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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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spompmr


l.Govers qTMO Like Tnamo Bashy rvc---- - -r J

Vol. VI, No. 53 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 10 July 1954


After 28 Years Service Reservists to GTMO


Heads for New York


Wednesday, 7 July, a task group of twelve escorts steamed into Guantanamo Bay on the last leg of a four week reserve training cruise.
The task group, commanded by CAPT J. B. Fellows, Jr., is made up of ships from the Eastern seaboard used exclusively for reserve training. The ships are maintained throughout the year by a skeleton crew, and each year several cruises are made for training reserves. During these cruises, reserviscs-under direct supervision of the crew- man the ship for their yearly training period.


This year, differing from the
previous years, the reserve training cruise was extended to four weeks-allowing more time for training and more time for operaions and visits to liberty ports.
Tis task group just returned
from South American ports and . is preparing to return to the United States.


Autnmatic Laindry Planned


Twenty eight years of continuous active Naval Service comes to an end next month when Peter J. Pazin, Chief Damage Controlman, will be released to inactive duty
Chief Pazin, known throughout the base as "Pappy" has been attached to the Base Police for the last 21 months of his tour in Guantanamo Bay.
Now 46, Pappy enlisted in 1926 and went through his "Boot" training at Newport, R. 1. His first ship was the old carrier, USS Lexington, and since then he's had duty on practically all the major types of Navy ships. During World War II, he was attached to the Amphibious Force, both in the Atlantic and Pacific areas. He attained the rank of Chief Warrant Officer during the war.
Chief Pazin reported to Gtmo in September 1952 attached to Fleet Training Group and was sent to the Base Police soon after his arrival.
Besides his present police duties, Pappy is also an avid musician and can tinkle out a tune on the piano with the best of them. He also knows how to handle the bass violin, and in lighter moments even takes a turn on the ukelele. He currently leads a group known as the "Rythm Ramblers" playing on week-ends and special occasions at the Petty Officers' Club.
Peppy will leave today on the USNS Thomas and plans to settle in Athens, N. Y. his hometown, with his wife, Mary Elizabeth, and thcir 15-year-old son, Nolan John. He expects to be released to inactive duty between August and October.
"The Navy's the best outfit in the world," says Chief Pazin. "The only thing I can say to the 'youngsters' is 'Stay with it' and they won't be sorry."


By Naval Station Exchange

Through the increasing facilities of the Naval Station Navy Exchange, laundry facilities will be increased here soon, as plans for a new laundromat are being made.
Anyone wishing to do a laundry may do so since this new service is not limited to military or civilian


Colonel R. E. Fojt
personnel. Thiere will be 12 completely automatic washers to begin with, and as operations demand, new ones will be added. Also, there will be the added services of automatic driers.
To save those doing laundry the trouble of carrying their own soap and bleach to the laundry, both soap and bleach will be issued in the proper amounts for the machines in small pre-packed packages for a small charge. As well as beingan added convenience to customers, this service will reduce mainteinance costs and possibly help in future expansion.


Last week, in a ceremony at the Naval Hospital James H. Johnson, Chief Quarterman, Maintenance, was presented with a citation for meritorious civilian service by CAPT Tilden 1. Moe, Commanding Officer, Naval Hospital. This is the second highest award which can be earned by a civilian. Those at the ceremony, left to right: LCDR I. V. King, Administrative Assistant, CAPT Tilden 1. Moe, Commanding Officer, CDR John B. MacGregor, Executive Officer, LT E. R. Mason, Finance Officer, James H. Johnson, and CWOHC H. W. Colt., Personnel Officer.


9


C.o.


Relieves Colonel Hill

Colonel Robert E. Foit, USMC, assumed command of the Marine Barracks Wednesday relieving Colonel John B. Hill, commanding officer for the last 23 months.
The change of command took place at the parade reviewed by many personnel of the base. Excerpts from both officer's orders were read and Col. Hill presented the Barracks colors to Col. Fojt.
Col. Fojt entered the Marine Corps from the U. S. Naval Academy class of 1931. At the Academy he was active in both football and track until a broken leg on two separate occasions necessitated his retirement from active athletic participation.
During the next decade the colonel was assigned to various biliets including duty with the 1st Provisional Marine Brigade in Haiti and as Military Aide and chief of police on Guam from 1938 to 1940.
During the war Colonel Fojt served as commanding officer of the 19th Marines, the. engineer regiment with the 3rd Marine Division. During that time he participated in the Bougainville and Guam campaigns. For his actions in the Bougainville campaign he recieved a Bronz Star with V, a letter of commendation and the Presidential citation. While on Guam Colonel Fojt recieved his first Legion of Merit with combat V.
Following the war the colonel was assigned to successive engineer billets both in the United States and overseas culminating in his being ordered to headquarters, Marine Corps as Chief of the Engineer Service in July 1949.
In July 1952 Colonel Fojt joined the 1st Mairne Division in Korea only to have his tour interrupted six months later by another leg fracture. However, during that six months he earned another Legion of Merit with V.
Following a period of hospitalization in Bethesda, Md. Colonel Fojt attended and graduated from the Naval War College in Newport, R. I., his last duty station before being assigned to Gtmo.
Colonel Fojt was accompanied to Gtmo by his wife, Alice and their daughter, Patricia. They also have another daughter, Dorothy, who is married.


Clothing Allowance Increased

The Navy EM clothing allowance is expected to jump from $5.40 to $6 monthly beginning July 1, 1954. This probably will mean a little more cash for Navy men since overall clothing prices for indi-idual purchases will drop slightly. Examples: dress jumper, dropped from $9.05 to 8.75; undress jumper, from $7.00 to $6.70; dungaree trousers from $170 to $1.65; but the noacoat will remain the same at $24.45.


9


Pappy Pazin Retires


Twelve DE's Bring Colonel Fojt New Marine


- m -






a


THE INDIAN


Navy Unveils New Amphibious Assault Plane


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Station
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615
Saturday, 10 July 1954
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADi Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT william R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sandness----- Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC-------------------Editor
H. L. Sisson. J03 -------------------- Newv
Jerry Lewis. J03i- ----Features Pierce Lehmbeck-------------------Sports
F. L. Cannon, JOSN_ - ___Photographer
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945. and Fina nod with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THlE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


An Editorial....


Keep the Reds


in the Dark
The Reds are a curious bunch of guys. They want to know everything about us.
So they won't get anything out of you, eh ? Don't be so sure. You might not know much, but you know a little hit.
Besides being curious, the Reds are patient. Any little crumb of information you may let dropthey'll pick up. They're very interested in little things.
Because these little things, added to a lot of other little things and tabulated on the Red adding machine, add up to a lot of big things.
Start getting security conscious
-if you're not already. Keep your lip buttoned about anything even remotely concerned with military and security matters, because the Reds are keeping a close tab on everything.
The less the Reds know, the less they find out, the better it isfor you. (AFPS)


Navy to Assign Names

To LST, ADG Vessels

Washington (AFPS)-The Navy is planning to name its Landing Ship Tanks (LSTs) and Degaussing Vessels (ADGs).
The Chief of Naval Operations believes the naming of these ships has a number of advantages. It will boost morale and p r e s t i g e of personnel abroad, aid in positive identification of units, and assist in delivery of personal and official correspondence.
Unit and fleet commanders reeommended the move with the
Chief of Naval Operations adding
-pproval.


New York (AFPS)-The world's first "flying LST"-a transport plane thac can taxi to a beach and unload tanks, trucks or troops from its bow-is now being produced for the Navy by the Convair Division of the General Dynamics Corporatnon.
The assault transport plane- a bow-loader version of the fourengined turboprop R3Y-1 Tradewind-is designated the R3Y-2. It has the same high performance charac- --
teristics of the regular transport obstructions. The deck is 88 feet
-a range of more than 2000 miles long and more than nine feet and a rate of climb faster than wide.
many WWII fighter planes. Tne five-man crew is on a deck
Both transports will go into above the cargo deck. The hull
service late this year with the below the cargo deck is compartNavy's Fleet Logistic Air Wings, mnted for strength and waterPacific. tight integrity. Like the standard
RFY-1, the flying LST has a 10-ft.
FoR- assault operations, the wide door on the aft port side for R3Y-2 lands i offshore waters normal dock loading of cargo.
and taxis to the beach. When toe It can carry four 155mm hownull touches the sand, the bow itzers, tree 21/-ton trucks, six
opens upward and a ramp drops, jeeps or two half-tracks which can
allowing loaded vehicles or troops be unloaded through its bow door to debark. opening 8 ft. 6 in. wide by 6 ft.
To pull off the beach, the pilot 8 in. high.
simply reverses the props and The R3Ys are the largest water
backs off. A 30-second run lifts based planes ever built by Conthe 80-ton plane into the air- vair. Each is powered by four
The bow-loader can carry 24 Allison T-40 turboprop engines
tons of cargo on its cargo deck developing approximately 22,000 which stretches back in one level norsepower. unbroken by bulkheads or other

CuLeas Mt Passive Defense
Cub Leaders Mveet;


Carnival Planned
by Millie Jamieson

A Leaders' Meeting of the Guantanamo Bay Cub Scouts was held at the home of Mrs. R. K. Minard on July 6. It was decided that future Pack Meetings will be held on the last Tuesday of earn month beginning promptly at 7:30, and each Cub must be accompanied by at least one parent. The next meeting will be on July 27, when ribbons will be awarded for the best baked goods or candy made by the Cubs and their Dads, and then the "goodies" will be auctioned. So, come on, Cubs and Dads-"shoo" Mother from the kitchen and let's find out who is the best cook.
A Scout carnival is being planned for August 14. The Scout Carnival Committee will have ics next meeting at the NAS Administration Building at 7:30 on July 19.
We are happy to welcome a new Den Mother, Mrs. W. J. Boyer, who will be reorganizing the Dens #2 and #5. Any boys who were in these Dens and wish to continue their Cubbing, or any new boys who are interested may contact Mrs. Boyer at 123 Villamnar. This Den is for boys living in the areas of Bargo or Vi i ar.


Drills Studied

Thiursday afternoon, 1 July, the board for the hurricane and passive defense drills met and discussed the two drills which took place on 26 June. Although no final statement by the board has been made available for publication, several points were mentioned by the problem control team concerning this year's drills.
Evacuation to the shelter took only 30 minutes a record time .-and this was appraised by the problem control team as being very goon.
In respect to the passive defense dill, it was noted by the problem control team that there was a failure of personnel participating in the problem to use their imaginanion in carrying out the drill, This consisted of such matters as persons using telephones in areas that had been destroyed, assimiating damage reports and casualaty reports came in just 45 minutes after the burst of the bomb.
According to CDR R. M. Beaugrand, Base Plans Officer, and Officer in Chasge, Problem Control Team, the passive defense drill was carried out very well considering that this was the first year that such a drill had been attempted here.


