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Indian

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Indian
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"Govers qTMO Like Tke Sunshitrne"

Vol. VI, No. 51 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 26 June 1954


New WIO Bill Affects Army, Navy, A.F.

Washington (AFPS)-The Warrant Officer Act of 1954 has been signed by President Eisenhower making possible a uniform WO program for all of the Armed Forces. It will become effective Nov. 1, 1954 and will apply to WOs in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard and Marine Corps.
The bill setting up a statutory
WO program came about for Aark Begins On
three main reasons. First, there is a wide difference between the Bay Hill Beer Hall laws and regulations on WOs in the various military services.
.Construction of a new beer hall Second, the Career Compensation for the Bay Hill area is now unAct of 1949 established four pay derway. The new beer hall, which grades. Third, the WO program has already been officially dubbed
needs to be vitalized by a manda- as "The Beer Barrel," will be lotory system of consideration for cated ontVictory Hill Road directly tor syte ofconidraton or behind the Navy Exchange Dry promotion and elimination. Cleaners and just helow Bay Hill
The WO Act provides for pro- Barracks No. 1.
motion, elimination and retirement Althoughonly $2500 was allotted of regular WOs of all services. fr the construction of The Beer Barrel, it is estimated that the Four military grades have been final building will have a value set up in place of the present two. much greater. This is being acThese are not the same as the four complished by donations-both of grades set up in 1949, since they equipment and labor. were only pay grades. The present Equipment in the form of tables, grades will be renamed. For ex- chairs, etc. are being donated by ample, a warrant officer (junior the EM Club, PO Club, and the grade) will be re-designated. a CPO Club. Volunteer labor from warrant officer, W-1. Navy, Marine Bay hill will be utilized to cut the Corps and Coast Guard chief war- labor cost. In addition to the volrant officers will remain commis- unteer labor, it is estimated that sioned WOs. SeaBee labor wil be used in the
The bill provides that no WOs construction.
will be reduced from their present By these methods, the final buildpermanent or temporary grades ing will be much more ".-lush" than
as a result of the redesignations, it could have possibly been on the A warrant officer, W-1 will be original appropriation.
required to serve three years in The building itself will be a
grade before being considered for pavilion type affair-oen on all promotion. W-2s and W-3s must sides. However, in the future, it
serve six years in grade before is hoped that it will be screened in being considered for promotion. on three sides with a solid wall Boards will be convened at least built behind the bar which F,Veches annually to consider WOs for pro- almost the full length of the 30' motion. X 100' building.
At present, it is estimated that Those who are twice passed over the building will be complete and will be separated from the service ready to "open for business' somewith severance pay. WOs with '18 time in July. years of active service who have been passed over twice will be permitted service to qualify for retirement pay.
All WOs, regardless of component, may apply for retirement after 20 years' activeFederal n service. The secretary of each service will decide whether the application should be accepted.
However, male WOs of age 62 and female WOs of age 55, will b retired mandatorily if they have completed 20 years of active service. The exceptions to this are male permanent regular WOs under age 62 who receive permission from the secretary of their service, and male WOs, either regular or reserve, who A are under age 64 but who have not completed 20 years of service by age 62.


The promotion features of the act .
apply only to permanent regular Last week, Cub Scouts of the
WOs. The matter of promotion for Mothers were taken on a tour of M temporary and reserve WOs is left boys were given a complete tour of to the secretaries of the individual they are shown viewing Leeward P services. the air strip.


Disaster Drills

End Today


Both Hurricane Patsy and an atomic attack will strike and inflict their damage on the Naval Base and surrounding areas today while personnel will be safely sheltered in specially constructed disaster shelters.
Both are mythical happenings created to drill personnel of the base in case of an actual hurricane or atomic attack.
At 0800 this morning the climax of the three day hurricane drills will begin as the signal (four groups of nine blasts on the base fire alarm system) will begin the evacuation to shelter. As soon as personnel are safely sheltered, a plane will make two circles of smoke over the base marking the total destruction and casualty areas for the passive defense drill.
At no time during the passive defense drill will personnel be allowed in the disaster or casualty area. This is necessary to avoid confusion in carrying out the problem in an efficient manner. However, as soon as these areas are determined, personnel will be allowed to proceed to their respective homes or barracks or jobs if they are not in the disaster or casuality areas.
All personnel will be instructed on how to proceed to their homes or barracks, but if the barracks or home is in the disaster or casualty area, personnel must remain in the vicinity of the hurricane shelter.
At no time will the hurricane shelters be closed.
Above all, personnel should know what they are supposed to do in the case of an atomic attack or a hurricane. The next time might not be a drill.


Naval Base and the respective Den cCalla Field and Leeward Point. The the air facilities of both fields. Here, point field from a high hill overlooking


Four Commands Receive

SecNav Safety Awards

In the past two weeks four commands of the Naval Base have received Secretary of the Navy Safety Awards for 1953. ,Naval Supply Depot topped the list as they received their fifth and sixth safety awards-for Industrial Safety, and for Motor Vehicle Safety.
The Naval Station was cited recently with their award by RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Base Commander. The award was presented to CAPT W. R. Caruthers.
This is the third year in succession that the Naval Station has heen cited for their motor vehicle safety. Each year they have improved upon their record of the previous year and each year, more miles have been driven in more vehicles year with less accidents than in the previous.
The Naval Air Station was cited this last week in a formal ceremony by Admiral Taylor.
The Air Station's safety award was for Industrial Safety in 1953. According to A. J. McGowan, Base Safety Engineer, this is due primarily because of the excellent functioning of a safety committee in the Public Works Department. Along with this primary reason, two shops-the NAS Piblic Works Paint Shop, and ,he NAS Carpenter Shop, have very impressise records for no lost-time accidents which has contributed greatly to the overall record for the Air. Station.
The fourth command here to receive a safety award was the Naval Hospital. RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander Naval Base, presented the Secretary of the Navy award for Industrial Safety to CAPT Tilden I. Moe, Commanding Officer, Naval Hospital.


Swimmers' Itch Still

Dangerous To Bathers


This last weekend, a few more cases of "Swimmers' itch" turned in at the Naval Hospital here. Research is still in progress, and no cause has been determined to this date. Swimmers should take every precaution possible when swimming in salt water, or they should avoid the problem entirely by swimming in pools on the Naval Base.


GTMO Has The Braine

The USS Braine, DD 630, com-


manded by CDR James S. Habaker, arrived here in Guantanamo Bay this last week. The Braine will be in Guantanamo for a period of training under Fleet Training Group.


U. -









PaEe Two TII~ INDIAN Saturday, 26 June 1954


TEENAGE-ROUND-UP Hospital Notes
U- T-4-U'V-.4-


The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Station
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615
Saturady, 26 June 1964
U. S. NAVAL BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sandness_----__Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC-------------------Editor
H. L.* Sisson, J03S-------------------- News
Jerry Lewis, JO3--------------Features
Pierce Lehmbeck-------------------Sports
F. L. Cannon, JOSN_- _____Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein mustanot be reproduced without written permission, Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


WGBY Hi-Lites
by John Hull

With the familiar "Dum Da Dum Dum", and the phrase, "All we want are the facts", "Dragnet" returns to the WGBY program schedule Thursday, July 1 at 8:30 P.M. After a short sojourn, during which the program won several more awards, "Dragnet" resumes its dramatizations of true cases taken directly from the files of the Los Angeles Police Department.
With director Jack Webb, who takes on the guise of Detective Sergeant Joe Friday, will be Ben Alexander in the role of his partner, Frank Smith. Both gentlemen are so convincing in their roles that they are often taken as real policemen by the unsuspecting public.
On Saturday morning, June 26, at 11:30, the award winning "You Are There" resumes its series of shows. "You Are There" is a dramatic program which re-creates famous pages from history as if they were currently unfolding. Each week the audience is taken back through history for an "on-thespot" special events broadcast.
Reporter Walter Cronkite and members of the CBS Television News Staff "cover" the events. The


series is produced by Charles Russell and directed by Sidney Lumet. In the past, "You Are There" has been taken directly from the radio broadcasts. The current programs are from the audio portion of the television series.
"George Washington Slept Here", the riotous farce by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart, will be presented by the "Theatre Guild" Monday, June 28 at 9:00 P.M. In the starring roles will be Van Heflin, Ann Rutherford and Kenny Delmar. Based on the personal experiences of the authors, who own homes in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, "George Washington Slept Here" leaves no comic possibility untouched in its burlesque on the rigors of country living.


by JUdy IYOst
The Teenage hayride last Saturday nite was a big success. Everyone had a cool time of it! Poor Jean C. is still counting her mosquito bites-and from all reports, most of the others must-ve been doing some fancy swatting, too, for there was food left over!! What's the que' pasa ? ? ?
Hey kats, did ya know that Barbara Garis is back with us? She left us at the beginning of this year, and it's a pleasure to welcome her back to our gang. She's spending some time this summer with Babs Pistole.
Last Thursday nite, Sherry gave a "going away" party for Wally G. and John M. It was really the coolest! Sherry's cookin' was the most!
The tears have realy been sheddin' this week! First, we said goodbye to Wally, who left on the Thomas, last Saturday afternoon. Then, on the following Monday, we bade fond adieu to Glenna Wright. Next, it was John Moon, who left on the Wednesday nite FLAW. Another kleenex, anyone?
Tuesday nite, there was a farewell party for John M. and Leonard T. The gang met at Roxey's to have refreshments, and then _popped off to the skating rink. Everyone had a wonderful time, thanks to Roxey!
Did ya dig. . . . Dexter and his girls at N.O.B. . . . Jean C.'s new hairdo. . . . Jane, making one last tour in Cuba Groan). . . . Pat's comic books. . . . Jay C.'s bowling .... Pattie down at "the" sailboat..... Betty's buzzer (dreamy). . . . Pierce's hotdogs (five dozen of um!). . ..
The kats at the ball park, last Friday nite. Man, I'll bet they were tired!
By the way! Your's truly, Luella Parsons, Jr., is writing this week from a wheelchair! So take a tip from me, ya'll, and never trust a wave, ya heah? ?


The Lucky Bag
by Betty Radcliffe

Checking through the visitors file this week I found that there are several nice visitors on the base . . . Mrs Bruce Grant from Anaheim, California arrived on the base last Tuesday to visit her sister, Mrs. J. W. Richmond. Mrs. Grant will be here about a month before returning to her home in California, where she will teach school while her husband is stationed in England.
Mrs. Lois Pryor from San Jose, California, arrived last Sunday to visit her sister, Mrs. A. M. Rose. Mrs. Proyer is vice-principle in the Hoover School in San Jose. Mrs.


Proyer and Mrs. Rose leftthis week by plane to Santiago and Port Au Prince, where they will spend two or three days. Mrs. Pryor will leave for the States the first week in July.
David M. Adams from Chicago arrived the 19th to visit his brother R. M. Adams. David graduated from high school the 18th of this month and will enter the University of Illinois. David will be here until about July 3rd.
Hope all you visitors haveenjoyed your visit hereand will come back again sometime.

Seasickness is when you travel across the ocean by rail.


Heirport News
During the past week, the following births were recorded: a daughter, Judith Ann, born 16 June to MM3 and Mrs. Richard L. Lightfoot; a son, Duane Neal, born 17 June to ACC and Mrs. Jesse E. Stokes; a daughter, Barbara Ann, born 17 June to AD1 and Mrs. Paul A. Lazos; and a daughter, Susan Neill, born 18 June to CDR and Mrs. Addison S. Archie, Jr.
Your Hospital
When the word "hospital" is mentioned, one generally thinks of doctors, nurses, and ward corpsmen but seldom thinks of the many others that keep a hospital going. Lets look at one grou) of those people.
The Record Office performs an undramatic, and at times monotonous, task but an essential one. The records of all patients admitted go through the Receipt and Transfer section. Here, incoming orders are receipted and out-going orders written, and Service Records, Pay Records and Health Records are kept in order and up to date. The Medical History section summarizes all medication and treatment received by patients and outlines this information in their health record. A daily report is made in the Record Section covering all patient and staff personnel in the hosptial and their status. As an aid in assimilating medical data from the entire Navy, IBM cards are prepared on all patients admitted. These cards contain all information pertinent to the particular diagnosis and treatment and are periodically mailed to BuMed A cross-index system of all types of diseases, injuries, and operations is also maintained. This is useful to doctors when a case comes up that is unusual to the medical profession. It enables them to quickly locate and study case histories to better qualify themselves to administer aid to a patient.
Departures
During the past week nine men departed from this command. Those leaving 16 June were E. L. Driver, HM1, to Naval Station, Green Cove Springs, Fla.; J. J. Webbs, HN, to Naval Ammunition Depot, Crane, Ind.; W. E. Hughes, HM3, and C. M. Crouse, HA, to Receiving Stations for separation. W. H. Ferkler, HM2, left 18 June for the USS Deuel. This move somewhat interrupted his plans -for he was in the process of building a 36' cabin cruiser. B. W. Cox, HM3, left for separation on 19 June while F. B. Lalor, HMC, departed on the same date for duty at the Naval Hospital, Portsmouth, N. H. Lalor was one of our Collection Agents as well as Head Mortician. Leaving for duty 21 June on the USS Maloy were


W. B. Honeycutt, HM2, and Tom W. Hart, HM2. Hart was one of the outstanding allround athletes of this command. He was catcher and first baseman on our baseball team last year, a member of the varsity basketball team for the past two years, high triple scorer in the recent base bowling tournament, and shot in the high 70's and low 80's in golf.

