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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English

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Govecs QTMO Like The Sanshinre"


Vol. VI, No. 42


U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba


Saturday, 24 April 1954


New RPIO


2 Years o

Firmly situated to the fleet landing boa square stone building that reads, 'Register tions Issuance Office'.
One might view it v aboard and wonder w ficant about the careful ed and solidly reinforce record books will hav main RPJO building o 10th naval district v proximate worth of $ facts will go on to say was appropriated for i tion by various Mobile Battalions and local la stands eleven-feet abo


LT V. M. Ornelas, d spark-plug of the building.

sports 8-inch reinforc bulkheads, is sound pro ricane, bomb and flood air-conditioned through details will point out terror of the building c third office space and


Building Culminates


f Design & Planning

the right of vault space and that it serves the tshed is a forces both ashore and afloat with with a sign all classified communications pubed Publica- lications.
But these are just statistics. hile coming Where did it come from and how iat is signi- did it get there? That's a different ly construct- story and quite a human one. d walls. The LT V. M. Ornelus, Officer-Ine ft asnth Charge of the registered publicaithe entne tions issuing office and a veteran ,th an ap- in this highly specialized field, $60,000. The dreamed of such a 'model' building that $45,000 over two years ago. The building ts construc- is a dream product, taken bit by construction bit from all other RPIO buildings thor, that it of it's kind. There is one found in ye sea-level, each of the naval districts all over
the world.
The finished product is the cul- mination of many years of experience with classified publications and the service of which is of the
utmost importance to the navy.
Much of the material LT Ornelus
and his staff handle is classified and because of strict governing regulations cannot be discussed here but little need be said of the
great importance of such work.
After two years of planning,
designing and off-and-on construction, the building has finally been
completed.
A visualization, pursued and
completed but not without that ironic twist that has a way of
sneaking into the last act.
Late next month, LT Ornelus
and his family will be on the way to San Diego, California for further assignment. When the lieutenesigner and ant leaves however, he will leave new RPIO aboard the naval base at Guantanamo Bay, one of the finest RPIO buildings found anywhere in the world, something that will reed concrete main as a credit to his initiative of, fire, hur- and ingenuity. Truly deserving of proof and is a well-done is the man who built out. Further from a dream something that will that the in- serve the navy and the country ontains one- well for many years to come. two-thirds


....... ....


The recently completed Registered Publication Issuing Office, located across from the Fleet Landing, serves forces both ashore and afloat with all classified communications. The new building is sound, fire, bomb, and flood proof to provide absolute security. This new building culminates many years of study of RPIO functions and it results in a "dream" building.


Armed Forces Offered Navy Lengthens Gift Shopping Service EM Early Outs


The Armed Services Hospitality Service has once again offered its services to military personnel stationed overseas. This extended service, at no extra cost is offered so that men may purchase gifts for Mother's Day, May 9.
To take advantage of this shopping service, personnel should mail their request to the Hospitality Committee stating the type and approximate cost of the desired gift along with a money order and the address to which the gift is to be sent. The committee will purchase the gift, send it to the addressee, and refund any money over and above the cost of the gift.
For faster service, the Hospitality Committee has two main offices for serving both east and west of the Mississippi River. Personnel desiring to send gifts to persons living east of the Mississippi should address their requests to the Armed Services Hospitality Committee, 1350 Pennsylvania Ave, Washington 4, D. C. For addressees living west of the Mississippi, requests should be sent to the American Women's Voluntary Services, 3rd and El Camino Streets, San Mateo, Calif.


To Jan. 20, '55


Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has extended its program of early separations for enlisted personnel to include all who normally would have been separated by Jan. 20, 1955.
Personnel affected by this announcement will be released two months early. According to the extension to BuPers Notice 1910, this action is mandatory and will not require any special requests on the part of the individual EM.
This announcement applies to personnel of the regular Navy, the Naval Reserve and the Fleet Reserve who now are on active duty. Certain reservists had agreed to remain on active duty for 24 months and were scheduled for release by Jan. 20, 1955. They may now accept an early release.
With the exception of the extension of the period to Jan. 20, 1955, this announcement is the same as the one which took effect Jan. 1, 1953, and would have expired Aug. 31, 1954.