F -


Page Two


Saturday 10 July 1954


,


Sunday, 11 July 1954

Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930-2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic)


The Chaplain's Corner




"And there were cert-in Greeks among them that came up to worship at the feast. The same came therefore to Phillip, which was of Bethsaida of Galilee, and deired him saying, "Sir, we would see Jesus". John 12:21-2
Jesus and his disciples had arrived in Jerusalem, A few days earlier Jesus had brought Lazarus from the dead in the city of Bethany. A party of Greeks heard of the miracle as they passed through the city. As soon as they arrived It Jerusal-m, they sought out Phillip and made this request, "Sir, we would see Jesus".
Now this simple incident can easily be overlooked by the average peson reading the Bible, but it should not 1.e a- it has a meaning for each of us who are followers of Jesus.
For one thing it reveals a universal hu-an longing to see Jesus. Every person who hears about Jesus comes to toe place that he wishes to know Him. He may wait as long as he can to make his request known. But in his sanest moment or in the hour of desperation when he realizes his need for a power greater than his own, he wishes to see Jesus.
For another thing, it reveals that the seeker endeavors to find Jesus through someone who knows Him. Phillip is a Greek name, and many Greeks lived in Bethsaida which was his home town. Therefore, the Greeks sought to find Jesus through Phillip with whom they were aquainted. Those who need Jesus turn naturally to us who are His followers. They have every right to believe that we can introduce them to Jesus. Our Lord counts on each of us to bring others to Him, and this glorious task will be easter for us if we use this prayer.
"0 Christ, may we sense the deep longings of our followman to know thee. Hay we be wise enough and devoted enough to lead every needy person to thee. Hell) us to lift thee up until thou shalt be able to draw all mankind to thee. Amen:"








Saturday, 10 July 1954


THE INDIAN


Now Officers Arrive at Base Command

Reporting aboard the Naval Base here this last week on board the USNS Pvt. William H. Thomas were four new officers for four commands. CAPT W. D. F. Stagner arrived to assume command of the Dental Clinic; CAPT D. B. Cushing arrived to relieve CAPT W. H. Grovcrman as Chief Staff Officer at Fleet Training Group; CDR Gle E. Krause arrived to assume the duties of Naval Base Legal Officer; and CDR John B. MacGregor arrived to relieve CDR J. J. Times at the Naval Hospital.
On the afternoon of his arrival, Captain Stagner assumed command of the Dental Clinic in an informal office ceremony. Captain Stagner reported here from the 8th Naval District, New Orleans, La.


Captain Cushing

Captain Cushing arrived here from Naval War College, Newport, Rhode Island where he had been undergoing training. Prior to that, Captain Cushing was witn Fleet Training Group, Chesapeake Bay. Captain Cushing will take over as Cnief Staff Officer for Fleet Training Group here.

























Commander Krause

Commander Krause reported here from Commander, Service Forces, Atlantic Fleet, where he served as Legal Officer, and immediately took up the duties as Naval Base Legal Officer and Legal Assistance Officer. Commander Krause relieved CDR A. D. Whiteman who departed Guantanamo Bay on 19 June.


Commander MacGregor

Commander acGregor, who for two months served in the additional status of medical attendant to Vice President Richard M. Nixon, reported aboard Guantanamo Bay Naval Hospital from the National Naval Medical Center, Beriiesda. Md., where he was Assistant Chief of Medicine. Commander MacGregor, will relieve Commander J. J. Timmes as Executive Officer and Chief of Medical Services.


WGBY Hi-Lites

by John Hull
Those of you who read this column last week are already aware of the active personnel problem here at WGBY. Beginning Monday, 2 July, because of the sudden transfer of Jim Wade, we will not be able to continue the daily broadcasts of the "Hillbilly Jamboree". Every attempt will be made to get it back on the air just as soon as a new man can "broken in'.
Speaking of new men, the response to last week's appeal for volunteers for a job as announcer at WGBY was very sparse. Out of some 11,000 men in Guantanamo Bay, we received only three pnone calls from interested parties. So, if you read the column, rnought you might like to try ott, but just neglected to do anything about it don't delay any longer. Our staff is down to three men now and
another man is due to leave any clay. In over six years of continuous service to the people at Guantanamo Bay, WGBY has never had to cut it's 17-hour-a-day program schedule, but the staff has never been so reduced.
No matter where you are on the base, you have a good chance of going to work here at WGBY. If you are attached to the Naval Station, it means a permanent transfer to the Special Service Division for full-time work. If you are in any other ba-e command, it means a TAD transfer for full-time duty. If you have at least one year 1(f, on your torur of duty at GTMO, and have little or no regional accent, we'll turn you into a competent announcer and engineer within six months.
Remember, call 9615. We will ask you to bring a note from your Division Officer saying you have his permission to audition, and then we will "cut a tape" any afternoon, Monday through Saturday, between 3 and 5 o'clock. Don't delay a moment longer. Gct in touch with us right away.


Columbian Ships Here CDR McElroy Completes

For Recreational Visit Jet Check-Out at Leeward


This last week. two Columbian snips the ARC Alim'ante Eldilla and the ARC .lmiu'ane Brion
arived in Guan.i no me Bay tot a i'ecreational and libeity tour.
The Two South American ships arrived heie \\ednesday, and even before the ships arri l, armangements were being mae v) w, lcome the officers, men, and midshipmen on board.
While here in Guantanamno both snips will lie isstied c h io old y passes for recreational sainhes ly the Naval Station Special Sr tvics. These passes will griliL to e holding 'hemt to free-of-chirge tise of facilities stich as the sk~ating rink, corral, sailboat locker, and other facilities wci nomally carry a charge for services.


Navy Suspends Issuance

Of Good Conduct Medal

Washington (AFPS)-Toe Navy has temporarily suspended issuance of its Gootd Conduct Medal. Temporary instructions have been issued for submitting requests for the medal until such time as the revision to the Navy and Marine Corps Awards Manual, NAVPERS 15,790, is distributed and the medals are again available.



DON'T MISS


'Out of the Frying Pan'


Starts Tuesday Night


Coimimantler R. Y. MrEli-oy of Fleer Training Group, Guanitanamio Bay, Cua accepts congrauIlacions of LCDR Frank H. 0. O'Brien, Commanding Cfficer, F i g h t e r Squretl'on THIRTY FOUR, following completion of his familiarization flight it) an F2H-2 "Banshee" jet of Fighter Squadron THIRTY FOUR based at Cecil Field, Florida. Commander McElroy was given a complete familiarization indoctrination neck out of tue "Banshee' and was made an official "short time" member of Fighter Squadron THIRTY FOUR.


Marine Pitching Ace

Enters Bethesda Hospital

"Rollie" Santos, Marine Leathmrneck pitching ace, was sent to tie Naval Hospital in Bethesda, Md. this week for an examination end possible operation on his right t'lbow.
Santos, who holds a Milwaukee Brave contract, compiled a league record of 11 wins and one loss during tne current baseball season. His st'ikeout performance reached 123.


Builds Twin-Engine Model Plane


Adjusting one of the twin engines on his new model plane, Robert Sprague, PHSN of Fleet Camera Pai'ty prepares for the test flight. The model is entirely his own design and, to the best of his knowledge, is -te first twin-engine, tricycle landing-gear model built here at Guantanamo. It has a seven foot wingspan. Sprague, who hails from Brunswick, Maine, 'has been building models for about four years, and is now working on a Piper Cub vith an eight-foot wingspan.


9


am


Page Three







Page Four


Saturday, 10 July 1954


THE .NDIAN


by CI. Guy Stephens, U.S. Marine Corps

Arriving aboard the USNS W. H. THOMAS last Friday was Colonel and Mrs. Robert E. Fojit and daughter Pat from Newport R. I., and Pfc. Floyd H. Tollay from Paris Island, South Carolina. Colonel Fojt relieved Colonel John B. Hill as Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks. The Change of Command Ceremony was held Wednesday, July 7th.
DEPARTURES
Departing this week for the States was Colonel and Mrs. John B. Hill and children, Jane, Bunn and Nancy. Col. Hill will report to Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendelton, Calif. for duty. BEfore reporting to Camp Pendelton Col. Hill and family will spend a few days with their families in Atlanta, Georgia. Others leaving wlrs MSgc. Robert G. Ragan to Marine Corps Air Station, Miami, Fla. SSgt. Ralph G. Mathias to Norfolk, Va. for disenarge. Sgt. Cornelius Moore to Brooklyn, N. Y. for discharge. Sgt. Josse Downey to Brooklyn, N. Y. for reassignment. Pfc. Roger J. Godfrey and Pvt. Norman G. Gardiner to Brooklyn, N. Y. for discharge.
BASEBALL BUNTS
With 8 games remaining, the Marines have clinched the Naval Base Cnampionship with a 9% game lead. . . Catcher Tom Felak, Second Baseman Jim Pace and Shortstop Andy Androvich played the full 9 innings in the annual All Star Game and were defensive strikeouts. . . Chuck Mason came around to score the wiming run in the 3 to 2 victory for the Naval Base All Stars. . . The top 5 Leatherneck sluggers are Tom Felak 444. . . Jim Pace 400. . . Billy Wood 351. . . Andy Androvich 340. . . And Larry Adams at 336. . . Felak leads the home run parade with a total of 9. . . Chuck Mason 7. . . and Andy Androvich 6. . . Followed closely by Jim Pace with 5. . . The Leathernecks have gathered a total of 41 doubles 5 triples. . . and 38 home runs in 24 games. . . Jim Pace's hitting streak has reached a total of 14 consecutive games... Andy Androvich hitting safely in 10 consecutive games. . . Pitcher Rollie Santos will be lost to the Leathernecks pitching staff with an ailing right arm. . . The mound ace holds one of the top records in the league at 11-1. . . His strikeout total had reached a high of 141 in his 14 appearences. . . Leathernecks will be faced with a pitching burden with Santos' departure. . . Andy Androvich likely to see mound duty in the remaining 8 games and the post season playoffs. . . Andy in one previous appearance had defeated the NAS Flyers. . . Pitcher Bob Goens likely to see plenty of action. . .


SCUTTLEBUTT











kI


'Dad let me borrow it for the weekondt"


Fishing Tornament


IAND DIVISION
Barracuda
Patts, C. w.- - - Is ' _bs. Hoppe, G....or E . -- 5 lbs., 12


Pi ku. S. . 7 1)s.
rml, d, H. A. - lbs., 8 ozs.
I<,.: ri , Sara - -- - -- - 14 lbs., 8 1,. oz,.
-k rrnanny, Ravrond E. 19 lbs., 8 ozs.
Mackerel (King)
i vrton, R. D. ____--. 5 lbs., 10 ozs.
Snapper
Fllery, C. L.. 21f lbs.
H inandez, J. C. 12 lrs.
H-ays. Robert. M. __-- 1 lb., 7 ozs. Hrlin, John k - - 91/2 as
Williamis. Mike -----7 ass.
.'rmieo,. Raymond 6 ozs.
Baker, F. R- - 5/2 ozs.
Hi, W. R. 5.ozs.
,I ,i'>esn, Rrrvn onr 5 ozs.
Sil);illa Peter - -- 1 az.
Tarpon
ilwvarl, K. D. - -------- 17 lbs.
lIr iy, R. I ------------ 12 lbs., 4 ozs.
Snook
irnrl , T.- A-- l 1 ls., 4 ss.
Hoten- r, T. A ----------- 3 lbs.


His , N. L. Shaw, Jirmmy


New stripes were added at the Marine Barracks recently by the above men. Standing, left to right, all corporals: A. J. Maracino, T. J. O'Connell, R. L. Willequer, R. J. Soukup and M. L. Orr. Kneeling, R. G. Sylvester and H. W. Rowley.


FTG Bulletin
y Jack Engstrom
LTJG Treffinger of the CIC Department, departed Gtmo Wednesday via FLAW flight for Jacksonville where he will be released to inactive duty. LTJG Treffinger, known as "Treff" round the Gtmo Golf Course, will be going into private business as an Architectural Appraiser.
LCDR Armstrong of the Air Department, will depart on the Thomas today with his family for a tour of stateside duty. He will report to the Naval Unit, Biological Division, Chenical Corporation, Camp Detrick located in Frederick, Maryland, good bye and good luck at your new duty station.
The First Class Petty Officers are hosts at a Fleet Training Group Picnic this afternoon at Phillips Park from 1230 to 1700. There will be entertainment and fun for all. Food and Liquid refreshments will be furnished by FTG Welfare and Recreation.
If you don't feel up to running races etc., come out anyway and meet some new people. Many new personnel have reported aboard since the last FTG Picnic and several new families have arrived from the states also, so it wil be a good time to get acquainted.
Chief Reynolds of the Engineering Department will be departing for the States Wednesday 14 July for Transfer to the Fleet Reserve and release to inactive duty. Chief Reynolds will have completed 20 years 3 months and nine days Naval services when released. Chief Reynolds has been the number one Golfer of the Training Group for the past few months.
Congratulations on a fine Naval Career and good luck in civilian life.
Chief Pazin, who has been TAD to the Base Police, will depart on the Thomas today for Brooklyn where he will be released to inactive duty . . . Frank Sygalas, RD1, will also depart Gtmo as he has received orders to report to Headquarters, MSTS Atlantic Area, Brooklyn for assignment afloat.... Al Harris, SO1, who just returned from a 30 day leave is a married man now. He married the former Vivian Emerson of Seattle, Washington on the 14th of June. Congratulations.


