and spread out they would cover an area of half-anacre. This wonderful smelling organ is the principal reason why a cut and bleeding diver should leave the water with much haste.
Another great aid in finding prey is found in another sense, much mis-interpreted by old wive's tales about the shark being deaf and blind. His sense of hearing vibrations is quite keen.
It has been proven time and time again that the slightest abnormal vibration in the water, so far as two miles away, will attract the shark and bring him speeding to the scene. The excited flapping of a speared fish sets up vibrations that travel at a great speed under water and give the shark a route to follow. He usually shows up at the scene of the spearing on the run after travelling at top speed through miles of water. His pilot fish generally are lost in the race but find their master later as he stalks the prey he has cone for.
The vibration theory has been credited to the microscopic hairs on sharks that are believed to act in the same manner as radar, enabling the great beast to "tune in" tie fin beats of other fish. This is probably one of the reasons for the shark's retreat when yelled at underwater whereas other fish do not respond.
When the keen senses of the shark enable him to find his prey, he becomes a victim of his own insane emotions and proceeds to rip and tear with his powerful teeth and jaws. His teeth are sharp enough to shave with and form several rows that line upper and lower jaws of fish.
He uses his jaws in a snapping motion, much like the 'gator but in a split second. Nothing short of steel can resist the cutting power of those jaws. Many true accounts of a maddened shark tearing into a boat are told by men who didn't believe their eyes when they watched 3-inch planking torn loose like so much paper.
Perhaps a classic example of this power is the case of a schooner that lost its rudder post. A harpooned 1500 pound tiger shark was being pulled close to the ship. Suddenly it rushed the ship and seizing the solid oak rudder post it chewed its way through this five and a half inch beam in a few seconds thus disabling the ship.
Stories about this predatory beast whose ancestors stem as far back as the rock ages when the vorld was still changing form are


Puttin' Around The Little League Knocks Out Homeruns, Tao


by Wright North
Professional in Charge GTMO Bay Golf Club
In a pouring rain last Sunday at Montego Bay, LT Grego won the Northern Championship with a 36-hole score of 152. . . . 74 and 78. Chief Lee Rodgers of NAS was tied for second with 153-76-77after incurring a 2-stroke penalty when his putt hit a competitor's ball on the green. (Ref. rule 35, 3B) LT Ruffini, with 157, was in 5th place.
Plans are beginning to materialize for the Mid-Island Championship of 72 holes on the 14th and 15th of August at the fine Manchester Club. All interested persons are urged to see LT Grego in order that entries may be made in advance since as an English custom they will not accent a nost-entry.
All golfers at the local course are kindly requested to use the temporary tees during the reconstruction of the regular playing tees.
Also, some golfers are being very careless on the greens, particularly near the cups and some even go so far as to step into the cups which is the most delicate part of the entire course.
Then, too, along with other sporting games, there are certain rules and regulations that govern both mateb and medal play. It is the individual's responsibility that no matter how good or bad they play, try to learn some of the more important ones.
I'll always remember a conversation I once heard at the Atlantic City C. C. A big, robust fellow of some 250 pounds had eventually hacked his way around the 18-holo course and was in the process of downing a quart of lemonade. Sone of his friends asked him about his game and how he had scored.
"Gentlemen, I'm only a beginner at this fine game of golf, and no matter how long I may be able to play, I want to always feel that I played according to the rules. Now, some of you played through my match today and have been sitting here for possibly and hour. However, if you had played by the rules and counted all of your strokes. some of you would still be out there on the golf course. In addition to that, there is something else I like about my 127 I shot today over your 78's and 80's. As I stand here listening to your conversation of incorrect handicaps and growls over losing a couple of dollars, first of all, I didn't play for a dime today and the lemonade I hold here in my hand is the only thing involved which, incidentally, I lost with 127. But you know, one thing, no matter how bad I play or try to learn, I want to always think that I've played the game according to the rules and regardloss of the score I always want to feel that I've enjoyed myself and had a good time. Bartender, give me another lemonade."

Raymond Duncan: A lot of parents pack up their troubles and send them off to a summer camp.

Changing Times, The Kiplinger Magazine: Things might be worse, Suppose your errors were tabulated and published every day like those of a ballplayer.
told by fishermen all over the world. He's a tough customer and it pays to learn as much about his living habits as possible from other experienced men before going down to tangle with hin.
Remember! You are the trespasser! Respect his home.


HAPPY TIGERS . . . . Home runs are not the exclusive property of the big leagues as proved by a flock of smiling Tigers of the Little League as they congratulate Taft Albright (14) after he put one away. The iound-ripper occured in last Sunday's game as the Tigers beat the first place Bears.


Dale Shelly of the Tigers hits the dirt at home plate in the TigerBear game last Sunday at Villamar. Gene Crouch is the plate umpire.


Little League Standings


Ladies' Golf Shots

by Miriam Hoy
Last Wednesday we had an ideal morning to play golf. The sun wasn't too bright and there was a
1 beautiful, cool breeze.
We played a Blind Five Tournament on the back nine, with tiemhers drawing holes 10-12-14-16-18 to total the individual scores. The lucky winners of golf balls were:
1st Flight
1st place-Corky Henning
tie Edna Edwards 2nd placetie Amla McCracken
Betsy Manning
2nd Flight
1st place-Sue Scott
2nd place-Fran Dykeman
3rd Flight
1st place-Betty Lou Tipler
2nd place-Nita Roberts
We are very sorry to hear that Lou Tockzko is having additional trouble with her foot. We miss you, Lou, and hope you'll be out playing again very soon.
Next Wednesday we will play 1- oie


c e lout nine for the least number BEARS 12 4 - of putts. Rope to see everyone then.
Tigers 10 4 1
Colts 5 11 7
Hawks 3 11 8

Little League Schedule Saturday, 17 July
Marines vs Air Station
Saturday, 17 uJly Sunday, 18 July
Colts vs Tigers Naval Station vs MCB-8
Sunday, 18 July Monday, 19 July
Hawks vs Bears VU-10 vs Marines
Tuesday, 20 July
Tuesday, 20 July M1CB-8 vs Air Station
Hawks vs Colts Wednesday, 21 July
Thursday, 22 July OPEN
Tigers vs Bears Thursday, 22 July
~__---- - --.Mat ines vs Naval Station
TOP FIVE PITCHERS Friday, 23 July
(As of Thursday 15 July) OPEN


W L PCT
Smith Marines 11 1 .916
Bigbie MCB-8 8 3 .727
Harrison NAS 5 2 714
Shackleton MCB-8 6 3 .500
HOMERUN LEADERS
(As of Thursday, 15 July) Felak Marines 11
Dotson MCB 9
Pace Marines 8
Androvich Marines 7
Mason Marines 6


Fe Pa Mo
Do Ad


TOP FIVE BATES
(As of Wednesday, 14 July)
AB H
lak Marines 100 42
cc Marines 99 40
rgan NavSta 115 44
tson MCB-8 114 43 .
ams Marines 112 39


AB 420 404 382 369
357


Woodrow Wilson: One of the proofs of the divinity of our gospel is the preaching it has survived.


90


b.>


-_







Saturday, 17 July 1954


THE INDIAN


Bee's Four Straight Assures



Second Place League Finish

by Pierce Lehmbeck
It was a stormy week for the pennant winners of the 1954 season as they suffered two setbacks in a row while narrowly ekeing out a 3-1 win over the cellar-dwelling NAS Flyers in their third appearance. Meanwhile, the red-hot Bees of MCB-8 showed up with some fine pitching including a one-hit stint by Jim Dotson followed by a two-hitter by Shackleton to move a full three games above the third-seated VU-10 Mallards while the Naval Station won two to leave the Flyers with no chance of pulling out of the cellar.


BRAVES, FLYERS WIN
OVER WEEK-END
The Naval Station Indians trotted to within four games of the faltering third-seated VU-10 Mallard, over the week-end as they drubbed the title-holding Marines 12-7 while the Naval Air Station shelled the Mallards, 17-7.
In the Indian win over the Leathernecks, it was the spark of changeover short-stop Mandy Mandis that made the difference once again as he led them at the plate rapping out a single and a grand-slammer in three trips to the plate accounting for four RBI's. On top of this he was the winning pitcher as he went the first eight frames holding the Leatherneck guns to ten safeties. Two of them were roundtrippers by Felak and Pace. Felak's, his tenth of the year, placed him on top in the race for honors once again, as he moved out of a tie with the.'Bees Jim Dotson.
Mandis was credited with the win, his fourth against five setbacks while Goens took the loss for the Marines.
NaySta 12 7 3
Marines 19 10 1
Sunday afternoon, the cellardwelling NAS Flyers popped up long enough to shell five Mallard hurlers for 17 runs on but eight hits as they easily won the stint, 17-7. The Mallard five had trouble all afternoon as they dealt out 17 free passes.
The 'fly-boys' chased their 17 run total around the paths in sprees as they came up with four in the bottom of the first, two in the second, one in the fourth, four in the fifth, five in the seventh and a final one in the eighth. The Mallards notched three in the second, three in the fifth and one in the eighth.
Harrison was credited with the win, his fifth against only one setback while Huber was chalked with his third loss against four wins.
NAS 17 8 1
VU-10 7 6 1

DOTSON, 'BEES SHUT-OUT 'TITLE-HOLDERS' IN ONE HIT
STINT
The newly second-seated 'Bees of MCB-8 handed the 'title-holding' Marine Leathernecks their second successive set-back and their first shut-out Monday night as big Jim Dotson came to within four batters of local baseball immortality as he hurled the first one-hitter of the aging '54 season.
With two outs in the eighth inning, manager and opposing hurler Chuck Smith bounced a dribbler back through the middle for the only safety of the game off the 'Bee regular initial sacker. Dotson went the full nine to strike out every Leatherneck in the line-up to rack up a total of 15 for the tilt. His control was near-perfect as he walked but two batters.
At the plate, the 'Bees were paced by Don Stoeckle, regular outfielder who came in to carry the load at first, as he doubled and homered


"Rebel" Jim Dotson

in three trips. MCB-8 scored their three run total by notching two in the second and one in the fourth.
Dotson was credited with the win, his second against one setback while Shreck, in his first apnearance was charged with the loss. Smith relieved in the second with two out.
MCB-8 3 6 2
Marines 0 1 4
BRAVES OVER FLYERS
Tuesday night the Naval Station Indians continued their climb towards third place as they cruised behind the two-hit hurling of Mandy Mandis to a 10-4 win over the Flyers of the Naval Air Station.
Desnite a lack of control which pa" e up seven free passes, Mandis pitched perfect baseball throughout as he was touched but twice, both times in the second when Sberlacker homered and Kaestler followed with a single. The little fellow who has been carrying just about all the Brave's work-load since early in the season sent seven men back to the bench via th strike-out route.
The Braves scored their 10 runs on a total of nine safeties with Kennedy leading the way with a bomevun and a triple in four trips. The Flyers scored one in the top of the second and three in the sixth wbn Mandy loaded the bases with walks and the Indian infield committed two miscues.
The win was number four aeainst five losses for Mandis while Woren took the loss for NAS. This game left the Braves three and a hali gaines back of the third seated Mallards of VU-10.
NavSat 10 9 2
NAS 4 2 4

BEES EDGE MALLARDS
Wednesday night the 'Bees of MCB-8 put the clincher on the second seat as they defeated the VU-10 Mallards 3-1 behind the three-hit hurling of Shackleton.
Shackleton pitched near flawless baseball for the first five innings


Leatherneck backstop Tom Felak trots across the plate into the extended arms of team mates after he hit his tenth round-tripper of the season last Saturday afternoon in the NavSta clash. This blow once again placed him in the lead spot for honors in the department.


