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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English

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- ~Govets ejTMO Llike T-te &nh

Vol. V1, No. 52 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Satturday, "I July 1954


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Col. Fojt Relieves

Col. John B. Hill

Colonel John B. Hill, USMC, will depart from Gtmo via FLAW on
7 July. Relieving him as Commanding Officer of Marine Barracks will be Colonel Robert E. Fojt, USMC, who arrived on MSTS yesterday. Colonel Hill is under orders to report to the Commanding General, Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton. Calfornia. Accompanying i ni will be his wife Jane and children Jane, Buinn and Nancy. They plan a stopover at their home in Atlanta, Ga. before proceeding to










- A












Colonel John B. Hill the coast.
Colonel Hill has been Commanding Officer of the barracks since 5 August 1952. During the past twenty-three months he has become a familiar figure to base personnel through his interest in base activities, particularly shooting and sports events. His consuming interest in shooting gave extra impetus to the formulation and success of the base rifle and pistol matches of the past two years. Further, Colonel Hill made personal arrangements for the rifle matches with the Royal Welch Fusillers at Kingston, Jamaica.
From an athletic standpoint, Colonel Hill made every effort to push not only the Marine program but that of the entire base as well. His success in the former is a rather impressive box score for a command of some 200 men:
Base Basketball Champs in 1954; Runner-up in baseball league and
(Continued on Page Eight)


Naval Base Thanked

For Red Cross Donation

Through the Community Fund, $4,000 was donated to the American Red Cross by the military personnel, civilian employees, and dependents here on the Naval Base. Recently, RADM Edmund B. Taylor received a letter acknowledging this donation. The letter in part read as follows:
''We a!"' forwarding the to Lal amount ($4,000 donated by personnel of tbis base) to the American Red Cross Headquarters of the Caribbean Area, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, where Mr. Howard R. Ross, Diiector of Operations, will forward the amount directly to National Headquarters, Washington, D. C.
"We greatly ap preciate your interest in our organization and we wish again to thank you and the personnel of our base for the generous response to the Fund Drive of 1954.
Veiry truly yours,
Assistant Field Director
Mrs. Helen Bowler

1954 Hurricane, Atomic

Defense Drills Completed


CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, prepares to send out a radio message during the recent passive defense drills. Standing by taking down notes on casualties and damag'e done is Gene Connick.
(See Pictures on Page 3)


Base Plans Busy Holiday Weekend

The 4th of July will not pass lightly over Guantanamo Bay.
Oil Saturday, Sunday, and Monday, families and groups will go to the beaches (which were all called for by Wednesday). Then on Sunday afternoon, the All Star game between the Naval Base All Stars and a Cuban All Star team will be played on Fleet Recreation Area, Diamond No. 1. Finally, on Monday, there will be a fireworks display given from the bay by the Naval Station.
-______Activity at the beaches began early this morning as families and
M CB -6 Completes picnic groups loaded cars with
BPo, handle au reiresnO e tH ments and headed for Windmill,
Operations H E.-' Phillips Park, and Kittery beaches as well as other picnic sites on the
Tuesday afternoon, Mobile Con- base. Since the majority of these struction Battalion SIX completed parties were private, no estimate their operations here in Guantan- was available on the amount of amo Bay as they went on board the food and drinks purchased. USS Deuel and departed for Davis- Sunday afternoon, activity will ville, Rhode Island, home base of begin at the Fleet Recreation Area, the construction battalions. Diamond No. 1, with the traditional
Differing from the usual proce- All Star game. This game has been dure of ComCBLant, MCB-6 is not one of the sports hi-lites of the being relieved by another battalion. year here in Guantanamo. However, all of the present jobs Full color will be added to the and projects of MCB-6 will be taken game with pre-game ceremonies over by MCB-8. and contests. At 1300, the contests
While here in Guantanamo Bay, will begin with the Baseball MCB-6, as well as working on the Throwing. For this contest, a prize Replacement Housing and other of $7.50 for 1st place and $5.00
projects, sent out several small for second place will be awarded. detachments to smaller bases and Following the ball throwing, both new sites here in the Caribbean. Naval Base All Stars and Cuban
Upon returning to Davisville, All Stars will participate in a base MCB-6 will be broken up further running contest. Prizes for this into more detachments. Only an contest will be the same as the Ball administrative unit will remain in Throwing Contest. Davisville. Following the contests, pre-game
---- ceremonies will be held as the
National Anthem will be played
East Bargo Empty; with Mrs. Earl Beiland as the vocal
soloist. After the National Anthem,
Moving Continues Chaplain M. 0. Stephenson will
give the invocation. Immediately
following the invocation. Chief
With the exception of three fam- Umpire F. X. O'Connor will call ilies, East Bargo is completely "play ball" and the game will be on. Vacant. The game itself promises to be
This area, which once housed 54 a thriller as the top stars of the families, is due to be entirely ren- Naval Base will be pitted against ovated by the construction of new local Cuban Stars from Guantanreplacement housing units. aino City. Umpiring the game
This last week, the last two will be Chief Umpire O'Connor, military families were moved into DiGennaro at 1st base, Richter at replacement Housing Unit No. 264. 2nd base, and Duffy at 3rd base. W. C. Bowers, BMI and his family, The game will he broadcast by and E. C. Williamson, BM2 and his Armed Forces Radio Station WGBY family-both of the Naval Station and CMKS of Guantanamo City.
-were the families to move. Finally, Monday night, the holiStill remaining in East Bargo clay weekend will come to a close are three families: W. G. Mathews, with a fire works display given by AD1 and his family, and W. F. the Naval station under the ausVicari, AD2 and his family, and pices of the Special Services, OrdG. F. Ward, Civilian, and his fam- nance, and Navy Exchange departily. Both Mathews and Vicari are ments. The gigantic display will expecting orders soon as their begin at 1930 and will continue tours of duty are up here. Ward uninterrupted for about one hour. will move into the next replace- To provide maximum room for ment unit available for civilian spectators, parking and at the
(Continued on Page Six) (Continued on Page Three)


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3
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Page Two


M


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 3 July 1954


TEENAGE-ROUND-UP NAS Crosswinds
by Dick Friz


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Station
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615
Saturday, 3 July 1954
U. S. NAVAL BASE Clantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT william R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sandness-_.____--Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC-------------------Editor
H. L. Sisson, JO3--------------------News
Jerry Lewis, J03 -------- --------Features
Pierce Lembeck ------------------ Sports
F. L. Cannon, JOSN _-Photographer
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and Financed with non-appropriated funds.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news iay be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


WV A I *" I. I I I - - C

by John Hull

Although WGBY comes under the command of the Naval Station, it serves all commands on the base and every man, woman and child in Guantanamo Bay has a direct interest in the successful operation of the station. With a staff of five men, WGBY is on the air a total of 122 hours per week. Considering that the Armed Forces Radio Service recommends, at the least, 11 men to operate a station of this size, it is easy to see that we are seriously shorthanded.
During the month of July, we are conducting an intensive drive to recruit new men for our staff of announcers. These men might come from any command on the base. In the case of Naval Station personnel, it means a permanent transfer to the Special Services Division for full-time work. If you are in any other command, it means a TAD transfer to the Naval Station for fulltime duty.
We don't expect to find a "Martin Block" or an "Al Jarvis" here at Guantanamo Bay, but we are prepared to take any man with at least one year left on his tour of duty here, a man with little or no regional accent, and turn him into a competent announcer and enginer in six months. Do we sound optimistic ? Well,' onie of the best men we ever had never got beyond the 10th grade in school, but he was a hard worker, asked questions constantly and always seeked to im-prove.
You may be just the man we are looking for but we won't find you if you don't dial 9-615 and tell us you would like to take an audition. We will ask you to bring a note from your Division Officer saying you have his permission to try out, and then ask you to come down any afternoon, Monday throuith Saturday, between 3 and 5 o'clock and "ctut a tape". The work is very rewarding and you'll get the best kind of "grass roots" training in radio.


by Judy Yost

Hey gals, theah's a new boy on the base! His name is Charles Edwards. He just graduated from high school in Texas, and plans to go to college there this fall. Glad to have ya aboard, Charles!
Man! Jimmy Dexter has really had tough luck! First of all, he was out at Windmill Beach, standing on some rocks, when a landslide started. He was really shook! Next, to top this off, the undertow carried him out. (By the way, all of this happened the very same day!) Then, he was sitting down on a rock, enjoying the scenery and taking life easy, when he slipped off. Brother, did he do some fancy flips! (Tain't funny is it, Dex?) And last, but not least, he broke his dad's fishing rod! (A sad case)
Last Saturday morning was really something ! Most of the kats could be seen rubbing the sandman's dust out of their eyes! Lots of the gang played cards or just sat around and talked. These hurricane drills are real gassers, aren't they? Oh well, they're fun, anyway!
The big disappointment of the week was the group of swingerroos who had struggled via feet and bus, to get to the Villamar dance-and after finally making , to find out it was the wrong nigi--'-'No dance, no music, no nothin'!
Did ya dig . .. . Barbara G. and Phil . . . the gals and their "adnirers" . . . Jackie S. and "Philly is in the corner of Pa. In fact, it's the whole corner!". . . Norman trying to get off the bus ... Pierce's pitchin' . . . The kats at the Snack Shack soaking up the sun Eddie's new girl. . . . The water fights at the pool . . . Jeanne singing "Seven Lonely Days" and "Why Did You Leave Me". . . .