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Standing before the plaque marking the spot where the Japanese surrender was signed on the quarterdeck of the UJSS Missouri are CAPT Robert T. S. Kieth, Commanding Officer, USS Missouri, ADM Sadik Altincan, Commander in Chief, Turkish Navy, RADM Seref Karapinar of the admiral's staff, and CAPT F. L. Tedder, Commanding Officer, Fleet Training Group.






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The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel.

Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615
Saturday, 24 April 1954
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT william R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sandness - Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC-------------------Editor
H. L. Sisson, JOS--------------------News
Jerry Lewis, JOS-----------Features
J. C. Dierks, J03-------------------.Sports
Pierce Lehmbeck.-------------------Sports
F. L. Cannon, JOSN -----_Photographer James DelleMonache, PI3----------Makeup
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


News-Shy Sailors

Affect Folks at Home

Why the reluctance of Naval Station military personnel to get their names in their home-town newspapers?
LTJG John McMahon, Information and Education Officer, would like to know the answer.
A dearth of news from Naval Station personnel is depriving the Fleet Home Town News Center of valuable stories, he said this week.
His efforts to obtain more news have included the periodic distribution of a public information form to be filled out by all hands. The form is intended to provide information for routine news stories, reporting that so-and-so is now serving at the Naval Station, as well as special features which may be warranted in connection with unusual achievements.
Few of the forms had been returned this week, and LTJG McMahon fears that next week will be no different in this respect, because-well, have you returned YOURS?
Why should you bother?
Here's why. Not only do stories in your home town paper make the home folks feel good, but they also contribute materially to the major objectives of Navy public relations. As listed in the handbook for Fleet Home Town News Center, these are:
To stimulate interest in Naval activities;
To procure for personnel of the Navy and Marine Corps public recognition commensurate with their accomplishments;
To build good public relations.
LTJG McMahon says his office could process a minimum of ten stories per day-if only he could get those forms from the publicityshy people who are still hanging on to them.


TEENAGE-ROUND-UP
by Barbara Burke and Linda Thurston
Outside of the three R's-the razor, the rope, and the revolver, we know of only one sure-fire method of coping with the coming play, "Girl Shy". That is, to get it over with. Right now you'll find the cast in a hub-bub over the collecting of props, costumes, and cues. Pat Wormwood can be seen chasing about looking for her dust cloth, while "Caroline" Sierra sashays around in her "o, la-la" rhumba costume. But what's this we see up center stage? It's "Cecil" Lehmbeck in full blush, practicing his stage kiss on "Peaches" Davie. And there, over in a corner, is Cavanaugh floating off with his "muse". If you'd like to see how these situations form a hilarious plot, we'd advise you to see the swarms of kats that are selling tickets Sounds paradoxical doesn't it ? (That is if there aren't any other paradoxes around.)
Last Monday after the lo-o-o-ng weekend, the Seniors piled into George MacMichaels car and took off on their annual Skip Day. The gig was held at Windmill Beach where the crew, plus Mrs. Angie DiBella (who was the marvelous chaperone), tried their skill in volley ball, swimming, drinking, eating and relaxing. Eddie Stafford proved to be quite the boy in his ability to put up the volley ball net. We heard via Norman W. Huddy that Pierce (ch e shire cat) Leahmbeck found some interesting species of seeds while on a pictorial mountain climbing expedition. The day was brought to a glorious close as those involved stopped on their homeward bound trip to spy for a moment on the P. E. class whose eager young minds were absorbed in trying to concentrate on whacking a few golf balls out of the driving range.
One of the strangest contradictions to beset contradiction fanciers recently was the situation confronting anybody who was seeking mustaches in Gtmo Bay. Certain kats should have an experience that would forever dispell the notion (cherished from boyhood no doubt) that a mustache makes one irresistible to the opposit sex. After all, a few hundred hairs on the upper lip, no matter how silky, cannot supplant a triple-A rating in Bradstreet. So ends the bitter pill to our foxy brethren.
Well, hasta luego, kiddies, keep your noses clean and don't take any wooden rhetoric.


The Lucky Bag
by Betty Radcliffe
I shall sail right into this column by telling you a few things about the Naval Station Sailboat Landing. . . . The Sailboat Landing has eight sailboats; 7 Seagulls and one Snipe, they also have 8 rowboats. These boats can be checked out between the hours of 0800 and 1500. Each boat is equipped with life jackets and other necessary gear. It is necessary to have a Skipper's Card to check out a boat. Skiiper's cards can be obtained by passing a written test of 15 questions.
Also available at the Sailboat Landing is a complete line of fishing gear. Rods and reels can be checked out and kits of hooks and sinkers, etc. can be purchased. Rods and reels checked out have to be returned by 0900 the following day. Fresh bait is also available and can be purchased between the hours of 0800 and 1700.
Recently LT Sandness received


An Editorial....