Old Timers Limber Up for Game


With Indians Next Friday Night

Baseball's "Old-timers" are once again chomping at the bit (bat?) and limbering up creaky joints to prove once and for all that they can play better ball than the "youngsters" of today.


with the Mallards finally working around a lone run in the bottom of the sixth. The Bees scored their three runs by putting together a total of nine safeties off Mallard server Breske to come up with one in the first, one in the third and one in the sixth.
The win was number six for Shackleton against three setbacks. For Huber, it was loss number four aesinst four wins.
MCB-8 3 9 1
VU-10 1 3 2
MARINE OVER FLYERS
In closing out the week of night play, the pennant winning Marine Leathernecks shook off a two game losing streak by ekeing out a 3-1 win over the cellar-dwelling NAS Flyers.
It was a pitcher's duel all the way as the Leathernecks started and finished with manager Chuck Smith and the Flyers did the same with staff ace Harrison. The Marines scored their three runs with Androvich and Felak providing the needed punch to shove around one in the fourth, fifth and sixth frans. Androvich was credited with two RBI's while Felak came up with other in the form of his eleventh round-tripper. This blow, which came in the top of the fifth, placed him two up on the pack for honors in the that department.
Smith took the win, his eleventh against one loss while Harrison suffered his second set-back against five wins.
Marines 3 7 2
NAS 1 5 5


Ma MC VU NA
Na


League Standings
(As of Thursday, 15 July)
W L
rinos 24 4
B-8 16 12
-10 13 15
S 7 21
vSa 10 18


GB
8
11 17
14


The last time they tried it, just a few weeks ago, thay almost made it, too. In the top of the fifth inning they had the Naval Station Indians on the short end of a 3 to 1 score. The Indians were at bat with the bases loaded and only one out. Then, fortunately for somebody, came the rains!
The Indians, eager to prove that the old-timers' three runs were all a mistake, have challenged them to a decisive play-off, and the game is scheduled for next Friday, the 23rd, under the lights of diamond number one in the Fleet Recreation area.
John F. X. O'Connor, chief umpire of the Base League and the shrewd instigator of the rheumatism-brigade classic, has propped up much the same line-up as last time. Earl Sandness will play first base, Doe Sims will be at 2nd, Gene Crouch at short and Boo Ferris will weigh down the third sack. Hopefully roaming the outfield will be Phil Dunmire, Indian manager, in left, Robby Robinson in center and Tommy Douglas in rip'lt. Starting battery (if charged) will 1e either "Big Al" Rothenberg of NAS or Chuck Smith of the Marines on the mound with mentor O'Connor behind the plate.
O'Connor has optimistically selected only two reserves to fill in wherever enthusiasm gives way to age, Jim Coughlin and Andy Gradus.
Jerry Morgan will manage the Braves for the game, and the latest word from the dugout is that Morgan may epitomize the Indians' tongue-in-check attitude by taking over the mound duties himself. And Morgan a confirmed shortstop!
Whatever the outcome, the fans are in for a night of good baseball when the wisdom of the aged is pitted against the power of youth. But then, everybody knows what the outcome will be-or do they?


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Page Six


THE INDIAN


Confessions of a Boot TEENAGE- ROUND-UP Meetings . . .
T ime & Pisce


As confessed by Elliot Gallant to Dick Friz I stood before the mirror in the Men's room, and gave myself a final appraisal . . . baggy pants, a crew cut that had narrowly missed being as have, and khaki spats. I looked like a 'wetback', that had just been caught sneaking over the Mexican border. I wanted to hide in one of the stalls until it was all over, but I didn't have change.
Besides, my parents were coming, . . . it had been two whole months since that fatal day when I brought in the papers, and announced, "Sion here Pop, I'm joining the Navy!" It would have produced the exact effect had I revealed that I made a prospective mother out of the neighbor girl. Mom's last letter had been encouraging, however. They had watched "Victory at Sea" on TV last week, and when a gold braided Admiral inspected rigid lines of gleaming white sailors, to the tune of "Anchors Aweigh," Pop had poked his nose out of the racing results of the Brooklyn Eagle, long enough to give a grunt of approval.
I walked into the vast reception room . . . they weren't in sight, so I lit a Lucky, hung it out of the corner of my mouth like I'd seen a salty first class do it, and watched drammer-er drama unfold.
A peach-fuzzed "Boot" was in one corner, creasing wings in his white hat . . . a masculine looking Wave was telling her folks that 'Bainbridge was such a trilling place!' my bunk mate Al Rizzo's entire clan had arrived and were showering him with wet kisses and pizza and pepperoni. . . . A guy in a leather Jacket and motorcycle cap said to his Wave friend, "Gee Flo, when's your first leave? The draft board's hot on my trail." A plump matron, with newly rinsed carrot colored hair was pulling a 'Bernhardt' crying out (so everyone could hear) "What have they done to my Jamie?"
Then the doors swung open . . . I spotted a familiar polo coat, and there was the Master, dragging Mom, five-year old Sis, and Roberta, the light of my life, behind him. I want-to enfold Roberta to my bosum, when she said, "My, you're looking just fine Elliot, so-" Pop interceded with a "My boy, you're looking lousy . . . what did they use on your head, pinking shears?" "Now, Alex, you promised," Mom said . . . "besides he looks fine." She encircled me with her arms, and I blushed. "Aw Mom," I said, "don't go ape-" The boom.of the loud speaker saved an awkward moment . . . NOW HEAR THIS: DUE TO A HEAVY BLIZZARD IN THE NEW ENGLAND AREA, MOTORISTS ARE ADVISE TO LEAVE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.
There was just time enough for Mom to say, "Why Elliot two stripes-a s erg meant already ?" Roberta grabbed my hand and whispered, "Write every day." Pop gave me the grip and slipped me a twenty dollar bill . . . "Now don't spend this on those Baltimore women." Sis said, "I've gotta go to the bathroom." They loaded me with Salomi and honey cake and were gone.
I surveyed the now vacant arena
-it looked like Ebbets Field after the Bumbs took the pennant last fall . . . a hand touched my shoultier and my pal Arch said, "Come on kid, lets go back to the barracks


by Judy Yost
Last weekend was begun with Sherry P. giving a surprise birth(lay dinner for Edgar H. After dinner, the gang went to the movies, and then back to Sherry's. Everyone had a wonderful time playing "bunco" and oodles of other games. Congrats, Ed!
Friday night was quite an event! Almost every teen-ager on the base went up to the Villamar dance. Everyone had a real cool time, especially when they started in on the "Bunny Hop". By the way, the "Bunny Hop" champs are Roxey, Jimmy D., and Pat W. Nice going, kats.
Saturday nite, after the movies, a lot of the kids went over to Dolores R.'s house. Eveah-body had a swell time of it.
We want to extend a big welcome to Pat Fojt. Pat came to "glorious" Gtmo from Newport, R. I., and is fourteen years of age. We also want to welcome Pat and Evelyn Ralston, who lived in Vallejo, California, before coming here. Evelyn is fourteen and Pat is eighteen. Then, a great big "Hi" to Geraldine Bailey, from Norfolk, Va. Glad to have ya, kids!
DID YA DIGThe gang of boys at the Snack Shack last week-Barbara B. and Anita putting in a plug for "Out of the Frying Pan"-Dolores and Sharon drooping at the bus stop (wonder why?)-Ed's scooterPat Mc.'s new permanent-Noriman and George's summer hobbiesDexter's "luck"-Tom Burnes and "Crazy Legs"-Pat's bathing suit(RRRRRRRuff !)-Ronny's pipeJean's new dance sten (Brother, the dance-floors's hard!).
Hey gang! I hear Pat McGowan's planning to go back to the "states" this summer for a vacation. Sure hope you have a wonderful time, Pat! (Envy envy!).
That's all for now.

and eat your chow."
Later that evening, as I scraped the last crumbs and salomi skins together, the squawk box followed: NOW HEAR THIS: THIS IS TAPS-TAPS-TAPS. ALL LIGHTS WILL BF EXTINGUISHED AND SILENCE WILL BE RETAINED ABOUT THE DECK . . . THE LITTLE PICNIC IS OVER . . . REVILLE GOES DOWN ONE HOUR EARLIER TOMORROW, SO YOUSE MEN CAN POLICE UP THAT MESS YOU MADE
"Hey Riz," did you hear what he called us MEN," I exclaimed (carressing the word) "Ya, go to sleep," he yawned, "It's only a finger of speech."


OPERATION BLONDE


Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd & 4th Tuesday each month. Community Auditorium Ladies' Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association 2000 : 2nd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Room, Community Auditorium Little Theatre Group 2000; 2nd Tuesday each month Marina Point
Hospital Service Volunteers 1000; 2nd Tuesday each month Hospital Medical Library
American Legion Auxiliary, Unit One
202 3cd Tuesday each month Girl Scoot
Hut, Marina Point Toastmsasters Club 92 190 ant Thtt rsdty, Oivers Club dining room.
American Legion, Guantanamo Bay Post I 2030 ; 3rd Tuesday each month u Community Auditorium, Marina Point Parent-Teachers Association 19201; tst Tuesday of each month Naval Base School
Felloweraft Club No. 1078 2000 each Thursday, Practice, Business Meeting, 1st Thursday -- Community
Hall
National Supervisors Association 1900; Ist Monday each month, Civilian Training Conference Room. Toastmasters Club No. 113 1900 each Thursday in the Flamingo Room, Fleet Recreation Center. New
members welcome.


John Elwood, BMC, and Bob Pace, TDAN, display part of a Fourth of July catch, which they battled off Phillips Park. The trophy, a 67 pound grouper, was the biggest haul in the undersea persuit for the day. On the succerding day, they pulled in a 57 pound grouper.


Olin Miller: Men never learn anything about women, but they have a lot of fun trying.

General George Kenney: Air power is like poker. A second-best hand is like none at all-it will cost you dough and win you nothing.


Fishing Tournament

LAND DIVISION
Barracuda
lath. C. W . I___ - _ 18 11). Mackert, A . ------------It Its., 10 ozs.
Adams, Mary - - lbs., 8 o's.
Jacks
MacAnanny, Raymond E. 19 lbs., 8 ozs.
Romand, Sam ---------- 14 lbs., S oz s.
Nixon, W. . - --------- 12 Ils., 8 ozs.
Snapper
Kelley, C. L. ------------ 39 lbs.
Heinandee, J. 12 Ihs.
Hays, Rohert, M.-1 lh., 7 ora.
Hanlin, John ----------9V2 ozs.
Williams, Mike 7 ozs.
Jamieson, Raymond 0 os.
Baiter, F. RN. ----- 51/2 sa
Hise, W. R - 51 oz.
Jamieson, Raymond 5 ozs.
Soballe, Peter _ 1 oz.
Mackerel (King)
Howerton, R. D. - ------- 5 lbI., 10 ozs.
Mackerel (Spanish)
Dean, w . v. - ____- ..--- 7 lbs.


Tarpon
Iedward, a. a. -------- 17
Henry, R. L. ----------- 12
Snook
tunds, George -------- 10 Horner, T. A. ---------- 3
Grouper
H ise, N . I. -- _______- __Shaw , Jimm ____--_----


lbs. lbs.,
lbs., lbs.


4
4


ozs. ozs.


9 ozs. S ('s.


BOAT DIVISION
Barracuda
Carroll, J. C. 21 lbs.
Daevnport, si- lbs., 8 ors.
Hawes, D. D. - - lbs., 8 ozs.
Snapper
Roberts, V. A. - 50 lbs.
Carroll, J. C-- - -- - -3 Is., 5 nra. Ward, G. F. 8 zn.
Tarpon
Davis , N . Q. ha .- _______ 20 Ibs., 4 ozs.
Swanson, G. A . 13 lbs., 8 ozs.
Snook
Emverzo, Eifani, ,n_.. 15 lbs., 2 ozs. Carringtn, laurie 12 lbs, I ozs.
SPECIAL DIVISION
Bonefish
Wenslalt, D. C -----------2 lbs., 10 ozs.
Wind, Marion A . ---------lbs., 8 ozs.
Emverzo, Epifanio' - lbs., 2' oz,,s.
Croakers
Sanborn, Jim 5 ozs.
Dalton, Kathryn _______ 2 ors.
Ladyfish
osmouse, J. H. --------- 4 lbs., 8 nra.
Pornpans
Bedward, Kenneth 20 lbs.
Giory, G. K. ----------- 16 lbs., 4 ozs.
tomano, Sam --------- 8 1hs., 12 o-.
Soballe, Pete ---------- 2 lbs., 2 ozs.
Shark
Hawes, D. D. - ---------- 19 lbs.
Choate, E. J. ----------- 15 lbs.
leredith, Fred ----_-- 41 lbs., I ozs.
Triggerfish
Lee, G. A.- ---------------4 lbs., 0 ors.
SPEARFISHING DIVISION
Grouper
Ellwood, L. D ---------- 50 lbs.
Nichols, E. M -G-----------t lbs.
Jacks
Dean, W. V.------- - 18 lbs., 8 oza.
Andyews, R. M. ------ -II lbs.
Mackerel
Scheibel, K.E ---------- lbs., 11 ozs.
Snappers
Warl, G1.F ------------ 14 ts.,3 ozs.
Niehols, E. M.- ---------24 ilts.
Barracuda
Flath, C. W.- -----------1S'- lbs.
Pace, Iber ----------12 lbs.
Andrews, R. M.--------- 10 lbs.
Tarpon
Watts, H. N.-__-_-_-_--1 lbs., 8 ozs.
Hogfish
Ward, G. F., ------------ 5 lbs., 15 nzs.


Other Fish
Angel
Falr, . 1 ' __Yellowtail Shaw, Diana Mtria ---Carroll, J. T _-------Bream


Moore, Ricky


lbs., 4ua..
7 ozs. S lb., 9 ozs.
1 or.


9


a


e
Saturday 17 Jul1 1954


,x~


Va


Time & Place








Saturday, 17 July 1954 THE INDIAN


Einame EthcL9s

by John 11. Olsen, DT2
Looks like another loss and gain for the Dental Clinic, the loss being LT Ricker and family who departed for the "States" via the Thomas last Saturday. He is slated for duty at the Naval Dental School, National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, M a r y 1 a n d. Though we're a little late, we want to take this opportunity to wish the Rickers good luck at their new station.
We were bolstered in our sorrow over the loss of LT Ricker by the arrival of Mrs. Judith Doss, wife of one of our Dental Officers. She arrived in Guantanamo City last Saturday by commercial plane and was met by a happy Dr. Doss. Welcome aboard, Mrs. Doss, we hope you'll enjoy your stay as much as we enjoy having you.
This welcome wouldn't be complete without including the Dotes. They also reported aboard the 10th. They include Mr. Dote's wife, Phyllis, his two daughters, Joelle, 5, Nancy, 4, and a son Michael, whom I hear plays a good game of golf for a young man of 13. I'll bet he'll make the top of the golf ladder in no time at all.
Guess that's all 'till next time, I have to get ready for inspection.