"Are your mother and father home ?"
"They was in but they is out."
"Good Lord, where's y o u r grammar?"
"She's gone upstairs for to lay down."


Sunday, 27 June 1954
Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930-2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services
Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic)

The Chaplain's Corner

Many of life's supreme tragedies are results, not of our viciousness, not of our cruelty, not of our depravity, but of our thougthlessness.
"'T was never in my heart
To play so ill a part,
But evil is wrought
For want of thought".
How many lives are lost and how many dollars worth of property are destroyed each year by accidents. Now, a majority of these accidents are not necessary. They are the results of sheer carelessness. They are born of our refusal to think. We dash madly along the highway in our cars. Suddenly there is a crash. Then we think how easily the catastrophe might have been avoided. If we had only been as thoughtful before the tragedy as we have been since, it need never have occurred.
What pain we often inflict upon others through our thoughtlessness. Without thinking, we have uttered words that have cut like a two edged sword and have left scars that can never be erased. Without thinking, we have passed on to others bits of idle rumors that have become whirlwinds of gossip that have gathered up the filth and half-truths of the community and have left in their wakes broken homes, tarnished reputations, and heartaches. Without thinking, we have yielded to the lust of the flesh in ways that have dishonored the teaching of our parents and have brought shame to our wives and families, and regardless of how we may suffer for our thoughtless acts, they will suffer a hundred times more.


One of the most pitiful sounds in all the world is the agonizing cry of the person who is reaping the fruits of his own thoughtlessness: "God, I didn't mean to do it. I just didn't think. 0 God, give me another chance".
What needlessmisery could be avoided if we through faith and prayer keep our minds centered on God who teaches that material things are a gift from Him to be used for His glory, that the body is the temple of His Spirit to be presented unto Him as a living and holy sacrifice, and that His followers are kind and helpful to their fellowmen.
Marion 0. Stephenson
CDR, CHC, USN


Saturday, 26 June 1954


THE INDIAN


Page Two


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Music Makers Give Recital CAPT Moon Leaves


Yesterday evening at 8:30 in the patio of the Naval Base School, the annual piano recital of the Junior Music Makers presented 12 piano students of Mrs. H. P. McNeal.
The program consisted of 21 selections with solos, duets, and trios. Mrs. McNeal played numbers with Frances Linder, Margaret Mathews, Judy Yost, Sharon Pavlow, and Carol Echols.
Following the recital, Mr. H. P. McNeal presented awards to students for work accomplished in the past year.
Those participating in the program were: Judy Yost, Gary Houston, Billy Sutherling, Billy Mathews, Frances Linder, Ralph Sierra Jr., L u c ill e Mahaffey, Margaret Mathews, Delores Sierra, Bob Houston, Sharon Pavlow, and Carol Echols.
Pupils on the program who were not able to participate due to departure from Guantanamo Bay prior to the recital were: Danny Ornelas, Sally S carborough, Sue Wright, and Glenna Wright.
Student ushers were: Susan Richmond, Kathy Murphy, Carol Brown, Taft AlIb r ig ht, Allan Roberts, and Bill Brown.


LT Hoppe New NavSta

Personnel Officer

LT Gordon E. Hoppe, an exchief quartermaster with 17/2 years of naval service, is .the new Personnel Officer for the Naval Station.
He relieved LT C. E. Kleinert who departed last week for duty with the Commandant, 3rd Naval District in New York after serving as Personnel Officer here for about 29 months.
LT Hoppe served in submarines in the Pacific area during the great-


For San Francisco

CAPT M. A. Moon turned over the command of the U. S. Navy Dental Clinic to the interim commanding officer, CDR F. K. Etter, present executive officer, in the ceremonies held at the clinic onWednesday, 23 June.
Commander Etter will command the clinic until the arrival of CAPT William D. F. Stagner on July 2.
Captain Moon has been at Guantanamo Bay since 1952 when he arrived from the Naval Air Station at Corpus Christi, Tex.
He was commissioned LTJG in the Dental Corps in May 1927 and went on active duty in September 1941. In August of 1945 he transferred to the regular Navy. I Captain Moon married Doris G. Bacon in Salem, Ore., his home


Enlisted men looking for a night's relaxation should have no trouble finding their club as the entrance to the E.M. Club here has the only neon sign on the base.


EM, Petty Officers' Clubs Provide


Cool Drinks For Hot Sailors
by Jerry Lewis
A welcome sight indeed after a hard day in the hot sun is the familiar "One-Eyed' Indian on the label of a bottle of cold Hatuey, or the purchase of any mixed drink you desire. It's all yours at a nominal fee at the Enlisted Men's Club, Naval Station-another facility of 4th Division Special Services.


CAPT Max A. Moon town, in December 1935.
The captain, his wife and their son, John, departed on the FLAW plane Wednesday night. In Jacksonville, Fla. they will commence an auto tour across the country to the captain's new duty station at the Naval Shipyard in San Francisco, Calif. Enroute, they will visit friends and relatives in Ohio, Idaho, Oregon and California.
Captain Moon was chairman of the 1953 and 1954 Guantanamo Bay Carnival Committee and was a member of the advisory group of the Officers' Club. Hunting and fishing are his main hobbies.
Before he left, Captain Moon said, "GTMO is truly unique, so live and enjoy every day of your cruise to the fullest because you suddently realize it is later than you think."


LT G. E. Hoppe
er part of World War II, and it was while he was in the USS Sunfish in 1943 that he was commissioned an ensign.
Joppa, Md. claims LT Hoppe as a native son. His wife, Elizabeth and three children, Diana, 12, Eric, 9, and Valerie 6, are waiting in Baltimore to join him here at the base as soon as quarters are available.
Before he reported to the Naval Station for duty LT Hoppe was the Diving and Recovery Officer at the Piny Point Annex of the U. S. Naval Gun Factory in Piny Point, Md.


Cub Scouts Enjoy

Air Station Tour
by Millie Jamieson

The Guantanamo Bay Cub Scouts made a tour of Leeward Point Auxiliary Air Station on Wednesday, June 16. The Scouts left the NAS Sea Plane Ramp by ferry boat and each boy sensed the thrill of all sea-faring men by being perimtted to take his turn at the helm. On arrival they were escorted to the 8,000 foot runway where the F2H2 Banshee Jets take off and land. The miracles of Jet flying were explained and the boys particularly enjoyed watching the target banner being towed and later dropped by the jet tow planes.
Before partaking of lunch at Recreation Beach a ride was taken to the highest point on Leeward where one can see clearly for many miles. This was- followed by several relay matches and a hike to the beach upon which the Scouts tried to "net" fish with a discarded target banner.
The group returned to the flight area in time to see the wonders of a radio controlled Drone (NOLO) preparing. to take off and learn some of its principles. The amazing idea to all Scouts was no pilot was necessary for the Drone. Also, they visited the hangar hwere a Banshee Jet was examined closely and their questions were answered.
Upon returning to NAS the Scouts were taken to McCalla Field and they were escorted aboard a blimp. All the various instruments needed to keep the blimp aloft were explained and some were tried by the boys.
Accompanying the Cub Scouts on their tour were CHGUN J. D. Sentz,


Centrally located in the heart of the Naval Station recreation area, blinking it's neon sign in the night, which incidentaly is the only neon sign aboard the entire naval base, is the EM Club.
Open from 1700 to 2130 on weekdays and 1300 to 2130 on weekends and holidays, the EM Club and its' branch, the Petty Officer's Club, stand as one of the most modern and one of the largest of any club of its' kind aboard any naval establishment. The club has facilities for 1200 men!
Built in 1946, the clubs' cost is estimated at appraximately $70,000 with another $44,000 for utilities, fixtures and other necessities. Included is the cost of the outdoor patio where visiting fleet orchestras often entertain while in port.
While on the subject of estimates, here is a figure to think about
-the average expense annually for beverages for the club is $644,688.56! A lot of quenching for many thirsty sailors!
The operating staff is comprised of 36 Cuban civilians in the EM section, eight others in the PO Club and still more operating the Canteen at Windmill Beach and the Snack Shack at the enlisted men's swimming pool. The Shack is about to undergo a large reconstruction period and will eventually be enlarged into a soda fountain and snack bar.
Special Services welcomes all shore and fleet personnel to this extensive facility provided for the enlisted man's recreation and relaxation aboard Guantanamo Bay Naval Base.

Mrs. F. Baker, Mrs. W. J. Laden, Mrs. W. E. Yarbrough, and yours truly. We are hoping that more paernts join us because the boys are looking forward to another tou in the near future.


Saturday, 26 Juti 19W4 THE INDIAN


Page Thre


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ED


Leathernecks Lack One Win


For Cinch on NavBase Pennant
by Pierce Lehmbeck

The Marine Leathernecks need but one more win to clinch the Naval Base League title after winning three during this past week of play. With wins over the Flyers of NAS, the Mallards of VU-10 and the Indians of the Naval Station the Marines, who have led league play from the very first game, are undoubtedly the team to take the pennant as the only way that they can possibly be beat out now is for them to lose all the rest of their games and even then the second-seated Mallards must win all the rest of theirs. All other teams are statistically


out.
LEATHERNECKS BEES
The league-leading Marines, after an 8-6 thirteen inning victory over the Naval Station Indians Friday night, came back Saturday afternoon to easily defeat the NAS flyers, 14-3.
The Leathernecks started with newcomer Holmes and N A S promptly loaded the sacks. To counter this uprising manager Smith gave shortstop Joe Androvich the nod and the little mainstay exhibited a new talent as he came to the hill and set the next three batters down in order. He finished the game by limiting the Flyers to three runs on eight safeties.
NAS suprised everyone by throwing manager Al Rothenberg and "Big Al" held the rampagers down for the first four innings until they finally got to his slow tantalizing tosses and chased him off the mound with six runs in the fifth and sixth innings. He gave way to Woren who finished the tilt giving up three runs in the last two frames.
Androvich was credited with the win and Rothenberg was charged with the loss.
Marines 14 3 3 NAS 3 9 4
Sunday afternoon Jim Dotson paced the MCB-8 'Bees to an 11 to 8 win over the Naval Station Indians as he drove in four runs and hit two round-trippers, both well over 350 feet, and became the fifth man in the Naval Base league to accomplished this feat. This stint placed him in a two-way tie for honors in the round-triper department with the Leatherneck's Tom Felak. Each have seven.
The Braves, behind the throwing arm of hurler Bill Royal, led the way for the first five innings until the 'Bee power finally broke through and ran him off the hill. Wolgamuth and Mandis followed in succession but they were also unable to stem the tide and MCB-8 went on to take the win.
Bigbie was credited with the win while Royal was charged with the loss.
MCB-8 11 15 2
NavSta 8 11 3
MARINES EDGE MALLADS
The Marines Leathernecks showed once and for all Monday night why they are undoubtedly the team to win the 1954 pennant race when they staged a last-ditch stand to defeat the VU-10 Mallards 9-7 in what could be called the most exciting game of the year.
Trailing by a 7-4 margin the league leaders came to the plate in the bottom half of the ninth and started a drive that sent them over the top. Adams began the rally by doubling to center field. Romano followed a little later with a triple


and Mason walked setting the stage for the down-to-the-wire finish. With one down and runners at first and third Gatti took two strikes and belted the ball over the left field fence--his fifth hit of the season and his third homerun. Once before Gatti beat the Mallards with a fourbagger--a 1 to 0 shutout. This win left the Leathernecks with but one more game to win in order to be in, the clear for the league title.
Santos was credited with the win after relieving Smith in the ninth while Presutti was charged with the loss after taking the reins from Hubber in the sixth.
VU-10 7 12 2 Marines 9 9 3
Mallards Over 'Bees
Tuesday night the second-seated VU-10 Mallards, cruising behind the six hit hurling of Jan Edgar, defeated the MCB-8 'Bees 10-2 and dropped them a full game and a half into third place.
The Mallards chased in six runs in the top of the second and were never headed as they came back with three in the fifth and one in the seventh. MCB-8 notched their two runs by scoring one in the top of the third and one in the seventh.
Edgar was credited with the win as he went the distance while Shackelton went the full nine frames to take the loss.
VU-10 10 9 3
MCB-8 2 6 5
'Bees Lose To Flyers
Wednesday night, the faltering 'Bees dropped their second in succession as they lost to the NAS Flyers 14-7. With this win, the Flyers once again climbed out of the cellar with the Indians of the Naval Station falling a half a game in.
The "fly-boys" pounded out a total of 11 hits while the. 'Bees miscued four times to score three in the top of the first, six in the sixth, one in the seventh and four in the eighth. MCB-8 scored two in the second, one in the third, three in the fifth and one in the seventh. The game was highlighted by the efforts of Flyer third sacker Collins who homered and hit two singles inhfour trips,aaccounting for four RBI's.
Worn was credited with the win and Hoffman, making his first appearance in the Naval Base League, was charged with the loss.
NAS 14 11 7
MCB-8 7 7 4
Marines Whail Braves
Thursday night, the leagueleaders closed out the week of night play by handing the Naval Station Indians the worse loss that they have ever suffered, 22-3.
After scoring four in the bottom of the third, the Leathernecks


Bob Gatti of the Marines is greeted by a lot of glad hands as he steps over the plate after belting in the winning run with a homer against the VU-10 Mallards. The league-leading Marines were behing, 7-4 in the 9th, came up to put five runs across. Gatti's homer was his third of the season.