One Minute-A-Day__


GITMO is UNIQUE, "KILL THEM WITH KINDNESS,"
"SLAY THEM WITH SERVICE" and "SERVICIO A LA FLOTA" are three well known slogans of organizations based at Guantanamo. They each have a god story, which is one of presenting a concise picture of their organizations.
If we would all stop one minute of every day and quote the Golden Rule and then say over and over "I am going to practice it today", what a wonderful place Gtmo would be. More would happen on this base in a short period of time than has ever happened before. It might be called a revolution or in this day of "isms" the practice could be better tabbed Golden Ruleism. When the hammer hits the finger, a wheel just doesn't seem to fit the toy, or an incident upsets our child, how many of us tell our children to count 10 before taking some action. It is a good rule, but better, practice Golden Ruleism and instruct them to say the Golden Rule ten times. Explain the meaning of the famous saying and as that child or any man or woman stands in front of you for judgement, issue the medicine that is deserving but way back in the rear of the old noggin keep this in mind, "deal wisely with others by imitating those who have dealt wisely with you."






SooK- NOOK'
by Jerry Lewis
Why do men climb mountains?
"Because it is there," said a great mountaineer.
Now the greatest mountain of them all has been conquered: Read the only authorized story of THE CONQUEST OF EVEREST by Sir John Hunt, leader of the British Everest Expedition of 1953. It is a complete story of the undertaking with 8 pages of full color photographs and 48 pages in black and white maps, sketches and drawings. Read the story of this century's greatest conflict between man and Nature!
Humor by E. B. White in the form of the SECOND TREE FROM THE CORNER, containing stories, poems, sketches, parodies, essays and comments, covering the past, the present, the future, the city and the country. It's a must!
THE MAN WHO WOULDN'T T A L K by Quentin Reynolds. George DuPre's story was too good to be true. It grew each time it was repeated. By the time DuPre told it to Quentin Reynolds, it was a whopper! It's an example of one of the most ingenious literary hoaxes perpetrated in many a day!
Theatre lovers! The Burns Mantle Yearbook, THE BEST PLAYS OF 1952-1953 edited by Louis Kronenberger and beautifully illustrated by Hirschfeld, is ready to be checked out.
Utilize your spare time by exploring new worlds by reading!

a letter from Mrs. Anna M. Ackelbein. Mom Ackelbein, as she was known to her many friends, lived at CB 27B before returning to her home in Cambridge, Ohio. Mrs. Ackelbein would like to be remembered to her friends and wishes they would write to her at P. 0. Box 129 Cambridge, Ohio.


Sunday, 25 April 1954

Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930 - 2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic)
LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)


It

The Chaplain's Corner

It's all very well for preachers and philosophers to tell us that something has gone wrong with humanity, that a monkey-wrench has been dropped into the works somewhere along the line, but it never seems to mean much to any one of us individually. That is, we can read about famines in China and earthquakes in South America with a benign sort of detachment, because we aren't affected personally. We go on eating, sleeping, working, and collecting our paycheck as usual.
Then one day we get a cold in the head. Our nose runs and our eyes water. We start fussing with aspirin and hot lemonade and quinine, but always with a feeling of futility, our cold will just have to run its course. We have a feeling or resentment, too. This cold in the head is a direct attack on our personal liberty.
And that is the precise spot in which we begin to realize that God's in His heaven, to be sure, but all's not right with the world. As long as men keep on having colds, as long as dogs go on biting people, as long as one person can still say, "I'm ashamed of myself," as long as we have wars and epidemics and toothaches, then we'll have to admit that things aren't running smoothly, although, as we look over the setup in the universe, we can't see any earthly reason why they shouldn't be running smoothly.
We Christians and Jews know the answer to that. God did plan a perfect world and actually had it running that way for awhile. Every creature on earth took orders from man; even plant life was kind to him.
We had that outer harmony, but besides that, we had the promise of God's friendship. We were to walk through life with our hand in His hand; we were never to know such words as shame and remorse. Our dignity, our integrity and common sense were to be inborn.
W. J. Spinney
CHC, USN