VU -10 Prop Blast

LT Al Bittle, after two years in this squadron, has returned to the States to be released from active duty. Al and his wife, Peg, will be m-issed by all the members of this unit.
LT Snyder and his family also departed. They were sent to the Naval Training Command at Pensacola. Good luck and best wishes to youl both.
W. G. Mace, ADI has taken leave in order to greet the new arrival tco his family. Mace won't reveal whether he wants a boy or girl, just says that he will take what the stork brings.
Everyone is very excited about the all hands party coming up on the 5th of July. All hands be sure Lnd make arrangements to come and be sure to bring your families. There will be plenty of fun, refreshments, food, and games.
Chief Pistole and LT Graves went hunting Saturday over at Leeward Point. They won't admit what they shot, but the blisters on their hands show that they had to row home.
The Mallard baseball team has been redhot the last few games, but the Marines seem to have cast
- spell over the Mallards. Don't give up, we still have the play off to go.
E. A. Schwichtenberg, ADC has


Who's Who At NAS:
THOMAS E. HAWKINS QMC: USNAS AOOD:
Chief Hawkins reported aboard Gtmo from the USS OPPORTUNE ARS-41, where he performed navigational duties. "Hawk" is a veteran of the Navy for 14 years, including duty on the USS RICHMOND, USS CLARK (DD361) USS PC 486, USNAS Quonset Point, R. I. and USS CORDUBA AF-32.
Born in Spartanburg, South Carolina, he attended High School there and also lettered in football. His other favorite sports are hockey and baseball (he is one of the most avid baseball fans down here.) He is married to Patricia Ruth Rowe of Dover Foxeroft, Maine, and they reside at RB-8. The chief is also a Mason. His favorite hobby besides pitching for Gosnell's Gosling softball team, is taking color slides.
The chief likes Gtmo duty, but recalls that his best station was as assistant navigator aboard the USS CORDUBA. The CORDUBA supplied outlying bases, and made cruises through both the Caribbean and Mediterranean. "If I was single, I'd prefer the Med." he said, "but being tied down-well the Caribbean will do." (Mrs. Hawkins, we are only spoofing.)
The following men will be transferred within the next few days: Norman Janicki, AB2, Howard Smith AK3, Austin Jones A/N will report aboard the USS LAKE CHAMPLAIN.
Fred Shimonek ADAN, and Ronald Lamb, ADAN, aboard the USS LEYTE: James Hagan, AC2 joins VR-6 at Chicopee Falls, Mass.; William Marshall PRI to USS K U L A G U L F; William Mathews, AB1 to USS SIBONEY; Clifford "Mumbles" Meador AKAN to VR-32 at NAS San Diego; Sam Conti ATAN to VF-173 in Jax; and Carleton Ingram AE3 to VF74-NAS Oceana, Va.
Vacation time beckons to a large group this past week . . . headed for the states are Spence Newins AE3, Paul Snyder A/N, Walt Benzman TD3, Gene Young SHSN, Harold Chapman A/N, Ben Bladies A/N, Bob Bonham A/N, Russel
Shaak AB3, James Houchin F/N, and Leo Mathews A/N. Gentlemen, don't forget to come back.
VF-22 and Vf-101 are aboard Leeward Point for gunnery trainingat present. VF-81, a recent visiting squadron, boasted a 42.9% banner. VF-74 had 16 individual "E's." VF-103 had 12 "E's." LCDR J. W. Lankford of VF-81 leads all marksmen with an astounding 78.4cr.
The Leeward Pointer is sponsoring the first official dog show at the "Rock" some time within the next few weeks. Pedigrees will be outlawed, and entries will be judged on appearance, poise, and ability to obey commands. A large turnout is expected since the canine population has now reached an all time high.

heen transferred to Jacksonville, Florida, and our only new comer to this unit is Mitchell, H., AT1, who hails from Lipscomb, Alabama.
Three new families will join us this weekend. LT Cyrus' wife, Mildred, LTJG Blair's wife, Wayne, and LTJG Winkler's wife, Faith. Welcome aboard.



9


Sunday, 4 July 1954

Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic)


The Chaplain's Corner




"Our Nation's Prayer" was written by the Rev. Francis C. Young. Ever since its inception, this patriotic prayer poem has been commended by every President regardless of political and religious affiliations.
Warren G. Harding was the first to recognize its inspirational value in these words: "The sentiment is in complete harmony with the best aspirations of our Republic. This nation can be helped every time this appeal to the God of the Universe is given sincere utterance."
On this 4th of July, it might be well for each one of us to realize the necessity of prayer in our own lives, and, at the same time, to realize our obligation to pray also for those in civil positions, for those charged with the government of our nation, of our state, our county, our city. For if we keep our Government more cons',tently in our prayers, the plane of our moral life as a nation would be higher, and there would be less cause for complaints of "corrupt politics." Through prayer we can obtain from God the helps we need in both spiritual and temporal affairs.
Our Nation's Prayer is: "Oh Lord, a sacred peace we crave: for this, with all our leaders brave we pray that Thy Almighty Hand will guard and guide our wondrous land. We'll melt with love the swords of men: to make of them the noblest pen. With this, dear God, our hope and aim, let us enshrine Old Glory's fame. For us our Fathers died by sword, and loved ones spent their lives, Oh Lord. Give us unselfish hearts like theirs, to prove our worth as loyal heirs. Direct our thoughts to holy deed, let love abide among the creeds. Pray, keep us in Thy watchful care. We seek, dear Lord, Thy help in prayer. Amen."
W. J. Spinney
CHC, LCDR, USN






a0


Saturday, 3 July 1954


THE INDIAN


S.S

>>


....................sax


GI R V. J. Soballe, Executive Officer, Naval Station (extreme left), points out damage clone by the mythical atomic bomb on a map of the base to RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base (second from left), and CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station (center), while staff officers look on.










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The largest number of dependents here on the Naval Base evr to ather in one spot at one time leave the hurricane shelters as the "all clear sounds.


Holidoy Weekend...
(Continued from Page One)
same time provide for the safety of spectators, the display will be fired from a barge located directly opposite the Teen Age Club and Mobile Point.
The areas around Mobile Point, the Teen Age Club, and the Marine Movie Lyceum will be the best place for the general public to observe the display. Car parking facilities will be available at all the above places.
Other recommended areas are the Chief Petty Officers' Club and the Officers' Club. The CPO Club is making available the parking lot behind the CPO Club, the playground area, and the Caribbean Room and patio to anyone desiring to use these facilities. Regular dinners, sandwiches, and beverages of all kinds will be served. Children are invited and the CPO playground will be supervised.
The Navy Exchange will place mobile canteens at various strategic points for spectators to purchase beverages and refreshments.


Reduced Furlough Fares

Continued Until Jan. 31

Washington (AFPS) -Reduced furlough fares on the nation's railroads have been extended to Jan. 31, 1955, for military personnel traveling in uniform at their own expense.
The reduction in fares for members of the Armed Forces would have ordinarily expired on June 30, 1954.
The tax-exempt action will continue on round-trip fares for military personnel on furlough at the rate of 2.025 cents a mile or less. The ticket is good in coaches and includes regular stopover and baggage privileges.

It is planned to have bands present musical programs at various locations on the Base. Various athletic contests and other sports programs will be presented throughout the day.
The residential points will be closed to the general public.


CAPT Moe Commended Hobby Shops Offer


For Bainbridge work

Recently, a letter of commendation to CAPT Tilden 1. Moe was forwarded to the base commander here. Captain Moe, who just recently took command of the hospital here, was previously Senior Medical Officer, Administrative Command, Bainbridge Md., and it was while he was at Bainbridge that Captain Moe was cited for his work in the field of medicine.
The letter of commendation was as follows:
I have read your letter of 20 May 1954 to Captain J. J. Sepero
(MC) USN and wish to commend you and your staff for the high order of initiative and agressiveness shown and the success achieved in the prevention of sireptococcal respiratory disease and its crippling complications among recruits at Bainbridge during your tour of duty. It is due to accomplishments such as this, above and beyond the ordinary call of duty in the care of the sick, that medicine advances in knowledge and skill.
Sincerely yours,
Rear Admiral (MC), USN
H. L. Pugh

LT Leroy Skelly Sets New

Air-to-Air Gunnery Record

by C. A. Wright, Jr.
Who's the man with the banjo ? Lieutenant Leroy W. Skelly of Fighter Squadron 101, still the only man to hold 6 E's in one year's weapons competition, fired his Banshee Aircraft to another record today. Always one to come through under pressure, Roy Skelly, in competition at 25,000 feet, put 78% of his 150 rounds through the target, battering by 31 hits his previous high this month. This constitutes a new fleet record in air-to-air gunnery.
The "old man of Jet Aviation" just passed his 38th mile post and plans soon to succeed Grampa Pettibone. He prings from Indiana soil at Fort Wayne. That's the man with the banjo!

Grandpa Admiral, Sir...

Waaaaahh!!

On Fathers' Day, RADM Edmund B. Taylor received news of a Fathers' Day gift that would make any man proud. His daughter, Fay Taylor Butler (Mrs. Walter Hillman Butler, Jr.) gave birth to a seven pound, eight ounce baby boy, Walter Hillman Butler, III.
Walter III was borne in Rockland Maine where Mr. and Mrs. Butler are vacationing for the summer. Mr. Butler is on the faculty of Cushing Academy at Ashburnham, Mass.


Useful Pastime
by Jrr Lr,,"5

Hobbyists and craftsmen need not waste time after hours at Guantanamo Bay, not when there are facilities for constructing anything from a simple cheesebox to a sea-going yacht with custom made furniture! Special Services, NavSta, sees to that.
Located behind Bay Hill, just forward of the Naval Station B'oatshed, is the fully-equipped, up-todate hobby shop with $4,400 worth of the best wood-working machinery available.
Situated within the same building is the newly opened photo-lab, airconditioned and geared with some of the finest photographic darkroom implements.
Operating under the auspices of the 4th Division, the hobby shop is headed by Harold F. Ganus DCC. Others are Bernard V. Gannon, DCFN and Harold R. Galloway, FN. The Cuban civilian at the shop is Joseph J. Charles.
In charge of the $1,100 photolab is Pete E. Broughton, American civilian. Amateur photo-bugs can, for a small charge, develop, priit and enlarge their own photographs in the modern thermiostatically controbnd darkroom any night of their choe>. -. If you want to learn about the faseg.tbig hebby, Pete will teach it to you, step by step.
This applies to the hobby shop and the craft of wood-making Supplies of every description if needed can be ordered through the hobby shop department. Model planes, ships and various other kits can be chosen from catalogs and built at leisure any night except Thursday at the shop. The Shop is also secured Sunday evenings after 1600. These hours apply also to the lab.
A man that can continue his favorite hobby while serving overseas will be better on the job. Why not look into this facility and use your spare time in learning more about your hobby? It will pay off!


Poppy Sales Net $243

For Disabled Vets

A final tabulation shows that base residents donated $243.00 during Poppy Day, 29 May. The Anmerican Legion Auxiliary wished to thank all who donated.
The money will be sent to the Coral Gables (Fla.) Veterans' Administration Hospital.
Last year's donation reached $353.00 and was sent to the Carville Leprosarium in Louisiana for veteran rehabilitation.


NayBase Grows Each Day

Guantanamo Bay is getting smaller all the time, and the base is growing square yard by square yard. However, this is not a process of nature.
Between Radio Point and Boat Shed road, there is a small inlet which is being utilized to cump surplus filling material taken off of various grading jobs on the " base. Eventually this inlet will
exist no longer and will possibly
---------- -- be used for Bay Hill parking and
recreation.


M


Page Three


Page Three






a

Page Four


Rollie Sanfos. MarineS, P


"Buzz" Presutti, VU-10, P


"Doc" Daugherty, NavSta, 3b


Ed Bigbie, SeaBees, 1)


Naval Base


Marines Cop Pennant With SeaBee Split
I P


Bob Dieden, VU-10, 3b Bill Wood, Marines, OF


y erce Lehmbec Marines
VU-10
The Marine Leathernecks came in through the back door Wednesday MCB-8 night to capture the league title when the second-seated VU-10 Mallards NavSta lost in twelve innings to the Naval Station Indians and then the Marines NAS came back Thursday night to shake off all doubt as to the rightful possession of the flag with a 7-6 win over the 'Bees of MCB-8.
The league-leaders entered this week of play needing but one win to cinch the pennant and fell short in their first bid Saturday afternoon when MCB-8 defeated them on tier home diamond, 16-8. However, the title-snaring game needed was provided Wednesday night when the VU-10 Mallards lost a twelve inning thriller to the Naval Station Indians, 7-6. Due to this loss by the Mallards the 'Bees .
crawled back into second place by one percentage point, but the Leatherneck edge the following night sent them toppling back into third.
Elsewhere around the league, the NAS Flyers had a stormy week as they lost to the Naval Station Indians Sunday afternoon 23-7 and to the 'Bees Tuesday night, 28-5. In the week-opener Monday night, a two-run homer off the bat of Jim Dotson gave the 'Bees a ' win over the Mallards in a display of things to come as the two clubs battle it out for the number two A horde of outstretched hands greet Marii spot during these last weeks of he crosses the plate after rapping his seco play. and his 9th of the season last week.