Hospital Notes

by Charles L. Brewer, YN3
Heirport News
From 7 July to 11 July, the following births were recorded; a daughter, Sandra Jean, born 7 July to SKC and Mrs. Eugene G. Richards; a daughter, Paula Ann, born 7 July to AE1 and Mrs. Joseph L. Hise; a son, Joseph Toliver III, born 8 July to CS1 and Mrs. Joseph T. Johnson; a daughter, Denise Diane, born 9 July to SN and Mrs. James A. Billington, a son, 9 July to PHC and Mrs. Paul R. Potts; a son, Gerald Frederick, born 11 July to AN and Mrs. Gerald Savage.
Departures
On 9 July 1954, LT Norman E. Forsee (MC), USNR, his wife and two children departed via FLAW for Jacksonville, Florida and subsequent separation. CDR Vernon W. H. Campbell (MC), USN and his family departed on the USNS PVT W. H. Thomas (TAP-185) on 10 July 1954. Dr. Campbell will report to the Charleston Naval Shipyard for duty.
P. F. Bannon, BMSN, USN was detached on 14 July and will report to the U.S.S. Lake Champlain (CVA-39) for duty. Also detached on that date was Boyce M. Lawton, Jr., HM2, USN. Lawton, better known in the hospital as "The Professor", will be discharged from the Navy sometime this month and plans on returning to school. So as our local financier leaves, it is our hope that there is always a bull market and that he continues to buy low and sell high.


Exemption ....

(The following is printed in its entirety from the Midland, Texas "Reporter-Telegram.")
"Notice: Will the party or parties that has constantly robbed my mail for the last year, please call for the rest of mail. Please give me your name so I can claim dependents on my income tax. E. G. Foust, Rt.1, Box 191-F"


New U. S. Mail Schedule in Effect

Following is the new mail schedule in effect at the base post office: INCOMING MAIL FROM THE UNITED STATES: MONDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY
0200 1920 1900 1920 2130
MAIL READY FOR DELIVERY TO BASE ACTIVITIES: ---- -----MONDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY
1100 0800 0800 0800 0800
OUTGOING MAIL TO THE UNITED STATES: MAIL CLOSES AT NAVY POST OFFICE: Monday - 1230 Wednesday - 0800, 1800 Friday - 0800 Saturday -1000 MAIL CLOSES AT DROP BOXES: Monday - 0900 Tuesday 2000 Wednesday - 1500 Thursday -2200 Friday - 2200 Saturday 0800


WGBY Hi-Lites
M~~q(OC "Uos


by Cpl. Guy Stephens, U.S. Marine Corps Arrivals
There was but one arrival this weeks Mrs. Robert L. Inman, wife of MSgt. R. L. Inman. Before coming to Guantanamo Mrs. Inman was residing in Summit, Ill. awaiting transportation. Welcome aboard Mrs. Inman, and may your stay in Guantanamo be a happy one.
Departures
There was also but one departure this week. That of "Rollie Santos". Raoul will he greatly missed by everyone, especially by the Leathernecks baseball and basketball teams. While in Gtmo Rollie was well on his way to set a new "Strikeout" record in baseball. While appearing in only 16 games, Rollie had a total of 123 strikeouts. Raoul was admitted to the USNH here for further transfer to the states for an operation to remove a bone chip from his right arm. Rollie left Wednesday night Via FLAW where he went to the hospital in Bethesda, Md. for the operation. So, from everyone at Marine Barracks we wish Rollie the best of luck.
Those enjoying the trip to Kingston, Jamaica last weekend were Capt. and Mrs. W. E. Kerrigan, Capt. and Mrs. Charles S. Smith, and Sgt. and Mrs. Bernard Lee. Everyone reported a wonderful time.
Baseball Bunts
The Base Champion Leathernecks were defeated for the 4th time this season in dropping 2 games over the past week, losing once again to the MCB-8 nine by a score of 3-0. . . . This marked the first time the Marines had been shut out this season. . . . Big Jim Dotson of the Seabees pitched a brilliant game limiting the slugging leathernecks to but one hit and that by his opposing pitcher, Captain "Smitty" Smith. . . . The game also saw Jim Pace's 15 game hitting streak come to a halt. . . . Smitty" Smith pitched good ball in relief of starter Don Schreck, a newcomer to the Leatherneck mound staff. . . . The little lefty appeared in his second ball game and wildness caused his departure in both. . . . 5 games remain on the Marines schedule. . . . Record is now 23-4. . . . Home run production has reached a season high of 42 in the 27 games played. . . . Catcher Tom Felak in the league lead with 10. . . . Tom also continues to lead the league in the hitting department with an average of .420. . . . Jim Pace hitting .403. . . . Post season tournament to begin August 1st. . . .


by John Hull
Due to an acute shortage of personnel, WGBY has been forced to restrict hours of broadcast. The new program schedule is now appearing daily in the "Papoose". The station is still on the air during the periods when we have the maximum listening audience; from 7:00 to 8:00 in the morning, from 12:00 to 1:00 in the afternoon, and the regular evening schedule goes into effect with the "Parade of Sports" at 3:00 each afternoon.
We sincerely regret that it is necessary to curtail our service to Guantanamo Bay and everything possible is being done to guarantee a return to full-time operation at the earliest date.
The response to our appeal for new announcers has improved and we have been giving several audiions each day. Incidentally, if you are interested, just call us at 9615 and we'll tell you how to apply.
A new series, the "Martin Block Show". will begin Monday, July 19 at 5:30 P.M., as a Monday through Friday series of thirty minute programs. Martin interviews with some of country's favorite artists, time devoted to the "good old bands gone by", and time for the top juke box favorites of a past year. He will also reserve part of his show to introduce brand new releases, picking out, in his opinion, the best guy and gal vocalists, giving the singing stars of tomorrow a chance to be heard.
An unusual tale will be presented on "Suspense" Friday, July 23 at 8:30 P.M. Starring Cornel Wilde, the story is entitled "Somebody Help Me", and is based on actual fact. Cornel Wilde does an outstanding job of acting as he portrays Ed, a lonely man who becomes a murderer.
"Tommy", the fast-paced and hilarious comedy by Howard Lindsay and Bertrand Robinson, will be presented by the "Theatre Guild On The Air" Monday, July 19 at 9:00 P.M., starring Wanda Hendrix and Kenny Delmar.
Be sure to watch the daily program schedule in the 'Papoose" for your favorite programs and any changes in the schedule presented each day over WGBY, 1450 on your dial.

Lawyer (to woman seeking a divorce): "Then your husband is quite elderly, I take it?"
Wife: "Elderly! . . . Why he's so old he gets winded just playing checkers.


VU-10 Prop Blast
A grand week-end was enjoyed in Kingston, Jamaica, by a large group from this Squadron. From watching and listening to all the reports, every one had a wonderful time going shopping, sightseeing and swimming at the hotels. The following were lucky enough to make the trip. Chief Magarity and Wife; R. J. Heywang and wife; M. E. Baker and wife; LT B. J. Graves and wife; R. B. Woods; J. K. Campbell; R. B. Matimore; K. F. Baker; L. F. Gesche; R. B. Rebhorn.
The big smile that Willie Mace is wearing around the Squadron is due to the new addition to the family, Linda Dell, 5 pound 13-1/4 oz. Congratulations to Mickey and I understand that the daughter and father are doing just fine.
Chief Pistole reports that he killed 65 pigeons last Saturday, but from other information I received was that the party as a whole only killed fifteen but that's a hunter for you.
The Mallards have been in a very low slump the last few games. Wouldn't hurt any if a few more people showed up at the games and give the team a little more support. The boys have done a wonderful job this season and they are to be congratulated by the whole Squadron.
These tall fishing tales, I guess, will never stop. I was taking with Uncle Dan Bennett the other day and he was telling me about this large fish that he caught. Seems that the fish was several feet long and quite large. Almost tore his line up in fact. After explaining how hard it was to catch, I finally got the truth out of him-only a large eel.
Thought we had a lot of 20 year men in this Squadron, but Greer, J. P., AD2, Gable, L. G., AD2, Alm, A. F., AD3 decided to cut their tours a little short and return to civilian life. Best of luck to you all, your job was "WELL DONE."
Had a little excitement the other night. Morphis, John E., ADI, reported into the Squadron with his wife. His first statement was "Where's the key to my house." Everyone was floored until they found out that his wife, Jewell, was a school teacher and had been given advance orders to come down. Welcome aboard.
Three other new members also reported aboard. Ballard, Galen 0., EMC, from Freeport, N. Y. Finney, Mylan C., AD2, from Galesburg, Ill. and Kelley Victor F., AN, from Delaware, Penn.


NSD Supply Line

LCDR and Mrs. William J. Sheehan, LT Larson, BMC and Mrs. W. G. Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. M. S. Sands, Warren G. Geihn, SA and John M. Nagel Jr., SA are among the many base residents that took advantage of the trip to Jamaica last weekend on the USS Olmsted. Everyone had a wonderful time shopping and sightseeing.
John W. Snyder, SN, left in the MSTS Thomas last Saturday for Brooklyn, N. Y. and separation.
Welcome to Ralph A. McNeill, SK3, whose home town is Easton, Massachusetts. Ralph came from the USS Malley (DD565).
Mrs. Frank B. Wilson recently accepted a position at the Depot as Mail Clerk. Hope you'll enjoy working with us, Ruth.
Mrs. John DiMascola returned to work on Monday. Millie spent the previous week in San Juan, Puerto Rico.


a


Page Seven





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Navy-10NDPPO-trio.-0020


Saturday, 17 July 1954


T111 l' INDIAN


% [
1 9 - 1


samm 1 1m- -11a -M
While going through the pinup file this photo happened to stand out for obvious reasons. The outfit-which seems to be real cool summer wear-was modeled in Paris. Unfortunately we don't know the lovely model's name.


MOVIES


Saturday, 17 July
RIDE CLEAR OF DIABLO Audie Murphy Dan Duryea
A railroad surveyor returns to his home town to avenge the killing of his father and younger brother. The town's respected lawmen are secret leaders of the rustlers and are responsible for the murders.
Sunday, 18 July ACT OF LOVE
Kirk Douglas Dany Robin
Story of a G. I. and his love for a young French girl. He tries in vain to get permission to marry her, but he is suddenly transfer red to another unit.
Monday, 19 July
BOY FROM OKLAHOMA
Will Rogers, Jr. Nancy Olson
Cowboy Will Rogers, Jr., stops in Blue Rock to mail his answers to a correspondence course in law, and stays to become sheriff.


NAS Crosswinds

by Dick Friz
CHGUN JOHN SENTZ: NAS ORDNANCE OFFICER. His subordinate duties include assisting the Base ordnance officer, in matters nertaining to aviation ordnance, Range officer, and Public Information officer.
Born in Taneytown, Maryland the gunner attended Gettysburg High School in Gettysburg, Pa. He entered the Navy through the enlisted ranks in 1936, and served on destroyers until 1939. Was in a patrol squadron on neutrality patrol until outbreak of World War II. He was appointed Warrant Officer in May of 1943.
Some of his duty stations include, NAS Miami, FAW 10 Hedron, Casu (F) 9, NAS Norfolk, VF1B, and NAF Litchfield Park, Arizona (Ass't Security Officer.) His last duty was aboard the WASP (CV 18).
Gunner Sentz married Betty Jane Ziegler of Cincinnati, Ohio. They have a boy, John David Jr., and a girl, Karen Ann.
The CHGUN is an expert in the .45 cal. pistol and hopes to lead the NAS team into a victory over toe Marines soon. He is als, active in bowling (captain of championship team last spring) and is acting master for the Cub-scouts.
News-Briefs
The following men departed from Guantanamo Bay on Wednesdav: James Miller AC3, and Bob Seagle CS3. Miller will report to Pensacola, Florida, for further orders in that command, and Seagle will be transferred to the Construction Battalion Center at Port Hueneme, California.
LT Emmet 0. Sanders, USN, will leave Guantanamo the 21st of July and report to duty at the Bureau of Aeronautics Photographic Division, Navy Department, Washington, D. C. His relief will be LT E. E. Pierce from the Navy Photographic Center in Anacostia. LT Sanders will be greatly missed by all his friends at this station, in addition to his smiling presence at the regular Friday evening "happy hour" at the A.O.Q. cocktail Lounge.
The following Air Station personnel made the trip to Kingston on the USS Olmsted APA 188 last woek end: Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Serig. Ti' and Mrs. M. R. McCann, LTJG V. J. D'Amico, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Clark, HMC, and Mr. and Mrs. R. -. Heywang, ADi.
Three members of the metal shop crew also went resorting, Alton (Tex) Sparks AM3, John Sokol AM3, and Cecil Wood AM2.