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 24 A$ -4






Sav.a24 ArT194


*6


Page Fiv, Page Three


Junior-Senior Play 'Girl Shy'Opens


Monday Night for 2-Day Run
Comedies about college boys and their troubles with college girls are usually a dime a dozen. Not so with "Girl Shy." This terrific litttle piece of college humor with criss-crossing plots and embarrassing situations will hold the attention of the most critical of audiences.
- .
. ..::.>Y&. -: . o


Pat Wormwood, Pierce Lehmbeck, John Moon and Mrs. Dunmire, the director, go through their lines during rehearsal for the Junior-Senior play. "Girl Shy" will be presented in arena style rather than conventional stage.


Written by Katharine Kavanaugh, the noted New York authoress, the play enjoyed a successful Broadway season some years back. Revived now and brought up to date by the Junior-Senior class of the Naval Base High School it will be presented Monday and Tuesday nights for the enjoyment of all comers.
And enjoyed it will be for the first twist that takes "Girl Shy" out of the ordinary comes in the first few lines of Act One and continues throughout all three acts. Enough suspense is created to make the audience wish it could shout the answer to the actors, and yet, enough sympathy is created to make it keep quiet and let the actors find out for themselves.
There is a touch of nostalgia, too, as the turmoil and characters of "school daze" are reincarnated.
Mrs. P. H. Dunmire, First Grade


teacher, and who has been in professional theatrics, herself, is directing "Girl Shy." Mrs. Dunmire is attempting something new with this version of the play. Instead of the conventional stage with the audience in front, the comedy will be presented in the "arena." The audience will be seated on three sides of a raised platform in the school patio. The front row of seats will be literally touching the stage.
The cast of characters in "Girl Shy" includes:
Pierce Lehmbeck in the leading role as "Tom Arsdale" who is "girl shy;" Norman Huddy as "Oke Stimson", his buddy who isn't; Pat Wormwood as the opposite lead, "Barbara Stanford;" Anita Sierra, John Moon, Linda Thurston, Wallace Grafton, Barbara Davie, Glenna Wright, Barbara Burke, James Cavanaugh and James Beaman.


Barbara Burke and Pat Wormwood rehearse a scene in Act I of "Girl Shy" being presented Monday and Tuesday nights in the school patio.

I


Santiago


de Cuba VU-10 Party Honors


(This is the first of a series of articles on Santiago written by the American ViceConsul).
By Authur W. Feldman American Vice Consul
Santiago de Cuba

This picturesque and historical city of about 150,000 on a beautiful and almost landlocked bay on the southern coast of Cuba is little visited by tourists. These pleasureseekers come to Havana and there remain, little realizing that a picturesque Cuba is found in this city, 601 miles away.
The city is built on many hills sloping down to the bay. Around and about the suburbs is a mountain range which offers a perpetual symphony of shades of green and blue as the light varies. Quite often the peaks are capped by low-lying white clouds which give the impression of being snow-blanketed.
The mean temperature is tolerable being 820 F in the winter and 88' F in the summer. However, there are pleasant breezes which offer some relief to those who mind the heat. To all intents and purposes there are only the summer and winter seasons with no evident intermediate periodic c h a n g e s. Thus, the local Chamber of Comcerce could easily claim the title "The city of constant warmth and sunshine" for Santiago de Cuba.
Santiago, as it is called in short, is an important commercial port because of its location near the Windward Passage entrance to the Caribbean Sea. Here, one can find vessels either unloading cargoes from Europe, Japan and the Western Hemisphere or loading sugar, manganese ore,rum, tobacco, honey and molasses for worldwide destinations on our side of the Iron Curtain.
It is not a strain on one's imagination to visualize the ghost of Governor Diego Velazquez, who founded the city in 1514 as the capital of the Island, conferring with that of Hernan Cortes, who was its mayor in 1514, about the expedition the latter was to lead to Mexico where gold and conquests awaited him. It was from Santiago that the expedition, sponsored and outfitted by Governor Velazqeuz, set sail in 1518. It was also from here that Governor Velazquez later sent a force to subdue Cortes since it appeared that Cortes had taken the bit in his teeth and had gone off on his own without even expressing some sentiment of appreciation for his sponsor's confidence and assistence.
Plaza C6spedes, renamed after Carlos Manuel de C6spedes, one of the leaders in Cuba's fight for independence, is the center of the past and present social and commercial life of the city. This square marks off the low part of the city from the high and the streets radiating from the square are known by the suffix "alto" for high or "bajo" for low, depending upon which direction they take.
The new municipal building on the north side of the Plaza (formerly known as the Plaza de Armas) is being built on the site of the original city hall. In digging the foundation, an old cistern was found which had painted in it a cross with the date 1643. For a wild moment, there was the hope among the Santiagueros that a treasure trove had been found. Only the firm stand taken by the local museum director, the city historian and the mayor stayed the desire of the disrespectful from destroying this memento of the dim past. The cistern has now been made part of the city hall and will be available for insp on.