LEAGUE STANDINGS (As of Trhursday, 1 July)


W 22 13
12
8
6


L GB


2
12 12 17 18


9 10
14 16


V

















in All Star Tom Felak as nd homerun of the game


Jim Pace, Marines, 21)


Larry Adams, Marines, lb


Jim Dotson, SeaBees, lb


"Andy" Androvich, Marines, SS


Saturday, 3 July 1954


THE INDIAN


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.S.


41


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4 aturda v31Jul 19Q54


THE INDIAN


"Siut" Sutherland, NAS, OF


Al


I


BASEBALL SCHEDULE

Sunday, 4 July
ALL STAR GAME
Monday, 5 July
Marine Barracks vs NAS
Tuesday, 6 July
MCB-8 vs Naval Station
Wednesday, 7 July
Marine Barracks vs VU-10
Thursday, 8 July NAS vs MCB-8




























SeaBe2 All-Smar Jim Dotson ge plate by Marine Felak last Saturda league leaders their second defeat of


"Brownie" Brown, SeaBees, OF


Ed Sherlacker NAS OF Smitty" Smith Marines, P


Stars, 1954



Base All Stars Face Cuban Nine Tomorrow
by Pierce Lehmbeck

Tomorrow on Fleet Recreation Diamond number one the Naval Base All-Stars will clash with the Cuban All-Stars in what promises to be the most exciting event of the NavBase athletic year. The top twenty-one horse-hiders, as chosen by a player-manager ballot will be out to make it two in a row as last year's All-Star nine met and defeated the Cuban representatives in the tradiional Independence Day Classic. Under the guiding hands of mangel Chuck Smith of the Marine Barracks and his hand-picked assistant Robbie Robinson of MCB-8, mhe All-Stars will be paced by the hurling efforts of strikeout king Rollie Sauitos of the Marines, firelballers Mandy Mandis of the Naval Station and Buzz Presutti of VU10, Ed Bigbie, the crooked arm of MCB-8 and manager Smith himself. Starting defensively will be Tom Felak of the Marines behind the plate, the 'Bees Jim Dotson on the initial sack, the Marine's Jim Pace and Joe Androvich at second and short respectively, VU-10's Bob Dieden on third base, Boo Ferris, also of VU-10 in left field, Chuck Mason of the Marines in center and Brown of the 'Bees in right.
Supporting this starting nine will be infielders Andy Konkoly of NAS, Lair ,v Adams of the Marine Barracks, Oke Layman of MCB-8, Jerry Morgan of NavSta, Doe Daugherty of NavSta and outfieldts tagged with expression at the ers Sherlacker of NAS, Sutherland
y as the rampaging Bees dealt the of NAS and Wood of the Marine the season. Barracks.


Jerry Morgan, NavSta, 21) & SS


At













"Okie" Layman, SeeBees, 21) Tom Felan, Marines, c


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Page Vive


"Boo" Ferris, VU-10, OF Chuck Mason, Marines, OF


y, yu 15


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JAW,


.401


"Miandy" Mandis, NavSta, 1)






e


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 3 July 1954


The Angle(R)

GROUPER
by Jerry Lewis
One of the laziest of all fish, yet surprisingly enough, one of the most popular targets for the local spear-fishermen is the Grouper or Jewfish.
Grouper is a general term which includes several species of fish. There are cabrillas, mero, hind, and jewfish. Because of their large size and vast availability, they are extremely popular, if not for their game-fighting ability, but rather for the struggle to bring one to the surface.
The great jewfish (Garrupa nigrita) is brown with black splotches and grows darker with age. His favorite haunting grounds are found in deep kelp in moderately deep water and may reach a weight of from 300 to 700 pounds.
Grouper are commonly colored greenish gray to orange brown with dark fins. They lead solitary lives and are characterized by a sullen expression.
The sight of their formidable appearance sends a shudder up the spine of a new visitor into the silent world. The fish has bulging eyes, thick lips, protruding lower jaw and a stout blimp-shaped body.
When hit with a spear, they flee to rocky crevices, offering little or no fight, and lodge their bulky body securely, using their spiny fins. That is when a keen knowledge of their habits and experience in diving is needed, plus patience and good old physical strength.


Puttin' Around
by Wright North
As a reminder to all golfers, starting times will be necessary Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays. The starting time sheet opens each Wednesday morning at 0800.
During the month of July, all greens are to be weeded from foreign grass. This is necessary for better playing conditions. You will find several men working on the green during this time. All players are cautioned against hitting into a green unless the workers are aware of your playing to this particular hole.
Many questions have been asked regarding the survey stakes between the first and putting green. They are to be the tentative location for the new clubhouse. I might also add at this time that the plans call for, in addition to the Pro Shop, ample space for club storage and display of merchandise. The club comprises approximately 300 members of which more than half are family members. Also included are a ladies' locker room and 800 square feet of locker space for men with approximately 100 lockers to be installed. Plans for the clubroom includes 700 square feet with soft lounge chairs where the weary may relax. Various golfing magazines will be subscribed to for the members' benefit. All trophies will be placed there along with the plaque now on display in the Snack Shack. In the summing up of this much needed addition to the Gtmo Golf Course, it is certainly something that has been needed for several years and when completed will be a building that any golf club would be proud to have. So on behalf of the present members, myself, and future members in later years, we wish to add just a thanks in advance to those persons responsible for something that will be wonderful improvement to the Gtmo Golf club.


Felak, Pace Lead NavBase

League Batting Race

Statistically, the fate of the league batting crown seems to be hanging between Leatherneck's Tom Felak and Jim Pace. Both are well over the .400 mark and seem to be improving steadily. In the homerun department Felak punched out two Staurday afternoon to push his total to a leagueleading nine only to have Jim Dotson of the 'Bees put two together during the week of play to knot the race again. In the pitching bracket, Marine Manager Smith's loss to MCB-8 ,Saturday marred his perfect record and dropped him into second ranking with an 8-1 total. Santos, also of the Marines, moved topside with an 11-1 record.


Andy Konkoly, NAS, c
Naval Base All Star

Ladies' Golf Shots
by Miriam Hoy

A. very successful Scotch Foursome was played last Sunday with a lot of fun had by all. The lucky winners of golf balls were:
1st Low Gross-Grego, Grego
2nd Low Gross-North, McElroy
3rd Low Gross-Tie
Henning, Henning
Brough, Gentry
1st Low Net-three-way tie:
Caruthers, Caruthers
DiMascola, Evans
Mathews, Burke
2nd Low Net - M c C r a c k e n, McCracken
3rd Low Net-Manning, Manning Closet to cup on No. 3 for the ladies was Edna Edwards. Closest to cup on No. 14 for the men was CDR Scott. Closest to cup on No. 18, Team Play was Bill Foulk and Miss Winchell. Longest putt on No. 9 for men or women was won by Fran Dykeman.
A Flag Tournament was played on Wednesday, June 30th on the back nine. This tournament is made up of the individuals handicap plus par. When the player drops her flag it indicates that her total number of strokes has been used up. The one who gets farthest on the course is the winner. Lucky winners were:
1st Flight-Corky Henning
Edna Edwards
2nd Flight-Marion Caruthers
Fran Dykeman
3rd Flight-Toni Winslow
Marge Sheehan
Next Wednesday, July 7th, we will play the front nine for Gross and Net. We would really like to have some newcomers join the club-so e on out gals.


Bud North sticks his chin out at the ball and offers three dliffereni places for it to light as Fred Meredith slides in safely to third in a Little League game at Villamar. The Colts knocked off the Bears, 0 to 3.


Record Fish Entries Little League Schedule


Hiuled In

Another big Guantanamo Bay Fishing Contest is underway. This looks like a record year wit> the biggest haul so far a 50-pound snapper, boated by V.A. Roberts. So dig out your rods and reels and join in the fun.
LAND DIVISION
Barracuda
Platts, C. W. - ----------1/ lbs.
Jacks
Pickett, S. L. ----------- 7 lbs.
Kilkland, H. A. --------- 8 lbs., 8 ozs.
Romand, Sam ----------14 lbs., ~~s *
MacAnanay, Raymond E. 19 lbs., 8 nr~s.
Mackerel (King)
Howerton, R. D. - ------- 5 lbs., 10 ozs.


Snapper
Heinandez, J. c. -____12 lbs. Hays, Robert, M. -_----1 lb., Hanlin, John ---Williams, Mike Jamieson, Raymond __Baker, F. R. --______-Jamieson, Raymond Soballe, Peter -----


7 ozs. 6 ozs. 51 ozs. 5 02s. 1 oz.


Tarpon
Bedward, K. D. - 17 lbs.
Henry, R. L. ----------- 12 lbs., 4 ozs.
BOAT DIVISION
Mrs. E. C. Kerslake __- 3 lbs., 7% ozs.
Lafnear, R. E. --------- 9 lbs., 1% ozs.
Snapper
Roberts, V. A. ---------- 5 lbs.
carroll, J. C. ----------- 0 lbs., 8 ozs.
Tarpon
Swanson, G. A. --------- 13 lbs., 8 ozs.
SPECIAL DIVISION
Bonefish


wind, Marion A. Sanborn, Ellen -.
Sanborn, Jim Dalton, Kathryn


2 lbs., 5 ozs.
Croakers
--- -- 8 ozs.
_-___-_ 2 o s.


Ladyfish
Smouse, J. H. -----------4 lbs., 8 ozs.
Pompano
Bedward, Kenneth - 20 lbs.
Gigey, G. K. - --------- ls., 4 ozs.
Romano, Sam --------- 8 lbs., 13 ozs.
Shark
Meredith, Fred ------- 41 lbs., 8 ozs.
SPEARFISHING DIVISION
Grouper
Nichols, E. M. -------rs16 lbs.
Snappers
Nichols, E. M. --------- 14 lbs.
Barracuda
Ward, C. F.-------- 5 lbs., 6: ms.


Ward, G. F.,


Hogfish
---_-_- 5 lbs., 15 ozs.


First sergeant: "What are we going to do about these men who ran off to join a nudist colony?"
CO: "Mark them absent without leaves."

"My mother-in-law gave a pint of blood to a sick man."
"Did the patient recover?"
"No, he froze to death."