Tom Felak, Marine catcher, comes in tripper in Saturday's game with NAS. four-bagger this season.


scored at will as the bats of Pace, Gatti, Mason, Wood and Androvich e x p 1 o d e d for round-trippers. Mason's was his seventh and placed him in a three-way tie for top honors in that department with Dotson of the 'Bees and Felak, also of the Leathernecks. All together the Marines totaled twentytwo safeties as they chased four Indian hurlers, Buss, Royal, Fiddler and Wood around the park. The Braves scored all three of their runs in the top of the ninth when Matthieu hit his second homer of the year with two on.
Santos was the winning pitcher as he notched his eleventh win against one setback and Buss was charged with the loss.
Marines 22 22 3 NavSta 3 7 7


after pounding out a roundFelak chalked up his sixth


Next Week's Schedule


Saturday, 26 June
MCB-8 vs Marine Barracks
Sunday, 27 June
NAS vs Naval Station
Monday, 28 June MCB-8 vs VU-10 Tuesday, 29 June MCB-8 vs NAS
Wednesday, 30 June
Naval Station vs VU-10
Thursday, 1 July
Marine Barracks vs MCB-8
Friday, 2 July
Open


Page Four-


*


THE INDIAN


mo


Saturday, 26 June 1954






6*


Saturday, 26 June 1954


THE INDIAN


LeagueStandings

(As of Thursday, 24 June)
W L GB
Marines 21 1
VU-10 12 10 9
MCB-8 9 11 11
NAS 6 15 14%
NavSta 6 17 15%



To Five Batters

(As of Wednesday, 23 June)
AB H PCT
Felak Marines 80 33 .413
Pace Marines 78 31 .398
Morgan NavSta 89 34 .382
Adams Marines 93 32 .344


RBI Leaders


(As of Wednesday, 23 June) Dotson MCB-8 23
Young NavSta 21
Felak Marines 19
Ferris VU-10 18
Morgan NavSta 17
Androvich Marines 17



Pitching Records


(As of Thursday, 24

Smith Marines 8
Santos Marines 11
Bigbie MCB-8 7
Harrison NAS 4
Huber VU-10 4
Edgar VU-10 3


June) L PCT 0 1.000 1 .916 3 .700 1 .800 1 .800 1 .750


Homerun Leaders


(As of
Dotson Mason Felak Androvich Pace
Gatti Mayer Romano


Thursday,
MCB-8 Marines Marines Marines Marines Marines MCB-8 Marines


24 June)
7 7 7 6
4 4 3 3


NavBase All Stars

Play Cuban Stars

On Sunday, 4 July, tradition will once again stand predominate when a team of Naval Base All Stars will meet a team of Cuban All Stars in the yearly Independence Day thriller. This annual contest which began three years ago has developed into one of the most exciting exhibitions to be witnessed each year by sports fans here on the Naval Base.
These classics were be fuu in 1952 when the NavBase met and were defeated by a team from Fortuna. The following year the All-Stars avenged the loss. However, the the team which the All-Stars will meet this year will be a combination of Cuban All-Stars from Guantanamo City and should prove to be much stronger.
The NavBase All-Stars are chosen by a player -ballot in which each player turns in a ballot with a first and second choice for each infield position, five outfielders and four pitchers. The Manager of each team takes these ballots and works them down to a single ballot for the team as a whole. These are in turn handed in to the Base Basehall Com-mission where they counted and the All-Stars announced. The Basehall Commission reports that the AllStar team should be announced no later than the first part of next week.

"A fellow in my home town," remarked Herb Shriner, "was born with a silver spoon in his mouth. He swallowed it-and he hasn't stirred since."

If nobody knows the troupe you've seen, says singer Vaughn Monroe, you're not living in a small town.


Baries Mandis Mattheiu Snyder Ferris Adams Dieden


NavSta NavSta NavSta NAS VU-10
Marines VU-10


2
2
2
2
2
2
2


Seven ladies of the Ladies' Golf Club display their trophies and prizes that were presented to them at the recent luncheon held at the Family Restaurant. Left to Right: Miriam Hoy, Fran Dykeman, Corky Henning (receiving the trophy for Eloise Gushanas who was not able to be present at the luncheon), Jane McElroy, Marion Caruthers, Toni Winslow, and Marge Sheehan.


Jack Timmes of the Colts sets himself to catch the throw home as David Herold of the Hawks slides in safe by a mile.


Little League Schedule.....


uda,2 June

Bears vs Colts
Tuesday, 29 June
Bears vs Tigers Thursday, 1 July Hawks vs Colts


GTMO Golf Hi-Lites
by Wright North
Professional in Charge GTMIO Bay Golf Club

With the annual club championship decided again for another year, both in the ladies' and men's classes, some activities are planning their own inter-department tournaments. Fleet Training Group has already completed their highly successful tournament in a 54-hole medal play running over a period of two weeks. Their final round was completed last Sunday followed by refreshments and presentation of awards on the party grounds near the 17th fairway.
I'd like to suggest to other commands that now is the best time of the year for such affairs since there is very little fleet play, and, then too, the days long enough for a foursome to play 18 holes after
3 P.M.
The Naval Station Special Services Department welcomes to the GTMO Golf Club its newest members: CAPT Moe, CO Naval Hospital, and daughter Patsy Ann; J. L. Wood, R. E. Hamrick, J. C. Logsdon, H. P. Wiseman, R. W. Rabbe, R. S. Toland, W. R. Filer, C. H. Shatfield, L. P. Dinger, Mrs. William Kerrigan, R. D. Braussard, J. S. Morgan, R. R. Stanis, G. W. Willich, CDR A. L. Vogel, Mrs. C. E. Roberts, C. E. Schaub, J. B. King, Jack Engstrom, Andrew Gaglino, D. L. Newman, and D. F. Green. We know you will hit some rocks at tines and 3-putt against the grain; but when all the strokes are added up, this, too, is one half of the game.
I'd like to take this opportunity on behalf of all the club members to send a word of cheer to Mrs. R. D. Viafora who is convalescing. We all miss your pleasant smile and hope you will be ack soon.


Pete Agdamag, Hawks pitcher, shows his technique of holding runners on base and still "put them across the plate."


Colt Pitcher Wright North, Jr., prepares to toss in a few pitches before last week's game with the Hawks.

A newspaper got a call from a woman who wanted her spouse's name put in the obituary column because she caught him kissing his secretary.
"How long has be been dead?"
"He starts tomorrow."


Page Pive






Gs


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 26 June 1954


The Angle(R)
by Jerry Lewis

In writing of fish life, it must not be overlooked that 'life' is not only found in the sleek denizens that endlessly cruise the depths in search of food and spawning grounds, nor not only in the lazier creatures such as the Jewfish and the Octopus, but also in the motionless formations of fantastic coral and stationary animals that pretend to play the part of vegetable life.
These so-called 'plants' of the sea, deceiving in their natural beauty and gracefully lolling in the passing tides, may be equally as carnivorous, and in some cases more so, than the formidable shark or barracuda!
The waters of the world, covering three-quarters of the Earth's surface, comprises 140 million liquid square miles with and average depth of 1200 feet and is an arena teeming with an estimated 200,000 species of marine life. An arena filled with thundering surf, quiet beaches, coral jungels, hidden reefs 'raced by rippling shafts of sunlight, delicate colors, all of which defies description.
The only passport necessary for your entry into the strange and beautiful kingdom of silence is a pair of flippers and a mask. The sea will welcome you.
The waters of the West Indies is a veritable underwater paradise for explorers and nature lovers. The water is warm, colored with ultramarine blue and is as clear as crystal.
In the depths, is an underwater fairyland of delicate sea fans, sea


plumes, elkhorn coral, coral trees of fantastically grotesuqe shapes, patterns of soft rich color, all illuminated by rays of light that find their way into the deepest regions. Countless species of coral fish are as colorful as, their surroundings and many have the ability to change their color to fit their home.
One of the most impressive pieces of workmanship produced by marine life is the tiny coral Polyp, a living animal only one-eight to onesixteenth of an inch in diameter. It is these creatures who are responsible for the great magnificent reefs of the oceans of the world.
They produce by budding and dividing, casuing a reef to grow at the rate of four to eight feet every one hundred years. Other species of Polyp grow into the so-called 'plants' of the sea, the fans, plumes, elkhorn coral and countless other varieties.
The next time you visit this strange world, and providing your air supply in sufficient, stop and think about that beautiful sea fan swaying in the tide. You're looking at something that took a century to create. It is alive with millions of tiny animals. Thus the reason for the loss of color when the fan is cut and brought into the air.
It is not recommended that you grasp elkhorn antler coral. Its' white-tipped points wil sting and will be an everlasting reminder that the reason the silent world is so beautiful and why its' life abounds in such great abundance is because it has been out of the destructive reach of man since the beginning of time. That is how it will remain
-a challenge and a mystery that can only be solved by science.


What D'Ya'


Say?


The INDIAN will award a certificate good for $1.00 worth of merchandise at the Navy Exchange for each question accepted andxused. Submit your questions to Editor, The Indian, Box 19.)

The question: What player in the Naval
Base League would get your all-star vote.

The place: Marine Site Ball Park, NavStaMCB-8 game.


Jim Fisher, BU2, MCB-8
"Tom Felak; I think he's the
best all-'round player in the league."


W. G. Hunt, BMC, NavSta "Well, I'd say Dotson. He looks like major league material to me."


R. F. Jackson, BU3, MCB-8
"Don Stoeckel of MCB-8 for his determination. He lives baseball. He's a good hitter in the pinches a fine infielder."


William Moore, SW3, MCB-8
"Dotson plays a lot of ball; he's a good infielder, hitter, you name it!"


Ladies' Golf Shots
by Miriam Hoy

This week the ladies received golf balls for winning low gross and low net on the front nine.
The winners were:
First Flight
Gross-Corky Henning
Net-two-way tie
Alma McCracken
Edna Edwards
Second Flight
Gross-Sue Scott
Net-Marine Aslin


Third Flight
Gross-Val Evans
Net-Anita Roberts
This week we have quite a few newcomers joining the Third Flight players. A hearty welcome is extended to the following: Joye Graves, Terry M o s e 1 e y, B. J. Sutherling, Billie Nelson, and Evelyn Leach.
Lots of luck to you new members, and may you all have many good games.
Don't forget the Scotch Foursome tomorrow. Pick a partner and the Committee will comprise the foursome

4


Edwin Rooff, BM1, NAS MAA Force
"Sutherland of NAS would get mine for his fielding a-hitting."

9


Tho-mas E. Hawkins, QMC, NAS
"Krall of NAS for me. He's a good fielder and slugger."