NAS Crosswinds
hy Dick Friz
The holiday weekend provided a rash of trips . . . Some NAS personnel took the pleasure jaunt to Kingston, part of the FLAW Crew spent a well earned rest in Gtmo City, and several lucky ones made it to Miami. Chief and Mrs. H. B. Cooper, and Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Seg visited Santiago. Mr. and Mrs. Bob Heywong also made the trip. Another jaunt also made the will be made this weekend.
The family of LCDR J.N. Parker, Mrs. Parker and two sons, arrived via USNS THOMAS, on Friday, 2nd of July. They are residing at Paola Point. LCDR Parker is the new Officer in Charge of Leeward Point Field, reporting aboard for the command on 6 of July.
. . . John California CSSA transferred his culinary skills to Leewaid Point, reporting aboard from McCalla. Another new arrival was Reynold McGivvivray A/N. PROMOTIONS . . . PACT Dale E.
Leeper USN promoted to CHPCLK effective June 1, 1954.
BOSN Joseph A. Hould USN promoted to CHBOSN effective 1 July 1954.
LTJG Malcolm R. McCann, US NR promoted to LT effective 2 July, 1954. ENS Jerry W. A arts USNR reported to duty the 28 of June from the USS MELVIN R. NAWMAN (DE-416). He has been assigned duties as BOQ and Mess Officer and Treasurer, of the Commissioned Officers Mess. Welcome Aboard!
LCDR and Mrs. J. D. Bedford announced the arrival of their first born1, Joseph Jr. last week, and the Mrs. and Joe Jr. are doing fine. Our Personnel Officer still carries the dark circles under his eyes, the cachet of the anxious father. The Naval Hospital's motto of 'never having lost a father' should lend some assurance.
The following men will depart from Guantanamo Bay this weekend: Earl Maier AD2, and Jim Wade AC3, WGBY announcer are to be transferred to NAS Pensacola for further assignment in that command.
Wallace Heaton AD3, George Silkman AD3, and John McCelland AC:l to Patuxent River. Wilbert Kuni, PH3 will head for Anacostia.


Grouper


BOAT DIVISION Mrs. E. C. Koslake - 3 lbs.,
Lrafnear, R. E. __ __-- _- 9 lbs.,
Snapper
Roberts, V. A. n e50 lbs. Carroll, J. C. 3---- lbs.,
Tarpon
Swanson, G. A. ___--__ 13 lbs.,
SPECIAL DIVISION
Bonefish
Winrd, Bai-io A. - -- -- 2 lbs., Sranborn, Ellen ---Croakers
Sanbcrn, Jiyn Darlton,, Kathryn ---


9 ozs. 8 ozs. 7%"/ ozs. 1% ozs. 8 ozs. 8 ozs.
s.


Ladyfish
Smouse, J. H. ---------- 4 lbs., 8 ozs.
Pompano
lervard, Kenneth 20 lbs.
Cbvrvv, G. K.- ------------16 lis .1 asos.
Romaso, Sam 8 Irs., 131 riss.
Soballe, Peter --------- 2 lbs.. 2 ozs.
Shark
Meredith, Fred _____-__ 41 lbs., 8 ozs. Hawes, D. D. - ---------- 1i lbs.
Triggerfisl,
Lee, G. A. _ -- -s- 4 lbs., S oz .
SPEARFISHING DIVISION


Nichols, E. M. --rouper 16
Mackerel Scheibel, K. E. _ ___- 8
Snappers Nichols, E. M. _- 14
Barracuda W ard, C. F. __ _._____ 5
Hogfish
WardI, C. F.-- ------------5
Other Fish
Angel
Faler, L. B.
Y'llowtail Shaw, Diana Mara Carrroll, J. T. --
Bream


Moore, Ricky


lbs.
lbs., 11 i ,zs. lbs.
lbs., 1.5 ozs. lbs., 15 ozs.

2 lbs., OZs.


i .


Ladies' Golf Shots

by Miriam Hoy
Thij week the ladies received golf balls for winning low gross and low net on the Front Nine. The lucky winners were:
First Flight
Gross-Corky Henning
Net-Lou Toczko
Second Flight
Gross-Marion Caruthers
Net-Fran Dykeman
Third Flight
Gross-two-way-tie
Betty Lou Tipler
Val Evans
Net-Emma Hutton
It is awfully nice having Lou Toczko and Pat Gentry back playing with us again. Lou's limping a ittle yet, but nevertheless playing a beautiful game.
Next week we'll have a Blind Five Tournament on the Back Nine. Even though everyone is suffering considerably with the heat these days-hope to see a lot of you Wednesday.
Today Jane McElroy leaves on the USNS Thomas for a month's visit in the Stat-s. We wish you a pleasant trip, Jane, and have yourself a wonderful time.


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Saturday, 10 July 1954


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Saturday, 10 July 1954


TlIE IN 1)1 .N


Base League Narrows to Second Place VU-10, SeaBee Struggle
by Pierce Lehmbeck


Naval Base All-Stars Edge Cubans, 3 to 2

In Annual 4th of July Classic

The Naval Base All-Stars, paced by the four hit hurling of the Naval Station's Mandy Mandis and the ringing bat of NAS's Milo Sutherland, moved to their second successive Independence Day win over the Cuban All Stars Sunday afternoon as they edged the visitors 3-2 before an overfowing holiday crowd.


Milo Sutnerland of the Naval Air Station is narrowly tagged out at tie plate by Cuban All-Star backstop Guia last Sunday afternoon in the traditional Independence Day classic which the Base All-Stars won for the second straight year, 3-2. Sutherland led the All-Stars at the plate as he collected three singles in four trips.


Victory was the order of the day as NavBase mentor Chuck Smith of the Marine Barracks united substitutions to tie point that only eleven names showed in tile ine-up. Mandis, in going the distance, became the first All-Star pitcher to ever accomplish the feat.
With the All-Stars notching all thiee of their runs in the bottom of the second, the little 'Pride of the Indians' pi ched flawless baseball for the first four innings as he eld the visiting Cubans hitless until the top of the fourth. He finished the game scattering a total of four safeties, none of then going for extra bases. While Mandis was carrying his load so superbly on the hill, other All-Stars were showing their worth also, as the Leatherneck keystone duo, Pace and Androvich, played brilliantly afield and the Flyer's Milo Sutherland led the team's offense with a three for four day at the plate. It was the latters bat that put the spark into the NavBase's second inning uprising.
On the Cuban side of the fence, soirt stop Valiente dazzle the ciowd with his flashy infield play and led his team at the plate with twro singles in four trips to the plate.
Mandis was credited with the win while A. Street was charged wi to the loss. Neither pitcher gave up an extra base blow as Mandis struck out a total of six while Strtet sat five down.
This ran the now traditional Independeice Day series to 2-1 in favor of the NavBase. At their first meeting in 1952, the Cubans took the tilt in an extra inning game, 3-2 with the Base taking the 1953 tilt, 8-7.
NavBase 3 8 4
Cuba 2 4 3


Proudly beaming from the winner's circle are Claxton of the Cuban All-Stars and Milo Sutherland, the Naval Air Station's contribution to the Base A Il -S t a r Squad, after the two athletes notched first places in the pre-game contests held as part of the afternoon. The Cuban's Claxton is displaying the ball which he threw further than all other entrants in the ball-throwing event and Sutherland was the fastest man on the base paths as he took all four in 15. 2.

HOMERUN LEADERS
(As of Thursday, 8 July) Felak Marines 9
Dotson MCB-8 9
Pace Marines 7
Mason Marines 6
Androvich Marines 6

PITCHING RECORDS
(As of Thursday, 8 July)
Santos Marines 11 1 .916
Smith Marines 10 1 .909
Bigbie MCB-8 8 3 .727
Harrison NAS 4 1 .800
Huber VU-10 4 2 .666


With the Marine Leathernecks already the 1954 pennant winners of the Naval Base League local interest focuses on the battle for second place which raged throughout this past week of play with the 'Bees of MCB-8 winning a decisive two and edging the VU-10 Mallards out of the slot by a full game.
'BEES EDGE NAVSTA TO
NOTCH TIE FOR SLOT the top of the first and the other
The first step in the 'Bee climb the fourth.
towards the coveted seat this week Smith was credited with the win, was a 12-7 win over the fourth his tenth against one setback, as
place Naval Station Indians Tues- he struck out six. Breske was day night. charged with the loss, his fifth
The Braves, with Babe Fidler on against two wins. He gave way the mound, jumped off to an early to Edgar in the eigth. three run lead in the first two Marines 10 13 5
frames, but the 'Bees power shoved VU-10 2 4 7
across four in the bottom of the 'BEES INTO SECOND
second, four in the third and four iY ONE
in the sixth as they went on to Capitalizing on the Mallard loss,
take the win and move into a tie MCB-8 came back to plant their for second with the Mallards best foot firmly a full game above Dotson was the big gun for MCB-8 VU-10 as they came from behind as his ringing bat sounded off for to edge the cellar-dwelling NAS three singles, a double and two Flyers, 6-5, Thursday night. RBI's in five trips. Baries rapped
out his third round-tripper for It was the big bat of Jim Dotson
the Naval Station in the eighth with once again that made the differno one on. ence as a grand slam double in the
Dotson was the winning pitcher seventh knotted the score at five as he went the distance to notch all. Manager Robbie Robinson the win striking out 11. Fidler was followed with the punch that won charged with the loss, going the the game by singling the big first first two and one third innings tally. giving up a total of eight runs
while striking out one. Mandis was Shackleton was the winning his relief as he finished the tilt hurler as be came on to relieve giving up four more runs and strik- starter Hoffman after the first five ing out three. The Brave defensive and two thirds frames. Woren was unit miscued six times while the. charged with his fifth loss against 'Bees committed four errors. but one win as the Flyer workMCB-8 12 13 4 horse went the full nine limiting
NavSta 7 12 1 the victors to eigth hits.
MCB-8 6 8 5
MARINES SHOVE MALLAR]) NAS 5 8 4
INTO THIRD
Wednesday night the pennantholding Marine Leathernecks cruis- IEAGUE STANDINGS
ed behind the four hit serving of (As of Thursday, 8 July)
manager Chuck Smith to a 10-2 M W L GB
win over the VU-10 Mallards to Marines 23 2
give the 'Bees undisputed posses- MCB-8 14 12 91/2
sion of the second seat. VU-10 13 13 10'/2
With the Leatherneck guns, NavSta 8 18 151/
Felak and Pace, leading at the NAS 6 19 17
plate, the league-leaders scored TOP FIVE BATTERS
almost at will as they came up (As of Thursday, 8 July)
with two in the fourth, one in the -AB H AV
fifth, five in the seventh and a Felak Marines 94 41 .439
final two in the eighth. The Pace Marines 90 38 .422
Mallards, behind the combined hurl- Adams Marines 104 37 .356 ing efforts of Breske and Edgar Dotson MCB-8 108 38 .352 scored their two by taking one in Sutherland NAS 62 21 .340


0-1

2' - 's


All-Star manager Oxford Allen of Cuba and Chuck Smith of the Naval Base meet with RADM E. B. Taylor before the game as the
Base Comnander informally wishes both the best of luck.