Saturday, 3 July
Colts vs Bears Sunday, 4 July Hawks vs Tigers Monday, 5 July Tigers vs Colts .Thursday, 8 July Bears vs Hawks

East Bargo.
(Continued from Page One) personnel.
Movement of families into replacement units from Central and West Bargo will continue in the future.
Replacement housing will be assigned according to the length of time the family has been in Bargo and length of time remaining here in Guantanamo Bay. The families who have been in Bargo for the longest time and still have more than six months remaining on their tour of duty will be assigned to the replacement units first.
Also, to be fair to the families presently in Guantanamo Bay, no families on the waiting list for housing will be assigned directly to replacement housing. They will have to be assigned to housing in Bargo and then move to the Replacement housing later as more replacement units are completed.



SCUTTLEBUTT






Lc~72









A kid reporter, trying to get the secret of Babe Ruth's success at the bat, asked him: "Know anything about psychology?"
"Don't know much about him," said the Babe. "Ain't played a horse in three months."


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Saturday, 3 July 1954


THE INDIAN


Grease Paint Gossip
by Joyce Simmons

To complete the rostrum of the characters in "Out of the Frying Pan" we have four more actors who have smaller roles, but no less important ones.
Ethel Beach, who (lid such a splendid job portraying the hauty Mrs. Griswald in our last play, again finds herself in the character part of Mrs. Garnet, the landlady. As always, Ethel gives much spice to her acting and her entrances and exits give and amusing interlude in the general trend of the comedy.
Joyce Mickiewicz plays the "unwelcome" friend of one of the girls as Muriel Foster, and her untimely visit proves almost the undoing of the happy fellowship of the three girls and three boys who share the same apartment together.
Easton Guillory and Ronnie Eastefan are policemen in the play who are called in to investigate a reported scream coming from the apartment, and instead find a corpse that isn't really a corpse
-all of which makes for a very exciting and fun-packed scene.
I would like to mention at this time that the "backstage" crew have been working very hard during all the rehearsals. For the first time, the Little Theatre now has two very attractive temporary rooms (thanks to the efforts of Lee Douglas, Ronald Mathieu, and Howard Jones). This addition will give the actors much moire time for quick changes and eliminate much of the confusion we formerly had over "who" rated first choice on "the" one and only dressing room.
So now don't forget. "Out of the Frying Pan" will begin its run in a little over a week, on July 13th through 17th. Watch for the time and place for ticket sales.

An irate visitor darted angrily up to the beekeeper and complained: "One of your bees stung me, and I want you to do something about it."
The beekeeper answered soothingly: "Sure, lady. Just show me which bee it was an I'll have it punished."


FTG Bulletin
bv Jack Engstron

Captain D. B. Cushing, USN, the new Fleet Training Group Chief Staff Officer, accompanied by his wife and children, arrived yester(lay on the THOMAS from Norfolk, Virginia.
Captain and Mrs. Cushing were introduced to the officers and wives of FTG at a welcome aboard cocktail party given in their honor. The Captain will meet all the other FTG personnel this morning at inspection.
Captain Cushing, who reported to Commander Fleet Training Group as relief for Captain W. H. Groverman now serving Oi CinCLant Staff, will reside with his family on Marina Point.
Also arriving on the THOMAS was Mrs. Catherine R. McConnon and daughter Virginia, wife and daughter of LT McConnon FTG Staff Secretary. The McConnon's will reside in Quarters EP-630 on Evans Point.
Welcome aboard, and may your stay in Guantanamo be an enjoyable one.

The USS OLMSTED APA-188 will make a recreational visit to Kingston Jamaica over the weekend of 10 and 11 July. The OLMSTED will depart Gtio on Friday evening 9 July at 1800 and return early Monday morning.
Quotas lave heen assigned to the various commands on the base for the trip. The OLMSTED will have herthing space for 50 officers, 47 females, dependents and military, and 200 enlisted.

The United Fruit Company is sponsoring a holiday party and golfing at Banes, Cuba to which several people stationed here have received invitations.
Attending from the Training Group are LT(jg) Treffinger, Chief and Mrs. Monte and Chief Reynolds and his wife.
Jack Engstrom, your FTG reporter wishes to make an apology to CDR McElroy and CDR Simmons for demoting them to LCDR's in last weeks FTG Bulletin. A grave error on my part which I hope caused neither of you any em1 arrasment.


What D' Ya' Say?

The INDIAN will award a certificat, n-Od fr s1.0( worth of merchandise ait the Navy Exchaoge for each quei in accepted and tised Subit, your questions to Editor, IThe Indian, Box'19.)

The question: What would you suggest as a good name for ball diamond No. 1? The place: Ball diamond No. 1.



-A v
- -


. C. Wiggs, RMC, Security Group Det., NavBase
"Since everybody plays here, I'd call it the ''All Star Diamond'."


11.1M. Jacobson, DC3, MCB-8
"Why not call it 'Little Fenway Pur'l


G. . Bailey, FTC, Fleet Training Group
'Home of the Brave' is what I'd call it; everything ele hv-e named after the one-eyed Indian."


B"bbN Wdalls, FT', I SSDortch,
"Well, you might call it 'The Pail .


i I


On Friday, 25 June, 12 piatio students of Amrs. 11. P. McNeal presented the annual Junior Music Makers recital in the patio of the Naval Base School. Those participating, were, front row, left to right: Gary Houston, Bob Houston, Ralph Sierra, and Billy Sutherland. Real: row, left to right: Billy Jean Echols, Carol Echols, Lucille Mahaffey, Dolores Sierra, Judy Lynn Yost, Mrs. 1I. P. McNeal, Sherry Pavlow, Margaret Mathews, and Firances Linder.


I - IM. .\. Prost, BUL, MCB-8
"I think 'Sportsman's Field' would be appropriate, since no one team is really connect with the field." #


Cari Paadilainen, .U , 51(-5 "1oV aloUL cillin" i 'h1iamp' Park'."


Page Seven






m


Navy-1ONDPPO-Gtio.,-020


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 3 July 1954


MOVIES


Saturday, 3 July
ARENA
Gig Young Jean Hagen
The story of a young bronc buster and his wife who have been sepaated for several years and then meet at the rodeo in Tucson, Ariz.
Sunday, 4 July
WHITE WITCH DOCTOR
Robert Mitchum Susan Hayward
A widow wants to carry out her dead husband's wishes to live among the African natives and help them.
Monday, 5 July THE CADDY
Dean Martin Jerry Lewis
Jerry Lewis is an ace golfer, but crowds make him nervousand unable to play. He becomes Martin's caddy and teaches him the game, amid a riot of laughs.
Tuesday, 6 July
SMALL TOWN GIRL
Jane Powell Farley Granger
No information available.
Wednesday, 7 July
FORTY-NINTH MAN
John Ireland Richard Denning
Story based on enemy powers exploding A-bomb on American city. Security authorities try to track down bomb, being smuggled in piece by piece.
Thursday, 8 July
THE GOLDEN BLADE
Rock Hudson Pipar Laurie
Story takes place in Bagdad and involves the magic Sword of Damascus. A commoner saves the people from exploitation with it.


Daniel In Lion's Den
(AP) London, June 27 - Just before he died up in Yorkshire, Septimus Daniel Gilbert made his will. The will published here yesterday, showed he left these instructions:
"Bury me in the same grave as my wife, and on the gravestone put this inscription: "Daniel in the Lion's Den."


We're not trying to drive a good thing into hte ground, but here's Marilyn Monroe in a different light, and a very attractive one at that.


Cub Scouts Receive Awards,

Welcome New Members
by Millie Jamieson

The Guantanamo Bay Cub Scouts of America, Pack #401 held its meeting on June 29, at the Little Theatre, with Cubs and parents participating in ritual and songs. All were happy to welcome the new members, David Scott, George Gardes, Richard Baker, Willie Morales, Jimmie Shaw, Tommy Crouch, and Dwane King with Bob Cat pins. Bear badges were awarded to Jay Dee Sentz, and Phillip Crouch; Lion badges were earned by David Herold and Russel Baker. Silver or gold arrow points under the various ranks were achieved by John Crouch, David Herold, and Dickie Reynolds 'while one-year Service Stars were given to John Huddy and Jim and Pete Minard.
Many air-bourne models were submitted by the boys following the June month theme of "Air Adventures". An inspiring reproduc-


Col. Hill. . .
(Continued from Page One)
tourney in 1953; 3rd in softball in 1952; 3rd in baseball league and first in tourney 1952; a probable first in baseball in 1954.
Also during his tour Colonel Hill instituted a program at Marine Barracks to add to the existing vegetation in the area. Perhaps the most outstanding example of this program are the royal palm trees presently being planted about the Marine Area.
A Change of Command Ceremony will be held on the Marine Barracks parade ground at 0930, 7 July 1954. Service and Civilian personnel are invited to view this ceremony which will be a regular parade modified to the Change of Command.
tion of a blimp, by Billie Yarbrough, made with cardboard and covered with tin-foil won the first award. In accordance, a movie, "History of Naval Aviation" was enjoyed by all.
A Leaders' Meeting will be held at the home of Mrs. R. K. Minard (PP173) at 1930 on July 9.


'500K' NO OK

by Francis L. Cannon, JOSN

FOR YOUR INFORMATION
POWER OF WORDS
by Stuart Chase
This is more than a usual examination of semantics; Mr. Chase delves deeply into the psychological and physiological bases for communication. He says "to understand communication one should study the human nervous system as well as the language developed in human culture." He reports the latest findings in semantics, meaning, and how to deal with an increasingly complicated world. MUSIC IN WESTERN CULTURE
by Paul Henry Lang
In this 100-page volume, Professor Lang of Columbia Univ. treats music not as something apart from life, but rather as part of the general current of our civilization. He sheds light on the forces which determined the development of music as a part of intellectual and artistic life.
THE ROAD TO SANTA FE
Edited by Kate L. Gregg
Don't pass this on the shelf and mutter something about "those westerns. . . ." This is a collection of diaries of the surveyors of the Santa Fe Road and gives a true picture of what the area was like and what the people were like. George Champlin Sibley was field executive of a group of U.S. surveyors handed the job of marking out a trade route from Missouri to New Mexico; he was also a man who kept a fascinating diary. FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT Around the World in 1000 Pictures
Edited by Milton Runyon and
Vilma Bergane
How to see the world without leaving Guantanamo Bay (you can't anyway!) A collection of 1000 excellent pictures of all the places in the free world where an American traveler is likely to go. There are a generous number of pictures of England and Europe as well as the Caribbean.
Cork In Bottle MacDonald Hasting
Montague Cork is a sort of a present-day Sherlock Holmes-sans Watson. As manager of the Anchor Accident Insurance Co., Ltd., he is taken to the village of Bottle on a nierry mystery whirl. There have been no police in Bottle for 10 years and the appearance of any sort of snoop brings out the worst in the dour villagers.
IN PASSING . . .