'Page Six


-- ,


40









Saturday, 26 Juiie 1954 tHE INDIAN Page Seven


Yippee Keeps NavBase Supplied

When the familiar word, "The 'YIPPEE's in," gets passed around among the grocery shoppers of the base, the Commissary Store is in for a busy day. For the store will be stocked with milk, lettuce, tomatoes and other vegetables fresh from the States. That everyone knows. But surprisingly few people know much more about the YFR-1152, as the "YIPPEE" is known in her informal moments.
The "YIPPEE" is one of the very
few wooden ships in full commission in the U. S. Navy. Originally ss
designed as a Tuna boat, she was Grease Paint gossipp
built for the Navy in 1945 by the by Jo Si
Seattle Drydocking and Shipyard oyce immons
Co., with very few changes, and
commissioned as the YP-629. The One of the highlights of "Out
end of World War II found the of the Frying Pan" is Gordon
"YIPPEE" in the Philippines. Thomson's "mad scene," in the Since late 1946 she has been as- role of George Bodell, a very signed to Guantanamo Bay, and happy-go-lucky young man with an
used primarily to transport fresh unexcelled sense of humor. Gordon, provisions in from Florida. who hails from New York and
About five times each quarter majored in English at C.C.N.Y. the YIPPEE makes the trip to does a bit of fine acting in this Miami, loads provisions ordered by particular scene, where he pretends Naval Supply Depot and the Com- to be crazy when he arrives at the emissary Store, and general mer~ famous "joint" apartment to change chandise ordered by the Navy Ex his clothes, only to discover that
change. This voyage is about 600 the father of one of the feminine miles each way and therefore in roommates is there on insection. the course of a year, the "YIPPEE" This, of course, creates quite a steams a distance equal to a cruise .is, ofcoushichrMat Thout a around the world at the equator. situation, wh r. omson
Each trip, the "YIPPEE" can squirms out of by his fast thinkcarry nearly ten thousand cubic ing and highly stimulating acting. feet of frozen and chill cargo in Don Nash, who is the third young eleven refrigerated holds, plus man to share this mixed-up, theamiscellaneous cargo and three trical-minded apartment, plays the automobiles topside. Her average part of Tony Dennison, a shy but cruising speed is 10 knots, and if handsome youth whose own ambishe were hard pressed, she could tion to be a great actor is not as steam ten thousand miles without strong as the girl who loves him refueling. She is 128 feet long and wishes for him. This is Don's first has a 29 foot beam. appearance on the stage. and he is
The commanding officer it LT doing remarkably well. He majored
John G. Carpenter, USN and the in English and Economics at St. executive officer is Chief Machinist Mary's College, and is now inH. P. Auerbach, U SN. Three Chief terested 'in pursuing a career as Petty Officers and twenty one men radio announcer, after he leaves round out the crew of twenty six' the navy. The vessel is under the operational To Jim Boyette, the theatre is control of the Commanding Officera. s' m
Naval Station, and the Command_ a hohhy-just as is swimming, ing Officer, Naval Supply Depot coming from Pass-a-Grill Beach, coordinates space requirements Fla. (near St. Petershurg) Jim among the base activities that use majored n chemistry at St. Peterher hold spaces for shipment. Ev- shurg's Jr. College and hopes eveneryone will agree that the "YIP- tually to become an electrical PEE" provides invaluable services enacting the part of Mr. Kenny, to the base. Long may she sail! engineer. In the meantime, Jim is


Little Johnny had been very naughty. Later after he had been reprimanded his father asked, "Now, son, tell me why I punished you."
Johnny threw up his hands and exclaimed. "That does it! First you pound the devil out of me and now you don't why you did it."


the famous producer around whom the entire cast of "Out of the Frying Pan" circulates. Mr. Kenny, although known throughout the theatrical world for his success as a producer is far more interested in his personal hobby as a culinery expert when at home-which only adds to the over-all comedy of this "laugh-a-minute" play.

0


F TG Bulletin

A very successful FTG Golf Tournament came to a close last Sunday under the hot sun on the GTMO Course with six of the nine honors being shared by three Training Group families.
LCDR Skadowski took the top honors in the Low Net division with the low tournament score of 208. He carried a 19 stroke handicap. While his dad was busy salting away the top spot, "K" "J" Skadowski took the second spot in the Junior division by shooting 235 Net.
The Scott family carried away two honors following Sunday's play. LCDR Scott shot a 238 for the Low Gross of the tournament and Mrs. Scott won the ladies division with a net score of 217.
LCDR McElroy and his wife nailed down two second positions. LCDR McElroy took the second spot in the Low Gross event by shooting a 239, just one stroke under first place honors. Mrs. McElroy placed second in the ladies division shooting a 222, for the 54 hole tourney.
Chief Monte, LT Hall and Ronnie Mosley were the three people to break into the family monopoly. Monte shot a 216 for second honors in the Low Net event and Ronnie Mosley took the first spot in the Junior flight with a net score of 266. LT Hall shot the low net 18 holes in the tournament. Playing with a 37 handicap he turned in a 94, good for a winning 67, one stroke better than LCDR, Skadowski, LCDR Simmons and Chief Monte who all carded an 18 hole score of 68.
Trophies will be presented to the winners at the Fleet Training Group picnic sometime in July.
* * *
Several new officers reported aboard recently. We wish to welcome aboard LT Page and LT Cockrane of the Air Department, LT Robinson and LT Williams of the Gunnery Department and LT Christie with the Engineering Department.
Chief Monte's niece, Miss Juanita Theriot, arrived Sunday from Beaumont, Texas for a ten day visit with the Chief and his Wife. We hope your visit to Guantanamo will be a pleasent one to remember.

It seems that as of late the FTG Ladder has gone to pot and it is now in the stage of revision. Being that all the Golfers or would-be golfers in the command are not of what you might call Competitive Calibre, or Par-Shooters, the ladder will be revised so that all hands will have a chance at the top rung.
It is intended to have one large Cup for the top position and each man that reaches the top of the ladder will have his name inscribed on the cup. He also will be awarded


a small trophy for the first time he takes over the top rung of the ladder.
All suggestions that you may have which would promote more interest in this program will be greatly appreciated. If you have some ideas contact CDR King or LCDR Skadowski.
There is also a Hole-in-One Trophy which hasn't been won as yet and is for the taking by the person that shoots the Golfer's Dream in a Competitive Match.
* **
Three members of the Training Group departed Gtmo Wednesday for new assignments. John Francis, FP1, will report to the USS Gen. H.W. Butner (TP-113) for duty and Leslie Ohl, FP1, will report to the USS Shadwell, (LSD-15) for


NAS Crosswinds
by Paul Snyder

Who's Who at N.A.S.
Andrew A. Konkoly, AL2.
Radio Shack
"Andy" Konkoly of the Radio Shack hails from Cleveland, Ohio where he graduated from Benedictine High School after participating in varsity baseball and basketball. "Andy" entered the Navy January 9, 1951 and attended AT/L School August 15, 1951. He was enrolled at Fenn College in Cleveland for one year before entering the service. Here at Gtmo, "Andy" catches for the Flyers baseball squad after spending his working hours repairing radio and electronic equipment. Konkoly intends to further his education by enrolling at Ohio State University where he plans to get a degree in Aeronautical Engineering when he completes his present tour.

The NAS sponsored All Base Tennis Tournament will be imaxed sometime this week-end with the finals of "A" Division. LT Whitman, victor 6-2, 6-2 over Chief Sims earlier this week draws a bye until the finals.
E. M. Nichols, 6-3, 6-3 victor over John Page wil meet either Chief Penoso or Sid Rand in the semifinals of the lower bracket.
Bob Bear blasted past Rich Cipriani 6-4, 6-2 in the finals of "B" Division to win the trophy in that competition. In the semi-finals, Bear defeated Fred Shimonek of Leeward Point, 6-4, 6-0. Special Services' Announcements
Last week a new Spanish class was inaugurated with a very satisfying turnout. The class, under the instruction of Professor Jones, is primarily intended for beginners, but more advanced students are invited to refresh their knowledge. Personnel from N.A.S. and VU-10 including their dependents 4re eligible to participate. The weekly class commences at 1900 on Thursdays in the Training Room at the Administration Building.
A Leathercraft Class will be started in the near future under the guidance of LCDR F. N. Vanderhoef with assistance from J. B. Gosnell BMC. These classes are tentatively scheduled for McCalla and Leeward Point Hobby Shops. Fundamentals in working leather, tooling, lacing, and the actual construction of useful leather products will be the aims of this group. Further details will be announced after the required materials arrive.
Departures
Leaving NAS this week are Roy Coleman PRi to NAS Memphis, Tennessee; Ralph L. Paterson HN to the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina; and


Forrest M. Sandage, BMC, to NAS Key West, Florida. Good luck at your new duty stations, men.

duty. Chief Shepherd will report to NavSchools in Washington, D.C., for Instructor duty at the "FT" Class "B" school there.
***
Ship Departures
USS Deuel APA-160 29 June
USS Gatling DD-671 29 June
USS Bauer DM-26 1 July
USS Cambria APA-36 2 July
USS Dortch DD-670 2 July
Ship Arrivals
USS Olmstead APA-188 28 June
USS Trathen DD-538 28 June
USS Gainard DD-706 29 June
USS Compton DD-705 2 July


Page Seven-i


Saturday, 26 Juiie i954


THE INDIAN


w








Navy-i0NDPPO-Gtffi6.=-6043


THE 1NDIAN


mo


Saturday, 26 June 1954


MOVIES


Saturday, 26 June
BEACHEAD
Frank Lovejoy Tony Curtis
Before the Bouganville assault, four men are sent ashore to find if radioed information that the Japanese have laid mines is true. They find the French family that sent the message captives of the Japanese.
Sunday, 27 June
PLAYGIRL
Shelley Winters Barry Sullivan
Small-town girl comes to city to live with friend who is night club singer. Girl becomes involved in the murder of the singer's friend.
Monday, 28 June
TENNESSEE CHAMP
Deway Martin Keenan Wynn
Young fighter who trusts manager implicity finds that the manager has fixed one of his fights. Struggles between honesty and desire to do what manager wants.
Tuesday, 29 June
DRIVE A CROOKED ROAD
Mickey Rooney Dianne Foster
Young and ambitious mechanic is duped into driving a get-away car by a gang-leader's girl friend. He finds that he was tricked, protests. Killer is sent after him.
Wednesday, 30 June SASKATCHEWAN
Alan Ladd Shelley Winters
Canadian Mountie rescues girl from Indian attack then brings her back to his post. An American Marshal is there, waiting to take her back to the States on criminal charges.
Thursday, 1 July MIAMI STORY
Barry Sullivan Luther Adler
Aroused citizens enlist services of former top ganster to help them clean up the community when two muscle men are shot down at an airport by the local crime syndicate men.

"He's the kind of a man who bits the nail squarely on the thumb.


The little girl pictured here is lovely Rita Moreno. She recently completed work on her latest flicker, "Garden of Evil." She does her gardening with Spencer Tracy.


Ename fEtcuts


Last Wednesday Captain Moon read his orders to the assembled personnel of the Dental Clinic and departed that night with Mrs. Moon and son, John. Their destination is San Francisco. Good Luck to them all and they will be missed by all hands.
Two days before Cantain Moon was detached the Dental Gang had an improntu meeting and suprised him with a caricature of the Captain as we jokingly see him.


Mr. Dote, our finance officer, has gone to the States on leave to assist his family on their trip to Gtmo we'll be glad to have them on board.
Dr. Haymes is coming along fairly well following his bout with Dr. Timmes. We're keeping your office dusted, Ben.
Olsen is happy with the ring in the nose again -his wife, Marvelene, flew in commercial a few days ago.
Old soldiers may never die but overworked dentists surely do. The following epitaph was noted on a gravestone: Here lies Dentist Smith, filling his last cavity.


-B00K-Nooie

by Francis L. Cannon, JOSN
FOR YOUR INFORMATION
General Dean's Story
As told to William L. Worden, by Major General William F. Dean.
This book was written entirely from memory-that was all General Dean had when he was released by the North Korean Communists. But his memory is accurate-and vivid. He wandered in the hills of South Korea for 35 days with a .45 and 12 rounds of ammunition, scavanging for food and dodging capture at every turn. When he was finally captured he spent three years putting up a valiant fight against the "brain washing" of the Reds.
My Partner, Ben Hogan
by Jimmy Demnaret
Demaret, one of Hogan's best friends in golf for more than 20 years, tells the story of the life of a great golfer on and off the tournament circuit.
The Reason Why
by Cecil Woodhan-Smith
The charge of the Liffht Brigade
-one of the worst blunders in military history. Mrs. WoodhamSmith tells why and how 500 men were sacrificed in an impossible charge. She tells of the personalities of the two men who effected the charge-Lord Lucas and Lord Cardigan, both ruthless, both hated enemies; yet Lord Lucas ordered the charge and Lord Cardigan led it.
FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT
The Dollmaker
by Harriete Arnow
The story of a woman, unrooted from her familiar surroundings in the hills of Kentucky and thrust into the confusion of wartime Detroit, where her husband took a job. She feels completely out of place there and is in misery and terror. Her one consolation is an unfinished figure in cherry-wood which she constantly whittles. It symbolizes something to her, gives her strength against what she feels to be the false values of city life.
The Song Of Ruth
by Frank G. Slaughter
Taken from the Old Testament Book of Ruth, this paints a brilliant and colorful picture of life in Biblical times. The book was written simultaneously with the screenplay.
The Faulkner Reader
Sixteen works and excerpts from William Faulkner, giving a representative selection. "The Sound and the Fury" is included complete. There are nine short stories and excerpts from other novels. His


Nobel Prize Address is also included.
IN PASSING . . .
The library now has 15 books in the Arco series for Civil service jobs. A few are, Steno-typist; Auto Machinist and Meclimic; Storekeeper; Bookkeeper. There are also a number of books on how to nlay several different sports, basketball, baseball, etc.; all are illustrated. And in the way of juvenile books the library now ham books for the age group 8-14. New Saturday hours are in effect; the library will be closed on Saturday morning, open from 1300-1630; 1730-2130. The library in the Naval Base school will be open during the summer from 0800 to 1630, Monday through Friday.