9


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Page Five





me

Page Six


Golf Course


by Jerry
'Fore!-chen a sudden swish followed by a solid tud rhat sends a brand new ball soaring through the air down toe fairway of the 18-hole Guaniinamo Bay Naval Bas- golf course, another Naval Stotin Spt-cial Services facility provided for your recreation.
Located on the road to Kittery Beacon, about one-hundred yards fron Recreation Road, is the club house. Open to all military personnel, American civilians and their dependents, the golf course offers the pursuit of one of America's most respected sports Ol some of the finest greens found anywhere. Hours are from 0800 to 1700 on weekdays and 0700 to 1800 Saturnday, Sundays and holidays.
The golf store maintains a rental system by which sets of clubs can 1e rented for 35 cents per (lay, green fees are 65 cents and golf balls can be purchased for as low as 45 cents each or $5.00 a dozen. Tne balls are the new Dunlop 65's, reputed to be the very finest and soli by the 4th Division at an extreimely low price.
In charge of the club's activities and there to ntlp you better your game is Golf Professional Wright North AMC.
The course is an 18-hole spread covering an area of 2,480 square yards on ihe hnrs nine nid 2,131


Provides Relaxation


-quare yards on the back nine. The cos'c of labor necessary in keeping the rolling greens in ton condition is approximately $35,000 annually. That's a lot of giass!
An expansion pro:iam is already underway. When the project is completed, club remembers will enjoy a new tropical-typ- clubhouse which will house a golf shop anti spaceous locker rooms equipped with showers. A covered porch completely surrounding the club will be outfi6'ced with blended bamboo fu niture and to this will be added a new snack bar and lounge.
You have undoub tedly heard about the skeptic who saw no sport in chasing a tiny ball around 18 holes in the bot sun. That was before he hit his first ball! Now he strolls the green in checkered hat, baggey pants and is quite happy at the prospect of a day in the sun with a golf bag strapped to his shoulder. He is firmly convinced of the satisfaction attainable when he doffs his cap and yells "Fore!" after solidly connecting with the little white ball now soaring down the fairway.
To simplify une game of golf, you place a small sphere about 2 inches in ci cumfe ence on a large spnere about 25,000 miles in circumference,-the object: hit the little one!


W

T the IN D worth of n
question ac Edior, The

The qu JIM will i The pl































Sheldon Connors, SN, Flag Division
"It will at leAst give the average sailor an incentive to ship over."


hat D' Ya' Say?

IAN will award it certificate eood for $1.00 erchandise at the Navy Exchange for each cepted and used. Submit your questions to Indian, Box 19.)

estion: Do you think the new bonus increase reenlistments? ace: Fleet Boat Pool Shed


Eugene Caruso, FN, Fleet Boat
Pool
"Yes, I think it ought to; at least it would help some who weren't sure to decide."
























J. T. Craven, SVCN, MCB-8
"I think it may convince some to ship over, but not coo many."


C. E. Naffe, EN2, USS Trathen, DD530
"Yes I believe it will. It certainly gives men more reason to ship over."

SCUTTLEBUTT


















"An tiisMY father's g0me r*QM1"


Richard Hanes, BM, Fleet Boat Pool
"I think a man doing 20 will do it regardless of a bonus. It's all a matter of liking the service."


m


Saturday, 10 July 1954


THE INDIAN







Saturday, 10 July 1954


THE INDIAN


m


Page Seven


Out of the Frying Pan Opens 5- Day Run Tuesday Night



Local LittlelTheatre Offers

Broadway Comedy Hit

For Nav Base Patrons

by Joy-e Simmon
At last the fruit of weCks of hard work is ready for you, the pbIii, to behold and enjoy, as "Out on the Frying Pan" opens at Ma- --ina Point on Tuesday, July 13th The female leads of the play 0 .and runs through Sacurday, July are Anita Sierra, Ruth G roen1Vtn. This gay production is the nost hilarious comedy ever at- vold and Shiley Emerson. V'te iOtd voieLidl Tneatr andt\Ln Is


Alembers of the cast of "Out of the Frying Pan" sit still long enough for the Ildian photographer 'o get their picture. In the back row, left to right: Easton Guillory, Alan Wagner, Dan Nasn, Gordon Thompson, Jim Bovett and Ronnie Estefan. Front row, same order: Joyce Midkiewicz, Aidta Sierra, Shirley Emerson, Ruth Groenveld and Ethyl Beach. Burt Knight, another member of the east, was not present for the photo.


Be tty Radcliffe and Dave Humes have cone a wond iful job directing.
The story revolves around three young men (Alan Wagner, Dai Nash, and Gordon Thompson) and tree young women (Anita Sierra, Shirley E m e r s o n, and Ruth Groenveld) who are aspiring young actors and actresses anxious to succeed in the theatrical world. Because they have very little cash but much ambition and ingenuity, they decide to economize by sharing an apartment between them-the apartment being paid for by the father of one of the girls, who knows nothing of their liberal ariangemient and arrives unexpectedly in town to visit his daughter.
Meanwhile, the young people nave discovered a famous producer living in the same building, and they immediately concentrate all their efforts to lure him to their apartment, where they go to great length enacting one of his own plays (under most involved and trying conditions.) There is not just one high point


The male leads of "Out of the Frying Pan" are Alan Wagner, Gordon Thompson and Dan Nash.

in this play, but many, many comPlicated situations kept alive by a continuous stream of invigorating dialogue and lots of action. The production spurns boredom and guarantees you an evening of real fun and laughter for all of the family. Don't forget-eurtain time is 8:00 P.M. and the tickets are only 75c, with refreshments served for your convenience between the acts. Lets see you there.


Ii t \ ?


nimeof w LtI T t(,in rehieise one of dhe ilnlarious scenes from "Out of dhe Frying Pan" which is to be piesenced here soon. Those appearing in this scene are, left to right: Alan Wagner, Dan Nash, Gordon Thompson, and Burt Knight.
























Si iouniided by co pses" Alan WXagnec, as Noriman ham iUp the closig sceIe of a play wvvithini a play trying rehersal of "Out of tne Frying Pan."


Four of the I-ading characters attempt to convince Joyce Mickiewicz, as Muriel, that she should take the part of a corpse.





'Out of the Frying Pan'

Community Auditorium

Located Atop Marina Point

Starting Tuesday at 8:00 P. M.


ADMISSON 754


.1 - - - - --9- - - - - 4







Navy-10NDPP-Gtro.0020


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Saturday, 10 July 1954


THE INDIAN


Hospital Notes

Heirport News
From 22 June through 5 July, the following births were recorded: a daughter, Theodora Lea, born 22 June to DC1 and Mrs. John W. Cofield; a son, John Joseph, born 22 June to CWO and Mrs. James J. Devlin; a daughter. Connie Sue, born 25 June to PH3 and Mrs. James L. Holder, a son, Joseph Donald, born 28 June to LCDR and Mrs. Joseph D. Bedford; a son, Steven Joel, born 29 June to EN2 and Mrs. Uscoe J. Fitts; a daughter, Lyndia Dell, born 1 July to ADI and Mrs. Willie G. Mace; a son, Mark Alan, born 3 July to FN and Mrs. Forrest May; a daughter, Linda Carol, born 3 July to EM1 and Mrs. Carel E. Mills; and a son, Mark Greer, born 4 July to CDR and Mrs. David L. G. King.
New Arrivals
CDR John B. Mac Gregor (MC) USN, and family arrived 2 July from the Naval Hospital, National Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland. He will assume duties as Executive Officer of this command and also hold the post of Chief of Medical Services.
Prior to entry into the Naval Service, CDR MacGregor obtained his B. S. and M. D. degrees from the University of Virginia. He has since served as intern at the Naval Hospital, Portsmouth, Va., junior medical officer aboard the USS Ranger, medical officer of DesDiv 73; ward medical officer at the Naval Hospital, Brooklyn; junior medical officer aboard the USS Albemarle; medical officer aboard the USS Yukon; completed the School of Aviation at Pensacola, Fla.; flight surgeon at the Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Fla.; flight surgeon of an evacuation squad in tne Pacific area; Officer-in-Charge of Physiological Test Section at the Naval Air Training Center, Patuxet River, Md.; resident in medicine at the Naval Hospital, Philadelphia; assistant chief of medicine at the Naval Hospital, Jacksonville Fla.; and Cardiologist and Assistant Chief of Medicine ac the Naval Hospital, National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Md. He also acted as the medical attendant to Vice-President Nixon for two months during this period.
He is also married to the former Catherine F. Wilkinson of Jacksonville, Florida, has three children, Catherine Wynne, 10, Sussan M., 8, and John B., Jr., 4. Afton, Virginia is claimed as his home town.
Also arriving on 2 July from the Naval Hospital, National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Md., was CDR Louis E. Tebow (MC) USN, and his family.
CDR Tebow obtained his B. S. and M. D. degrees from the University of Illinois and performed graduate work at the University of Pennsylvania. He has served at


7 KQ~" t

MOVIES


/


f


With all the talk about brief Bikini bathing suits and short cropped hair, Shirley Allen from Arlington, Va. proves there is still plenty of appeal i the "country-stbyle" gal.


the Naval Hospital, Portsmouth, Va., was under instruction at the National Naval Center,ETAOITA National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda; Senior Medical Officer with CAIRNS, Austrailia, aboard the TG-70.1, and of a Naval Unit at Melborne, Austrailia; assistant Medical Officer at the Naval Training Center, Great Lakes, Illinois; Senior Medical Officer aboard the USS Atlanta; resident surgeon at the Naval Hospital, Great Lakes; assistant Medical Officer at the Naval Gun Factory, Washington, D. C.; resident surgeon at the Naval Hospital, Bethesda; Senior Medical Officer of Surgical Team #10 on duty at the Naval Hospital, Yokosuka, Japan; resident surgeon at Bethesda and consultant in surgery at the Dispensary, Washington, D. C. He will assume the duties of the Surgical Services upon the detachment of CDR J. J. Times (MC) USN. Other arrivals on 2 July include


V. G. Agen, HN, T. E. Corbett, HN, and A. C. Ball, HN, from the Air Transportation Squadron ONE, Pax. River, Md.; 1. Baron, HN and N. J. O'Brien, HN, from the Receiving Station, Brooklyn; N. M. Nilsen, HM3, and W. J. Nye, HM3, from the Naval Hospital, Philadelphia; and R. A. Langlois, HN, and A. Pincus, HN, from the Naval Medical School, National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Md.
Departures
On 30 June four of our men departed: W. O. Speckmann, HMC for duty as an instructor at the Naval Hospital Corps School, San Diego, California; C. C. Hills, HM3, and T. F. Rogers, HN, for duty at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, S. C.; and C. H. Tanner, HN, to CLUSA for separation.

IF YOU CAN SEE THIS, YOU CAN SEE
OUT OF THE FRYING PAN'


9


9


Saturday, 10 July
ARROWHEAD
Charlton Heston Jack Palance
A U. S. Cavalry Scout has a maniacal hate for the Indians. The Army tries to make peace with them against his advice but are very nearly wiped out in an attack.
Sunday, 11 July
QUO VADIS
Robert Taylor Deborah Kerr
The story depicts Rome when it ruled an enslaved world under Emperor Nero; the persecution of Christians and the burning of Rome.
Monday, 12 July
ISLAND IN THE SKY
John Wayne Lloyd Nolan
A transport plane gets lost in a snowstorm and is forced to land in uncharted wastelands in the north continent.
Tuesday, 13 July
GUN BELT
George Montgomery Tab Hunter
Reformed outlaw is framed by his brother, who thinks it makes little difference if the law thinks he is an outlaw again.
Wednesday, 14 July
PRINCE OF PIRATES
John Derek Barbara Smith
A 16th - century swashbuckler about a band of volunteers who set out to free their country from the advancing power of Spain.