Caine Mutiny Court Martial, by Herman Wouk-The script of the current hit play taken from the novel.
Short Cut to Photography, by Godfrey Finkel-A guide in clear language for the photo-freshman.
The Best from Fantasy and Science Fiction-The third annual edition presents 16 stories, gleaned from last year's editions of the magazines.
To prevent misunderstanding and accusing looks at the librarian, the books reviewed here are not necessarily on the shelf, ready to be taken out. It may be a week or more after reviewing before they are ready for circulation.

A classified advertisement read: Wanted-Man to wash dishes and two pretty waitresses.


9 9




Full Text

PAGE 1

oGncsers TMO Like The Snshine" --Vol. VI, No. 52 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 3 July 1954 Col. Fojt Relieves Naval Base Thanked Base Plans Busy Holiday Weekend Col. John B. Hill Colonel John B. Hill, USMC, will depart from Gtmo via FLAW on 7 July. Relieving him as Commanding Officer of Marine Barracks will be Colonel Robert E. Fojt, USMC, who arrived on MSTS yesterday. Colonel Hill is under orders to report to the Commanding General, Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton. California. Accompanying him will be his wife Jane and children Jane, Bunn and Nancy. They plan a stopover at their home in Atlanta, Ga. before proceeding to Colonel John B. Hill the coast. Colonel Hill has been Commanding Officer of the barracks since 5 August 1952. During the past twenty-three months he has become a familiar figure to base personnel through his interest in base activities, particularly shooting and sports events. His consuming interest in shooting gave extra impetus to the formulation and success of the base rifle and pistol matches of the past two years. Further, Colonel Hill made personal arrangements for the rifle matches with the Royal Welch Fusillers at Kingston, Jamaica. From an athletic standpoint, Colonel Hill made every effort to push not only the Marine program but that of the entire base as well. His success in the former is a rather impressive box score for a command of some 200 mien: Base Basketball Champs in 1954; Runner-up in baseball league and (Continued on Page Eight) For Red Cross Donation Through the Community Fund, $4,000 was donated to the American Red Cross by the military personnel, civilian employees, and dependents here on the Naval Base. Recently, RADM Edmund B. Taylor received a letter acknowledging this donation. The letter in part read as follows: "We are forwarding the total amount ($4,000 donated by personnel of this base) to the American Red Cross Headquarters of the Caribbean Area, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, where Mr. Howard R. Ross, Director of Operations, will forward the amount directly to National Headquarters, Washington, D. C. "We greatly appreciate your interest in our organization and we wish again to thank you and the personnel of our base for the generous response to the Fund Drive of 1954. Very truly yours, Assistant Field Director Mrs. Helen Bowler 1954 Hurricane, Atomic Defense Drills Completed CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, prepares to send out a radio message during the recent passive defense drills. Standing by taking down notes on casualties and damage lone is Gene Connick. (See Pictures on Page 3) The 4th of July will not pass lightly over Guantanamo Bay. On Saturday, Sunday, and Monday, families and groups will go to the beaches (which were all called for by Wednesday). Then on Sunday afternoon, the All Star game between the Naval Base All Stars and a Cuban All Star team will be played on Fleet Recreation Area, Diamond No. 1. Finally, on Monday, there will be a fireworks display given from the bay by the Naval Station. Activity at the beaches began early this morning as families and MCB -6 Completes picnic groups loaded cars with Operations H. mints and headed for Windmill, _________as well as other picnic sites on the Tuesday afternoon, Mobile Conbsse. Since the majority of these struction Battalion SIX completed parties were private, n estimate their operations here in Guantanwas available on the amount of amo Bay as they went on board the food and drinks purchased. USS Deuel and departed for DavisSunday afternoon, activity will ville, Rhode Island, home base of begin at the Fleet Recreation Area, the construction battalions. Diamond No. 1, with the traditional Differing from the usual proceAll Star game. This game has been dure of ComCBLant, MCB-6 is not one of the sports si-lites of the being relieved by another battalion. year here in Guantanamo. However, all of the present jobs Full color will he added to the and projects of MCB-6 will be taken game with pre-game ceremonies over by MCB-8. and contests. At 1300, the contests While here in Guantanamo Bay, will begin with the Baseball MCB-6, as well as working on the Throwing. For this contest, a prize Replacement Housing and other of $7.50 for 1st place and $5.00 projects, sent out several small for second place will be awarded. detachments to smaller bases and Following the ball throwing, both new sites here in the Caribbean. Naval Base All Stars and Cuban Upon returning to Davisville, All Stars will participate in a base MCB-6 will be broken up further running contest. Prizes for this into more detachments. Only an contest will be the same as the Ball administrative unit will remain in Throwing Contest. Davisville. Following the contests, pre-game _____ ceremonies will be held as the p National Anthem will be played East Bargo Empty; with Mrs. Earl Beiland as the vocal soloist. After the National Anthem, Moving Continues Chaplain M. 0. Stephenson will give the invocation. Immediately following the invocation. Chief With the exception of three famUmpire F. X. O'Connor will call ilies, East Bargo is completely "play ball" end the game will be on. Vacant. The game itself promises to be This area, which once housed 54 a thriller as the top stars of the families, is due to be entirely renNaval Base will be pitted against ovated by the construction of new local Cubes Stars from Guantanreplacement housing units. amao City. Umpiring the game This last week, the last two will be Chief Cmpire O'Connor, military families were moved into Diennaro st lst base Richter st replacement Housing Unit No. 264. 2nd base, aic Duffy it 3sd base. W. C. Bowers, BM1 and his family, The game will be broadcast by and E. C. Williamson, BM2 and his Armei Forces Radio Station WGBY family-both of the Naval Station and CMKS of Guantanamo City. -were the families to move. Finally, Monday night, the hellStill remaining in East Bargo (lay weekend will come to a close are three families: W. G. Mathews, with a fire woiks display given by ADi and his family, and W. F. the Naval CG ion udes the atsVicari, AD2 and his family, and pieces of the Special Services, OrdG. F. Ward, Civilian, and his famnaice aii Navy Exchange departily. Both Mathews and Vicari are ieits The gigantic display will expecting orders soon as their begin at 1930 end will cointe tours of duty are up here. Ward uiterrupted for about one hour. will move into the next replaceTi provide maxitm room for ment unit available for civilianspectator s hacking ad at the (Continued ow Page Six) a Coiitiaue on Page Three)

PAGE 2

Saturday, 3 July 1954 The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Station Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 3 July 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. SandnessOfeer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC-----------Editor H. L. Sisson, J0LN---ews Jerry Lewis, J03 ---Feature Pierce Lehmbeck ---Sports F. L. Cannon, JOSNPhotographer THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearingmherein must not be reproduced without wyittea permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. WGBY v H.i-Lies by John Hull Although WGBY comes under the command of the Naval Station, it serves all commands on the base and every man, woman and child in Guantanamo Bay has a direct interest in the successful operation of the station. With a staff of five men, WGBY is on the air a total of 122 hours per week. Considering that the Armed Forces Radio Service recommends, at the least, 11 men to operate a station of this size, it is easy to see that we are seriously shorthanded. During the month of July, we are conducting an intensive drive to recruit new men for our staff of announcers. These men might come from any command on the base. In the case of Naval Station personnel, it means a permanent transfer to the Special Services Division for full-time work. If you are in any other command, it means a TAD transfer to the Naval Station for fulltime duty. We don't expect to find a "Martin Block" or an "Al Jarvis" here at Guantanamo Bay, but we are prepared to take any man with at least one year left on his tour of duty here, a man with little or no regional accent, and turn him into a competent announcer and engineer in six months. Do we sound optimistic ? Well, one of the best men we ever had never got beyond the 10th grade in school, but he was a hard worker, asked questions constantly and always seeked to improve. You may be just the man we are looking for but we won't find you if you don't dial 9-615 and tell us you would like to take an audition. We will ask you to bring a note from your Division Officer saying you have his permission to try out, and then ask you to come down any afternoon, Monday through Saturday, between 3 and 5 o'clock and "cut a tape". The work is very rewarding and you'll get the best kind of "grass roots" training in radio. TEENAGE-ROUND-UP NAS Crosswinds ht Dick Fese y u y os Hey gals, theah's a new boy on the base! His name is Charles Edwards. He just graduated from high school in Texas, and plans to go to college there this fall. Glad to have ya aboard, Charles! Man! Jimmy Dexter has really had tough luck! First of all, he was out at Windmill Beach, standing on some rocks, when a landslide started. He was really shook! Next, to top this off, the undertow carried him out. (By the way, all of this happened the very same day!) Then, he was sitting down on a rock, enjoying the scenery and taking life easy, when he slipped off. Brother, did he do some fancy flips! (Tain't funny is it, Dex?) And last, but not least, he broke his dad's fishing rod! (A sad case) Last Saturday morning was really somethin'! Most of the kats could be seen rubbing the sandman's dust out of their eyes! Lots of the gang played cards or just sat around and talked. These hurricane drills are real gassers, aren't they? Oh well, they're fun, anyway! The big disappointment of the week was the group of swingerroos who had struggled via feet and bus, to get to the Villamar dance-and after finally making ? to find out it was the wrong nig.a1No dance, no music, no nothin'! Did ya dig .., .Barbara G. and Phil ...the gals and their "admirers" ..Jackie S. and "Philly is in the corner of Pa. In fact, it's the whole corner!" .Norman trying to get off the bus ..Pierce's pitchin' ...The kats at the Snack Shack soaking up the sun Eddie's new girl. ...The water fights at the pool ...Jeanne singing "Seven Lonely Days" and "Why Did You Leave Me". ... VU-10 Prop Blast LT Al Bittle, after two years in this squadron, has returned to the States to be released from active duty. Al and his wife, Peg, will be missed by all the members of this unit. LT Snyder and his family also departed. They were sent to the Naval Training Command at Pensacola. Good luck and best wishes to you both. W. G. Mace, AD1 has taken leave in order to greet the new arrival to his family. Mace won't reveal whether he wants a boy or girl, just says that he will take what the stork brings. Everyone is very excited about the all hands party coming up on the 5th of July. All hands be sure and make arrangements to come and be sure to bring your families. There will be plenty of fun, refreshments, food, and games. Chief Pistole and LT Graves went hunting Saturday over at Leeward Point. They won't admit what they shot, but the blisters on their hands show that they had to row home. The Mallard baseball team has been redhot the last few games, but the Marines seem to have cast a spell over the Mallards. Don't give up, we still have the play off to go. E. A. Schwichtenberg, ADC has 9 Who's Who At NAS: THOMAS E. HAWKINS QMC: USNAS AOOD: Chief Hawkins reported aboard Gtmo from the USS OPPORTUNE ARS-41, where he performed navigational duties. "Hawk" is a veteran of the Navy for 14 years, including duty on the USS RICHMOND, USS CLARK (DD361) USS PC 486, USNAS Quonset Point, R. I. and USS CORDUBA AF-32. Born in Spartanburg, South Carolina, he attended High School there and also lettered in football. His other favorite sports are hockey and baseball (he is one of the most avid baseball fans down here.) He is married to Patricia Ruth Rowe of Dover Foxcroft, Maine, and they reside at RB-8. The chief is also a Mason. His favorite hobby besides pitching for Gosnell's Gosling softball team, is taking color slides. The chief likes Gtmo duty, but recalls that his best station was as assistant navigator aboard the USS CORDUBA. The CORDUBA supplied outlying bases, and made cruises through both the Caribbean and Mediterranean. "If I was single, I'd prefer the Med." he said, "but being tied down-well the Caribbean will do." (Mrs. Hawkins, we are only spoofing.) The following men will be transferred within the next few days: Norman Janicki, AB2, Howard Smith AK3, Austin Jones A/N will report aboard the USS LAKE CHAMPLAIN. Fred Shimonek ADAN, and Ronald Lamb, ADAN, aboard the USS LEYTE: James Hagan, AC2 joins VR-6 at Chicopee Falls, Mass.; William Marshall PR1 to USS KULA G UL F; William Mathews, AB1 to USS SIBONEY; Clifford "Mumbles" Meador AKAN to VR-32 at NAS San Diego; Sam Conti ATAN to VF-173 in Jax; and Carleton Ingram AE3 to VF74-NAS Oceana, Va. Vacation time beckons to a large group this past week ...headed for the states are Spence Newins AE3, Paul Snyder A/N, Walt Benzman TD3, Gene Young SHSN, Harold Chapman A/N, Ben Bladies A/N, Bob Bonham A/N, Russel Shaak AB3, James Houchin F/N, and Leo Mathews A/N. Gentlemen, don't forget to come back. VF-22 and Vf-101 are aboard Leeward Point for gunnery training at present. VF-81, a recent visiting squadron, boasted a 42.9%, banner. VF-74 had 16 individual "E's." VF-103 had 12 "E's." LCDR J. W. Lankford of VF-81 leads all marksmen with an astounding 78.4(,. The Leeward Pointer is sponsoring the first official dog show at the "Rock" some time within the next few weeks. Pedigrees will be outlawed, and entries will be judged on appearance, poise, and ability to obey commands. A large turnout is expected since the canine population has now reached an all time high. been transferred to Jacksonville, Florida, and our only new comer to this unit is Mitchell, H., AT1, who hails from Lipscomb, Alabama. Three new families will join us this weekend. LT Cyrus' wife, Mildred, LTJG Blair's wife, Wayne, and LTJG Winkler's wife, Faith. Welcome aboard. Sunday, 4 July 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. O. Stephenson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) The Chaplain's Corner "Our Nation's Prayer" was written by the Rev. Francis C. Young. Ever since its inception, this patriotic prayer poem has been commended by every President regardless of political and religious affiliations. Warren G. Harding was the first to recognize its inspirational value in these words: "The sentiment is in complete harmony with the best aspirations of our Republic. This nation can be helped every time this appeal to the God of the Universe is given sincere utterance." On this 4th of July, it might be well for each one of us to realize the necessity of prayer in our own lives, and, at the same time, to realize our obligation to pray also for those in civil positions, for those charged with the government of our nation, of our state, our county, our city. For if we keep our Government more consistently in our prayers, the plane of our moral life as a nation would be higher, and there would be less cause for complaints of "corrupt politics." Through prayer we can obtain from God the helps we need in both spiritual and temporal affairs. Our Nation's Prayer is: "Oh Lord, a sacred peace we crave: for this, with all our leaders brave we pray that Thy Almighty Hand will guard and guide our wondrous land. We'll melt with love the swords of men: to make of them the noblest pen. With this, dear God, our hope and aim, let us enshrine Old Glory's fame. For us our Fathers died by sword, and loved ones spent their lives, Oh Lord. Give us unselfish hearts like theirs, to prove our worth as loyal heirs. Direct our thoughts to holy deed, let love abide among the creeds. Pray, keep us in Thy watchful care. We seek, dear Lord, Thy help in prayer. Amen." W. J. Spinney CHC, LCDR, USN Page Two -ii THE INDIAN