4A4




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ccGo ei's qTMO L'ke TMk urnslirte' New W.O. Bill Affects Army, Navy, A.F Washington (AFPS)-The Warrant Officer Act of 1954 has been signed by President Eisenhower making possible a uniform WO program for all of the Armed Forces. It will become effective Nov. 1, 1954 and will apply to WOs in the Army, Marine Corps. The bill setting up a statutory WO program came about for three main reasons. First, there is a wide difference between the laws and regulations on WOs in the various military services. Second, the Career Compensation Act of 1949 established four pay grades. Third, the WO program needs to be vitalized by a mandatory system of consideration for promotion and elimination. The WO Act provides for promotion, elimination and retirement of regular WOs of all services. Four military grades have been set up in place of the present two. These are not the same as the four grades set up in 1949, since they were only pay grades. The present grades will be renamed. For example, a warrant officer (junior grade) will be re-designated a warrant officer, W-1. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard chief warrant officers will remain commissioned WOs. The bill provides that no WOs will be reduced from their present permanent or temporary grades as a result of the redesignations. A warrant officer, W-1 will be required to serve three years in grade before being considered for promotion. W-2s and W-3s must serve six years in grade before being considered for promotion. Boards will be convened at least annually to consider WOs for promotion. Those who are twice passed over will be separated from the service with severance pay. WOs with 18 years of active service who have been passed over twice will be permitted service to qualify for retirement pay. All WOs, regardless of component, may apply for retirement after 20 years' active Federal service. The secretary of each service will decide whether the application should be accepted. However, male WOs of age 62, and female WOs of age 55, will be retired mandatorily if they have completed 20 years of active service. The exceptions to this are male permanent regular WOs under age 62 who receive permission from the secretary of their service, and male WOs, either regular or reserve, who are under age 64 but who have not completed 20 years of service by age 62. The promotion features of the act apply only to permanent regular WOs. The matter of promotion for temporary and reserve WOs is left to the secretaries of the individual services. Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard and Work Begins On Bay Hill Beer Hall Construction of a new beer hall for the Bay Hill area is now underway. The new beer hall, which has already been officially dubbed as "The Beer Barrel," will be located on Victory Hill Road directly behind the Navy Exchange Dry Cleaners and just below Bay Hill Barracks No. 1. Although only $2500 was allotted for the construction of The Beer Barrel, it is estimated that the final building will have a value much greater. This is being accomplished by donations-both of equipment and labor. Equipment in the form of tables, chairs, etc. are being donated by the EM Club, PO Club, and the CPO Club. Volunteer labor from Bay hill will be utilized to cut the labor cost. In addition to the volunteer labor, it is estimated that SeaBee labor wil be used in the construction. By these methods, the final building will be much more ".plush" than it could have possibly been on the original appropriation. The building itself will be a pavilion type affair-onen on all sides. However, in the future, it is hoped that it will be screened in on three sides with a solid wall built behind the bar which streches almost the full length of the 30' x 100' building. At present, it is estimated that the building will be complete and ready to ."open for business' sometime in July. Disaster Drills End Today Both Hurricane Patsy and an atomic attack will strike and inflict their damage on the Naval Base and surrounding areas today while personnel will be safely sheltered in specially constructed disaster shelters. Both are mythical happenings created to drill personnel of the base in case of an actual hurricane or atomic attack. At 0800 this morning the climax of the three day hurricane drills will begin as the signal (four groups of nine blasts on the base fire alarm system) will begin the evacuation to shelter. As soon as personnel are safely sheltered, a plane will make two circles of smoke over the base marking the total destruction and casualty areas for the passive defense drill. At no time during the passive defense drill will personnel be allowed in the disaster or casualty area. This is necessary to avoid confusion in carrying out the problem in an efficient manner. However, as soon as these areas are determined, personnel will be allowed to proceed to their respective homes or barracks or jobs if they are not in the disaster or casuality areas. All personnel will be instructed on how to proceed to their homes or barracks, but if the barracks or home is in the disaster or casualty area, personnel must remain in the vicinity of the hurricane shelter. At no time will the hurricane shelters be closed. Above all, personnel should know what they are supposed to do in the case of an atomic attack or a hurricane. The next time might not be a drill. Last week, Cub Scouts of the Naval Base and the respective Den Mothers were taken on a tour of McCalla Field and Leeward Point. The boys were given a complete tour of the air facilities of both fields. Here, they are shown viewing Leeward Point field from a high hill overlooking the air strip. Saturday, 26 June 1954 Four Commands Receive SecNav Safety Awards In the past two weeks four commands of the Naval Base have received Secretary of the Navy Safety Awards for 1953. Naval Supply Depot topped the list as they received their fifth and sixth safety awards-for Industrial Safety, and for Motor Vehicle Safety. The Naval Station was cited recently with their award by RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Base Commander. The award was presented to CAPT W. R. Caruthers. This is the third year in succession that the Naval Station has been cited for their motor vehicle safety. Each year they have improved upon their record of the previous year and each year, more miles have been driven in more vehicles year with less accidents than in the previous. The Naval Air Station was cited this last week in a formal ceremony by Admiral Taylor. The Air Station's safety award was for Industrial Safety in 1953. According to A. J. McGowan, Base Safety Engineer, this is due primarily because of the excellent functioning of a safety committee in the Public Works Department. Along with this primary reason, two shops-the NAS Pblic Works Paint Shop, and he NAS Carpenter Shop, have very impressise records for no lost-time accidents which has contributed greatly to the overall record for the Air. Station. The fourth command here to receive a safety award was the Naval Hospital. RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander Naval Base, presented the Secretary of the Navy award for Industrial Safety to CAPT Tilden I. Moe, Commanding Officer, Naval Hospital. Swimmers' Itch Still Dangerous To Bathers This last weekend, a few more cases of "Swimmers' itch" turned in at the Naval Hospital here. Research is still in progress, and no cause has been determined to this date. Swimmers should take every precaution possible when swimming in salt water, or they should avoid the problem entirely by swimming in pools on the Naval Base. GTMO Has The Braine The USS Braine, DD 630, commanded by CDR James S. Habaker, arrived here in Guantanamo Bay this last week. The Braine will be in Guantanamo for a period of training under Fleet Training Group. Vol. VI, No. 51 pp U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba -f 9)qe

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Saturday, 26 June 1954 9?aTEENAGE-ROUND-UP HospitalNotes 'y iN T IfJ Yo ihe Indian s mission-i-' onuri and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Station Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturady, 26 June 1964 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sandness--------Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC------------------Editor H. L. Sisson, JO3-------------------News Jerry Lewis, J03-------------Features Pierce Lehmbeck------------------Sports F. L. Cannon, JOSN--------Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission, Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy rnhtos unless otherwise credited. WGBY Hi-Lites by John Hull With the familiar "Dum Da Dum Dum", and the phrase, "All we want are the facts", "Dragnet" returns to the WGBY program schedule Thursday, July 1 at 8:30 P.M. After a short sojourn, during which the program won several more awards, "Dragnet" resumes its dramatizations of true cases taken directly from the files of the Los Angeles Police Department. With director Jack Webb, who takes on the guise of Detective Sergeant Joe Friday, will be Ben Alexander in the role of his partner, Frank Smith. Both gentlemen are so convincing in their roles that they are often taken as real policemen by the unsuspecting public. On Saturday morning, June 26, at 11:30, the award winning "You Are There" resumes its series of shows. ,"You Are There" is a dramatic program which re-creates famous pages from history as if they were currently unfolding. Each week the audience is taken back through history for an "on-thespot" special events broadcast. Reporter Walter Cronkite and members of the CBS Television News Staff "cover" the events. The series is produced by Charles Russell and directed by Sidney Lumet. In the past, "You Are There" has been taken directly from the radio broadcasts. The current programs are from the audio portion of the television series. "George Washington Slept Here", the riotous farce by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart, will be presented by the "Theatre Guild" Monday, June. 28 at 9:00 P.M. In the starring roles will be Van Heflin, Ann Rutherford and Kenny Delmar. Based on the personal experiences of the authors, who own homes in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, "George Washington Slept Here" leaves no comic possibility untouched in its burlesque on the rigors of country living. The Teenage hayride last Saturday nite was a big success. Everyone had a cool time of it! Poor Jean C. is still counting her mosquito bites-and from all reports, most of the others must-ve been doing some fancy swatting, too, for there was food left over!! What's the que' pasa? ? ? Hey kats, did ya know that Barbara Garis is back with us? She left us at the beginning of this year, and it's a pleasure to welcome her back to our gang. She's spending some time this summer with Babs Pistole. Last Thursday nite, Sherry gave a "going away" party for Wally G. and John M. It was really the coolest! Sherry's cookin' was the most! The tears have realy been sheddin' this week! First, we said goodbye to Wally, who left on the Thomas, last Saturday afternoon. Then, on the following Monday, we bade fond adieu to Glenna Wright. Next, it was John Moon, who left on the Wednesday nite FLAW. Another kleenex, anyone? Tuesday nite, there was a farewell party for John M. and Leonard T. The gang met at Roxey's to have refreshments, and then popped off to the skating rink. Everyone had a wonderful time, thanks to Roxey! Did ya dig. ...Dexter and his girls at N.O.B. ...Jean C.'s new hairdo. ...Jane, making one last tour in Cuba Groan). ...Pat's comic books. ...Jay C.'s bowling. ...Pattie down at "the" sailboat. Betty's buzzer (dreamy). ...Pierce's hotdogs (five dozen of um!). ... The kats at the ball park, last Friday nite. Man, I'll bet they were tired! By the way! Your's truly, Luella Parsons, Jr., is writing this week from a wheelchair! So take a tip from me, ya'll, and never trust a wave, ya heah ? ? The Lucky Bag by Betty Radcliffe Checking through the visitors file this week I found that there are several nice visitors on the base ...Mrs Bruce Grant from Anaheim, California arrived on the base last Tuesday to visit her sister, Mrs. J. W. Richmond. Mrs. Grant will be here about a month before returning to her home in California, where she will teach school while her husband is stationed in England. Mrs. Lois Pryor from San Jose, California, arrived last Sunday to visit her sister, Mrs. A. M. Rose. Mrs. Proyer is vice-principle in the Hoover School in San Jose. Mrs. Proyer and Mrs. Rose leftthis week by plane to Santiago and Port Au Prince, where they will spend two or three days. Mrs. Pryor will leave for the States the first week in July. David M. Adams from Chicago arrived the 19th to visit his brother R. M. Adams. David graduated from high school the 18th of this month and will enter the University of Illinois. David will be here until about July 3rd. Hope all you visitors haveenjoyed your visit hereand will come back again sometime. Seasickness is when you travel across the ocean by rail. Ly Juy y usL the outstanding allround athletes of this command. He was catcher and first baseman on our baseball team last year, a member of the varsity basketball team for the past two years, high triple scorer in the recent base bowling tournament, and shot in the high 70's and low 80's in golf. "Are your mother and father home ?" "They was in but they is out." "Good Lord, where's your grammar?" "She's gone upstairs for to lay down." I -uny,///l JuII 1\\\\\\954%. Sunday, 27 June 1954 I just didn't think. 0 God, give me another chance". What needless misery could be avoided if we through faith and prayer keep our minds centered on God who teaches that material things are a gift from Him to be used for His glory, that the body is the temple of His Spirit to be presented unto Him as a living and holy sacrifice, and that His followers are kind and helpful to their fellowmen. Marion 0. Stephenson CDR, CHC, USN Page Two THE INDIAN Heirport News During the past week, the following births were recorded: a daughter, Judith Ann, born 16 June to MM3 and Mrs. Richard L. Lightfoot; a son, Duane Neal, born 17 June to ACC and Mrs. Jesse E. Stokes; a daughter, Barbara Ann, born 17 June to AD1 and Mrs. Paul A. Lazos; and a daughter, Susan Neill, born 18 June to CDR and Mrs. Addison S. Archie, Jr. Your Hospital When the word "hospital" is mentioned, one generally thinks of doctors, nurses, and ward corpsmen but seldom thinks of the many others that keep a hospital going. Lets look at one group of those people. The Record Office performs an undramatic, and at times monotonous, task but an essential one. The records of all patients admitted go through the Receipt and Transfer section. Here, incoming orders are receipted and out-going orders written, and Service Records, Pay Records and Health Records are kept in order and up to date. The Medical History section. summarizes all medication and treatment received by patients and outlines this information in their health record. A daily report is made in the Record Section covering all patient and staff personnel in the hosptial and their status. As an aid in assimilating medical data from the entire Navy, IBMI cards are prepared on all patients admitted. These cards contain all information pertinent to the particular diagnosis and treatment and are periodically mailed to BuMed. A cross-index system of all types of diseases, injuries, and operations is also maintained. This is useful to doctors when a case comes up that is unusual to the medical profession. It enables them to quickly locate and study case histories to better qualify themselves to administer aid to a patient. Departures During the past week nine men departed from this command. Those leaving 16 June were E. L. Driver, HM1, to Naval Station, Green Cove Springs, Fla.; J. J. Webbs, HN, to Naval Ammunition Depot, Crane, Ind.; W. E. Hughes, HM3, and C. M. Crouse, HA, to Receiving Stations for separation. W. H. Ferkler, HM2, left 18 June for the USS Deuel. This move somewhat interrupted his plans .for he was in the process of building a 36' cabin cruiser. B. W. Cox, HM3, left for separation on 19 June while F. B. Lalor, HMC, departed on the same date for duty at the Naval Hospital, Portsmouth, N. H. Lalor was one of our Collection Agents as well as Head Mortician. Leaving for duty 21 June on the USS Maloy were W. B. Honeycutt, HM2, and Tom W. Hart, HM2. Hart was one of Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 17301800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Jewish Services Friday: 1900-Naval Base Chapel Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. O. Stephenson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) The Chaplain's Corner Many of life's supreme tragedies are results, not of our viciousness, not of our cruelty, not of our depravity, but of our thougthlessness. 'T was never in my heart To play so ill a part, But evil is wrought For want of thought". How many lives are lost and how many dollars worth of property are destroyed each year by accidents. Now, a majority of these accidents are not necessary. They are the results of sheer carelessness. They are born of our refusal to think. We dash madly along the highway in our cars. Suddenly there is a crash. Then we think how easily the catastrophe might have been avoided. If we had only been as thoughtful before the tragedy as we have been since, it need never have occurred. What pain we often inflict upon others through our thoughtlessness. Without thinking, we have uttered words that have cut like a two edged sword and have left scars that can never be erased. Without thinking, we have passed on to others bits of idle rumors that have become whirlwinds of gossip that have gathered up the filth and half-truths of the community and have left, in their wakes broken homes, tarnished reputations, and heartaches. Without thinking, we have yielded to the lust of the flesh in ways that have dishonored the teaching of our parents and have brought shame to our wives and families, and regardless of how we may suffer for our thoughtless acts, they will suffer a hundred times more. One of the most pitiful sounds in all the world is the agonizing cry of the person who is reaping the fruits of his own thoughtlessness: "God, I didn't mean to do it.