ODD's Wolfe and McCoy

Monday night, 26 April, beginning at 1830 at the Naval Air Station Enlisted Men's club a change of command party will be held for the officers and enlisted men of VU-10 and their dependents. Principal guests of honor at the dinner-dance will be CDR T. B. Wolfe, Commanding Officer, CDR D. E. McCoy, who has been assigned to relieve Commander Wolfe, CDR R. C. Spears, Executive Officer, LCDR W. K. Woodard, and LCDR A. D. Nelson.
Besides the dinner and dance there will be a floor show featuring VU-10 personnel with Jerry Lewis as master of ceremonies.
Commander McCoy will arrive Monday morning on the USNS Thomas, and the change of command ceremonies have been planned for 0830 the following Saturday, 1 May at the VU-10 hanger. All commanding officers and executive officers of base commands have been invited, and the Naval Base band will be on hand to add full color to the ceremony.
Commander Wolfe, who has received notice that his next assignment will be with Chief of Naval Operations, N a v y Department, Washington D. C., has commanded VU-10 since September 1952. He graduated from the Naval Academy in 1941 with a Bachelor of Science Degree and first served on board the USS Herbert, DD 160. Prior to his assignment as Commanding Officer, VU-10, Commander Wolfe was navigator on board the USS Coral Sea, and before that he was Executive Officer of VPMS 3 and Fasron 117.
Commander Wolfe will depart from Guantanamo sometime in May with his wife, Mary Kay, and their two daughters Mary and Kathrine.

CDR R. C. Spears, executive officer of VU-10, will also be relieved and reassigned in May. His next assignment will take him to Corpus Christi, Tex. for duty under the Chief of Naval Air Advanced Training.
CDR C. C. Stamn has already reported aboard to relieve Commander Spears.
With the arrival Monday of CDR D. E. McCoy as Commander Wolfe's relief, Utility Squadron 10 has the unique distinction of being the only utility squadron in the Atlantic with four full commanders attached
-even if only for a short time.

Henry Garcia Wins

Slogan Contest

Henry Garcia, employee relations assistant in the Industrial Relations Office, was this week adjudged winner of the $5 prize offered for a slogan for the Indian.
Mr. Garcia's entry, "The expression of America under the sky of Cuba," was picked as the best entry by the Editorial Sub-Committee.
Because of the requirement for a shorter slogan, Mr. Garcia's entry will not actually be used as the Indian slogan. Instead, the slogan "Covers Gtmo like the sunshine." suggested by CDR R. C. Spears, a member of the committee, will be used.
In addition to the entry of Mr. Garcia, contest entries were received from Mrs. Marina Heimer, LTJG John McMahon, John F. Arguello, YN3, Richard J. Modrow, YN3, Pierce Lehmbeck, and James Dexter.