Entameb EtdktR98


We're glad to see Mrs. Doss made it back from Kingston, Jamaica. The reports are so glowing -his wife, who is arriving today, will want to make the trip real soon.
Dr. Haymes is back in his office at full throttle. He always did like to work standing up, says he.
The stuff you see clinging to the Nealon family shoes "ain't hay ", it's excelsier- the packers have been at work in their quarters. They're super-short-timers now.
CDR Etter, Mrs. Etter and daughter Alice, (Missy) hit the road for the States next Wednes(lay. After a visiting trip up the East coast they'll visit home (Indianapolis) then report in to the Great Lakes for duty. Let's think of them next winter, eh?
Captain and Mrs. Stagner arrived on board the THOMAS 2 July. Their son Bill and house guest Ronnie Sperier arrived by bus and train from Havana. The two "boys" are college classmates at South Eastern Louisana.

A deaf woman entered a church with an ear trumpet. Soon after she had seated herself, an usher tiptoed over and whispered, "One toot and out you go!"


STUF F







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Full Text

PAGE 1

oplepwr __ Goe's QTMO Like ThIe &assInte"Vol. VI, No. 53 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 10 July 1954 Pappy Pazin Retires Twelve DE's Bring Colonel Fojt New Marine Afn 28 Y S i R i t fTnO er ears erv ce eserVIOI o Heads for New York Twenty eight years of continuous active Naval Service comes to an end next month when Peter J. Pazin, Chief Damage Controlman, will be released to inactive duty Chief Pazin, known throughout the base as "Pappy" has been attached to the Base Police for the last 21 months of his tour in Guantanamo Bay. Now 46, Pappy enlisted in 1926 and went through his "Boot" training at Newport, R. I. His first ship was the old carrier, USS Lexington, and since then he's had duty on practically all the major types of Navy ships. During World War II, lie was attached to the Amphibious Force, both in the Atlantic and Pacific areas. He attained the rank of Chief Warrant Officer during the war. Chief Pazin reported to Gtmo in September 1952 attached to Fleet Training Group and was sent to the Base Police soon after his arrival. Besides his present police duties, Pappy is also an avid musician and can tinkle out a tune on the piano with the best of them. He also knows how to handle the bass violin, and in lighter moments even takes a turn on the ukelele. He currently leads a group known as the "Rythm Ramblers" playing on week-ends and special occasions at the Petty Officers' Club. Pappy will leave today on the USNS Thomas and plans to settle in Athens, N. Y. his hometown, with his wife, Mary Elizabeth, and their 15-year-old son, Nolan John. He expects to be released to inactive duty between August and October. "The Navy's the best outfit in the world," says Chief Pazin. "The only thing I can say to the 'youngsters' is 'Stay with it' and they won't be sorry." Wednesday, 7 July, a task group of twelve escorts steamed into Guantanamo Bay on the last leg of a four week reserve training cruise. The task group, commanded by CAPT J. B. Fellows, Jr., is made up of ships from the Eastern seaboard used exclusively for reserve training. The ships are maintained throughout the year by a skeleton crew, and each year several cruises are made for training reserves. During these cruises, reservists-under direct supervision of the crewman the ship for their yearly training period. This year, differing from the previous years, the reserve trainmng cruise was extended to four weeks-allowing more time for training and more time for operations and visits to liberty ports. This task group just returned from South American ports and is preparing to return to the United States. Automatic Laundry Planned By Naval Station Exchange Through the increasing facilities of the Naval Station Navy Exchange, laundry facilities will be increased here soon, as plans for a new laundromat are being sade. Anyone wishing to do a laundry may do so since this new service is not limited to military or civilian Colonel R. E. Fojt personnel. There will be 12 completely automatic washers to begin with, and as operations demand, new ones will be added. Also, there will be the added services of automatic driers. To save those doing laundry the trouble of carrying their own soap and bleach to the laundry, both soap and bleach will be issued in the proper amounts for the machines in small pre-packed packages for a small charge. As well as being an added convenience to customers, this service will reduce mainteinance costs and possibly help in future expansion. Last week, in a ceremony at the Naval Hospital James H. Johnson, Chief Quarterman, Maintenance, was presented with a citation for meritorious civilian service by CAPT Tilden I. Moe, Commanding Officer, Naval Hospital. This is the second highest award which can be earned by a civilian. Those at the ceremony, left to right: LCDR I. V. King, Administrative Assistant, CAPT Tilden I. Moe, Commanding Officer, CDR John B. MacGregor, Executive Officer, LT E. R. Mason, Finance Officer, James H. Johnson, and CWOHC H. W. Colt., Personnel Officer. a 9 C. O. Relieves Colonel Hill Colonel Robert E. Fojt, USMC, assumed command of the Marine Barracks Wednesday relieving Colonel John B. Hill, commanding officer for the last 23 months. The change of command toolt place at the parade reviewed by many personnel of the base. Excerpts from both officer's orders were read and Col. Hill presented the Barracks colors to Col. Fojt. Col. Fojt entered the Marine Corps from the U. S. Naval Academy class of 1931. At the Academy he was active in both football and track until a broken leg on two separate occasions necessitated his retirement from active athletic participation. During the next decade the colonel was assigned to various biliets including duty with the 1st Provisional Marine Brigade in Haiti and as Military Aide and chief of police on Guam from 1938 to 1940. During the war Colonel Fojt served as commanding officer of the 19th Marines, theengineer regiment with the 3rd Marine Division. During that time he participated in the Bougainville and Guam campaigns. For his actions in the Bougainville campaign he recieved a Bronz Star with V, a letter of commendation and the Presidential citation. While on Guam Colonel Fojt recieved his first Legion of Merit with combat V. Following the war the colonel was assigned to successive engineer billets both in the United States and overseas culminating in his being ordered to headquarters, Marine Corps as Chief of the Engineer Service in July 1949. In July 1952 Colonel Fojt joined the 1st Mairne Division in Korea only to have his tour interrupted six months later by another leg fracture. However, during that six months he earned another Legion of Merit with V. Following a period of hospitalization in Bethesda, Md. Colonel Fojt attended and graduated from the Naval War College in Newport, R. I., his last duty station before being assigned to Gtmo. Colonel Fojt was accompanied to Gtno by his wife, Alice and their daughter, Patricia. They also have another daughter, Dorothy, who is married. Clothing Allowance Increased The Navy EM clothing allowance is expected to jump from $5.40 to $6 monthly beginning July 1, 1954. This probably will mean a little more cash for Navy men since overall clothing prices for indi'idual purchases will drop slightly. Examples: dress jumper, dropped from $9.05 to 8.75; undress jumper, from $7.00 to $6.70; dungaree trousers from $170 to $1.65; but tie noacoat will remain the same at $24.45. -m