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M Satudy 3 oJuly 1954 CDR V. J. Soballe, Executive Officer, Naval Station (extreme left), points out damage clone by the mythical atomic bomb on a map of the base to RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base (second from left), and CAPT W. R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer, Naval Station (center), while staff officers look on. The largest number of dependents here on the Naval Base ever to gather in one spot at one time leave the hurricane shelters as the "all clear" sounds. Holidoy Weekend. (Continued from Page One) same time provide for the safety of spectators, the display will be fired from a barge located directly opposite the Teen Age Club and Mobile Point. The areas around Mobile Point, the Teen Age Club, and the Marine Movie Lyceum will be the best place for the general public to observe the display. Car parking facilities will be available at all the above places. Other recommended areas are the Chief Petty Officers' Club and the Officers' Club. The CPO Club is making available the parking lot behind the CPO Club, the playground area, and the Caribbean Room and patio to anyone desiring to use these facilities. Regular dinners, sandwiches, and beverages of all kinds will be served. Children are invited and the CPO playground will be supervised. The Navy Exchange will place mobile canteens at various strategic points for spectators to purchase beverages and refreshments. Reduced Furlough Fares Continued Until Jan, 31 Washington (AFPS) -Reduced furlough fares on the nation's railroads have been extended to Jan. 31, 1955, for military personnel traveling in uniform at their own expense. The reduction in fares for members of the Armed Forces would have ordinarily expired on June 30, 1954. The tax-exempt action will continue on round-trip fares for military personnel on furlough at the rate of 2.025 cents a mile or less. The ticket is good in coaches and includes regular stopover and baggage privileges. It is planned to have bands present musical programs at various locations on the Base. Various athletic contests and other sports programs will be p r e s e n ted throughout the day. The residential points will be closed to the general public. CAPT Moe Commended Hobby Shops Offer For Bainbridge work Recently, a letter of commendation to CAPT Tilden I. Moe was forwarded to the base commander here. Captain Moe, who just recently took command of the hospital here, was previously Senior Medical Officer, Administrative Command, Bainbridge Md., and it was while he was at Bainbridge that Captain Moe was cited for his work in the field of medicine. The letter of commendation was as follows: I have read your letter of 20 May 1954 to Captain J. J. Sepero (MC) USN and wish to commend you and your staff for the high order of initiative and agressiveness shown and the success achieved in the prevention of streptococcal respiratory disease and its crippling complications among recruits at Bainbridge during your tour of duty. It is due to accomplishments such as this, above and beyond the ordinary call of duty in the care of the sick, that medicine advances in knowledge and skill. Sincerely yours, Rear Admiral (MC), USN H. L. Pugh LT Leroy Skelly Sets New Air-to-Air Gunnery Record by C. A. Wright, Jr. Who's the man with the banjo? Lieutenant Leroy W. Skelly of Fighter Squadron 101, still the only man to hold 6 E's in one year's weapons competition, fired his Banshee Aircraft to another record today. Always one to come through under pressure, Roy Skelly, in competition at 25,000 feet, put 78% of his 150 rounds through the target, battering by 31 hits his previous high this month. This constitutes a new fleet record in air-to-air gunnery. The "old man of Jet Aviation" just passed his 38th mile post and plans soon to succeed Grampa Pettibone. He prings from Indiana soil at Fort Wayne. That's the man with the banjo! Grandpa Admiral, Sir. Waaaaah h!! On Fathers' Day, RADM Edmund B. Taylor received news of a Fathers' Day gift that would make any man proud. His daughter, Fay Taylor Butler (Mrs. Walter Hillman Butler, Jr.) gave birth to a seven pound, eight ounce baby boy, Walter Hillman Butler, III. Walter III was borne in Rockland Maine where Mr. and Mrs. Butler are vacationing for the summer. Mr. Butler is on the faculty of Cushing Academy at Ashburnham, Mass. Useful Pastime by jerryy Lewis Hobbyists and craftsmen need not waste time after hours at Guantanamo Bay, not when there are facilities for constructing anything from a simple cheesebox to a sea-going yacht with custom made furniture! Special Services, NavSta, sees to that. Located behind Bay Hill, just forward of the Naval Station Boatshed, is the fully-equipped, up-todate hobby shop with $4,400 worth of the best wood-working machinery available. Situated within the same building is the newly opened photo-lab, airconditioned and geared with some of the finest photographic darkroom Implements. Operating under the auspices of the 4th Division, the hobby shop is headed by Harold F. Ganus DCC. Others are Bernard V. Gannon, DCFN and Harold R. Galloway, FN. The Cuban civilian at the shop is Joseph J. Charles. In charge of the $1,100 photolab is Pete E. Broughton, American civilian. Amateur photo-bugs can, for a small charge, develop, print and enlarge their own photographs in the modern therimostatically contro'pd darkroom any night of their chow'. -. If you want to learn about the fasc:ting .heb. by, Pete will teach it to you, step by step. This applies to the hobby shop and the craft of wood-making Supplies of every description if needed can be ordered through the hobby shop department. Model planes, ships and various other kits can be chosen from catalogs and built at leisure any night except Thursday at the shop. The Shop is also secured Sunday evenings after 1600. These hours apply also to the lab. A man that can continue his favorite hobby while serving overseas will be better on the job. Why not look into this facility and use your spare time in learning more about your hobby? It will pay off! Poppy Sales Net $243 For Disabled Vets A final tabulation shows that base residents donated $243.00 during Poppy Day, 29 May. The American Legion Auxiliary wished to thank all who donated. The money will be sent to the Coral Gables (Fla.) Veterans' Administration Hospital. Last year's donation reached $353.00 and was sent to the Carville Leprosarium in Louisiana for veteran rehabilitation. NavBase Grows Each Day Guantanamo Bay is getting smaller all the time, and the base is growing square yard by square yard. However, this is not a process of nature. Between Radio Point and Boat Shed road, there is a small inlet which is being utilized to dump surplus filling material taken off of various grading jobs on the base. Eventually this inlet will exist no longer and will possibly be used for Bay Hill parking and recreation. m THE INDIAN Page Tree Page Three

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Page Four Rollie Santos, Marines, P "Buzz" Presutti, VU-10, P "Doc" Daugherty, NavSta, 3b Ed Bighie, SeaBees, P U.S. Naval Base Marines Cop Pennant With SeaBee Split by Pierce Lehmbeck The Marine Leathernecks came in through the back door Wednesday night to capture the league title when the second-seated VU-10 Mallards lost in twelve innings to the Naval Station Indians and then the Marines came back Thursday night to shake off all doubt as to the rightful possession of the flag with a 7-6 win over the 'Bees of MCB-8. The league-leaders entered this week of play needing but one win to cinch the pennant and fell short in their first bid Saturday afternoon when MCB-8 defeated them on their home diamond, 16-8. However, the title-snaring game needed was provided Wednesday night ? when the VU-10 Mallards lost a twelve inning thriller to the Naval Station Indians, 7-6. Due to this loss by the Mallards the 'Bees crawled back into second place by one percentage point, but the Leatherneck edge the following., night sent them toppling back into third. Elsewhere around the league, the NAS Flyers had a stormy week as they lost to the Naval Station Indians Sunday afternoon 23-7 and to the 'Bees Tuesday night, 28-5. In the week-opener Monday night, a two-run homer off the bat of Jims Dotson gave the 'Bees a 3-1 win over the Mallards in a display of things to come as the two clubs battle it out for the number two A hoide of outstietched hands spot during these last weeks of he crosses the plate after rapping play. Bob Dieden, VU-1,3 y' Bill Wood, Marines, OF Jim~~~~X Pae Iu0e and his 9th of the season last week Jim Dotson, SeaBees, lb 0 LEAGUE STANDINGS (As of Thursday, 1 July) Marines VU-10 MCB-8 NavSta NAS W L GB 22 2 13 12 9% 12 12 10 8 17 14 6 18 16 greet Marine All-Star Tom Felak as g his second homerun of the game "Andy" Androvich, Marines, SS M Saturday, 3 July 1954 THE INDIAN Larry Adams, Marines, lb