,a 24Arl15


THE INDIAN










Marine Leathernecks Top League In First Round

by Pierce Lehmbeck


As the Marine Leathernecks marched to a 5-3 victory over the Naval Station Indians Tuesday night they notched their third straight win against no defeats to lead the local nines into their third week of play.
Leading the Leathernecks, who exhibited some fine hurling in holding the Braves to but three hits, was outfielder Chuck Mason who found the left field fence twice in succession to establish a new local mark for homeruns in one game. To add to this performance, he finished out the evening by singling and reaching first on an infield error to score three of the Marine's five runs.
Starting on the mound for the Leathernecks was veteran hurler and manager, "Smitty" Smith. Smith showed near perfect control during the first four innings by holding the Braves hitless and walking only one. However, in the top of the fifth they seemingly figured out his odd style and hopping serve to slap him for three runs on three hits to go ahead of the earlier two run margin which had been provided by Mason's round-trippers. To get out of this predicament, Smith called on his staff ace Rollie Santos who finished the last four innings by holding the Braves hitless and striking out nine.
The breaking point came when the Marines finally caught Brave starter Bill Royal, who until this point had thrown a near flawless game in giving up but four hits, by tagging him for three runs on four singles and a couple of costly infield boots Buss came in to put out the fire and from that point on, both teams went scoreless with the Leathernecks banging out two more hits in the bottom of the eighth.
Santos was credited with the win after relieving Smith in the fifth. This ran his record to two wins against no defeats.
For the Braves, Royal was credited with the loss to give him a one and one mark. He was relieved by Buss in the seventh.
Mallards Nudge Flyers
The VU-10 Mallards, cruising behind the hurling efforts of Dutch Huber and Harry Breske, pushed to a 4-2 win over the NAS Flyers Wednesday night, to notch their first victory of this young '54 campaign.
Starting for the Mallards, Huber had the Flyers completely under his control for the first seven innings as he held them scoreless while giving up but six hits. However, in the top of the eighth the Flyers finally caught him and promptly scored two runs on two well placed singles. Harry Breske came in to relieved Huber and set the Flyers down in order via the strikeout route. He finished the tilt by giving up but one safety during the last session.
The Mallards scored the deciding runs in the fourth and fifth innings. Led by clean-up batter Bob Dieden who collected a double and two singles in four times at the plate, they tagged starter Sutherland for one run in the fourth and three in the fifth.
Huber was credited with the win, his first against no defeats while Sutherland was charged with the loss, his third in as many starts. The Flyers committed five miscues while the Mallards made three misplays.
Leathernecks-SeaBees Win Over
Weekend
Last weekend at the Marine Site


field, over capacity crowds turned out to see the Marine Leathernecks edge the VU-10 Mallards and the SeaBees of MCB-8 down the NAS Flyers in two beatiful pitching exhibitions.
In the 3-1 Leatherneck win over the Mallards on Saturday afternoon, Rollie Santos, in his first appearance on the local scene was at his best as he held VU-10 to three hits while striking out fourteen. Starter Buzz Presutti of the Mallards was also having a good day as he blanked the Leathernecks for the first seven innings while giving up but two safeties.
The breaking point in this duel came when the Mallards clipped Santos for one run on two hits in the bottom of the seventh, only to have them come back in the top of the eighth and knot the score with one run also. In the ninth the Leathernecks salted the game away by chasing Presutti off the mound and then belting reliever Harry Breske for two more runs.
In Sunday's game, it was the big right arm of Bigby which made all the difference as the SeaBees edged the NAS Flyers, 4-3.
The big fellow with the odd windup had the Flyers coming and going as he held them to but five hits in going the distance-none of them going for extra bases.
Meanwhile, the SeaBee batting order tagged starter Sutherland for two runs in the bottom of the seventh to notch an early lead for the big right hander. They came back to score one more in the third with the fourth and deciding run being scored in the sixth.
The Flyers made an attempt to come from behind in the closing innings as they tagged Bigby for two in the seventh but fell short as they pushed across only one in the top of the ninth.


Next week's Schedule

Saturday, 24 April
Naval Station vs NAS Sunday, 25 April
Marines vs MCB-8 Tuesday, 27 April
Naval Station vs VU-10 Wednesday, 28 April
NAS vs Marines
Thursday, 29 April
MCB-8 vs Naval Station


Top Ten Batters


Player Team AB
Dieden VU-10 11
Layman MCB-8 8
Konkley NAS 11
Yarbrough NAS 9
Dotson MCB-8 7
Pace Marines 5
Foster VU-10 5
Young NavSta 9
Androvich Marines 9 Stoeckle MOB-S 9


H
6
4
5
4
3
2
2
3
3
3


AVG
.545 .500
.454 .444 .428 .400 .400 .333 .333 .333


Pitching Records


Player Team
Santos Marines
Bigby MCB-8
Shackleton MCB-8 Smith Marines
Huber VU-10
Royal NavSta
Presutti VU-10 Buss NavSta
Breske VU-10
Sutherland NAS


Won Lost
2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 3


Tom Felak, Marine catcher, lays the wood to one for a two bagger which proved to be the keynote in the home-standing Leatherneck's 3-1 victory over the VU-10 Mallards last Saturday afternoon. The Mallard catcher is Richard Rea.