PAGE 2

m Page Two Saturday, 10 July 1954 Navy Unveils New Amphibious Assault Plane The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Station Spectal Seriics Detartment Fleet Receaiona Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 10 July 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Cuantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sandness_Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC-------------Editor H. L. Sisson, JO.-----------------News Je-ry Lewis. JO3--Features Pierce Lehmibck---li ------Sparts F. L. Cannon. JOSN_Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and (inancei with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material arpearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to 'rHE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. An Editorial. Keep the Reds in the Dark The Reds are a curious bunch of guys. They want to know everything about us. So they won't get anything out of you, eh ? Don't be so sure. You might not know much, but you know a little bit. Besides being curious, the Reds are patient. Any little crumb of information you may let dropthey'll pick up. They're very interested in little things. Because these little things, added to a lot of other little things and tabulated on the Red adding machine, add up to a lot of big things. Start getting security conscious -if you're not already. Keep your lip buttoned about anything even remotely concerned with military and security matters, because the Reds are keeping a close tab on everything. The less the Reds know, the less they find out, the better it isfor you. (AFPS) Navy to Assign Names To LST, ADG Vessels Washington (AFPS)-The Navy is planning to name its Landing Ship Tanks (LSTs) and Degaussing Vessels (ADGs). The Chief of Naval Operations believes the naming of these ships has a number of advantages. It will boost morale and prestige of personnel abroad, aid in positive identification of units, and assist in delivery of personal and official correspondence. Unit and fleet commanders reeommended the move with the Chief of Naval Operations adding pproval. New York (AFPS)-The world's first "flying LST"-a transport plane that can taxi to a beach and unload tanks, trucks or troops from its bow-is now being produced for the Navy by the Convair Division of the General Dynamics Corporation. The assault transport planea bow-loader version of the fourengined turboprop R3Y-1 Tradewind-is designated the R3Y-2. It has the same high performance characteristics of the regular transport obstructions. The deck is 88 feet -a range of more than 2000 miles long and more than site feet and a rate of climb faster than wide. many WWII fighter planes. Tie five-tan crew is on a deck Both transports will go into above the cargo deck. Tie hull service late this year with the below tie cargo deck is compartNavy's Fleet Logistic Air Wings, totitet for strength atd waterblow t -the rtgo Liec ties camnar. For assault operations, the R3Y-2 lands in offshore waters and taxis to the beach. When the hull touches the sand, the bow opens upward and a ramp drops, allowing loaded vehicles or troops to debark. To pull off the beach, the pilot simply reverses the props and backs off. A 30-second run lifts the 80-ton plane into the air. The bow-loader can carry 24 tons of cargo on its cargo deck which stretches back in one level unbroken by bulkheads or other R3Y-1, the flying LST has a 10-ft. wide door on the aft port side for normal dock loading of cargo. It can carry four 155mm howitzers, three 2/2-ton trucks, six jeeps or two half-tracks which can be unloaded through its bow door opening 8 ft. 6 in, wide by 6 ft. 8 in. high. The R3Ys are the largest water based planes ever built by Convair. Each is powered by four Allison T-40 turboprop engines developing approximately 22,000 horsepower. Cub Leaders Meet; Passive Defense Carnival Planned by Millie Jamieson A Leaders' Meeting of the Guantanamo Bay Cub Scouts was held at the home of Mrs. R. K. Minard on July 6. It was decided that future Pack Meetings will be held on the last Tuesday of each month beginning promptly at 7:30, and each Cub must be accompanied by at least one parent. The next meeting will be on July 27, when ribbons will be awarded for the best baked goods or candy made by the Cubs and their Dads, and then the "goodies" will be auctioned. So, come on, Cubs and Dads-"shoo" Mother from the kitchen and let's find out who is the best cook. A Scout carnival is being planned for August 14. The Scout Carnival Committee will have its next meeting at the NAS Administration Building at 7:30 on July 19. We are happy to welcome a new Den Mother, Mrs. W. J. Boyer, who will be reorganizing the Dens #2 and #5. Any boys who were in these Dens and wish to continue their Cubbing, or any new boys who are interested may contact Mrs. Boyer at 123 Villattar. This Den is for boys living in the areas of Bargo or Vtar. Drills Studied Thursday afternoon, 1 July, the board for the hurricane and passive defense drills met and discussed the two drills which took place on 26 June. Although no final statement by the board has been made available for publication, several points were mentioned by the problem control team concerning this year's drills. Evacuation to the shelter took only 30 minutes a record time -and this was appraised by the problem control team as being very good. In respect to the passive defense drill, it was noted by the problem control team that there was a failure of personnel participating in the problem to use their imagination in carrying out the drill, This consisted of such matters as persons using telephones in areas that had been destroyed, assimiating damage reports and casualaty reports came in just 45 mittutes after the burst of the bomb. According to CDR R. M. Beautarand, Base Plans Officer, and Officer in Charge, Problem Control Teatm, the passive defense drill was carried out very well considering that this was the first year that such a drill had been attempted here. Sunday, 11 July 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. O. Stephenson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) The Chaplain's Corner "And there were certain Greeks among them that came up to worship at the feast. The same came therefore to Phillip, which was of Bethsaida of Galilee, and desired him saying, "Sir, we would see Jesus". John 12:21-2 Jesus and his disciples had arrived in Jerusalem, A few (lays earlier Jesus had brought Lazarus from the dead in the city of Bethany. A party of Greeks heard of the miracle as they passed through the city. As soon as they arrived at Jerusalm, they sought out Phillip and made this request, "Sir, we would see Jesus". Now this simple incident can easily be overlooked by the average person reading the Bible, but it should no, be a it has a meaning for each of us who are followers of less. For one thing it reveals a universal hurian longing to see Jesus. Every person who hears about Jesus comes to the place that he wishes to know Him. He may wait as long as he can to make his request known. But in his sanest moment or in the hour of desperation when he realizes his need for a power greater than his own, he wishes to see Jesus. For another thing, it reveals that the seeker endeavors to find Jesus through someone who knows Him. Phillip is a Greek name, and many Greeks lived in Bethsaida which was his home town. Therefore, the Greeks sought to find Jesus through Phillin with whom they were aquainted. Those who need Jesus turn naturally to us who are His followers. They have every right to believe that we can introduce them to Jesus. Our Lord counts on each of us to bring others to Him, and this glorious task will be easter for us if we use this prayer. "0 Christ, may we sense the deep longings of our followman to know thee. Hay we be wise enough and devoted enough to lead every needy person to thee. Help us to lift thee up until thou shalt be able to draw all mankind to thee. Amen:" THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 10 July 1954 New Officers Arrive at Base Command Reporting aboard the Naval Base nere this last week on board the USNS Pvt. William H. Thomas were four new officers for fouer commands. CAPT W. D. F. Stagner arrived to assume command of the Dental Clinic; CAPT D. B. Cushing arrived to relieve CAPT W. H. Groverman as Chief Staff Officer at Fleet Training Group; CDR Grle E. Krause arrived to assume. the duties of Naval Base Legal Officer; and CDR John B. MacGregor arrived to relieve CDR J. J. Times at the Naval Hospital. On the afternoon of his arrival, Captain Stagner assumed command of the Dental Clinic in an informal office ceremony. Captain Stagner reported here from the 8th Naval District, New Orleans, La. : Captain Cushing Captain Cushing arrived here from Naval War College, Newport, Rhode Island where he had been undergoing training. Prior to that, Captain Cushing was with Fleet Training Group, Chesapeake Bay. Captain Cushing will take over as Chief Staff Officer for Fleet Training Group here. Commander Krause Commander Krause reported here from Commander, Service Forces, Atlantic Fleet, where he served as Legal Officer, and immediately tools up the duties as Naval Base Legal Officer and Legal Assistance Officer. Commander Krause relieved CDR A. D. Whiteman who departed Guantanamo Bay on 19 June. Commander MacGregor Commander MacGregor, who for two months served in the additional status of medical attendant to Vice President Richard M. Nixon, reported aboard Guantanamo Bay Naval Hospital from the National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda. Md., where he was Assistant Chief of Medicine. Commander MacGregor, will relieve Commander J. J. Timmes as Executive Officer and Chief of Medical Services. WGBY Hi-Lites by John Hull Those of you who read this column last week are already aware of the active personnel problem here at WGBY. Beginning Monday, 2 July, because of the sudden transfer of Jim Wade, we will not be able to continue the daily broadcasts of the "Hillbilly Jamboree". Every attempt will be made to get it back on the air just as soon as a new man can "broken in". Speaking of new men, the response to last week's appeal for volunteers for a job as announcer at WGBY was very sparse. Out of some 11,000 men in Guantanamo Bay, we received only three phone calls from interested parties. So, if you read the column, thought you might like to try out, but just neglected to do anything about it don't delay any longer. Our staff is down to three men now and another man is due to leave any day. In over six years of continuous service to the people at Guantanamo Bay, WGBY has never had to cut it's 17-hour-a-day program schedule, but the staff has never been so reduced. No matter where you are on the base, you have a good chance of going to work here at WGBY. If you are attached to the Naval Station, it means a permanent transfer to the Special Service; Division for full-time work. If you are in any other bare command, it means a TAD transfer for full-time duty. If you have at least one year lif, on your tour of duty at GTMO, and have little or no regional accent, we'll turn you into a competent announcer and engineer within six months. Remember, call 9615. We will ask you to bring a note from your Division Officer saying you have his permission to audition, and then we will "cut a tape" any afternoon, Monday through Saturday, between 3 and 5 o'clock. Don't delay a moment longer. Get in touch with us right away. COB McElroy Completes For Recreational Visit Jet Check-Out at This last week. two Columbian ships--the ARC Almirante EldillI and the ARC Almirante Brion arrived in GuanC tsmo Bay for a recreational and liberty tour. The two South American ships arrived here Wednesday, and even before the ships arrived, arrangements were being mac 'et w Icome the officers, men, and midshipmen on board. While here in Guantanamo, both ships will be issued comnpi metaly passes for recreational facilities by the Naval Station Special Services. These passes will gr aii those holding them to free-of-charge use of facilities such as the skating rink, corral, sailboat locker, and other facilities wrich normally carry a charge for services. Navy Suspends Issuance Of Good Conduct Medal Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has temporarily suspended issuance of its Good Conduct Medal. Temporary instructions have been issued for submitting requests for the medal until such time as the revision to the Navy and Marine Corps Awards Manual, NAVPERS 15,790, is distributed and the medals are again available. DON'T MISS 'Out of the Frying Pan' Starts Tuesday Night Leeward Commander R. Y. McElroy of Flet Training Group, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba accepts congratulations of LCDR Frank H. 0. O'Brien, Commanding Cfficeir, F i g h t e r Squadron THIRTY FOUR, following completion of his familiarization flight in an F2H-2 "Banshee" jet of Fighter Squadron THIRTY FOUR based at Cecil Field, Florida. Commander McElroy was given a complete familiarization inloctrination check out of the "Banshee' and was made an official "short time" member of Fighter Squadron THIRTY FOUR. Marine Pitching Ace Enters Bethesda Hospital "Rollie" Santos, Marine Leatherneck pitching ace, was sent to it'h Naval Hospital in Bethesda, Md. this week for an examination and possible operation on his right elbow. Santos, who holds a Milwaukee Brave contract, compiled a league record of 11 wins and one loss during the current baseball season. His strikeout performance reached 123. Builds Twin-Engine Model Plane Adjusting one of the twin engines oii his new model plane, Robert Sprague, PHSN of Fleet Camera Party prepares for the test flight. The model is entirely his own design and, to the best of his knowledge, is the first twin-engine, tricycle landing-gear model built here at Guantanamo. It has a seven foot wingspan. Sprague, who hails from Brunswick, Maine, has been building models for about four years, and is now working on a Piper Cub with an eight-foot wingspan. 0 m THE INDIAN Columbian Ships Here Page Three