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M 5. 1 1 1 "Sut" Sutherland, NAS, OF "Brownie" Brown, SeaBees, OF Ed Sherlacker, NAS, OF "Smitty" Smith, Marines, P All Stars, 1954 BASEBALL SCHEDULE Sunday, 4 July ALL STAR GAME Monday, 5 July Marine Barracks vs NAS Tuesday, 6 July MCB-8 vs Naval Station Wednesday, 7 July Marine Barracks vs VU-10 Thursday, 8 July NAS vs MCB-8 SeaBee All-Star Jim Dotson gel plate by Marine Felak last Saturda league leaders their second defeat of Base All Stars Face Cuban Nine Tomorrow by Pierce Lehmbeck Tomorrow on Fleet Recreation Diamond number one the Naval Base All-Stars will clash with the Cuban All-Stars in what promises to be the most exciting event of the NavBase athletic year. The top twenty-one horse-hiders, as chosen by a player-manager ballot will be out to make it two in a row as last year's All-Star nine met and defeated the Cuban representatives in the traditional Independence Day Classic. Under the guiding hands of manVger Chuck Smith of the Marine Barracks and his hand-picked assistant Robbie Robinson of MCB-8, the All-Stars will be paced by the hurling efforts of strikeout king Rollie Santos of the Marines, fireballeis Mandy Mandis of the Naval taStion and Buzz Presutti of VU10, Ed Bigbie, the crooked arm of MCB-8 and manager Smith himself. Starting defensively will be Tom Felak of the Marines behind the plate, the 'Bees Jim Dotson on the initial sack, the Marine's Jim Pace and Joe Androvich at second and short respectively, VU-10's Bob Dieden on third base, Boo Ferris, also of VU-10 in left fieki, Chuck Mason of the Marines in center and Brown of the 'Bees in right. Supporting this starting nine will he infielders Andy Konkoly of NAS, Larry Adams of the Marine Barracks, Oke Layman of MCB-8, Jerry Morgan of NavSta, Doc Daugherty of NavSta and outfieldts tagged with expression at the ers Sherlacker of NAS, Sutherland as the rampagng Bees dealt the of NAS and Wood of the Marine the season. Barracks. Jerry Morgan, NavSta, 21 & SS "Mandy" Mandis, NavSta, P "Okie" Layman, SeaBees, 2h 6 m THE INDIAN Page Five "Boo" Ferris, VU-10, OF Chuck Mason, Marines, OF Tom Felak, Marines, c L y, y

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a Page Six The Angle(R) GROUPER by Jerry Lewis One of the laziest of all fish, yet surprisingly enough, one of the most popular targets for the local spear-fishermen is the Grouper or Jewfish. Grouper is a general term which includes several species of fish. There are cabrillas, mero, hind, and jewfish. Because of their large size and vast availability, they are extremely popular, if not for their game-fighting ability, but rather for the struggle to bring one to the surface. The great jewfish (Garrupa nigrita) is brown with black splotches and grows darker with age. His favorite haunting grounds are found in deep kelp in moderately deen water and may reach a weight of from 300 to 700 pounds. Grouper are commonly colored greenish gray to orange brown with dark fins. They lead solitary lives and are characterized by a sullen expression. The sight of their formidable appearance sends a shudder up the spine of a new visitor into the silent world. The fish has bulging eyes, thick lips, protruding lower jaw and a stout blimp-shaped body. When hit with a spear, they flee to rocky crevices, offering little or no fight, and lodge their bulky body securely, using their spiny fins. That is when a keen knowledge of their habits and experience in diving is needed, plus patience and good old physical strength. Puttin' Around by Wright North As a reminder to all golfers, starting times will be necessary Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays. The starting time sheet opens each Wednesday morning at 0800. During the month of July, all greens are to be weeded from foreign grass. This is necessary for better playing conditions. You will find several men working on the green during this time. All players are cautioned against hitting into a green unless the workers are aware of your playing to this particular hole. Many questions have been asked regarding the survey stakes between the first and putting green. They are to be the tentative location for the new clubhouse. I might also add at this time that the plans call for, in addition to the Pro Shop, ample space for club storage and display of merchandise. The club comprises approximately 300 members of which more than half are family members. Also included are a ladies' locker room and 800 square feet of locker space for men with approximately 100 lockers to be installed. Plans for the clubroom includes 700 square feet with soft lounge chairs where the weary may relax. Various golfing magazines will be subscribed to for the members' benefit. All trophies will be placed there along with the plaque now on display in the Snack Shack. In the summing up of this much needed addition to the Gtmo Golf Course, it is certainly something that has been needed for several years and when completed will be a building that any golf club would be proud to have. So on behalf of the present members, myself, and future members in later years, we wish to add just a thanks in advance to those persons responsible for something that will be wonderful improvement to the Gtmo Golf club. Felak, Pace Lead NavBase League Batting Race Statistically, the fate of the league batting crown seems to be hanging between Leatherneck's Tom Felak and Jim Pace. Both are well over the .400 mark and seem to be improving steadily. In the homerun department Felak punched out two Staurday afternoon to push his total to a leagueleading nine only to have Jim Dotson of the 'Bees put two together during the week of play to knot the race again. In the pitching bracket, Marine Manager Smith's loss to MCB-8 ,Saturday marred his perfect record and dropped him into second ranking with an 8-1 total. Santos, also of the Marines, moved topside with an 11-1 record. Bud North sticks his chin out at the ball and offers three different places for it to light as Fred Meredith slides in safely to third in a Little League game at Villamar. The Colts knocked off the Bears, 6 to 3. Record Fish Entries Little League Schedule Andy Konkoly, NAS, c Naval Base All Star Ladies' Golf Shots by Miriam Hoy A very successful Scotch Foursome was played last Sunday with a lot of fun had by all. The lucky winners of golf balls were: 1st Low Gross-Grego, Grego 2nd Low Gross-North, McElroy 3rd Low Gross-Tie Henning, Henning Brough, Gentry 1st Low Net-three-way tie: Caruthers, Caruthers DiMascola, Evans Mathews, Burke 2nd Low Net -McCrac k e n, McCracken 3rd Low Net-Manning, Manning Closet to cup on No. 3 for the ladies was Edna Edwards. Closest to cup on No. 14 for the men was CDR Scott. Closest to cup on No. 18, Team Play was Bill Foulk and Miss Winchell. Longest putt on No. 9 for men or women was won by Fran Dykeman. A Flag Tournament was played on Wednesday, June 30th on the back nine. This tournament is made up of the individuals handicap plus par. When the player drops her flag it indicates that her total number of strokes has been used up. The one who gets farthest on the course is the winner. Lucky winners were: 1st Flight-Corky Henning Edna Edwards 2nd Flight-Marion Caruthers Fran Dykeman 3rd Flight-Toni Winslow Marge Sheehan Next Wednesday, July 7th, we will play the front nine for Gross and Net. We would really like to have some newcomers join the club-so coon out gals. Hauled In Another big Guantanamo Bay Fishing Contest is underway. This looks like a record year with the biggest haul so far a 50-pound snapper, boated by V.A. Roberts. So dig out your rods and reels and join in the fun. LAND DIVISION Barracuda Plants, C. W. ----18/ ibs. Jacks Pickett, S. L. --7 lbs. Kilkland, H. A. -8 lbs., 8 ozs. Romand, Sam 14 lbs., 8% ozs. MacAnanny, Raymond E. 19 1bs., 8 ozs. Mackerel (King) Howerton, R. D. -5 lbs., 10 ozs. Snapper Heinandez, J. C.12 lbs. Hays, Robert, M. -1 lb., 7 ozs. Hanlin, John --92 ozs. Williams, Mike 7 os. Jamieson, Raymond -6 os. Baker, F. R. 51/ os. Jamieson, Raymond 5 ozs. Soballe, Peter 1 oz. Tarpon Bedward, K. D. -17 lbs. Henry, R. L.12 lbs., 4 ozs. BOAT DIVISION Mrs. E. C. Kerslake 3 ibs., 7/ ozs. Lafnear, R. E.9 lbs. 11 ozs. Snapper Roberts, V. A.50 lbs. Carroll, J. C.30 lbs., 8 ozs. Tarpon Swanson, G. A.13 bs., 8 ozs. SPECIAL DIVISION Bonefish Wind, Marion A. -2 ibs., 8 ozs. Sanborn, Ellen -8 oss. Croakers Sanborn, Jim--8 ozs. Dalton, Kathryn -2 ozs. Ladylish Smouse, J. H. -4 lbs., 8 ozs. Pompano Bedward, Kenneth20 lbs. Giggy, G. K. --16 1Is., 4 ozs. Romano, Sam -8 lbs., 131/ ozs. Shark Meredith, Fred 41 lbs., 8 ozs. SPEARFISHING DIVISION Grouper Nichols, E. M. -1 lbs. Snappers Nichols, E. M. -14 lbs. Barracuda Ward. C. F.--5 lbs., 6: ozs. Hagfish Ward, G. F., 5 lbs., 15 ozs. First sergeant: "What are we going to do about these men who ran off to join a nudist colony?" CO: "Markc them absent without leaves." "My mother-in-law gave a pint of blood to a sick man." "Did the patient recover?" "No, he froze to death." Saturday, 3 July Colts vs Bears Sunday, 4 July Hawks vs Tigers Monday, 5 July Tigers vs Colts Thursday, 8 July Bears vs Hawks East Bargo. (Continued from Page One) personnel. Movement of families into replacement units from Central and West Bargo will continue in the future. Replacement housing will be assigned according to the length of time the family has been in Bargo and length of time remaining here in Guantanamo Bay. The families who have been in Bargo for the longest time and still have more than six months remaining on their tour of duty will be assigned to the replacement units first. Also, to be fair to the families presently in Guantanamo Bay, no families on the waiting list for housing will be assigned directly to replacement housing. They will have to be assigned to housing in Bargo and then move to the Replacement housing later as more replacement units are completed. SCUTTLEBUTT A kid reporter, trying to get the secret of Babe Ruth's success at the bat, asked him: "Know anything about psychology?" "Don't know much about him," said the Babe. "Ain't played a horse in three months." m Saturday, 3 July 1954 THE INDIAN