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Music Makers Give Recital CAPT Moon Leaves Page Three Yesterday evening at 8:30 in the patio of the Naval Base School, the annual piano recital of the Junior Music Makers presented 12 piano students of Mrs. H. P. McNeal. The program consisted of 21 selections with solos, duets, and trios. Mrs. McNeal played numbers with Frances Linder, Margaret Mathews, Judy Yost, Sharon Pavlow, and Carol Echols. Following the recital, Mr. H. P. McNeal presented awards to students for work accomplished in the past year. Those participating in the program were: Judy Yost, Gary Houston, Billy Sutherling, Billy Mathews, Frances Linder, Ralph Sierra Jr., L u c i 11 e Mahaffey, Margaret Mathews, Delores Sierra, Bob Houston, Sharon Pavlow, and Carol Echols. Pupils on the program who were not able to participate due to departure from Guantanamo Bay prior to the recital were: Danny Ornelas, Sally Scarborough, Sue Wright, and Glenna Wright. Student ushers were:. Susan Richmond, Kathy Murphy, Carol Brown, Taft A 1 brig h t, Allan Roberts, and Bill Brown. LT Hoppe New NavSta Personnel Otfficer LT Gordon E. Hoppe, an exchief quartermaster with 171/2 years of naval service, is .the new Personnel Officer for the Naval Station. He relieved LT C. E. Kleinert who departed last week for duty with the Commandant, 3rd Naval District in New York after serving as Personnel Officer here for about 29 mounths. LT Hoppe served in submarines in the Pacific area during the greatLT G. E. Hoppe er part of World War II, and it was while he was in the USS Sunfish in 1943 that he was commissioned an ensign. Joppa, Md. claims LT Hoppe as a native son. His wife, Elizabeth and three children, Diana, 12, Eric, 9, and Valerie 6, are waiting in Baltimore to join him here at the base as soon as quarters are available. Before he reported to the Naval Station for duty LT Hoppe was the Diving and Recovery Officer at the Piny Point Annex of the U. S. Naval Gun Factory in Piny Point, Md. For San Francisco CAPT M. A. Moon turned over the command of the U. S. .Navy Dental Clinic to the interim commanding officer, CDR F. K. Etter, present executive officer, in the ceremonies held at the clinic onWednesday, 23 June. Commander Etter will command the clinic until the arrival of CAPT William D. F. Stagner on July 2. Captain Moon has been at Guantanamo Bay since 1952 when he arrived from the Naval Air Station at Corpus Christi, Tex. He was commissioned LTJG in the Dental Corps in May 1927 and went on active duty in September 1941. In August of 1945 he transferred to the regular Navy. Captain Moon married Doris G. Bacon in Salem, Ore., his home Enlisted men looking for a night's relaxation should have no trouble finding their ,club as the entrance to the E.M. Club here has the only neon sign on the base. EM, Petty Officers' Clubs Provide Cool Drinks For Hot Sailors by Jerry Lewis A welcome sight indeed after a hard day in the hot sun is the familiar "One-Eyed' Indian on the label of a bottle of cold Hatuey, or the purchase of any mixed drink you desire. It's all yours at a nominal fee at the Enlisted Men's Club, Naval Station-another facility of 4th Division Special Services. CAPT Max A. Moon town, in December 1935. The captain, his wife and their son, John, departed on the FLAW plane Wednesday night. In Jacksonville, Fla. they will commence an auto tour across the country to the captain's new duty station at the Naval Shipyard in San Francisco, Calif. Enroute, they will visit friends and relatives in Ohio, Idaho, Oregon and California. Captain Moon was chairman of the 1953 and 1954 Guantanamo Bay Carnival Committee and was a member of the advisory group of the Officers' Club. Hunting and fishing are his main hobbies. Before he left, Captain Moon said, "GTMO is truly unique, so live and enjoy every day of your cruise to the fullest because you suddently realize it is later than you think." :Y" f "i:'/ i~iA (4Y.: SU "}:Uivy A .r. ;.;,fit!; UI tdtt Cub Scouts Enjoy Air Station Tour by Millie Jamieson The Guantanamo Bay Cub Scouts made a tour of Leeward Point Auxiliary Air Station on Wednesday, June 16. The Scouts left the NAS Sea Plane Ramp by ferry boat and each boy sensed the thrill of all sea-faring men by being perimtted to take his turn at the helm. On arrival they were escorted to the 8,000 foot runway where the F2H2 Banshee Jets take off and land. The miracles of Jet flying were explained and the boys particularly enjoyed watching the target banner being towed and later dropped by the jet tow planes. Before partaking of lunch at Recreation Beach a ride was taken to the highest point on Leeward where one can see clearly for many miles. This was followed by several relay matches and a hike to the beach upon which the Scouts tried to "net" fish with a discarded target banner. The group returned to the flight area in time to see the wonders of a radio controlled Drone (NOLO) preparing. to take off and learn some of its principles. The amazing idea to all Scouts was no pilot was necessary for the Drone. Also, they visited the hangar hwere a Banshee Jet was examined closely and their questions were answered. Upon returning to NAS the Scouts were taken to McCalla Field and they were escorted aboard a blimp. All the various instruments needed to keep the blimp aloft were explained and some were tried by the boys. Accompanying the Cub Scouts on their tour were CHGUN J. D. Sent, Centrally located in the heart of the Naval Station recreation area, blinking it's neon sign in the night, which incidentaly is the only neon sign aboard the entire naval base, is the EM Club. Open from 1700 to 2130 on weekdays and 1300 to 2130 on weekends and holidays, the EM Club and its' branch, the Petty Officer's Club, stand as one of the most modern and one of the largest of any club of its' kind aboard any naval establishment. The club has facilities for 1200 men! Built in 1946, the clubs' cost is estimated at appraximately $70,000 with another $44,000 for utilities, fixtures and other necessities. Included is the cost of the outdoor patio where visiting fleet orchestras often entertain while in port. While on the subject of estimates, here is a figure to think about -the average expense annually for beverages for the club is $644,688.56! A lot of quenching for many thirsty sailors! The operating staff is comprised of 36 Cuban civilians in the EM section, eight others in the PO Club an'd still more operating the Canteen at Windmill Beach and the Snack Shack at the enlisted men's swimming pool. The Shack is about to undergo a large reconstruction period and will eventually be enlarged into a soda fountain and snack bar. Special Services welcomes all shore and fleet personnel to this extensive facility provided for the enlisted man's recreation and relaxation aboard Guantanamo Bay Naval Base. Mrs. F. Baker, Mrs. W. J. Laden, Mrs. W. E. Yarbrough, and yours truly. We are hoping that more paernts join us because the boys are looking forward to another tou in the near future. rt :-X ":; Saturday, 26 SUn 1954 THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 26 June 1954 -oeFu TEIDA -. '---I-Clibs Leathernecks Lack One Win For Cinch on NavBase Pennant by Pierce Lehmbeck The Marine Leathernecks need but one more win to clinch the Naval Base League title after winning three during this past week of play. With wins over the Flyers of NAS, the Mallards of VU-10 and the Indians of the Naval Station the Marines, who have led league play from the very first game, are undoubtedly the team to take the pennant as the only way that they can possibly be beat out now is for them 'to lose all the rest of their games and even then the second-seated Mallards must win all the rest of theirs. All other teams are statistically out. LEATHERNECKS BEES The league-leading Marines, after an 8-6 thirteen inning victory over the Naval Station Indians Friday night, came back Saturday afternoon to easily defeat the NAS flyers, 14-3. The Leathernecks started with newcomer Holmes and N A S promptly loaded the sacks. To counter this uprising manager Smith gave shortstop Joe Androvich the nod and the little mainstay exhibited a new talent as he came to the hill and set the next three batters down in order. He finished the game by limiting the Flyers to three runs on eight safeties. 1NAS suprised everyone by throwing manager Al Rothenberg and "Big Al" held the rampagers clown for the first four innings until they finally got to his slow tantalizing tosses and chased him off the mound with six runs in the fifth and sixth innings. He gave way to Woren who finished the tilt giving up three runs in the last two frames. Androvich was credited with the win and Rothenberg was charged with the loss. Marines 14 3 3 NAS 3 9 4 Sunday afternoon Jim Dotson paced the MCB-8 'Bees to an 11 to 8 win over the Naval Station Indians as, he drove in four runs and hit two round-trippers, both well over 350 feet, and became the fifth man in the Naval Base league to accomplished this feat. This stint placed him in a two-way tie for honors in the round-triper department with the Leatherneck's Tom Felak. Each have seven. The Braves, behind the throwing arm of hurler Bill Royal, led the way for the first five innings until the 'Bee power finally broke through and ran him off the hill. Wolgamuth and Mandis followed in succession but they were also unable to stem the tide and MCB-8 went on to take the win. Bigbie was credited with the win while Royal. was charged with the loss. MCB-8 11 15 2 NavSta 8 11 3 MARINES EDGE MALLADS The Marines Leathernecks showed once and for all Monday night why they are undoubtedly the team to win the 1954 pennant race when they staged a last-ditch stand to defeat the VU-10 Mallards 9-7 in what could be called the most exciting game of the year. Trailing by a 7-4 margin the league leaders came to the plate in the bottom half of the ninth and started a drive that sent them over the top. Adams began the rally by doubling to center field. Romano followed a little later with a triple and Mason walked setting the stage for the down-to-the-wire finish. With one down and runners at first and third Gatti took two strikes and belted the ball over the left field fence--his fifth hit of the season and his third homerun. Once before Gatti beat the Mallards with a fourbagger--a 1 to 0 shutout. This win left the Leathernecks with but one more game to win in order to be in, the clear for the league title. Santos was credited with the win after relieving Smith in the ninth while Presutti was charged with the loss after taking the reins from Hubber in the sixth. VU-10 7 12 2 Marines 9 9 3 Mallards Over 'Bees Tuesday night the second-seated VU-10 Mallards, cruising behind the six hit hurling of Jan Edgar, defeated the MCB-8 'Bees 10-2 and dropped them a full game and a half into third place. The Mallards chased in six runs in the top. of the second and were never headed as they came back with three in the fifth and one in the seventh. MCB-8 notched their two runs by scoring one in the top of the third and one in the seventh. Edgar was credited with the win as he went the distance while Shackelton went the full nine frames to take the loss. VU-10 10 9 3 MCB-8 2 6 5 'Bees Lose To Flyers Wednesday night, the faltering 'Bees dropped their second in succession as they lost to the NAS Flyers 14-7. With this win, the Flyers once again climbed out of the cellar with the Indians of the Naval Station falling a half a game in. The "fly-boys" pounded out a total of 11 hits while the, 'Bees miscued four times to score three in the top of the first, six in the sixth, one in the seventh and four in the eighth. MCB-8 scored two in the second, one in the third, three in the fifth and one in the seventh. The game was highlighted by the efforts of Flyer third sacker Collins who homered and hit two singles in four trips, accounting for four RBI's. Woren was credited with the win and Hoffman, making his first appearance in the Naval Base League, was charged with the loss. NAS 14 11 7 MCB-8 7 7 4 Marines Whail Braves Thursday night, the leagueleaders closed out the week of night play by handing the Naval Station Indians the worse loss that they have ever suffered, 22-3. After scoring four in the bottom of the third, the Leathernecks Bob Gatti of the Marines is greeted by a lot of glad hands as he steps over the plate after belting in the winning run with a homer against the VU-10 Mallards. .The league-leading Marines were behing, 7-4 in the 9th, came up to put five runs across. Gatti's homer was his third of the season. Tom Felak, Marine catcher, comes in after pounding out a roundtripper in Saturday's game with NAS. Felak chalked up .his sixth four-bagger this season. scored at will as the bats of Pace, Gatti, Mason, Wood and Androvich ex p 1 oded for round-trippers. Mason's was his seventh and placed him in a three-way tie for top honors in that department with Dotson of the 'Bees and Felak, also of the Leathernecks. All together the Marines totaled twentytwo safeties as they chased four Indian hurlers, Buss, Royal, Fiddler and Wood around the park. The Braves scored all three of their runs in the top of the ninth when Matthieu hit his second homer of the year with two on. Santos was the winning pitcher as he notched his eleventh win against one setback and Buss was charged with the loss. Marines 22 22 3 NavSta 3 7 7 Next Week's Schedule Saturday, 26 June MCB-8 vs Marine Barracks Sunday, 27 June NAS vs Naval Station Monday, 28 June MCB-8 vs VU-10 Tuesday, 29 June MCB-8 vs NAS Wednesday, 30 June Naval Station vs VU-10 Thursday, 1 July Marine Barracks vs MCB-8 Friday, 2 July Open Page Four THE INDIAN Gj