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m by Col. Guy Stephens, U.S. Marine Corps Arriving aboard the USNS W. H. THOMAS last Friday was Colonel and Mrs. Robert E. Fojt and daughter Pat from Newport R. I., and Pfc. Floyd H. Tolley from Paris Island, South Carolina. Colonel Fojt relieved Colonel John B. Hill as Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks. The Change of Command Ceremony was held Wednesday, July 7th. DEPARTURES Departing this week for the States was Colonel and Mrs. John B. Hill and children, Jane, Bunn and Nancy. Col. Hill will report to Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendelton, Calif. for duty. Before reporting to Camp Pendelton Col. Hill and family will spend a few dlays with their families in Atlanta, Georgia. Others leaving wer MSgc. Roberti G. Ragan to Marine Corps Air Station, Miami, Fla. SSgt. Ralph G. Mathias to Norfolk, Va. for discharge. Sgt. Cornelius Moore to Brooklyn, N. Y. for discharge. Sgt. Josse Downey to Brooklyn, N. Y. for reassignment. Pfc. Roger J. Godfrey and Pvt. Norman G. Gardiner to Brooklyn, N. Y. for discharge. BASEBALL BUNTS With 8 games remaining, the Marines have clinched the Naval Base Championship with a 91 2 game lead. ..Catcher Tom Felak, Second Baseman Jim Pace and Shortstop Andy Androvich played the full 9 innings in the annual All Star Game and were defensive strikeouts. ..Chuck Mason came around to score the winning run in the 3 to 2 victory for the Naval Base All Stars. ..The top 5 Leatherneck sluggers are Tom Felak 444. ..Jim Pace 400. Billy Wood 351. ..Andy Androvich 340. .. And Larry Adams at 336. ..Felak leads the home run parade with a total of 9. ..Chuck Mason 7. .. and Andy Androvich 6. ..Followed closely by Jim Pace with 5. .. The Leathernecks have gathered a total of 41 doubles 5 triples. ..and 38 home runs in 24 games. ..Jim Pace's hitting streak has reached a total of 14 consecutive games. Andy Androvich hitting safely in 10 consecutive games. ..Pitcher Rollie Santos will be lost to the Leathernecks pitching staff with an ailing right arim. ..The mound ace holds one of the top records in the league at 11-1. ..His strikeout total had reached a high of 141 in his 14 appearences. ..Leathernecks will be faced with a pitching burden with Santos' departure. Andy Androvich likely to see mound duty in the remaining 8 games and the post season playoffs. ..Andy in one previous appearence had defeated the NAS Flyers. ..Pitcher Bob Goens likely to see plenty of action. .. SCUTTLEBUTT Ddett 'Doe let me borrow it for the weekends" New stripes were added at the Marine Barracks recently by the above men. Standing, left to right, all corporals: A. J. Maracino, T. J. O'Connell, R. L. Willequer, R. J. Soukup and M. L. Orr. Kneeling, R. G. Sylvester and H. W. Rowley. FTG Bulletin by Jack Engstrom LTJG Treffinger of the CIC Department, departed Gtmo Wednesday via FLAW flight for Jacksonville where he will be released to inactive duty. LTJG Treffinger, known as "Treff" round the Gtmo Golf Course, will be going into private business as an Architectural Appraiser. LCDR Armstrong of the Air Department, will depart on the Thomas today with his family for a tour of stateside duty. He will report to the Naval Unit, Biological Division, Chemical Corporation, Camp Detrick located in Frederick, Maryland, good bye and good luck at your new duty station. The First Class Petty Officers are hosts at a Fleet Training Group Picnic this afternoon at Phillips Park from 1230 to 1700. There will be entertainment and fun for all. Food and Liquid refreshments will be furnished by FTG Welfare and Recreation. If you don't feel up to running races etc., come out anyway and meet some new people. Many new personnel have reported aboard since the last FTG Picnic and several new families have arrived from the states also, so it wil be a good time to get acquainted. Chief Reynolds of the Engineering Department will be departing for the States Wednesday 14 July for Transfer to the Fleet Reserve and release to inactive duty. Chief Reynolds will have completed 20 years 3 months and nine days Naval services when released. Chief Reynolds has been the number one Golfer of the Training Group for the past few months. Congratulations on a fine Naval Career and good luckt in civilian life. Chief Pazin, who has been TAD to the Base Police, will depart on the Thomas today for Brooklyn where he will be released to inactive duty ...Frank Sygalas, RD1, will also depart Gtmo as he has received orders to report to Headquarters, MSTS Atlantic Area, Brooklyn for assignment afloat. Al Harris, SO1, who just returned from a 30 day leave is a married mean now. He married the former Vivian Emerson of Seattle, Washington on the 14th of June. Congratulations. NAS Crosswinds by Dick Friz The holiday weekend provided a rash of trips ...Some NAS personnel took the pleasure jaunt to Kingston, part of the FLAW Crew spent a well earned rest in Gtmo City, and several lucky ones made it to Miami. Chief and Mrs. H. B. Cooper, and Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Serig visited Santiago. Mr. and Mrs. Bob Heywong also made the trip. Another jaunt also made the will be made this weekend. The family of LCDR J.N. Parker, Mrs. Parker and two sons, arrived via USNS THOMAS, on Friday, 2nd of July. They are residing at Paola Point. LCDR Parker is the new Officer in Charge of Leeward Point Field, reporting aboard for the command on 6 of July. John California CSSA transferred his culinary skills to Leeward Point, reporting aboard from McCalla. Another new arrival was Reynold McGivvivray A/N. PROMOTIONS ...PACT Dale E. Leeper USN promoted to CHPCLK effective June 1, 1954. BOSN Joseph A. Hould USN promoted to CHBOSN effective 1 July 1954. LTJG Malcolm R. McCann, US NR promoted to LT effective 2 July, 1954. ENS Jerry W. Aarts, USNR reported to duty the 28 of June from the USS MELVIN R. NAWMAN (DE-416). He has been assigned duties as BOQ and Mess Officer and Treasurer, of the Commissioned Officers Mess. Welcome Aboard! LCDR and Mrs. J. D. Bedford announced the arrival of their first born, Joseph Jr. last week, and the Mrs. and Joe Jr. are doing fine. Our Personnel Officer still carries the dark circles under his eyes, the cachet of the anxious father. The Naval Hospital's motto of 'never having lost a father' should lend some assurance. The following men will depart frost Guantanamo Bay this weekend: Earl Maier AD2, and Jim Wade AC3, WGBY announcer are to be transferred to NAS Pensacola for further assignment in that command. Wallace Heaton AD3, George Silkman AD3, and John McCelland ACl to Patuxent River. Wilbert Kuni, PH3 will head for Anacostia. 0 Fishing Tornament LAND DIVISION Barracuda Platts, C. W. 1 lbs. Hope, Gordon E 5 ls., 12 ozs. Incks ii-kett i S. L. -7 bs. t ilkb'nd, H. A. ----8 lbs., 8 ozs. Romand, Sam 14 lbs., S ozs. NacAnanny, Raymond E. 19 lbs., 8 ozs. Mackerel (King) How~rton, R. D. _5 bs., 10 z Snapper K lley, C. L. 39 lbs. H inandez, J. C. 12 lbs. Hays,. Robert, M. 1 b., 7 ozs. Hanlin, John ----9t/ ozs. Williams, Mike ---7 ozs. Jamtieoan, Raymond -_ 6 ozs. Ja nieson, Raymond -5 ozs. Soballe, Peter -1 oz. Tarpon B-dward, K. D. ___ 17 lbs. Henry, R. L. 12 bs., 4 ozs. Snook Bunda, Geo e10 lbs., 4 ozs. Horn r, T. A. __ 3 lbs. Grounper His, N. L. (----ourr 9 ozs. Shaw, Jimmy 8 ozs. BOAT DIVISION Mrs. E. C. Kerslake -_ 3 lbs., 7/ ozs. Lafnear, R. E. 9 bs., 11 ozs. Snapper Roberts, V. A. --p p50 lbs. Carroll, J. C.-30 lbs., 8 ozs. Tarpone Swanson, G. A. T 13 lbs., 8 ozs. SPECIAL DIVISION Bonefish Wind, Marion A. 2 lbs., 8 ozs. Sanborn, Ellen ----8t%_ ozs. Croakers Sanborn, Jim 8 ozs. Dalton, Kathryn -2 ozs. Ladyfish Smiouse, J. H. -4 lbs., 8 ozs. Pomepano Bedward, Kenneto no-20 lbs. Ciey. G. K. -16 lbs., 4 os. Romanoe, Sam, 8 5 i,,., 131. oys. Ssballie, Peley" 2 lbs,. 2 zs Shark Meredith, Fred .41 lbs., 8 ozs. Hawes, D. D. _---19 lbs. Trtiggerfishl Lee, G. A. __ -i l bs., 8 ozs. SPEARFISHING DIVISION Nichols, E. M. (rouperl Mackerel Scheibe, K. E. -8 1bs., 11 s. Nichols, E. M. Snappersl4 lbs. Barracuda Ward, C.F. 5 lbs., 6: o es. Ward, G. F., ____H i 5 bs,. 15 o s. Other Fish Angel Faler, L. B .-3lbs., 4 o,. Yellowtail Shaw,,, Diana, Maryia _-_ 7 o Cayrll, J. T.M 1 lb., 9 ozs. Bream Moore, Ricky -1 oz. Ladies' Golf Shots by Miriam Hoy This week the ladies received golf balls for winning low gross and low net on the Front Nine. The lucky winners were: First Flight Gross-Corky Henning Net-Lou Toczko Second Flight Gross-Marion Caruthers Net-Fran Dykeman Third Flight Gross-two-way-tie Betty Lou Tipler Val Evans Net-Emmna Hutton It is awfully nice having Lou Toczko and Pat Gentry back playing with us again. Lou's limping a little yet, but nevertheless playing a beautiful game. Next week we'll have a Blind Five Tournament on the Back Nine. Even though everyone is suffering considerably with the heat these days-hope to see a lot of you Wednesday. Today Jane McElroy leaves on the USNS Thomas for a isonth's visit in the Stat. s. We wish you a pleasant trip, Jane, and have yourself a wonderful time. Page Four Saturday, 10 July 1954 THE INDIAN

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am Saturday, 10 July 1954 THE INDIAN Page Five Base League Narrows to Second Place VU-10, SeaBee Struggle Naval Base All-Stars Edge Cubans, 3 to 2 In Annual 4th of July Classic The Naval Base All-Stars, paced by the four hit hurling of the Naval Station's Mandy Mandis and the ringing bat of NAS's Milo Sutherland, moved to their second successive Independence Day win over the Cuban All Stars Sunday afternoon as they edged the visitors 3-2 before an overflowing holiday crowd. Milo Sutherland of the Naval Air Station is narrowly tagged out at the plate by Cuban All-Star backstop Guia last Sunday afternoon in the traditional Independence Day classic which the Base All-Stars won for the second straight year, 3-2. Sutherland led the All-Stars at the plate as he collected three singles in four trips. Victory was the order of the day as NavBase mentor Chuck Smith of the Marine Barracks limited substitutions to the point that only eleven names showed in the line-up. Mandis, in going the distance, became the first All-Star pitcher to ever accomplish the feat. With the All-Stars notching all three of their runs in the bottom of the second, the little 'Pride of the Indians' pitched flawless baseball for the first four innings as he held the visiting Cubans hitless until the top of the fourth. He finished the game scattering a total of four safeties, none of then going for extra bases. While Mandis was carrying his load so superbly on the hill, other All-Stars were showing their worth also, as the LeathernecI keystone duo, Pace and Androvich, played brilliantly afield and the Flyer's Milo Sutherland led the team's offense with a three for four day at the plate. It was the latter's bat that put the spark into the NavBase's second inning uprising. On the Cuban side of the fence, short stop Valiente dazzle the crowd with his flashy infield play and led his team at the plate with two singles in four trips to the plate. Mandis was credited with the win while A. Street was charged with the loss. Neither pitcher gave up an extra base blow as Mandis struck out a total of six while Street sat five down. This ran the now traditional Independence Day series to 2-1 in favor of the NavBase. At their first meeting in 1952, the Cubans took the tilt in an extra inning game, 3-2 with the Base taking the 1953 tilt, 8-7. NavBase 3 8 4 Cuba 2 4 3 Proudly beaming from the winner's circle are Claxton of the Cuhan All-Stars and Milo Sutherland, the Naval Air Station's contribution to the Base A l1-S t a r Squad, after the two athletes notched first places in the pre-game contests held as part of the afternoon. The Cuban's Claxton is displaying the ball which he threw further than all other entrants in the ball-throwing event and Sutherland was the fastest man on the base paths as he took all four in 15. 2. HOMERUN LEADERS (As of Thursday, 8 July) Felak Marines 9 Dotson MCB-8 9 Pace Marines 7 Mason Marines 6 Androvich Marines 6 PITCHING RECORDS (As of Thursday, 8 July) Santos Marines 11 1 .916 Smith Marines 10 1 .909 Bigbie MCB-8 8 3 .727 Harrison NAS 4 1 .800 Huber VU-10 4 2 .666 With the Marine Leathernecks already the 1954 pennant winners of the Naval Base League local interest focuses on the battle for second place which raged throughout this past week of play with the 'Bees of MCB-8 winning a decisive two and edging the VU-10 Mallards out of the slot by a full game. 'BEES EDGE NAVSTA TO NOTCH TIE FOR SLOT the top of the fist and tie other The first step in the 'Bee climb i the fourth. towards the coveted seat this week Smith was credited with the win, was a 12-7 win over the fourth his tenth against one setback, as place Naval Station Indians Tueshe struck out six. Breske was clay night. charged with tie loss is fifth The Braves, with Babe Fidler on against two wils. He gave way the mound, jumped off to an early to Edgar in the eighth. three run lead in the first two Marines 10 13 5 frames, but the 'Bees power shoved VU-10 2 4 7 across four in the bottom of the 'BEES INTO SECOND second, four in the third and four 13V ONE in the sixth as they went on to Capitalizing oi the Mallard loss, take the win and move into a tie MCB-8 came hack to plant their for second with the Mallards. best foot firmly a full game above Dotson was the big gun for MCB-8 VU-10 as they came from behind as his ringing bat sounded off for t edge the cellar-dwelling NAS three singles, a double and two Flyers, 6-5, Thursday night. RBI's in five trips. Baries rapped It was the big bat of Jim Dotson out his third round-tripper for the Naval Station in the eighth with once aga tat slamie the no one on. seventh knotted tie score at five Dotson was the winning pitcher all. Manager Robbie Roinson as he went the distance to notchwon the win striking out 11. Fidler was charged with the loss, going the tile acroe b i g the iifi first two and one third innings sac r h w giving up a total of eight runs while striking out one. Mandis was Shackleton wis the winning his relief as he finished the tilt hurler as he came oi to relieve giving up four more runs and strikstarter Hoffman after tie first five ing out three. The Brave defensive end two thirds frames. Worn was unit miscued six times while the charged with his fifth loss against 'Bees committed four errors. hut one win as the Flyer workMCB-8 12 13 4 1101e went tie full nine limiting NavSta 7 12 1 the victors to eigth hits. MARINES SHOVE MALLARD NAS5 8 4 INTO THIRD NAS 5_5_8_ 4 Wednesday night the pennantholding Marine Leathernecks cruised behind the four hit serving of (As of Thursday, 8 July) manager Chuck Smith to a 10-2 W L GB win over the VU-10 Mallards to Marines 23 2 give the 'Bees undisputed possesMCB-8 14 12 9 sion of the second seat. VU-10 13 13 101/2 With the Leatherneck guns, NavSta 8 18 151/ Felak and Pace, leading at the NAS 6 19 17 plate, the league-leaders scored TOP FIVE BATTERS almost at will as they came up (As of Thursday, 8 July) with two in the fourth, one in the AB H AV fifth, five in the seventh and a Felak Marines 94 41 .439 final two in the eighth. The Pace Mirines 90 38 .422 Mallards, behind the combined hurlAdams Marines 104 37 .356 ing efforts of Breske and Edgar, Dotson MCB-8 108 38 .352 scored their two by taking ois ill Sutherland NA 2 21 .340 All-Star manager Oxford Allen of Cuba and Chuck Smith of the Naval Base meet with RADM E. B. Taylor before the game as the Base Commander formally wishes both the best of luck. 0