Training . . . .
(Continued from Page Two)
technique developed in previous hours of practice-when to fire, when to turn, and how to recover so that the price of a hit may not he the loss of a plane flown into the banner.
At this writing Lieutenant Roy Skelly leads the squadron with his high percentage of hits on one banner, but Lieutenant JG Tom Pickett has the best average for the rounds fired. To help the pilots learn from their efforts our Air Force exchange pilot, Captain Bob Denny, keeps a status board known as "Shootin' Poop." An evening meeting collects the lessons learned and records them for tomorrow.
There they go again-the laboring tow plane followed by its four eager persuers filling the hot air with tearing sound and fading out over the ocean for another try at it.


FTG Bulletin

by Jack Engstrom 17 July 1954
Commander R. Y. McElroy is now wearing the Silver Eagles of a Navy captain. Captain McElroy reported to the Fleet Training Group on 1 July 1953 after conpleting a tour of duty at the Naval Academy.
Upon graduation from Lebanon High School, Lebanon, Kentucky he entered the Naval Academy at Annapolis from which he graduated in 1935. Captain McElroy received his TNhTsi'v Wings at Pensacola Florida in 1938.
Serving as Squadron Commander of VC-26 in the European Theater and later as Air Officer aboard thUSS MAROUS ISLAND (CVE-77)
in the Pacific Theater he was awarded the Navy Cross, the Disfinguisbhd Flying Cross, The Bronze Star and five Air Medals.
Captain McElroy, FTG Air Offieer, resides at Marina Site I with his wife and two children; two other children are attending school in Arizona.
Lieutenant Commander G. A. Gardes, FTG CIC Officer, was nnpointed to the rank of commander effective 1 July 1954.
Commander Gardes, a graduate of Fairview High School, Dayton. Ohio and a graduate of the Naval Academy, class of '42, reported aboard 15 January 1954 after Commanding the USS HAVERSON (DER-316) for 21 months.
Upon graduation from the Academy and receiving his commission he reported to the USS SAMPSON (DD-394) where he served as Gunnery Officer for 30 months. The SAMPSON was the flagship for the Biak invasion. He also served as executive officer aboard the USS LAFBERG.
Commander Gardes is married to the former Jeanne Smith of Hagerstown, Maryland. CDR Gardes, his wife and four children, reside at Radio Point.
Chief Reynolds of the Engineering Department left for the States Tuesday morning for retirement. Chief Reynolds, a Diesel Specialist, will retire with twenty years, three months service.
After a few weeks vacation in the states, Chief Reynolds will return to Guantanamo Bay and take a Civil Service job in the Utilities Division of the Public Works Department.
Congratulations on a fine Navy career and we will be looking forward to seeing you again in August.
A note of thanks to the First Class Petty Officers for conducting a very successful picnic last Saturday.
Among the prizes awarded, were the three team trophies and individual trophies which were awarded to the FTG Bowling Team I for winning the Naval Base Championship.
SHIP ARRIVALS
USS H. D. Crow DE-252 19 July
USS Sturtevant DE-239 19 July
SHIP DEPARTURES
UJSS McCard DD-822 20 July
USS Maloy EDE-791 22 July

Junior was bemoaning the fact that his drycleaning had not been delivered.
"I haven't got a decent pair of pants to my name," he told his father: "What should I do?"
"Well, son," volunteered Dad suddenly, "why don't you sue them for promise of breaches?..
"Of course I can spell correctly," said the company clerk, "but I'm not a fanatic about it."


SOOK- N-O

by Francis L. Cannon, JOSN
FOR YOUR INFORMATION THE SECRET DIARY OF
HAROLD L. ICKES: THE FIRST
1000 DAYS
Harold L. Ickes' diary is the record of his official and personal life during his 19 years as Secretary of the Interior. This volume covers the first four years-1933 to 1936-of the Roosevelt administration. There are frank, unretouched portraits of General MacArthur, Alf Landon, Harry Hopkins and W i IIi a m Randolph Hearst, to name a few. He tells of F.D.R. without a trace of hero-worship and points out many things which will disturb both his idolaters and bitter enemies.
HOW THE UNITED NATIONS WORKS by Tom Gait
In language that is about as clear as you can get on such a subject, Mr. Galt explains the workings of th- United Nations, showing how all the components operate and how their operations affect everyone. There are sprightly cartoon-like illustrations by Norman Tate.
U.S. GRANT AND THE AMERICAN MILITARY
TRADITION by Bruce Catton
The administration of U.S. Grant, analyzed with an eye to present conditions. Grant wa a man well qualified to be a military leader, but these very qualities proved a liability when he was placed in the highest civilian office. He felt, from his years in the military, that Congress was the final authority and saw himself as little more than an administrative officer.
FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT TREASURE DIVING HOLIDAYS
by Jane and Barney Crile
Most of the year Barney Crile is a well-known surgeon attached to the Cleveland Clinic, but when vacation time comes he and his family pack their aqualungs and head for warm waters and excercise their abilities as expert deep-sea prowlers. They also tell of many devices and techniques which have widened their underwater horizon.
0, KING LIVE FOREVER
by Henry Myers
The story of a quest for the secret of life. The man in quest was handsome, vigorous, and more than a hundred years old with every intention of living for several hundred more. His story begins in the time of young Queen Victoria, continues through our time and never really ends.
IN PASSING . . .
PERDU - Paride Rombi. Boy's search for unknown father in the Mediterranean.
ENJOY YOUR GOLF - Lealand Gustavson. Gives many fine points of the game with illustrations.
THE WHISTLING SHADOW
-Mabel Seeley. A suspense story and a girl with a mysterious past.
THE MOTION OF THE HEART
-Blake Cabot. How medical research combats heart disease.

Two sergeants at the induction center were discussing the arrival of a recruit that day. "His mother was there, his girl was there, her folks were there. Such crying and screaming-I thought he'd never stop."




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_________~~ _______Govevs qTMO Like Th &rec~nshina" Vol. VI, No. 54 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 17 July 1954 Little Theatre Closes Co OTen Inspects Station Craw Organizations Thank Successful 5-Day Hit Base Contributors In Tonite's Performance The Guantanamo Bay Little Theatre closes its doors tonight on an extremely successful 5-day run of the broadway hit, "Out of the Frying Pan." With a cast of 12 headed by Alan Wagner, the comedy played to over 1,000 customers during the first four days. Tonight's final performance is expected to be seen by about 300 people. Sharing male lead honors with Mr. Wagner are Dan Nash and Gordon Thompson; and on the leading lady side of the spotlight are Anita Sierra, Ruth Groenveld and Shirley Emerson. These six are ably supported by Ethel Beach, Joyce Mickiewicz, Burt Knight, Jim Boyett. Easton Guillory and Ronnie Estafan. The comedy concerns the plight of six young thespians trying to attract the attention of a theatrical producer. The fact that they have to share the same apartment leads to embarrassing and hysterical situations. All turns out well in the end, of course, but the intervening three acts provide an evening of laughable enjoyment for the audience. The play was directed by Betty Radcliffe and David Hume. RADM G. B. H. Hall, Commandant, 10th Naval District, inspects Naval Station personnel during the annual administrative and personnel inspection of the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base held this week. Admiral Hall returned to San Juan Wednesday but the continuing survey board is still making the administrative inspection. New Officers Installed Barracks Colors Presented to New Commander At Fleet Reserve New officers for the fiscal year 1955 were installed at a ceremony and dance held by the Fleet Reserve Association, Branch 100, and the Ladies Auxiliary, Unit 100, at the Naval Air Station Enlisted Men's Club on Wednesday, June 14th. New Officers of the Fleet Reserve Branch are: President-D. E. Waltz Vice-Pres.-J. M. Tarwater Secretary-P. A. Lazos Treasurer-V. M. Roberts Corresponding Secretary-W. J. Phillips Chaplain-R. Rust Members elected to the Board of Directors: F. A. Mapstone, A. F. Kerslake, R. W. Yale, E. E. Anderson, E. H. Lawrence, W. I. Hamm and A. Krekman. New officers of the Ladies' Auxiliary: President-V. W. Roberts Vice-Pres.-J. W. Dexter Secretary-S. Hamm Treasurer-B. Collins Chaplain-V. E. Mapstone Members elected to the Board of Directors: E. C. Kerslake, V. E. Mapstone V. Lawrence, M. Lisnick and D. Waltz. Colonel John B. Hill, former commanding officer of the Marine Barracks, hands the Barracks colors to Captain W. E. Kerrigan who in turn presented them to the new commanding officer, Colonel R. E. Fojt. The change of command took place at Marine Site last week. For Carnival Donations As reported in The Indian a few weeks ago allocations of funds received from the annual Guantanano Bay carnival has been completed and the command has received several letters of thanks and appreciation from various organizations. In reply to the donation of $1,250.00 to the 1954 Heart Fund General Mark Clark wrote, in part, "I am proud of the ever-increasing support for the Heart Fund by the Armed Forces and am particularly grateful to the men and women overseas for their help in combating heart disease." Mr. Basil O'Connor, president of the National Foundation for Inf;ntile Paralysis wrote, "The heartwarming response to our fund raising appeal by the Armed Forces, and the civilians working with them, is most gratifying. Please convey my personal thanks to all of them." Mr. Elmer H. Bobst, Chairman of the American Cancer Society's National Campaign Committee, said, "We deeply appreciate your support of the work being done by the American Cancer Society. Your contribution will help immeasurably in the continuation and expansion of this important life saving program." Mr. Henry W. Stevens, Business Manager of the National Tuberculosis Association, wrote, "Please be assured that these hundreds of contributions represented by this check will be spent in the fight to control Tuberculosis in the same sense of trust placed in us by some 14,000.000 contributors to our work." These were only a few of the many letters received by RADM E. B. Taylor, ComNavBase, in acknowledgement of the donations sent out by this command. Letters came from The Salvation Army, both in Cuba and the national headquarters in New York, from the Archbishop of Santiago de Cuba, from the Episcopal Church of All Saints in Guantanamo. A total of $17,250.00 was sent out as donations for charitable organizations. Included in the list, 1 but not mentioned above, are the Navy Relief Society, the American national Red Cross and various Cuban charities. The Old Timers g vs I The Indians (See Sport Page for details) 9!& -o