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Saturday, 26 June 1954 THE INDIAN Page i~ive (As of Dotson Young Felak Ferris Morgan Androvich Five Batters Wednesday, 23 June) AB H PCT Marines 80 33 .413 Marines 78 31 .398 NavSta 89 34 .382 Marines 93 32 .344 RBI Wednesday, MCB-8 NavSta Marines VU-10 NavSta Marines 23 June) 23 21 19 18 17 17 Pitching Records (As of Thursday, 24 w Smith Marines 8 Santos Marines 11 Bigbie MCB-8 7 Harrison NAS 4 Huber VU-10 4 Edgar VU-10 3 Homerun (As of Dotson Mason Felak Androvich Pace Gatti Mayer Romano Thursda MCB-8 Marines Marines Marines Marines Marines MCB-8 Marines June) L PCT 0 1.000 1 .916 3 .700 1 .800 1 .800 1 .750 Leaders y, 24 June) 7 7 7 6 4 4 3 3 League Baries Mandis Mattheiu Snyder Ferris Adams Dieden NavSta NavSta NavSta NAS VU-10 Marines VU-10 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 Seven ladies of the Ladies' Golf Club display their trophies and prizes that were presented to them at the recent luncheon held at the Family Restaurant. Left to Right: Miriam Hoy, Fran Dykeman, Corky Henning (receiving the trophy for Eloise Gushanas who was not able to be present at the luncheon), Jane McElroy, Marion Caruthers, Toni Winslow, and Marge Sheehan. (As of Thursday, w Marines 21 VU-10 12 MCB-8 9 NAS 6 NavSta 6 Standings Pete Agdamag, Hawks pitcher, shows his technique of holding runners on base and still "put them across the plate." 24 June) L GB 1 10 9 11 11 15 14 17 15/2 NavBase All Stars Play Cuban Stars On Sunday, 4 July, tradition will once again stand predominate when a team of Naval Base All Stars will meet a team of Cuban All Stars in the yearly Independence Day thriller. This annual contest which began three years ago has developed into one of the most exciting exhibitions to be witnessed each year by sports fans here on the Naval Base. These classics were be!'un in 1952 when the NavBase met and were defeated by a team from Fortuna. The following year the All-Stars avenged the loss. However, the the team which the All-Stars will meet this year will be a combination of Cuban All-Stars from Guantanamo City and should prove to be much stronger. The NavBase All-Stars are chosen by a player -ballot in which each player turns in a ballot with a first and second choice for each infield position, five outfielders and four pitchers. The Manager of each team takes these ballots and works them down to a single ballot for the team as a whole. These are in turn handed in to the Base Baseball Commission where they counted and the All-Stars announced. The Baseball Commission reports that the AllStar team should be announced no later than the first part of next week. "A fellow in my home town," remarked Herb Shriner, "was born with a silver spoon in his mouth. He swallowed it-and he hasn't stirred since." If nobody knows the trouble you've seen, says singer Vaughn Monroe, you're not living in a small town. Little League Schedule Saturday, 26 June Tigers vs Hawks Sunday, 27 June Bears vs Colts Tuesday, 29 June Bears vs Tigers Thursday, 1 July Hawks vs Colts GTMO Golf Hi-Lites by Wright North Professional in Charge GTMO Bay Golf Club With the annual club championship decided again for another year, both in the ladies' and men's classes, some activities are planning their own inter-department tournaments. Fleet Training Group has already completed their highly successful tournament in a 54-hole medal play running over a period of two weeks. Their final round was completed last Sunday followed by refreshments and presentation of awards on the party grounds near the 17th fairway. I'd like to suggest to other commands that now is the best time of the year for such affairs since there is very little fleet play, and, then too, the days long enough for a foursome to play 18 holes after 3 P.M. The Naval Station Special Services Department welcomes to the GTMO Golf Club its newest members: CAPT Moe, CO Naval Hospital, and daughter Patsy Ann; J. L. Wood, R. E. Hamrick, J. C. Logsdon, H. P. Wiseman, R. W. Rabbe, R. S. Toland, W. R. Filer, C. H. Shatfield, L. P. Dinger, Mrs. William Kerrigan, R. D. Braussard, J. S. Morgan, R. R. Stanis, G. W. Willich, CDR A. L. Vogel, Mrs. C. E. Roberts, C. E. Schaub, J. B. King, Jack Engstrom, Andrew Gaglino, D. L. Newman, and D. F. Green. We know you will hit some rocks at times and 3-putt against the grain; but when all the strokes are added up, this, too, is one half of the game. I'd like to take this opportunity on behalf of all the club members to send a word of cheer to Mrs. R. D. Viafora who is convalescing. We all miss your pleasant smile and hope you will be jack soon. Colt Pitcher Wright North, Jr., prepares to toss in a few pitches before last week's game with the Hawks. A newspaper got a call from a woman who wanted her spouse's name put in the obituary column because she caught him kissing his secretary. "How long has be been dead?" "He starts tomorrow." Jack Timmes of the Colts sets himself to catch the throw home as David Herold of the Hawks slides in safe by a mile. Top (As of Felak Pace Morgan Adams Leaders Y I lII S i Saturday, 26 Jurne 1984 Page Five THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 26 June 1954 1 rpa --THEINDIA The Angle(R) by Jerry Lewis In writing of fish life, it must not be overlooked that 'life' is not only found in the sleek denizens that endlessly cruise the depths in search of food and spawning grounds, nor not only in the lazier creatures such as the Jewfish and the Octopus, but also in the motionless formations of fantastic coral and stationary animals that pretend to play the part of vegetable life. These so-called 'plants' of the sea, deceiving in their natural beauty and gracefully lolling in the passing tides, may be equally as carnivorous, and in some cases more so, than the formidable shark or barracuda! The waters of the world, covering three-quarters of the Earth's surface, comprises 140 million liquid square miles with and average depth of 1200 feet and is an arena teeming with an estimated 200,000 species of marine life. An arena filled with thundering surf, quiet beaches, coral jungels, hidden reefs graced by rippling shafts of sunlight, delicate colors, all of which defies description. The only passport necessary for your entry into the strange and beautiful kingdom of silence is a pair of flippers and a mask. The sea will welcome you. The waters of the West Indies is a veritable underwater paradise for explorers and nature lovers. The water is warm, colored with ultramarine blue and is as clear as crystal. In the depths, is an underwater fairyland of delicate sea fans, sea plumes, elkhorn coral, coral trees of fantastically grotesuqe shapes, patterns of soft rich color, all illuminated by rays of light that find their way into the deepest regions. Countless species of coral fish are as colorful as. their surroundings and many have the ability to change their color to fit their home. One of the most impressive pieces of workmanship produced by marine life is the tiny coral Polyp, a living animal only one-eight to onesixteenth of an inch in diameter. It is these creatures who are responsible for the great magnificent reefs of the oceans of the world. They produce by budding and dividing, casuing a reef to grow at the rate of four to eight feet every one hundred years. Other species of Polyp grow into the so-called 'plants' of the sea, the fans, plumes, elkhorn coral and countless other varieties. The next time you visit this strange world, and providing your air supply in sufficient, stop and think about that beautiful sea fan swaying in the tide. You're looking at something that took a century to create. It is alive with millions of tiny animals. Thus the reason for the loss of color when the fan is cut and brought into the air. It is not recommended that you grasp elkhorn antler coral. Its' white-tipped points wil sting and will be an everlasting reminder that the reason the silent world is so beautiful and why its' life abounds in such great abundance is because it has been out of the destructive reach of man since the beginning of time. That is how it will remain -a challenge and a mystery that can only be solved by science. What D' Ya' Say? The INDIAN will award a certificate good for $1.00 worth of merchandise at the Navy Exchange for each question accepted and used. Submit your questions to Editor, The Indian, Box 19.) The question: What player in the Naval Base League would get your all-star vote. The place: Marine Site Ball Park, NavStaMCB-8 game. N,. N.AJim Fisher, BU2, MCB-8 "Tom Felak; I think he's the best all-'round player in the league." W. G. Hunt, BMC, NavSta "Well, I'd say Dotson. He looks like major league material to me." rrrvr lr rr ~r, r .r ."::::::.v ::::: {: ti.}:":: }:"}:"::::":::"}:": }:::":::"::{"i :"::":":":":C".' "i :"i}:":::"}: i i:":4iii:"i:ti"i:"::"}:titi"i ::"::"::"::". :::::::. .v::::. r ...r .:"::.". ". :::: :":.::":.: ""i :ti"}:"}:"::"i:":':ti":"i :": i :"i :"i :":":"i ::"i i :"i ::"i ::"::": i i :'i :"i :"i :ti"i :":": ti'::ti :"}:'i : i :":"::"i :"i :"i :"::":::: ::::%: }}i :" 1. rl.ti. r: r::::: :"" ::.:. ,"l/r Jr Jr rr"" ". : Jr: r::::::::: r.:" .:. r ..:.':::. ":::::::.'.:::":.r: Y:::: :::: r/r r r.rr::::: ":'::: ".; .".rrr. .tiff': '"K" !r} ""r: l'" .rr. r:r 'K. ,xv rlrv. '"'v. 'tifii. '. ::{"::. r"h .,rt V. ::. .::. tiff '. .. N :5""" ': :'. i : is .r. t V V .. t. .r. '"r i :. : is :"::" X i is ". :!" :"i';: .r' 1. 1 /::. II R. F. Jackson, BU3, MCB-8 "Don Stoeckel of MCB-8 for his determination. He lives baseball. He's a good hitter in the pinches a fine infielder." William Moore, SW3, MCB-8 "Dotson plays a lot of ball; he's a good infielder, hitter, you name it!" Ladies' Golf Shots by Miriam by This week the ladies received golf balls for winning low gross and low net on the front nine. The winners were: First Flight Gross-Corky Henning Net-two-way tie Alma McCracken Edna Edwards Second Flight Gross-Sue Scott Net-Marine Aslin Third Flight Gross-Val Evans Net-Anita Roberts This week we have quite a few newcomers joining the Third Flight players. A hearty welcome is extended to the following: Joye Graves, Terry Mose 1 e y, B. J. Sutherling, Billie Nelson, and Evelyn Leach. Lots of luck to you new members, and may you all have many good games. Don't forget the Scotch Foursome tomorrow. Pick a partner and the Committee will comprise the foursomesEdwin Rooff, BM1, NAS MAA Force "Sutherland of NAS would get mine for his fielding a hitting." Thomas E. Hawkins, QMC, NAS "Krall of NAS for me. He's a good fielder and slugger." nI Page Six THE INDIAN