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m Page Six Golf Course Provides Relaxation i What D' Ya' Say? The INDIAN will award a cer ileaite g1ood for $1.00 worth of merchandise at the Navy Exchange for each question accepted and used. Submit your questions to Litor, The Indian, Box 19.) The question: Do you think the new bonus bill will increase reenlistments? The place: Fleet Boat Pool Shed by Jerry 'Fore!-then a sudden swish followed by a solid nd chat sends a brand new ball soaring through the air down the fairway of the 18-hole Guancanamo Bay Naval Bas" golf course, another Naval StAtin Special Services facility provided for your recreation. Located on the road to Kittery Beaca, about one -hundred yards from Recreation Road, is the club house. Open to all military personnel, American civilians and their dependents, the golf course offers the pursuit of one of America's most respected sports on some of the finest greens found anywhere. Hours are from 0800 to 1700 on weekdays and 0700 to 1800 Saturday, Sundays and holidays. The golf store maintains a rental system by which sets of clubs can be rented for 35 cents per day, green fees are 65 cents and golf balls caii be purchased for as low as 45 cents each or $5.00 a dozen. The balls are the new Dunlop 65's, reputed to be the very finest and sold by the 4th Division at an extremely low price. In charge of the club's activities and there to help you better your game is Golf Professional Wright North AMC. The course is an 18-hole spread covering an area of 2,480 square yards on the first nine and 2,931 square yards on the back nine. The cost of labor necessary in keeping the rolling greens in can condition is approximately $35,000 annually. That's a lot of grass! An expansion piog'rai is already underway. When the project is completed, club m iabeirs will enjoy a new tropical-typ^ clubhouse which will iouse a golf shop and spaceous locker rooms equipped with showers. A covered porch coimpletely suirrountding ihe club will be outficted with blended bamboo furniture and to this will be added a new snack bar and lounge. You have undoubtedly heard about the skeptic wlho saw no sport in chasing a tiny ball around 18 holes in the hot sun. That was before he hit his first ball! Now he strolls the green in checkered hat, baggey pants and is quite happy at tie prospect of a day in tihe sun with a golf bag strapped to his shoulder. He is firmly convinced of the satisfaction attainable when he doffs his cap and yells "Fore!" after solidly connecting with the little white ball now soaring down the fairway. To simplify che game of golf, you place a small sphere about 2 inches in ci cumnfrence on a large sphere about 25,000 miles in circumference,-the object: hit the little one! Eugene Caruso, FN, Fleet Boat Pool "Yes, I think it ought to; at least it would help some who weren't sure to decide." Sheldon Connors, SN, Flag Division "It will at least give the average sailor an incentive to ship over." J. T. Craven, SVCN, MCB-8 "I think it may convince some to ship over, but not too many." C. E. Naffe, EN2, USS Trathen, DD530 "Yes I believe it will. It certainly gives men more reason to ship over." SCUTTLEBUTT "And thus is my father's gome room?" Richard Hanes, BM1, Fleet Boat Pool "I chink a man doing 20 will do it regardless of a bonus. It's all a matter of liking the service." Saturday, 10 July 1954 m THE INDIAN 9

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4m Saturday, 10 July 1954 m Page Seven 'Out of the Frying Pan' Opens 5 -Day Run Tuesday Night Members of the cast of "Out of the Frying Pan" sit still long enough for the Indian photographer to get their picture. In the back row, left to right: Easton Guillory, Alan Wagner, Dan Nash, Gordon Thompson, Jim Boyett and Ronnie Estefan. Front row, same order: Joyce Mickiewicez, Anita Sierra, Shirley Emerson, Ruth Groenveld and Ethyl Beach. Burt Knight, another member of the cast, was not present for the photo. Local Little]Theatre Offers Broadway Comedy Hit For Nay Base Patrons by Joyce Simmons At last the fruit of weeks of hard work is ready for you, the public, to behold and enjoy, as "Out of the Frying Pan" opens at Marina Point on Tuesday, July 13th and runs through Saturday, July 17th. This gay production is the most hilarious comedy ever attempted by The Little Theatre, and Betty Radcliffe and Dave Humes have done a wond iful job directing. The story revolves around three yomg men (Alan Wagner, Dan Nash, and Gordon Thompson) and three young women (Anita Sierra, Shirley E im e r a a in, and Ruth Groenveld) who are aspiring young actors and actresses anxious to succeed in the threatrical world. Because they have very little cash but much ambition and ingenuity, they decide to economize by sharing an apartment between them-the apartment being paid for by the father of one of the girls, who knows nothing of their liberal arrangement and arrives unexpectedly in town to visit his daughter. Meanwhile, the young people have discovered a famous producer living in the same building, and they immediately concentrate all their efforts to lure him to their apartment, where they go to great length enacting one of his own plays (under most involved and trying conditions.) There is not just one high point The female leads of the play are Anita Sierra, Ruth Groenveld and Shirley Emerson. The male leads of "Out of the Frying Pan" are Alan Wagner, Gordon Thompson and Dan Nash. in this play, but many, many complicated situations kept alive by a continuous stream of invigorating dialogue and lots of action. The production spurns boredom and guarantees you an evening of real fun and laughter for all of the family. Don't forget-curtain time is 8:00 P.M. and the tickets are only 75', with refreshments served for your convenience between the acts. Lets see you there. Members of tihe Little Theatre rehearse one of the hilarious scenes from "Out of the Frying Pan" which is to be presented here soon. Those appearing in this scene are, left to right: Alan Wagner, Dan Nash, Gordon Thompson, and Burt Knight. Surouned by cotpses' Alan Wagner, as Norman, haims up the closing scene of a play within a play during rehersal of "Out of the Frying Pan." 0 Four of the Iading characters attempt to convince Joyce Mickiewicz, as Muriel, that she should take the part of a corpse. 'Out of the Frying Pan' Community Auditorium Located Atop Marina Point Starting Tuesday at 8:00 P. M. 9 THE INDIAN ADMISSON 754 i 1 0 1

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Navy-IONDPPO-Gtrie.-020 mf Saturday, 10 July 1954 THE INDIAN Hospital Notes Heirport News From 22 June through 5 July, the following births were recorded: a daughter, Theodora Lea, born 22 June to DC1 and Mrs. John W. Cofield; a son, John Joseph, born 22 June to CWO and Mrs. James J. Devlin; a daughter. Connie Sue, born 25 June to PH3 and Mrs. James L. Holder, a son, Joseph Donald, born 28 June to LCDR and Mrs. Joseph D. Bedford; a son, Steven Joel, born 29 June to EN2 and Mrs. Uscoe J. Fitts; a daughter, Lyndia Dell, born 1 July to AD1 and Mrs. Willie G. Mace; a son, Mark Alan, born 3 July to FN and Mrs. Forrest May; a daughter, Linda Carol, born 3 July to EM1 and Mrs. Carel E. Mills; and a son, Mark Greer, born 4 July to CDR and Mrs. David L. G. King. New Arrivals CDR John B. Mac Gregor (MC) USN, and family arrived 2 July from the Naval Hospital, National Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland. He will assume duties as Executive Officer of this command and also hold the post of Chief of Medical Services. Prior to entry into the Naval Service, CDR MacGregor obtained his B. S. and M. D. degrees from the University of Virginia. He has since served as intern at the Naval Hospital, Portsmouth, Va., junior medical officer aboard the USS Ranger, medical officer of DesDiv 73; ward medical officer at the Naval Hospital, Brooklyn; junior medical officer aboard the USS Albemarle; medical officer aboard the USS Yukon; completed the School of Aviation at Pensacola, Fla.; flight surgeon at the Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Fla.; flight surgeon of an evacuation squad in the Pacific area; Officer-in-Charge of Physiological Test Section at the Naval Air Training Center, Patuxet River, Md.; resident in medicine at the Naval Hospital, Philadelphia; assistant chief of medicine at the Naval Hospital, Jacksonville Fla.; and Cardiologist and Assistant Chief of Medicine at the Naval Hospital, National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Md. He also acted as the medical attendant to Vice-President Nixon for two months during this period. He is also married to the former Catherine F. Wilkinson of Jacksonville, Florida, has three children, Catherine Wynne, 10, Sussais M., 8, and John B., Jr., 4. Afton, Virginia is claimed as his home town. Also arriving on 2 July from the Naval Hospital, National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Md., was CDR Louis E. Tebow (MC) USN, and his family. CDR Tebow obtained his B. S. and M. D. degrees from the University of Illinois and performed graduate work at the University of Pennsylvania. He has served at MOVIES With all the talk about brief Bikini bathing suits and short cropped hair, Shirley Allen from Arlington, Va. proves there is still plenty of appeal in the "country-style" gal. the Naval Hospital, Portsmouth, Va., was under instruction at the National Naval Center,ETAOITA National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda; Senior Medical Officer with CAIRNS, Austrailia, aboard the TG-70.1, and of a Naval Unit at Melborne, Austrailia; assistant Medical Officer at the Naval Training Center, Great Lakes, Illinois; Senior Medical Officer aboard the USS Atlanta; resident surgeon at the Naval Hospital, Great Lakes; assistant Medical Officer at the Naval Gun Factory, Washington, D. C.; resident surgeon at the Naval Hospital, Bethesda; Senior Medical Officer of Surgical Team #10 on duty at the Naval Hospital, Yokosuka, Japan; resident surgeon at Bethesda and consultant in surgery at the Dispensary, Washington, D. C. He will assume the duties of the Surgical Services upon the detachment of CDR J. J. Times (MC) USN. Other arrivals on 2 July include V. G. Agen, HN, T. E. Corbett, HN, and A. C. Ball, HN, from the Air Transportation Squadron ONE, Pax. River, Md.; I. Baron, HN and N. J. O'Brien, HN, from the Receiving Station, Brooklyn; N. M. Nilsen, HM3, and W. J. Nye, HM3, from the Naval Hospital, Philadelphia; and R. A. Langlois, HN, and A. Pincus, HN, from the Naval Medical School, National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Md. Departures On 30 June four of our men departed: W. 0. Speckmann, HMC, for duty as an instructor at the Naval Hospital Corps School, San Diego, California; C. C. Hills, HM3, and T. F. Rogers, HN, for duty at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, S. C.; and C. H. Tanner, HN, to CLUSA for separation. IF YOU CAN SEE THIS, YOU CAN SEE OUT OF THE FRYING PAN Saturday, 10 July ARROWHEAD Charlton Heston Jack Palance A U. S. Cavalry Scout has a maniacal hate for the Indians. The Army tries to make peace with them against his advice but are very nearly wiped out in an attack. Sunday, 11 July QUO VADIS Robert Taylor Deborah Kerr The story depicts Rome when it ruled an enslaved world under Emperor Nero; the persecution of Christians and the burning of Rome. Monday, 12 July ISLAND IN THE SKY John Wayne Lloyd Nolan A transport plane gets lost in a snowstorm and is forced to land in uncharted wastelands in the north continent. Tuesday, 13 July GUN BELT George Montgomery Tab Hunter Reformed outlaw is framed by his brother, who thinks it makes little difference if the law thinks he is an outlaw again. Wednesday, 14 July PRINCE OF PIRATES John Derek Barbara Smith A 16th -century swashbuckler about a band of volunteers who set out to free their country from the advancing power of Spain. Enamel Etchings We're glad to see Mrs. Doss made it back from Kingston, Jamaica. The reports are so glowing -his wife, who is arriving today, will want to make the trip real soon. Dr. Haymes is back in his office at full throttle. He always did like to work standing up, says he. The stuff you see clinging to the Nealon family shoes "ain't hay ", it's excelsierthe packers have been at work in their quarters. They're super-short-timers now. CDR Etter, Mrs. Etter and daughter Alice, (Missy) hit the road for the States next Wednesday. After a visiting trip up the East coast they'll visit home (Indianapolis) then report in to the Great Lakes for duty. Let's think of them next winter, eh? Captain and Mrs. Stagner arrived on board the THOMAS 2 July. Their son Bill and house guest Ronnie Sperier arrived by bus and train from Havana. The two "boys" are college classmates at South Eastern Louisana. A deaf woman entered a church with an ear trumpet. Soon after she had seated herself, an usher tiptoed over and whispered, "One toot and out you go!" STUFFY rl!7 1 CS


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