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e Page Two THE INDIAN The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Station Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 17 July 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sandness__Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC --------------Editor H. L. Sisson, JOL----------------News Jerry Lewis, JO3 ---------Features Pierce Lehenbech---------Sports F. L. Cann JOSN--sotographer THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. An Editorial. House -Apes by Jack Engstrom Children, sometimes dubbed as House-Apes, Crumb-Crushers, Curtain-Climbers, Brats, etc., are the prime cause of parents getting old before their time and also a helper in bringing out those grey hairs. The Naval Base and the various commands attached to the base devote a great deal of time to safety at work, at home and at play. The traffic laws set up for the base are adequate along with the Base Police Force, whose job it is to see that these laws are carried out. All the safety rules and protective forces in the world aren't of any use to the public unless there is wholehearted cooperation. This brings to mind one point that concerns the base directly. No one likes to run over a child or hear of neighbor's child that has been struck by a car. It is well known that there are many small children on the Naval Base and when driving in the housing areas, special, caution should be taken. Most drivers are well aware of the fact, but children that play in the roads and children that taunt the drivers by seeing how long they can wait and then run across the street in front of an oncoming car need to be taken in hand by the parents. These small tricks, like pushing a stick under the wheels of a moving car, and seeing if they can touch a passing car, are shortcuts to trouble. A driver couldn't be blamed directly for an accident which might occur because of these tricks, but it would hang heavy on him or her and on the parents on the child. So parents, if you will take a few minutes time and stop and explain the dangers to children you might see playing in the streets and impress the situation on your own family it could save a lot of misery for everyone. Everyone loves kids so lets keep them alive. Deadline Nearing for INDIAN Photo Contest Only two weeks left to get in on the Indian's photo contest! To date, only three entries have been received in the Indian office -one a pin-up, another a harbor scene, and the third had to be disqualified because it did not meet the minimum size requirement of 4 x 4 inches. So, your chances of winning a merchandise certificate are good. But the first contest closes midnight, July 31st! The contest is open to: (1) Naval personnel stationed on board the Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay and the dependents of these personnel. (2) U.S. civilians employed at the base and their dependents. (Personnel of the 4th Division, Naval Station, are not eligible to participate in the contest.) First prize in each of the three contests will be a $20 merchandise certificate good at the Navy Exchange; second prize will be a $10 certificate; and third prize will be a $5 certificate. As mentioned before the first contest closes on July 31st; the second commences on August 1st and runs through September 30th; and the third commences on October 1st and ends November 30th. Deadline for entries is midnight of the closing dates. All entries submitted must be no smaller than 4 x 5 inches and no larger than S x 10 inches; either glossy or matte paper will qualify, but the photos must not be mounted. Negatives are not required, but all photos submitted become the property of the Indian. Winning entries will be printed in the Indian. Color photographs are not acceptable. On the back of each entry the following identification is required; Name, rate or rank, service number, department or division attached to and the command. The number of entries per person is unlimited. You can submit as many as you wish. The entries will be judged by a panel of judges from the Indian staff and/or the Indian advisory committee, and winners will be announced the week following the deadline. So, this is your chance to make that camera pay off. Send or bring your photos to the Indian office in the Fleet Recreation area or send them to Box 19. Training is Rugged at Leeward Point,,, by C. A. Wright, Jr. Lights are out by 2000 in Quonset A-2 where tired officers of VF-101 recoup themselves for another long day. The G-suits hanging on the line outside betray their profession, and the regular breathing within is good evidence that the work they do is not the small boy's dream of aviation. It is a job-taxing both mentally and physically the picked men who fly the Navy's aircraft. And yet you don't see here the hot-rod, devil-may-care "jet jockeys" that present such a warped picture of the aviator to the public eye. Sit in on an All Pilots Meeting some time. Does the big sleepy-eyed pilot slouched in the corner chair look more or less like your "jet jockey" than the big redfaced veteran with the squinting eyes? What about the boy over there scratching his head, who doesn't look old enough to support his new moustache? Or the older men with their lines of experience and knowing nods? Some are single, some married, some have their girls at home. Some like their Ron Anejos in the evening and a few their lemonades. The bellingerant and the mild, the athlete and the esthete, the bright and the solemn are all here, but they are all here for the same reason -whether they love it or just do it-to fly. Down the line similar Quonsets with similar iron bunks provide a few hours rest for the "Grim Reaper" crew. Long hours of flying time inevitably mean longer hours for those who must keep the Banshee screaming across this lost spit of nothing, keep it performing, keep it fueled, and keep in full of the deadly material that is its reason for being in the air. Who are these men? Have you watched the young mech in the red hat straining on a stubborn bolt with sweat trickling down his broad back, well browned in the tropical sun? Have you seen the third-class with the brand-new crow learning to think in his new responsibility? Have you had the pleasure of being assisted by an able and experienced first-class? Or have you watched the chief handling his men with the easy confidence born of knowing their thoughts because he came from their numbers himself ? Then never make the mistake of type-casting the sailor in any mold. Not much of the civilization of NAS Guantanamo blows down to Leeward Point to ruffle the whiskers on unshaven faces. Uniforms that would draw a second glance from the inspecting officer attract less attention here. The military organization grinds on unimpaired by the sacrifice of some formality. Perhaps it is the common loneliness of this place of hard work that fosters such a jovial casualness in tired faces of an evening. Perhaps it is the total lack of woman's touch or glance on this barren point that allows such luxuriant bachelor freedom. More likely it is our reason for being here that explains our ways. We are here to work and for no other reason. Here all else is sacrificed -sleep, civilization, family time, and personal cares-to hours. Flying hours. Hours of time in the air firing at the black crosses on white banners with the same tiresome but tireless technique mean proficiency in weapons, and with luck a few of the coveted individual "E"s. And the scores that win the "E"s mean that this month of grueling effort on the part of so many has produced a few more pilots well qualified to defend their country when they return. This is the way of life of Leeward Point, Cuba. Flight after flight taxis out from the line and roars up the runway, passing the hangar airborne in a bank that carries it high out to sea to the firing area. Each pilot checks his settings and reviews the (Continued on Page Eight) Sunday, 18 July 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. O. Stephenson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) The Chaplain's Corner When sucess is viewed through the eyes of the world, it means something quite different than when viewed through the eyes of Christ. Many whom the world praises as very successful have really gone woefully backward if judged according to the norm of Christ's principles. Of Himself it is said, that He was the stone which the builders rejected, but which became the cornerstone of the edifice. Unless we look through Christ's eyes we also get a false idea of equality. Christ did not see human nature in any other light than its true light, the light of individual need and ability. Socialism inclines to overlook the individual's weakness or ability, and strives to make everyone equal in every fact. The advocates of this theory insist on its power of uniformity; but they fail to realize that this very uniformity turns out to be a boomerang. A moderate amount of uniformity suits man's nature very well; but too much of it sooner or later causes him inquietude and in the end inevitably arouses his revolutionary spirit. Modern thought seeks to tear life away from religion, saying that religion holds men back. Modern science, in fact, mocks religion. It treats it as if there were no success at all to be expected from its guidance. But are we to hope for progress from cynics, whose desire is to tear down? Christians themselves are often infected with false ideas of success. Let them change their opinion about this matter and humbly take Christ's word for it that it is really better to have less of this world's goods with spiritual contentment than more with guilt and misery. And let us not forget that with all our trying, we can not hope to succeed of ourselves; God must give us the grace, and we must beg this grace of Him by much prayer. W. J. Spinney LCDR, CHC, USN S Saturday, 17 July 1954

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a Saturday, 17 July 1954 m Page Three by Jerry Lewis Aside from the various activities that come under the heading of Naval Station Special Services and which extend to the far reaches of the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, is a concentrated area that makes up the main battery of facilities located in the heart of Recreation Center. The area centers around the 4th Division Special Services Office and offers a vast variety of individual sporting activities that cover almost all sports save for those of colder climates. (-and the 4th has been giving that some serious thought too!) Contained within the area extending from Sherman Avenue to the outer boundaries of the golf course are the following activities intended for your spare-time recreation: Three baseball diamonds, regulation size and excellently conditioned. Diamond number one, the only hard-ball diamond equipped with a battery of night-lights, is the scene of many Base League clashes throughout the year and also affords tremendous seating capacity for such events as the annual AllStar game and final play-offs which draw large crowds. There are eight softball diamonds, three night-lighted, available to all ship's teams who make reservations with the main office within one week of gametime. Four modern basketball courts offer ample space for local and inter-service competition between ship's teams. The two night-lighted courts are of walk-top surface, the others of concrete surface. Four tennis courts, two with cork-turf and night-lighted and two with concrete surfaces, the latter two used during daylight hours. A fully equipped gymnasium with all gymnastic facilities provided for those desiring same is located in the main building. A boxing and wrestling ring, one heavy striking bag, speed bag platforms, lifting weights, speed bags, gloves and ropes, plus other gear available from the Athletic Gear Issue desk can be used. The Archery Range, located left of the main area, off Magazine Road, offers fine facilities for archery hobbyists or those who wish to learn the age-old art of the bow and arrow. Located in the recreation building are four bowling alleys available Monday through Friday from 1700 to 2130, and from 1300 to 2130 on weekends and holidays. Nine Pool tables are also available during the same hours and can be checked out at the nominal fee of 20 cents an hour. Located at the Center near the softball diamonds is the newly constructed cement plastic -covered skating rink. Clamp skates and shoe-skates are available on a rental basis for 30 cents an evening. Two of the most recent activities added to the long list of Special Service facilities are the baseball batting range located near the swimming pool, equipped with an automatic pitching machine that throws 20 balls for 25 cents and a bicycle rental system by which a new English style racer can be rented daily from 0900 to 1700 for 25 cents an hour. These are just a few of the many services offered by the 4th Division Naval Station Special Services and to which you have complete access when aboard the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base. Fleet Recreation Area Hub Of Special Services Activities What D' Ya' Say? 0 Robert V. Reynolds, SHC, 7th Div. "My wife and kids." Keith S. Woodward, MU2, NavBase Band "My family; otherwise I enjoy the tropics." John W. Grupe, YN3, 3rd Div. "Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." Alton Smith, SN in 4th Division, issues a pair of shoe skates at the Naval Station roller skating rink, one of the latest additions to the recreation area. Dr. Bobby Brown, brilliant third baseman of the New York Yankees, got his medical degree and served his internship while still a member of the team. He was asked by umpire Red Jones what branch of medicine he intended to specialize in. Always a ballplayer at heart, Dr. Bobby immediately replied: "Vivisection of umpires." -Arthur Daley in New York Times Gene Connick, SN 3rd Div. "American girls." James F. Shell, MUSN, NavBase Band Excitement of people and things to do, which are only slightly lacking on the base, int which are not nearly the same. Mostly I miss my girl" THE INDIAN The INDIAN will award a cer-tinente goo-d for $1.00 wor tth of merchandi-e at the Navy Ex change for each, qJu'stion accepted and used. Submit only qust6ins to Editor The Indian, B30x 19.1 The question: What do you miss most from the States? The place: Bay Hill barracks area. (This week's question was submitted by Miss Pat Wormwood, AV-62.) James P. DelleMoinache, P53, Print Shop "Tersy B."

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m Page Four The Angle(R) by Jerry Lewis Several weeks ago, the topic for one Angler column was the muchfeared yet little known habits of the shark. This week, I'd like to go into a little more detail concerning certain characteristics -f this reputed 'killer' because of the proximity of the east to the surrounding area of Guantanamo Bay. Aside from the various identifying factors of the shark previously discussed in this column, the shark is endowed with the keenest sense of smell found in any fish. It is estimated that if the thin leaflike olfactory organs of the shark were unfolded and spread out they would cover an area of half-anacre. This wonderful smelling organ is the principal reason why a cut and bleeding diver should leave the water with much haste. Another great aid in finding prey is found in another sense, much mis-interpreted by old wive's tales about the shark being deaf and blind. His sense of hearing vibrations is quite keen. It has been proven time and time again that the slightest abnormal vibration in the water, so far as two miles away, will attract the shark and bring him speeding to the scene. The excited flapping of a speared fish sets up vibrations that travel at a great speed uder water and give the shark a route to follow. He usually shows up at the scene of the spearing on the run after travelling at top speed through miles of water. His pilot fish generally are lost in the race but find their master later as he stalks the prey he has come for. The vibration theory has been credited to the microscopic hairs on sharks that are believed to act in the same manner as radar, enabling the great beast to "tune in" the fin beats of other fish. This is probably one of the reasons for the shark's retreat when yelled at underwater whereas other fish do not respond. When the keen senses of the shark enable him to find his prey, he becomes a victim of his own insane emotions and proceeds to rip and tear with his powerful teeth and jaws. His teeth are sharp enough to shave with and form several rows that line upper and lower jaws of fish. He uses his jaws in a snapping motion, much like the 'gator but in a split second. Nothing short of steel can resist the cutting power of those jaws. Many true accounts of a maddened shark tearing into a boat are told by men who didn't believe their eyes when they watched 3-inch planking torn loose like so much paper. Perhaps a classic example of this power is the case of a schooner that lost its rudder post. A harpooned 1500 pound tiger shark was being pulled close to the ship. Suddenly it rushed the ship and seizing the solid oak rudder post it chewed its way through this five and a half inch beam in a few seconds thus disabling the ship. Stories about this predatory beast whose ancestors stein as far back as the rock ages when the world was still changing form are Puttin' Around The Little League Knocks Out Homeruns, Too by Wright North Professional in Charge GTMO Bay Golf Club In a pouring rain last Sunday at Montego Bay, LT Grego won the Northern Championship with a 36-hole score of 152. ...74 and 78. Chief Lee Rodgers of NAS was tied for second with 153-76-77after incurring a 2-stroke penalty when his putt hit a competitor's ball on the green. (Ref. rule 35, 3B) LT Ruffini, with 157, was in 5th place. Plans are beginning to materialize for the Mid-Island Championship of 72 holes on the 14th and 15th of August at the fine Manchester Club. All interested persons are urged to see LT Grego in order that entries may he made in advance since as an English custom they will not accent a nost-entry. All golfers at the local course are kindly requested to use the temporary tees during the reconstruction of the regular playing tees. Also, some golfers are being very careless on the greens, particularly near the cups and some even go so far as to step into the cups which is the most delicate part of the entire course. Then, too, along with other sporting games, there are certain rules and regulations that govern both match and medal play. It is the individual's responsibility that no matter how good or bad they play, try to learn some of the more important ones. I'll always remember a conversation I once heard at the Atlantic City C. C. A big, robust fellow of some 250 pounds had eventually hacked his way around the 18-hole course and was in the process of downing a quart of lemonade. Some of his friends asked him about his game and how he had scored. "Gentlemen, I'm only a beginner at this fine game of golf, and no matter how long I may be able to play, I want to always feel that I played according to the rules. Now, some of you played through my match today and have been sitting here for possibly and hour. However, if you had played by the rules and counted all of your strokes. some of you would still be out there on the golf course. In addition to that, there is something else I like about my 127 I shot today over your 78's and 80's. As I stand here listening to your conversation of incorrect handicaps and growls over losing a couple of dollars, first of all, I didn't play for a dime today and the lemonade I hold here in my hand is the only thing involved which, incidentally, I lost with 127. But you know, one thing, no matter how bad I play or try to learn, I want to always think that I've played the game according to the rules and regardless of the score I always want to feel that I've enjoyed myself and had a good time. Bartender, give me another lemonade." Raymond Duncan: A lot of parents pack up their troubles and send them off to a summer camp. Changing Times, The Kiplinger Magazine: Things might be worse, Suppose your errors were tabulated and published every day like those of a ballplayer. told by fishermen all over the world. He's a tough customer and it pays to learn as much about his living habits as possible from other experienced men before going down to tangle with him. Remember! You are the trespasser! Respect his home. HAPPY TIGERS ....Home runs are not the exclusive property of the big leagues as proved by a flock of smiling Tigers of the Little League cs they congratulate Taft Albright (14) after lee put one away. The round-tripper occured in last Sunday's game as the Tigers beat the first place Bears. Dale Shelly of the Tigers hits the dirt at home plate in the TigerBear game last Sunday at Villamar. Gene Crouch is the plate umpire. Little League Standings BE Ti Co Ha ARS 12 gers 10 Its 5 wks 3 Little League Saturday, 17 Colts vs Tig Sunday, 18 J Hawks vs Be Tuesday, 20 Hawks vs C Thursday, 22 Tigers vs Be TOP FIVE PIT (As of Thursday, Smith Marines Bighie MCB-8 -arrison NAS Shackleton MCB-8 HOMERUN LE (As of Thursday, Felak Marines Dotson MCB Pace Marines Androvich Marines Mason Marines 4 4 Ladies' Golf Shots by Miriam Hoy Last Wednesday we had an ideal morning to play golf. The sun wasn't too bright and there was a beautiful, cool breeze. We played a Blind Five Tournament on the back nine, with members drawing holes 10-12-14-16-18 to total the individual scores. The lucky winners of golf balls were: 1st Flight 1st place-Corky Henning tie Edna Edwards 2nd placetie Amla McCracken Betsy Manning 2nd Flight 1st place-Sue Scott 2nd place-Fran Dykeian 3rd Flight 1st place-Betty Lou Tipler 2nd place-Nita Roberts We are very sorry to hear that Lou Tockzko is having additional trouble with her foot. We miss you, Lou, and hope you'll be out playing again very soon. Next Wednesday we will play the front nine for the least number of putts. Hope to see everyone then. 1 ice l Base La Schedule Schedule Saturday, 17 July uJlyMarines vs Air Statio u~l3 Sunday, 18 July ers Naval Station vs MCB-8 uly Monday, 19 July ars VU-10 vs Marines Tuesday, 20 July July MCB-8 vs Air Station olts Wednesday, 21 July July OPEN ars Thursday, 22 July Mines vs Naval Station CHERS Friday, 21 July 15 July) OPEN W L PCTg 1V L PCT TOP FIVE BATERS 11 1 .916 (As of Wednesday, 14 July) 8 3 .727 5 2 714AD H B 6 3 .500 Felak Marines 100 42 .420 6Pccce Marines 99 40 .404 ADERS Morgai NavSta 115 44 .182 15 July) Dotsoe MCB-8 114 41 .369 11 Atams Mariies 112 19 .157 9 8 Woodrow Wilsono: One of the 7 profsof the diiviieity of 0ocr gospel 6 pr tae eaching it lin survived. 9Monday, 19 July VU19s aie THE INDIAN M Saturday, 17 July 1954