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Satuday 2~3Juie 194 'CRE NDIN Pae Svei Yippee Keeps NavBase Supplied When the familiar word, "The 'YIPPEE's in," gets passed around among the grocery shoppers of the base, the Commissary Store is in for a busy day. For the store will be stocked with milk, lettuce, tomatoes and other vegetables fresh from the States. That everyone knows. But surprisingly few people know much more about the YFR-1152, as the "YIPPEE" is known in her informal moments. The "YIPPEE" is one of the very few wooden ships in full commission in the U. S. Navy. Originally designed as a Tuna boat, she was built for the Navy in 1945 by the Seattle Drydocking and Shipyard Co., with very few changes, and commissioned as the YP-629. The end of World War II found the "YIPPEE" in the Philippines. Since late 1946 she has been assigned to Guantanamo Bay, and used primarily to transport fresh provisions in from Florida. About five times each quarter the YIPPEE makes the trip to Miami, loads provisions ordered by Naval Supply Depot and the Commissary Store, and general merchandise ordered by the Navy Exchange. This voyage is about 600 miles each way and therefore in the course of a year, the "YIPPEE" steams a distance equal to a cruise around the world at the equator. Each trip, the "YIPPEE" can carry nearly ten thousand cubic feet of frozen and chill cargo in eleven refrigerated holds, plus miscellaneous cargo and three automobiles topside. Her average cruising speed is 10 knots, and if she were hard pressed, she could steam ten thousand miles without refueling. She is 128 feet long and has a 29 foot beam. The commanding officer it LT John G. Carpenter, USN and the executive officer is Chief Machinist H. P. Auerbach, USN. Three Chief Petty Officers and twenty one men round out the crew of twenty six. The vessel is under the operational control of the Commanding Officer, Naval Station, and the Commanding Officer, Naval Supply Depot coordinates space requirements among the base activities that use her hold spaces for shipment. Everyone will agree that the "YIPPEE" provides invaluable services to the base. Long may she sail! Little Johnny had been very naughty. Later after he had been reprimanded his father asked, "Now, son, tell me why I punished you." Johnny threw up his hands and exclaimed. "That does it! First you pound the devil out of me and now you don't why you did it." Grease Paint Gossip by Joyce Simmons One of the highlights of "Out of the Frying Pan" is Gordon Thomson's "mad scene," in the role of George Bodell, a very happy-go-lucky young man with an unexcelled sense of humor. Gordon, who hails from New York and majored in English at C.C.N.Y. does a bit of fine acting in this particular scene, where he pretends to be crazy when he arrives at the famous "joint" apartment to change his clothes, only to discover that the father of one of the feminine roommates is there on inspection. This, of course, creates quite a situation, which Mr. Thomson squirms out of by his fast thinking and highly stimulating acting. Don Nash, who is the third young man to share this mixed-up, theatrical-minded apartment, plays the part of Tony Dennison, a shy but handsome youth whose own ambition to be a great actor is not as strong as the girl who loves him wishes for him. This is Don's first appearance on the stage. and he is doing remarkably well. He majored in English and Economics at St. Mary's College, and is now interested in pursuing a career as radio announcer, after he leaves the navy. To Jim Boyette, the theatre is a hobby-just as is swimming, coming from Pass-a-Grill Beach, Fla. (near St. Petersburg) Jim majored in chemistry at St. Petersburg's Jr. College and hopes eventually to become an electrical enacting the part of Mr. Kenny, engineer. In the meantime, Jim is the famous producer around whom the entire cast of "Out of the Frying Pan" circulates. Mr. Kenny, although known throughout the theatrical world for his success as a producer is far more interested in his personal hobby as a culinery expert when at home-which only adds to the over-all comedy of this "laugh-a-rginute" play. FTG Bulletin A very successful FTG Golf Tournament came to a close last Sunday under the hot sun on the GTMO Course with six of the nine honors being shared by three Training Group families. LCDR Skadowski took the top honors in the Low Net division with the low tournament score of 208. He carried a 19 stroke handicap. While his dad was busy salting away the top spot, "K" "J" Skadowski took the second spot in the Junior division by shooting 235 Net. The Scott family carried away two honors following Sunday's play. LCDR Scott shot a 238 for the Low Gross of the tournament and Mrs. Scott won the ladies division with a net score of 217. LCDR McElroy and his wife nailed down two second positions. LCDR McElroy took the second spot in the Low Gross event by shooting a 239, just one stroke under first place honors. Mrs. McElroy placed second in the ladies division shooting a 222, for the 54 hole tourney. Chief Monte, LT Hall and Ronnie Mosley were the three people to break into the family monopoly. Monte shot a 216 for second honors in the Low Net event and Ronnie Mosley took the first spot in the Junior flight with a net score of 266. LT Hall shot the low net 18 holes in the tournament. Playing with a 37 handicap he turned in a 94, good for a winning 67, one stroke better than LCDR, Skadowski, LCDR Simmons and Chief Monte who all carded an 18 hole score of 68. Trophies will be presented to the winners at the Fleet Training Group picnic sometime in July. Several new officers reported aboard recently. We wish to welcome aboard LT Page and LT Cockrane of the Air Department, LT Robinson and LT Williams of the Gunnery Department and LT Christie with the Engineering Department. Chief Monte's niece, Miss Juanita Theriot, arrived Sunday from Beaumont, Texas for a ten day visit with the Chief and his Wife. We hope your visit to Guantanamo will be a pleasent one to remember. It seems that as of late the FTG Ladder has gone to pot and it is now in the stage of revision. Being that all the Golfers or would-be golfers in the command are not of what you might call Competitive Calibre, or Par-Shooters, the ladder will be revised so that all hands will have a chance at the top rung. It is intended to have one large Cup for the top position and each man that reaches the top of the ladder will have his name inscribed on the cup. He also will be awarded a small trophy for the first time he takes over the top rung of the ladder. All suggestions that you may have which would promote more interest in this program will be greatly appreciated. If you have some ideas contact CDR King or LCDR Skadowski. There is also a Hole-in-One Trophy which hasn't been won as yet and is for the taking by the person that shoots the Golfer's Dream in a Competitive Match. Three members of the Training Group departed Gtmo Wednesday for new assignments. John Francis, FP1, will report to the USS Gen. H.W. Butner (TP-113) for duty and Leslie Ohl, FP1, will report to the USS Shadwell, (LSD-15) for NAS Crosswinds by Paul Snyder Who's Who at N.A.S. Andrew A. Konkoly, AL2. Radio Shack "Andy" Konkoly of the Radio Shack hails from Cleveland, Ohio where he graduated from Benedictine High School after participating in varsity baseball and basketball. "Andy" entered the Navy January 9, 1951 and attended AT/L School August 15, 1951. He was enrolled at Fenn College in Cleveland for one year before entering the service. Here at Gtmo, "Andy" catches for the Flyers baseball squad after spending his working hours repairing radio and electronic equipment. Konkoly intends to further his education by enrolling at Ohio State University where he plans to get a degree in Aeronautical Engineering when he completes his present tour. The NAS sponsored All Base Tennis Tournament will be ulimaxed sometime this week-end with the finals of "A" Division. LT Whitman, victor 6-2, 6-2 over Chief Sims earlier this week draws a bye until the finals. E. M. Nichols, 6-3, 6-3 victor over John Page wil meet either Chief Penoso or Sid Rand in the semifinals of the lower bracket. Bob Bear blasted past Rich Cipriani 6-4, 6-2 in the finals of "B" Division to win the trophy in that competition. In the semi-finals, Bear defeated Fred Shimonek of Leeward Point, 6-4, 6-0. Special Services' Announcements Last week a new Spanish class was inaugurated with a very satisfying turnout. The class, under the instruction of Professor Jones, is primarily intended for beginners, but more advanced students are invited to refresh their knowledge. Personnel from N.A.S. and VU-10 including their dependents are eligible to participate. The weekly class commences at 1900 on Thursdays in the Training Room at the Administration Building. A Leathercraft Class will be started in the near future under the guidance of LCDR F. N. Vanderhoef with assistance from J. B. Gosnell BMC. These classes are tentatively scheduled for McCalla and Leeward Point Hobby Shops. Fundamentals in working leather, tooling, lacing, and the actual construction of useful leather products will be the aims of this group. Further details will be announced after the required materials arrive. Departures Leaving NAS this week are Roy Coleman PR1 to NAS Memphis, Tennessee; Ralph L. Paterson HN to the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina; and Forrest M. Sandage, BMC, to NAS Key West, Florida. Good luck at your new duty stations, men. duty. Chief Shepherd will report to NavSchools in Washington, D.C., for Instructor duty at the "FT" Class "B" school there. USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS Ship Departures Deuel APA-160 Gatling DD-671 Bauer DM-26 Cambria APA-36 Dortch DD-670 Ship Arrivals Olmstead APA-188 Trathen DD-538 Gainard DD-706 Compton DD-705 29 June 29 June 1 July 2 July 2 July 28 June 28 June 29 June 2 July Satur day, 286Jtile 1954 Page Seveii TH JINDIAN

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Nav-i N D POGttPW~6O4 TI~ IDIA Saurdy,.6 Jne 95 MOVIES Saturday, 26 June BEACHEAD Frank Lovejoy Tony Curtis Before the Bouganville assault, four men are sent ashore to find if radioed information that the Japanese have laid mines is true. They find the French family that sent the message captives of the Japanese. Sunday, 27 June PLAYGIRL Shelley Winters Barry Sullivan Small-town girl comes to city to live with friend who is night club singer. Girl becomes involved in the murder of the singer's friend. Monday, 28 June TENNESSEE CHAMP Deway Martin Keenan Wynn Young fighter who trusts manager implicity finds that the manager has fixed one of his fights. Struggles between honesty and desire to do what manager wants. Tuesday, 29 June DRIVE A CROOKED ROAD Mickey Rooney Dianne Foster Young and ambitious mechanic is duped into driving a get-away car by a gang-leader's girl friend. He finds that he was tricked, protests. Killer is sent after him. Wednesday, 30 June SASKATCHEWAN Alan Ladd Shelley Winters Canadian Mountie rescues girl from Indian attack then brings her back to his post. An American Marshal is there, waiting to take her back to the States on criminal charges. Thursday, 1 July MIAMI STORY Barry Sullivan Luther Adler Aroused citizens enlist services of former top ganster to help them clean up the community when two muscle men are shot down at an airport by the local crime syndicate men. "He's the kind of a man who hits the nail squarely on the thumb. The little girl pictured here is lovely Rita Moreno. She recently completed work on her latest flicker, "Garden of Evil." She does her gardening with Spencer Tracy. Enamel Etchings Last Wednesday Captain Moon read his orders to the assembled personnel of the Dental Clinic and departed that night with Mrs. Moon and son, John. Their destination is San Francisco. Good Luck to them all and they will be missed by all hands. Two days before CaDtain Moon was detached the Dental Gang had an improntu -meeting and suprised him with a caricature of the Captain as we jokingly see him. Mr. Dote, our finance officer, has gone to the States on leave to assist his family on their trip to Gtmo we'll be glad to have them on board. Dr. Haymes is coming along fairly well following his bout with Dr. Timmes. We're keeping your office dusted, Ben. Olsen is happy with the ring in the nose again -his wife, Marvelene, flew in commercial a few days ago. Old soldiers may never die but overworked dentists surely do. The following epitaph was noted on a gravestone: Here lies Dentist Smith, filling his last cavity. 0OK*NO 0K by Francis L. Cannon, JOSN FOR YOUR INFORMATION General Dean's Story As told to William L. Worden, by Major General William F. Dean. This book was written entirely from memory-that was all General Dean had when he was released by the North Korean Communists. But his memory is accurate-and vivid. He wandered in the hills of South Korea for 35 days with a .45 and 12 rounds of ammunition, scavanging for food and dodging capture at every turn. When he was finally captured he spent three years putting up a valiant fight against the "brain washing" of the Reds. My Partner, Ben Hogan by Jimmy Demaret Demaret, one of Hogan's best friends in golf for more than 20 years, tells the story of the life of a great golfer on and off the tournament circuit. The Reason Why by Cecil Woodham-Smith The charge of the Li9'ht Brigade -one of the worst blunders in military history. Mrs. WoodhamSmith tells why and how 500 men were sacrificed in an impossible charge. She tells of the personalities of the two men who effected the charge-Lord Lucas and Lord Cardigan, both ruthless, both hated enemies; yet Lord Lucas ordered the charge and Lord Cardigan led it. FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT The Dollmaker by Harriete Arnow The story of a woman, uprooted from her familiar surroundings in the hills of Kentucky and thrust into the confusion of wartime Detroit, where her husband took a job. She feels completely out of place there and is in misery and terror. Her one consolation is an unfinished figure in cherry-wood which she constantly whittles. It symbolizes something to her, gives her strength against what she feels to be the false values of city life. The Song Of Ruth by Frank G. Slaughter Taken from the Old Testament Book of Ruth, this paints a brilliant and colorful picture of life in Biblical times. The book was written simultaneously with the screenplay. The Faulkner Reader Sixteen works and excerpts from William Faulkner, giving a representative selection. "The Sound and the Fury" is included complete. There are nine short stories and excerpts from other novels. His Nobel Prize Address is also included. IN PASSING The library now has 15 books in the Arco series for Civil service jobs. A few are, Steno-tynist; Auto Machinist and Meclh'nic; Storekeeper; Bookkeeper. There are also a number of books on how to play several different sports, basketball, baseball, etc.; all are illustrated. And in the way of juvenile books the library now hai books for the age group 8-14. New Saturday hours are in effect; the library will be closed on Saturday morning, open from 1300-1630; 1730-2130. The library in the Naval Base school will be open during the summer from 0800 to 1630, Monday through Friday. I __ __ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Navy-i0N DPPO-Gtmal. =043 Saturday, 26 June 1954 THEl INDIAN