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W a Saturday, 3 July 1954 Grease Paint Gossip by Joyce Simmons To complete the rostrum of the characters in "Out of the Frying Pan" we have four more actors who have smaller roles, but no less important ones. Ethel Beach, who did such a splendid job portraying the hauty Mrs. Griswald in our last play, again finds herself in the character part of Mrs. Garnet, the landlady. As always, Ethel gives much spice to her acting and her entrances and exits give and amusing interlude in the general trend of the comedy. Joyce Mickiewicz plays the "unwelcome" friend of one of the girls as Muriel Foster, and her untimely visit proves almost the undoing of the happy fellowship of the three girls and three boys who share the same apartment together. Easton Guillory and Ronnie Eastefan are policemen in the play who are called in to investigate a reported scream coming from the apartment, and instead find a corpse that isn't really a corpse all of which makes for a very exciting and fun-packed scene. I would like to mention at this time that the "backstage" crew have been working very hard during all the rehearsals. For the first time, the Little Theatre now has two very attractive temporary rooms (thanks to the efforts of Lee Douglas, Ronald Mathieu, and Howard Jones). This addition will give the actors much more time for quick changes and eliminate much of the confusion we formerly had over "who" rated first choice on "the" one and only dressing room. So now don't forget. "Out of the Frying Pan" will begin its run in a little over a week, on July 13th through 17th. Watch for the time and place for ticket sales. An irate visitor darted angrily up to the beekeeper and complained: "One of your bees stung me, and I want you to do something about it." The beekeeper answered soothingly: "Sure, lady. Just show me which bee it was an I'll have it punished." FTG Bulletin by Jack Engstrom Captain D. B. Cushing, USN, the new Fleet Training Group Chief Staff Officer, accompanied by his wife and children, arrived yesterday on the THOMAS from Norfolk, Virginia. Captain and Mrs. Cushing were introduced to the officers and wives of FTG at a welcome aboard cocktail party given in their honor. The Captain will meet all the other FTG personnel this morning at inspection. Captain Cushing, who reported to Commander Fleet Training Group as relief for Captain W. H. Groverman now serving on CinCLant Staff, will reside with his family on Marina Point. Also arriving on the THOMAS was Mrs. Catherine R. McConnon and daughter Virginia, wife and daughter of LT McConnon FTG Staff Secretary. The McConnon's will reside in Quarters EP-630 on Evans Point. Welcome aboard, and may your stay in Guantanamo be an enjoyable one. The USS OLMSTED APA-188 will make a recreational visit to Kingston Jamaica over the weekend of 10 and 11 July. The OLMSTED will depart Gtmo on Friday evening 9 July at 1800 and return early Monday morning. Quotas have been assigned to the various commands on the base for the trip. The OLMSTED will have berthing space for 50 officers, 47 females, dependents and military, and 200 enlisted. The United Fruit Company is sponsoring a holiday party and golfiing at Banes, Cuba to which several people stationed here have received invitations. Attending from the Training Group are LT(jg) Treffinger, Chief and Mrs. Monte and Chief Reynolds and his wife. Jack Engstrom, your FTG reporter wishes to make an apology to CDR McElroy and CDR Simmons for demoting them to LCDR's in last weeks FTG Bulletin. A grave error on my part which I hope caused neither of you any emlarrasment. What D' Ya' Say ? The INDIAN will award a certificate oo for ,1.00 worth of merchandise at the Nav~y Exc.hangea for each question accepted and used. Submit your questions to Editor, The Indian, Box 19.) The question: What would you suggest as a good name for ball diamond No. I ? The place: Ball diamond No. 1. IL C. Viggs, RMC, Security Group Det., NavBase "Since everybody plays here, I'd call it the "All Star Diamond'." H.M. Jacobson, DC3, MCB-8 "Why not call it 'Little Fenway Pak'." G. M. Bailey, FTC, Fleet Training Group "'Home of the Brave' is what I'd call it; everything el ere ,named after the one-eyed Indian." Boblby Adams, Fi3, l'SS Dortch, "Well, you might call it 'The Park'." Ol Friday, 25 June, 12 piano students of Mrs. H. P. McNeal presented the annual Junior Music Makers recital in the patio of the Naval Base School. Those participating were, front row, left to right: Gary Houston, Bob Houston, Ralph Sierra, and Billy Sutherland. Rear row, left to right: Billy Jean Echols, Carol Echols, Lucille Mahaffey, Dolores Sierra, Judy Lynn Yost, Mrs. H. P. McNeal, Sherry Pavlow, Margaret Mathews, and Frances Linder. M. A. Prost, BUI, MCB-8 "I think 'Sportsman's Field' would be appropriate, since no one team is really connected 1 with the field." Carl Panvilainen. '3. MICB-R "How about callimie it 'Champ's Park'." THE INDIAN Page Seven o

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_ 1NP~O Gnu~O/)TEIDA Saturday, 3 July 1954 MOV I ES Saturday, 3 July ARENA Gig Young Jean Hagen The story of a young bronc buster and his wife who have been sepaated for several years and then meet at the rodeo in Tucson, Ariz. Sunday, 4 July WHITE WITCH DOCTOR Robert Mitchum Susan Hayward A widow wants to carry out her dead husband's wishes to live among the African natives and help them. Monday, 5 July THE CADDY Dean Martin Jerry Lewis Jerry Lewis is an ace golfer, but crowds make him nervous and unable to play. He becomes Martin's caddy and teaches him the game, amid a riot of laughs. Tuesday, 6 July SMALL TOWN GIRL Jane Powell Farley Granger No information available. Wednesday, 7 July FORTY-NINTH MAN John Ireland Richard Denning Story based on enemy powers exploding A-bomb on American city. Security authorities try to track down bomb, being smuggled in piece by piece. Thursday, 8 July THE GOLDEN BLADE Rock Hudson Pipar Laurie Story takes place in Bagdad and involves the magic Sword of Damascus. A commoner saves the people from exploitation with it. Daniel In Lion's Den (AP) London, June 27 -Just before he died up in Yorkshire, Septimus Daniel Gilbert made his will. The will published here yesterday, showed he left these instructions: "Bury me in the same grave as my wife, and on the gravestone put this inscription: "Daniel in the Lion's Den." We're not trying to drive a good Marilyn Monroe in a different light, thing into hte ground, but here's and a very attractive one at that. Cuh Scouts Receive Awards: Col. Hill. Welcome New Members by Millie Jamieson The Guantanamo Bay Cub Scouts of America, Pack #401 held its meeting on June 29, at the Little Theatre, with Cubs and parents participating in ritual and songs. All were happy to welcome the new members, David Scott, George Gardes, Richard Baker, Willie Morales, Jimmie Shaw, Tommy Crouch, and Dwane King with Bob Cat pins. Bear badges were awarded to Jay Dee Sentz, and Phillip Crouch; Lion badges were earned by David Herold and Russel Baker. Silver or gold arrow points under the various ranks were achieved by John Crouch, David Herold, and Dickie Reynolds while one-year Service Stars were given to John Huddy and Jim and Pete Minard. Many air-bourne models were submitted by the boys following the June month theme of "Air Adventures". An inspiring reproduc(Continued from Page One) tourney in 1953; 3rd in softball in 1952; 3rd in baseball league and first in tourney 1952; a probable first in baseball in 1954. Also during his tour Colonel Hill instituted a program at Marine Barracks to add to the existing vegetation in the area. Perhaps the most outstanding example of this program are the royal palm trees presently being planted about the Marine Area. A Change of Command Ceremony will be held on the Marine Barracks parade ground at 0930, 7 July 1954. Service and Civilian personnel are invited to view this ceremony which will be a regular parade modified to the Change of Command. tion of a blimp, by Billie Yarbrough, made with cardboard and covered with tin-foil won the first award. In accordance, a movie, "History of Naval Aviation" was enjoyed by all. A Leaders' Meeting will be held at the home of Mrs. R. K. Minard (PP173) at 1930 on July 9. f l :. / {f L \, ..... .:. l f) q Y 'I .::: l. IJ (\ff(f} fTY ,\\ 1. ". ...t:. all 1/J r" rir ". ". iii t.\ ..dS". irwirJJJ.w/. T7l r JN .......arc:::::.":: :":":": :": :":":: .::: :.ti":: :;:;:;:; :::":": :": :":": ':": :": :":":::": :": ::":: ':tiff : :": ::": ." ::: ::::::.:. rrs pJ. .:.":. ".". "."::." : :. ..is ..." ":::.:::::":: :":"::".::::::"::": :":"}:":::": ::":: :":::"::.: ": .".":::.". J.a., Yf/ //IJ1J ....::::.".:.,. *BO 0 K* NO0OK by Francis L. Cannon, JOSN FOR YOUR INFORMATION POWER OF WORDS by Stuart Chase This is more than a usual examination of semantics; Mr. Chase delves deeply into the psychological and physiological bases for communication. He says "to understand communication one should study the human nervous system as well as the language developed in human culture." He reports the latest findings in semantics, meaning, and how to deal with an increasingly complicated world. MUSIC IN WESTERN CULTURE by Paul Henry Lang In this 100-page volume, Professor Lang of Columbia Univ. treats music not as something apart from life, but rather as part of the general current of our civilization. He sheds light on the forces which determined the development of music as a part of intellectual and artistic life. THE ROAD TO SANTA FE Edited by Kate L. Gregg Don't pass this on the shelf and mutter something about "those westerns. ..." This is a collection of diaries of the surveyors of the Santa Fe Road and gives a true picture of what the area was like and what the people were like. George Champlin Sibley was field executive of a group of U.S. surveyors handed the job of marking out a trade route from Missouri to New Mexico; he was also a man who kept a fascinating diary. FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT Around the World in 1000 Pictures Edited by Milton Runyon and Vilma Bergane How to see the world without leaving Guantanamo Bay (you can't anyway!) A collection of 1000 excellent pictures of all the places in the free world where an American traveler is likely to go. There are a generous number of pictures of England and Europe as well as the Caribbean. Cork In Bottle MacDonald Hasting Montague Cork is a sort of a present-day Sherlock Holmes-sans Watson. As manager of the Anchor Accident Insurance Co., Ltd., he is taken to the village of Bottle on a merry mystery whirl. There have been no police in Bottle for 10 years and the appearance of any sort of snoop brings out the worst in the dour villagers. IN PASSING .. Caine Mutiny Court Martial, by Herman Wouk-The script of the current hit play taken from the novel. Short Cut to Photography, by Godfrey Finkel-A guide in clear language for the photo-freshman. The Best from Fantasy and Science Fiction-The third annual edition presents 16 stories, gleaned from last year's editions of the magazines. To prevent misunderstanding and accusing looks at the librarian, the books reviewed here are not necessarily on the shelf, ready to be taken out. It may be a week or more after reviewing before they are ready for circulation. A classified advertisement read: Wanted-Man to wash dishes and two pretty waitresses. ............... :.:-W. ........... ......... . :_: ;: :::AC Navy 10ND PPO--Gtma'i.,0020 MA IbMml THE INDIAN


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