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M Saturday, 17 July 1954 Bee's Four Straight Assures Second Place League Finish by Pierce Lehmbeck It was a stormy week for the pennant winners of the 1954 season as they suffered two setbacks in a row while narrowly ekeing out a 3-1 win over the cellar-dwelling NAS Flyers in their third appearance. Meanwhile, the red-hot Bees of MCB-8 showed up with some fine pitching including a one-hit stint by Jim Dotson followed by a two-hitter by Shackleton to move a full three games above the third-seated VU-10 Mallards while the Naval Station won two to leave the Flyers with no chance of pulling out of the cellar. BRAVES, FLYERS WIN OVER WEEK-END The Naval Station Indians trotted to within four games of the faltering third-seated VU-10 Mallard over the week-end as they drubbed the title-holding Marines 12-7 while the Naval Air Station shelled the Mallards, 17-7. In the Indian win over the Leathernecks, it was the spark of changeover short-stop Mandy Mandis that made the difference once again as he led them at the plate rapping out a single and a grand-slammer in three trips to the plate accounting for four RBI's. On top of this he was the winning pitcher as he went the first eight frames holding the Leatherneck guns to ten safeties. Two of them were roundtrippers by Felak and Pace. Felak's, his tenth of the year, placed him on top in the race for honors once again, as he moved out of a tie with the 'Bees Jim Dotson. Mandis was credited with the win, his fourth against five setbacks while Goens took the loss for the Marines. NavSta 12 7 3 Marines 19 10 1 Sunday afternoon, the cellardwelling NAS Flyers popped up long enough to shell five Mallard hurlers for 17 runs on but eight hits as they easily won the stint, 17-7. The Mallard five had trouble all afternoon as they dealt out 17 free passes. The 'fly-boys' chased their 17 run total around the paths in sprees as they came up with four in the bottom of the first, two in the second, one in the fourth, four in the fifth, five in the seventh and a final one in the eighth. The Mallards notched three in the second, three in the fifth and one in the eighth. Harrison was credited with the win, his fifth against only one setback while Huber was chalked with his third loss against four wins. NAS 17 8 1 VU-10 7 6 1 DOTSON, 'BEES SHUT-OUT 'TITLE-HOLDERS' IN ONE HIT STINT The newly second-seated 'Bees of MCB-8 handed the 'title-holding' Marine Leathernecks their second successive set-back and their first shut-out Monday night as big Jim Dotson came to within four batters of local baseball immortality as he hurled the first one-hitter of the aging '54 season. With two outs in the eighth inning, manager and opposing hurler Chuck Smith bounced a dribbler back through the middle for the only safety of the game off the 'Bee regular initial sacker. Dotson went the full nine to strike out every Leatherneck in the line-up to rack up a total of 15 for the tilt. His control was near-perfect as he walked but two batters. At the plate, the 'Bees were paced by Don Stoeckle, regular outfielder who came in to carry the load at first, as he doubled and homered "Rebel" Jim Dotson in three trips. MCB-8 scored their three run total by notching two in the second and one in the fourth. Dotson was credited with the win, his second against one setback while Shreck, in his first apnearance was charged with the loss. Smith relieved in the second with two out. MCB-8 3 6 2 Marines 0 1 4 TIRAVES OVER FLYERS Tuesday night the Naval Station Indians continued their climb towards third place as they cruised behind the two-hit hurling of Mandy Mandis to a 10-4 win over the Flyers of the Naval Air Station. Despite a lack of control which eAe up seven free passes, Mandis pitched perfect baseball throughout as he was touched but twice, both times in the second when Sherlacker homered and Kaestler followed with a single. The little fellow who has been carrying just about all the Brave's work-load since early in the season sent seven men back to the bench via the strike-out route. The Braves scored their 10 runs on a total of nine safeties with Kennedy leading the way with a homerun and a triple in four trips. The Flyers scored one in the top of the second and three in the sixth when Mandy loaded the bases with walks and the Indian infield committed two miscues. The win was number four aiainst five losses for Mandis while Woren took the loss for NAS. This game left the Braves three and a half games back of the third seated Mallards of VU-10. NavSat 10 9 2 NAS 4 2 4 BEES EDGE MALLARDS Wednesday night the 'Bees of MCB-8 put the clincher on the second seat as they defeated the VU-10 Mallards 3-1 behind the three-hit hurling of Shackleton. Shackleton pitched near flawless baseball for the first five innings Leatherneck backstop Tom Felak trots across the plate into the extended arms of team mates after he hit his tenth round-tripper of the season last Saturday afternoon in the NavSta clash. This blow once again placed him in the lead spot for honors in the department. Old Timers Limber Up for Game With Indians Next Friday Night Baseball's "Old-timers" are once again chomping at the bit (bat?) and limbering up creaky joints to prove once and for all that they can play better ball than the "youngsters" of today. with the Mallards finally working around a lone run in the bottom of the sixth. The Bees scored their three runs by putting together a total of nine safeties off Mallard server Breske to come up with one in the first, one in the third and one in the sixth. The win was number six for Shackleton against three setbacks. For Huber, it was loss number four against four vins. MCB-8 3 9 1 VU-10 1 3 2 MARINE OVER FLYERS In closing out the week of night nlay, the pennant winning Marine Leathernecks shook off a two game losing streak by ekeing out a 3-1 win over the cellar-dwelling NAS Flyers. It was a pitcher's duel all the way as the Leathernecks started and finished with manager Chuck Smith and the Flyers did the same with staff ace Harrison. The Marines scored their three runs with Androvich and Felak providing the needed punch to shove around one in the fourth, fifth and sixth frames. Androvich was credited with two RBI's while Felak came up with other in the form of his eleventh round-tripper. This blow, which came in the top of the fifth, placed him two up on the pack for honors in the that department. Smith took the win, his eleventh against one loss while Harrison suffered his second set-back against five wins. Marines 3 7 2 NAS 1 5 5 League Standings (As of Thursday, 15 July) W L GB Marines 24 4 MCB-8 16 12 8 VU-10 13 15 11 NAS 7 21 17 NavSa 10 18 14 The last time they tried it, just a few weeks ago, thay almost made it, too. In the top of the fifth inning they had the Naval Station Indians on the short end of a 3 to 1 score. The Indians were at bat with the bases loaded and only one out. Then, fortunately for somebody, came the rains! The Indians, eager to prove that the old-timers' three runs were all a mistake, have challenged them to a decisive play-off, and the game is scheduled for next Friday, the 23rd, under the lights of diamond number one in the Fleet Recreation area. John F. X. O'Connor, chief umpire of the Base League and the shrewd instigator of the rheumatism-brigade classic, has propped up much the same line-up as last rime. Earl Sandness will play first base, Doc Simis will be at 2nd, Gene Crouch at short and Boo Ferris will weigh down the third sack. Hopefully roaming the outfield will be Phil Dunmire, Indian manager, in left, Robby Robinson in center and Tommy Douglas in right. Starting battery (if charged) will be either "Big Al" Rothenberg of NAS or Chuck Smith of the Marines on the mound with mentor O'Connor behind the plate. O'Connor has optimistically selected only two reserves to fill in wherever enthusiasm gives way to age, Jim Coughlin and Andy Gradus. Jerry Morgan will manage the Braves for the game, and the latest word from the dugout is that Morgan may epitomize the Indians' tongue-in-check attitude by taking over the mound duties himself. And Morgan a confirmed shortstop! Whatever the outcome, the fans are in for a night of good baseball when the wisdom of the aged is pitted against the power of youth. But then, everybody knows what the outcome will be-or do they? THE INDIAN m Page Five

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Page Six THE INDIAN Confessions of a Boot TEENAGE-ROUND-UP Meetings .. Time & Place As confessed by Elliot Gallant to Dick Friz I stood before the mirror in the Men's room, and gave myself a final appraisal ...baggy pants, a crew cut that had narrowly missed being as have, and khaki spats. I looked like a 'wetback', that had just been caught sneaking over the Mexican border. I wanted to hide in one of the stalls until it was all over, but I didn't have change. Besides, my parents were coming ...it had been two whole months since that fatal day when I brought in the papers, and announced, "Sign here Pop, I'm joining the Navy!" It would have produced the exact effect had I revealed that I made a prospective mother out of the neighbor girl. Mom's last letter had been encouraging, however. They had watched "Victory at Sea" on TV last week, and when a gold braided Admiral inspected rigid lines of gleaming white sailors, to the tune of "Anchors Aweigh," Pop had poked his nose out of the racing results of the Brooklyn Eagle, long enough to give a grunt of approval. I walked into the vast reception room ...they weren't in sight, so I lit a Lucky, hung it out of the corner of my mouth like I'd seen a salty first class do it, and watched drammer-er drama unfold. A peach-fuzzed "Boot" was in one corner, creasing wings in his white hat ...a masculine looking Wave was telling her folks that 'Bainbridge was such a trilling place!' my bunk mate Al Rizzo's entire clan had arrived and were showering him with wet kisses and pizza and pepperoni. ...A guy in a leather jacket and motorcycle cap said to his Wave friend, "Gee Flo, when's your first leave? The draft board's hot on moy trail." A plump matron, with newly rinsed carrot colored hair was pulling a 'Bernhardt' crying out (so everyone could hear) "What have they done to my Jamie?" Then the doors swung open .. I spotted a familiar polo coat, and there was the Master, dragging Mom, five-year old Sis, and Roberta, the light of my life, behind him. I want-to enfold Roberta to my bosum, when she said, "My, you're looking just fine Elliot, so-" Pop interceded with a "My boy, you're looking lousy ...what did they use on your head, pinking shears?" "Now, Alex, you promised," Mom said ."besides he looks fine." She encircled me with her arms, and I blushed. "Aw Mon," I said, "don't go ape-" The boom of the loud speaker saved an awkward moment ...NOW HEAR THIS: DUE TO A HEAVY BLIZZARD IN THE NEW ENGLAND AREA, MOTORISTS ARE ADVISE TO LEAVE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. There was just time enough for Mom to say, "Why Elliot two stripes-a ser geant already?" Roberta grabbed my hand and whispered, "Write every day." Pop gave noe the grip and slipped me a twenty dollar bill ."Now don't spend this on those Baltimore women." Sis said, "I've gotta go to the bathroom." They loaded me with Salomi and honey cake and were gone. I surveyed the now vacant arena -it looked like Elobets Field after the Bumbs took the pennant last fall ...a hand touched my shoulder and my pal Arch said, "Come on kid, lets go back to the barracks by Judy Yost Last weekend was begun with Sherry P. giving a surprise birthday dinner for Edgar H. After dinner, the gang went to the movies, and then back to Sherry's. Everyone had a wonderful time playing "bunco" and oodles of other games. Congrats, Ed! Friday night was quite an event! Almost every teen-ager on the base went up to the Villamar dance. Everyone had a real cool time, especially when they started in on the "Bunny Hop". By the way, the "Bunny Hop" champs are Roxey, Jimmy D., and Pat W. Nice going, kats! Saturday nite, after the movies, a lot of the kids went over to Dolores R.'s house. Eveah-body had a swell time of it. We want to extend a big welcome to Pat Fojt. Pat came to "glorious" Gtmo from Newport, R. I., and is fourteen years of age. We also want to welcome Pat and Evelyn Ralston, who lived in Vallejo, California, before coming here. Evelyn is fourteen and Pat is eighteen. Then, a great big "Hi" to Geraldine Bailey, from Norfolk, Va. Glad to have ya, kids! DID YA DIGThe gang of boys at the Snack Shack last week-Barbara B. and Anita putting in a plug for "Out of the Frying Pan"-Dolores and Sharon drooping at the bus stop (wonder why ?)-Ed's scooterPat Mc.'s new permanent-Norman and Georee's summtoer hobbiesDexter's "luck"-Tom Burnes and "Crazy Legs"-Pat's bathing suit(RRRRRRRuff !)-Ronny's pipeJean's new dance sten (Brother, the dance-floors's hard!). Hey gang! I hear Pat McGowan's planning to go back to the "states" this summer for a vacation. Sure hope you have a wonderful time, Pat! (Envy envy!). That's all for now. and eat your chow." Later that evening, as I scraped the last crumbs and salomi skins together, the squawk box followed: NOW HEAR THIS: THIS IS TAPS-TAPS-TAPS. ALL LIGHTS WILL B$ EXTINGUISHED AND SILENCE WILL BE RETAINED ABOUT THE DECK. THE LITTLE PICNIC IS OVER ... REVILLE GOES DOWN ONE HOUR EARLIER TOMORROW, SO YOUSE MEN CAN POLICE UP THAT MESS YOU MADE ... "Hey Riz," did you hear what be called us MEN," I exclaimed (carressing the word) "Ya, go to sleep," he yawned, "It's only a figger of speech." Fleet Reserve Association 20(10: 2nd & 4th Tuesday each month. Community Auditorium Ladies' Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Room, Community Auditorium Little Theatre Group 2000; 2nd Tuesday each month Marina Point Hospital Service Volunteers 1000; 2nd Tuesday each month Hospital Medical Library Amrericn Legiun Auxiliary. Unit One 1930; 3rd Tuesday each mconth Cirl Scant Hut, Marina Point Toastmasters Club 92 1930 each Thursday, Offcers Club dining American Legion. Guantanamo Bay Post 1 1930 ; 3rd Tuesday each month; Community Auditorium. Marina Point Parent-Teachers Association 1930; 1st Tuesday of each month Naval Base School Felloweraft Club No. 1078 2000 each Thursday, Practice, Business Meeting, 1st Thursday -Community Malt National Supervisors Association 1900; 1st Monday each month, Civilian Training Conference Room. Toastmasters Club No. 113 1900 each Thursday in the Flamingo Room, Fleet Recreation Center. New members welcome. John Elwood, BMC, and Bob Pace, TDAN, display part of a Fourth of July catch, which they battled off Phillips Park. The trophy, a 67 pound grouper, was the biggest haul in the undersea persuit for the day. On the succe-ding day, they pulled in a 57 pound grouper. Olin Miller: Men never learn anything about women, but they have a lot of fun trying. General George Kenney: Air power is like poker. A second-best hand is like none at all-it will cost you dough and win you nothing. Time & Place 9 m M Saturday 17 Jul1 1954 Fishing Tournament LAND DIVISION Barracuda Plath, C. W ._----1SM;: lb. Hackert, A. 14 lbs., 10 uz. Adams, Mary 10 lbs., S ozs. Jacks MacAnanny, Raymond E. 19 lbs., 8 ozs. Romand, Sam 14 lbs., Slt ozs. Nixon, W. t. 12 Ibs. S ozs. Snapper Kelley, C. L. 39 lbs. Heinandez, J. C. 12 lbs. Hays, Robert, M. -1 tb., 7 ozs. Hanlin, John 9 ozs. Williams, Mike -7 ozs. Jamieson, Raymond 6 ozs. Balker, F. R. 51/2 ozs. Hise. W. I. 51ozs. JL amieson, Raymond _5 ozs. Soballe, Peter 1 oz. Mackerel (King) Howerton, R. D. -5 lbs., 10 ozs. Mackerel (Spanish) Dean, W. V. 7 lbs. Tarpon Bedward, K. D 17 lIs. Henry, R. L. 12 lbs., 4 ozs. Snook Bunda, George 10 lbs., 4 ozs. Horner, T. A. 3 lbs. Grouper H ise, N .L. ____--9 ozVs. Shaw, Jimmy 8 ozs. BOAT DIVISION Barracuda Carroll, J. C. 24 lbs. Daevnport, Sid __16 lbs., 8 ozs. Hawes, D. D. 14 lbs., S ozs. Snapper Roberts, V. A. 50 tbs. Carroll, J. .30 ils., 8 ozs. Ward, G. F. __ 18 lbs., S ozs. Tarpon Davis, N. Q. ___ 20 lbs., 4 ozs_ Swanson, G. A. 13 lbs., 8 ozs. Snook Emverzo, Epifanio 15 lbs., 2 ozs. Carrington, Laurie 12 lbs., 4 ozs. SPECIAL DIVISION Bonefish Wenslal, D. C. 3 Ibs., 10 ozs. Wind. Marion A. 2 lbs., S ozs. Emverzo, Epifanio 2 lbs., 2ozs. Croakers Sanhorn, Jim -8 ozs. Dalton, Kathryn 2 ozs. Ladylish Smouse, J. H. 4 bs., 8 ozs. Pompano Bedward, Kenneth 20 lbs. Giggy, G. K. 16 lbs., 4 ozs. Romano, Sam 8 lbs., 13 ?, oz. Soballe, Peter 2 lbs., 2 ozs. Shark Hawes, D. D. 19 ls. Choate,. E. J. 15 lbs, Meredith, Fred -41 lbs., S ozs. Triggerfish Lee, G. A. --4 lbs., S ozs. SPEARFISHING DIVISION Grouper Ellwood, L. D. 56 lbs. Nichols, E. M. -16 lbs. Jacks Dean, W. V.--1 lbs., 8 ozs. Andrews, R. M. 14 lIs. Mackerel Scheibel, K. E. S lbs., 11 ozs. Snappers Wardc. F. 14 ls, o. Nichols, E. M. -----14 lbh. Barracuda Plath, C. W. -I' lbs. Pace, Robert 12 lbs. Andrews, R. M 10 lbs. Watts, H. N. Tao 21 lbs., S ozs. Hogfish Ward, G. F., 5 lbs., 15 ozs. Other Fish Angel Faler, L. B. 3 s., 4 ozs. Yellowtail Shaw, Diana Maria -7 os. Carroll, J. T. ---_ 1 lb., 9 ozs. Bream Moore, Ricky --------1 oz.

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Saturday, 17 July 1954 Eniamet Etchings by John H. Olsen, DT2 Looks like another loss and gain for the Dental Clinic, the loss being LT Ricker and family who departed for the "States" via the Thomas last Saturday. He is slated for duty at the Naval Dental School, National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Mar y 1 an d. Though we're a little late, we want to take this opportunity to wish the Rickers good luck at their new station. We were bolstered in our sorrow over the loss of LT Ricker by the arrival of Mrs. Judith Doss, wife of one of our Dental Officers. She arrived in Guantanamo City last Saturday by commercial plane and was met by a happy Dr. Doss. Welcome aboard, Mrs. Doss, we hope you'll enjoy your stay as much as we enjoy having you. This welcome wouldn't be complete without including the Dotes. They also reported aboard the 10th. They include Mr. Dote's wife, Phyllis, his two daughters, Joelle, 5, Nancy, 4, and a son Michael, whom I hear plays a good game of golf for a young man of 13. I'll bet he'll make the top of the golf ladder in no time at all. Guess that's all 'till next time, I have to get ready for inspection. Hospital Notes by Charles L. Brewer, YN3 Heirport News From 7 July to 11 July, the following births were recorded; a daughter, Sandra Jean, born 7 July to SKC and Mrs. Eugene G. Richards; a daughter, Paula Ann, born 7 July to AE1 and Mrs. Joseph L. Hise; a son, Joseph Toliver III, born 8 July to CS1 and Mrs. Joseph T. Johnson; a daughter, Denise Diane, born 9 July to SN and Mrs. James A. Billington, a son, 9 July to PHC and Mrs. Paul R. Potts; a son, Gerald Frederick, born 11 July to AN and Mrs. Gerald Savage. Departures On 9 July 1954, LT Norman E. Forsee (MC), USNR, his wife and two children departed via FLAW for Jacksonville, Florida and subsequent separation. CDR Vernon W. H. Campbell (MC), USN and his family departed on the USNS PVT W. H. Thomas (TAP-185) on 10 July 1954. Dr. Campbell will report to the Charleston Naval Shipyard for duty. P. F. Bannon, BMSN, USN was detached on 14 July and will report to the U.S.S. Lake Champlain (CVA-39) for duty. Also detached on that date was Boyce M. Lawton, Jr., HM2, USN. Lawton, better known in the hospital as "The Professor", will be discharged from the Navy sometime this month and plans on returning to school. So as our local financier leaves, it is our hope that there is always a bull market and that he continues to buy low and sell high. Exemption (The following is printed in its entirety from the Midland, Texas "Reporter-Telegram.") "Notice: Will the party or parties that has constantly robbed my mail for the last year, please call for the rest of mail. Please give me your name so I can claim dependents on my income tax. E. G. Foust, Rtl, Box 191-F" New U, S. Mail Schedule in Effect Following is the new mail schedule in effect at the base post office: INCOMING MAIL FROM THE UNITED STATES: MONDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY 0200 1920 1900 1920 2130 MAIL READY FOR DELIVERY TO BASE ACTIVITIES: MONDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY 1100 0800 0800 0800 0800 OUTGOING MAIL TO THE UNITED STATES: MAIL CLOSES AT NAVY POST OFFICE: Monday -1230 Wednesday -0800, 1800 Friday -0800 Saturday -1000 MAIL CLOSES AT DROP BOXES: Monday -0900 Tuesday -2000 Wednesday -1500 Thursday -2200 Friday -2200 Saturday -0800 M~qroe M~s06sWG BY H iLites by Cpl. Guy Stephens, U.S. Marine Corps Arrivals There was but one arrival this week, Mrs. Robert L. Inman, wife of MSgt. R. L. Inman. Before coming to Guantanamo Mrs. Inman was residing in Summit, Ill. awaiting transportation. Welcome aboard Mrs. Inman, and may your stay in Guantanamo be a happy one. Departures There was also but one departure this week. That of "Rollie Santos". Raoul will he greatly missed by everyone, especially by the Leathernecks baseball and basketball teams. While in Gtmo Rollie was well on his way to set a new "Strikeout" record in baseball. While appearing in only 16 games, Rollie had a total of 123 strikeouts. Raoul was admitted to the USNH here for further transfer to the states for an operation to remove a bone chip from his right arm. Rollie left Wednesday night Via FLAW where he went to the hospital in Bethesda, Md. for the operation. So, from everyone at Marine Barracks we wish Rollie the best of luck. Those enjoying the trip to Kingston, Jamaica last weekend were Capt. and Mrs. W. E. Kerrigan, Capt. and Mrs. Charles S. Smith, and Sgt. and Mrs. Bernard Lee. Everyone reported a wonderful tlme. Baseball Bunts The Base Champion Leathernecks were defeated for the 4th time this season in dropping 2 games over the past week, losing once again to the MCB-8 nine by a score of 3-0. ...This marked the first time the Marines had been shut out this season. ... Big Jim Dotson of the Seabees pitched a brilliant game limiting the slugging leathernecks to but one hit and that by his opposing pitcher, Captain "Smitty" Smith. The game also saw Jim Pace's 15 game hitting streak come to a halt. "Smitty" Smith pitched good ball in relief of starter Don Schreck, a newcomer to the Leatherneck mound staff. ...The little lefty appeared in his second ball game and wildness caused his departure in both. ...5 games remain on the Marines schedule. ... Record is now 23-4. .Home run production has reached a season high of 42 in the 27 games played. Catcher Tom Felak in the league lead with 10. ...Tom also continues to lead the league in the hitting department with an average of .420. ...Jim Pace hitting .403. ...Post season tournament to begin August 1st. ... by John Hull Due to an acute shortage of personnel, WGBY has been forced to restrict hours of broadcast. The new program schedule is now appearing daily in the "Papoose". The station is still on the air during the periods when we have the maximum listening audience; from 7:00 to 8:00 in the morning, from 12:00 to 1:00 in the afternoon, and the regular evening schedule goes into effect with the "Parade of Sports" at 3:00 each afternoon. We sincerely regret that it is necessary to curtail our service to Guantanamo Bay and everything possible is being done to guarantee a return to full-time operation at the earliest date. The response to our appeal for new announcers has improved and we have been giving several auditions each day. Incidentally, if you are interested, just call us at 9615 and we'll tell you how to apply. A new series, the "Martin Block Show". will begin Monday, July 19 at 5:30 P.M., as a Monday through Friday series of thirty minute programs. Martin interviews with some of country's favorite artists, time devoted to the "good old bands gone by", and time for the top juke box favorites of a past year. He will also reserve part of his show to introduce brand new releases, picking out, in his opinion, the best guy and gal vocalists, giving the singing stars of tomorrow a chance to be heard. An unusual tale will be presented on "Suspense" Friday, July 23 at 8:30 P.M. Starring Cornel Wilde, the story is entitled "Somebody Help Me", and is based on actual fact. Cornel Wilde does an outstanding job of acting as he portrays Ed, a lonely man who becomes a murderer. "Tommy", the fast-paced and hilarious comedy by Howard Lindsay and Bertrand Robinson, will be presented by the "Theatre Guild On The Air" Monday, July 19 at 9:00 P.M., starring Wanda Hendrix and Kenny Delmar. Be sure to watch the daily program schedule in the "Papoose" for your favorite programs and any changes in the schedule presented each day over WGBY, 1450 on your dial. Lawyer (to woman seeking a divorce) : "Then your husband is quite elderly, I take it?" Wife: "Elderly! .Why he's so old he gets winded just playing checkers. VU-10 Prop Blast A grand week-end was enjoyed in Kingston, Jamaica, by a large group from this Squadron. From watching and listening to all the reports, every one had a wonderful time going shopping, sightseeing and swimming at the hotels. The following were lucky enough to make the trip. Chief Magarity and Wife; R. J. Heywang and wife; M. E. Baker and wife; LT B. J. Graves and wife; R. B. Woods; J. K. Campbell; R. B. Matimore; K. F. Baker; L. F. Gesche; R. B. Rebhorn. The big smile that Willie Mace is wearing around the Squadron is clue to the new addition to the family, Linda Dell, 5 pound 13-1/4 oz. Congratulations to Mickey and I understand that the daughter and father are doing just fine. Chief Pistole reports that he killed 65 pigeons last Saturday, but from other information I received was that the party as a whole only killed fifteen but that's a hunter for you. The Mallards have been in a very low slump the last few games. Wouldn't hurt any if a few more people showed up at the games and give the team a little more support. The boys have done a wonderful job this season and they are to be congratulated by the whole Squadron. These tall fishing tales, I guess, will never stop. I was taking with Uncle Dan Bennett the other day and he was telling me about this large fish that he caught. Seems that the fish was several feet long and quite large. Almost tore his line up in fact. After explaining how hard it was to catch, I finally got the truth out of him-only a large eel. Thought we had a lot of 20 year men in this Squadron, but Greer, J. P., AD2, Gable, L. G., AD2, Alm, A. F., AD3 decided to cut their tours a little short and return to civilian life. Best of luck to you all, your job was "WELL DONE." Had a little excitement the other night. Morphis, John E., AD1, reported into the Squadron with his wife. His first statement was "Where's the key to my house." Everyone was floored until they found out that his wife, Jewell, was a school teacher and had been given advance orders to come down. Welcome aboard. Three other new members also reported aboard. Ballard, Galen 0., EMC, from Freeport, N. Y. Finney, Mylan C., AD2, from Galesburg, Ill. and Kelley Victor F., AN, from Delaware, Penn. NSO Supply Line LCDR and Mrs. William J. Sheehan, LT Larson, BMC and Mrs. W. G. Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. M. S. Sands, Warren G. Geihn, SA and John M. Nagel Jr., SA are among the many base residents that took advantage of the trip to Jamaica last weekend on the USS Olmsted. Everyone had a wonderful time shopping and sightseeing. John W. Snyder, SN, left in the MSTS Thomas last Saturday for Brooklyn, N. Y. and separation. Welcome to Ralph A. McNeill, SK3, whose home town is Easton, Massachusetts. Ralph came from the USS Malley (DD565). Mrs. Frank B. Wilson recently accepted a position at the Depot as Mail Clerk. Hope you'll enjoy working with us, Ruth. Mrs. John DiMascola returned to work on Monday. Millie spent the previous week in San Juan, Puerto Rico. THE INDIAN m Page Seven

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a Nfavy-10NDPPO-din.-0020 Saturday, 17 July 1954 'THE IN IDIAN While going through the pinup file this photo happened to stand out for obvious reasons. The outfit-which seems to be real cool summer wear-vas modeled in Paris. Unfortunately we don't know the lovely model's name. MOVIES Saturday, 17 July RIDE CLEAR OF DIABLO Audie Murphy Dan Duryea A railroad surveyor returns to his home town to avenge the killing of his father and younger brother. The town's respected lawmen are secret leaders of the rustlers and are responsible for the murders. Sunday, 18 July ACT OF LOVE Kirk Douglas Dany Robin Story of a G. I. and his love for a young French girl. He tries in vain to get permission to marry her, but he is suddenly transferred to another unit. Monday, 19 July BOY FROM OKLAHOMA Will Rogers, Jr. Nancy Olson Cowboy Will Rogers, Jr., stops in Blue Rock to sail his answers to a correspondence course in law, and stays to become sheriff. NAS Crosswinds by Dick Friz CHGUN JOHN SENTZ: NAS ORDNANCE OFFICER. His subordinate duties include assisting the Base ordnance officer, in matters nertaining to aviation ordnance, Range officer, and Public Information officer. Born in Taneytown, Maryland the gunncr attended Gettysburg High School in Gettysburg, Pa. He entered the Navy through the enlisted ranks in 1936, and served on destroyers until 1939. Was in a patrol squadron on neutrality patrol until outbreak of World War II. He was appointed Warrant Officer in May of 1943. Some of his duty stations include, NAS Miami, FAW 10 Hedron, Casu (F) 9, NAS Norfolk, VF1B, and NAF Litchfield Park, Arizona (Ass't Security Officer.) His last duty was aboard the WASP (CV 18). Gunner Sentz married Betty Jane Ziegler of Cincinnati, Ohio. They have a boy, John David Jr., and a girl. Karen Ann. The CHGUN is an expert in the .45 cal. pistol and hopes to lead the NAS team into a victory over thi Marines soon. He is also active in bowling (captain of championship team last spring) and is acting master for the Cub-scouts. News-Briefs The following men departed from Guantanamo Bay on Wednesday: James Miller AC3, and Bob Seagle CS3. Miller will report to Pensacola, Florida, for further orders in that command, and Seagle will be transferred to the Construction Battalion Center at Port Hueneme, California. LT Emmet 0. Sanders. USN, will leave Guantanamo the 21st of July and report to. duty at the Bureau of Aeronautics Photographic Division, Navy Department, Washington, D. C. His relief will be LT E. E. Pierce from the Navy Photographic Center in Anacostia. LT Sanders will be greatly missed by all his friends at this station, in addition to his smiling presence at the regular Friday evening "happy hour" at the A.O.Q. cocktail Lounge. The following Air Station personnel made the trip to Kingston on the USS Olmsted APA 188 last week end: Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Serig. IT and Mrs. M. R. McCann, LTJG V. J. D'Amico, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Clark, HMC, and Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Heywang, AD1. Three members of the metal shop crew also went resorting, Alton (Tex) Sparks AM3, John Sokol AM3, and Cecil Wood AM2. Training (Continued from Page Two) technique developed in previous hours of practice-when to fire, when to turn, and how to recover so that the price of a hit may not be the loss of a plane flown into the banner. At this writing Lieutenant Roy Skelly leads the squadron with his high percentage of hits on one banner, but Lieutenant JG Tom Pickett has the best average for the rounds fired. To help the pilots learn from their efforts our Air Force exchange pilot, Captain Bob Denny, keeps a status board known as "Shootin' Poop." An evening meeting collects the lessons learned and records them for tomorrow. There they go again-the laboring tow plane followed by its four eager persuers filling the hot air with tearing sound and fading out over the ocean for another try at it. FTG Bulletin by Jack Engstrom 17 July 1954 Commander R. Y. McElroy is now wearing the Silver Eagles of a Navy captain. Captain McElroy reported to the Fleet Training Group on 1 July 1953 after completing a tour of duty at the Naval Academy. Upon graduation from Lebanon High School, Lebanon, Kentucky he entered the Naval Academy at Annapolis from which he graduated in 1935. Captain McElroy received his Nsv Wings at Pensacola Florida in 1938. Serving as Squadron Commander of VC-26 in the European Theater and later as Air Officer aboard the USS MAROUS ISLAND (CVE-77) in the Pacific Theater he was awarded the Navy Cross, the Distinguished Flying Cross, The Bronze Star and five Air Medals. Captain McElroy, FTG Air Officer, resides at Marina Site I with his wife and two children; two other children are attending school in Arizona. Lieutenant Commander G. A. Gardes, FTG CIC Officer, was anpointed to the rank of commander effective 1 July 1954. Commander Gardes, a graduate of Fairview High School, Dayton. Ohio and a graduate of the Naval Academy, class of '42, reported aboard 15 January 1954 after Commanding the USS HAVERSON (DER-316) for 21 months. Upon graduation from the Academy and receiving his commission he reported to the USS SAMPSON (DD-3941 where he served as Gunnery Officer for 30 months. The SAMPSON was the flagship for the Biak invasion. He also served as executive officer aboard the USS LAFBERG. Commander Gardes is married to the former Jeanne Smith of Hagerstown, Maryland. CDR Gardes, his wife and four children, reside at Radio Point. Chief Reynolds of the Engineering Department left for the States Tuesday morning for retirement. Chief Reynolds, a Diesel Specialist, will retire with twenty years, three months service. After a few weeks vacation in the states. Chief Reynolds will return to Guantanamo Bay and take a Civil Service job in the Utilities Division of the Public Works Department. Congratulations on a fine Navy career and we will be looking forward to seeing you again in August. A note of thanks to the First Class Petty Officers for conducting a very successful picnic last Saturday. Among the prizes awarded, were the three team trophies and individual trophies which were awarded to the FTG Bowling Team I for winning the Naval Base Championship. SHIP ARRIVALS USS H. D. Crow DE-252 19 July USS Sturtevant DE-239 19 July SHIP DEPARTURES USS McCard DD-822 20 July USS Maloy EDE-791 22 July Junior was bemoaming the fact that his drycleaning had not been delivered. "I haven't got a decent pair of pants to my name," he told his father: "What should I do?" "Well, son," volunteered Dad suddenly, "why don't you sue them for promise of breaches?"' "Of course I can spell correctly," said the company clerk, "but I'm not a fanatic about it." *BO K* NO0OK by Francis L. Cannon, JOSN FOR YOUR INFORMATION THE SECRET DIARY OF HAROLD L. ICKES: THE FIRST 1000 DAYS Harold L. Ickes' diary is the record of his official and personal life during his 19 years as Secretary of the Interior. This volume covers the first four years-1933 to 1936-of the Roosevelt administration. There are frank, unretouched portraits of General MacArthur, Alf Landon, Harry Hopkins and W ill i a n Randolph Hearst, to name a few. He tells of F.D.R. without a trace of hero-worship and points out many things which will disturb both his idolaters and bitter enemies. HOW THE UNITED NATIONS WORKS by Tom Galt In language that is about as clear as you can get on such a subject, Mr. Calt explains the workings of the United Nations, showing how all the components operate and how their operations affect everyone. There are sprightly cartoon-like illustrations by Norman Tate. U.S. GRANT AND THE AMERICAN MILITARY TRADITION by Bruce Catton The administration of U.S. Grant, analyzed with an eye to present conditions. Grant waa a man well qualified to be a military leader, but these very qualities proved a liability when he was placed in the highest civilian office. He felt, from his years in the military, that Congress was the final authority and saw himself as little more than an administrative officer. FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT TREASURE DIVING HOLIDAYS by Jane and Barney Crile Most of the year Barney Crile is a well-known surgeon attached to the Cleveland Clinic, but when vacation time comes he and his family pack their aqualungs and head for warm waters and excercise their abilities as expert deep-sea prowlers. They also tell of many devices and techniques which have widened their underwater horizon. 0, KING LIVE FOREVER by Henry Myers The story of a quest for the secret of life. The man in quest was handsome, vigorous, and more than a hundred years old with every intention of living for several hundred more. His story begins in the time of young Queen Victoria, continues through our time and never really ends. IN PASSING PERDU -Paride Rombi. Boy's search for unknown father in the Mediterranean. ENJOY YOUR GOLF -Lealand Gustavson. Gives many fine points of the game with illustrations. THE WHISTLING SHADOW -Mabel Seeley. A suspense story and a girl with a mysterious past. THE MOTION OF THE HEART -Blake Cabot. How medical research combats heart disease. Two sergeants at the induction center were discussing the arrival of a recruit that day. "His mother was there, his girl was there, her folks were there. Such crying and screaming-I thought he'd never stop."


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