Puttin' Around

by Wright North
The Intra-Command Golf tournament goes into the last week-end of double matches today when NAS meets Hospital at 1300 and Naval Station, striving to hold 3rd place, closes out the season against the team from MCB.
VU-10, first half winner and presently leading in the second half, will complete their schedule tomorrow morning against FTG. This match could very likely decide the second half since VU-10, with 80 points in five matches, is only 91/ points ahead of FTG with 70%/ points in a 4 matches. FTG will play their 6th and final match on Saturday, May 1st. against NAS and this, too, could be the deciding factor for the eventual winner.
Trophies Move to Adbldg
The 1953 ComTen trophy and the Santiago Challenge Cup, now on display in the golf shop, will be moved to the Administration Building Monday due to insufficient space in the golf shop. However, when better facilities are available, these golf trohpies from past years will probably be retained in the proposed new club house.
Traps Require Raking
All traps now have at least one rake, and all golfers are requested to use them in smoothing out their footprints and divots. There are also signs on each par 3 tee that read, "Please allow following players to hit tee shot on all par 3 holes after you have marked your ball on the green and removed bags and carts from line of play." Leaving a bag or cart in front of a green, or by not marking the ball on the green, particularly near the cup, may be the reason your fellow golfer does not hole out for a hole-in-one.
Congratulations
Congratulations to Bill Foulk, AOC, at the VU-10 detachment in Key West, for winning the City Championship. I wonder if we could be seeing him in the local course today and especially tomorrow in VU-10's drive to retain the IntraCommand cup?


Team
Mari MCBNava VU-1 NAS


League Standings
Won L
ine Leathernecks 3 8 Seabees 2
1 Station Indians 1 0 Mallards 1
Flyers 0


ost
0
0
2
2
3


Teen-age Bowling
Team Standings
GW GL
Lehmbeck's ----------- 22 5
MacMichaels ---------- 16 11
Beman's -------------- 14 13
Huddy's --------------- 2 25
High Average (Boys)
Pierce Lehmbeck --------- 162.28 George MacMichael ------- 154.11
High Average (girls)
Renee Skinner ------------117.27
Roxanna Moore ----------106.14
High Game (Boys
Pierce Lehmbeck -----------212
High Game (Girls)
Renee Skinner --------------167



SCUTTLEBUTT
















"Come on-dVe, Jerry, and we'll play some three-handed pinochle."

Scotch Foursome
All contestants in the Scotch foursome tomorrow are requested to be on time, and if possible early, in order to assign. Caddies Pairings for partners and starting time are available in the golf shop if you desire to call 9619.


Page~Four


THE INDIAN


Q11-i-


Saturday, 24 Aprf







24 April 1954 THE INDIAN Page Five


The Angle(R)

SHARK









by Jerry Lewis

Meet the shark. Nothing that swims is as well-known or as
widely feared as the carnivora known as the shark. There is something about the sleek easy power of this bullet-shaped creature with its wicked little eyes and razor sharp teeth that brings cold clammy fear to the heart of the bravest swimmer. There are recorded cases of sharks' attacking and killing human beings but these are quite rare.
The fact is that your chances of shark bite while swimming on the average beach are so small that you are more apt to be struck by lightning!
Science estimates that sharks have existed for three-hundred and fifty-million years! The common belief is that the only two living creatures that have not changed their original form from the dark ages to the present are the shark and ants.
A few peculiarities of this fish is that he has no bladder as other fish do. He must therefore continually swim or sink to the bottom. He also has a keen sense of smell which is the principal reason why a cut and bleeding skin-diver or swimmer should waste no time leaving the water. The power behind the sharks teeth is sufficient to shear off an arm or leg at ease. For example, once a harpooned shark weighing 1500-pounds was being towed in close to a schooner. Suddenly it rushed the ship and seizing the solid oak rudder post it chewed its way through the five and-a-half inch beam in a few seconds thus disabling the ship.
He is considered a coward by authorities. This has been proven by professional divers with years of swimming in shark-infested waters of the world.
The skin of the shark is almost like sandpaper. His hide is tanned and used in todays modern leather industry for the manufacture of shoes, belts, leather bags and other items on the market.
Of the ten general species of shark, here are a few commonly found in the waters of the West Indies: The blue shark (pictured) is a member of the mackerel shark family. He has a stout nose and attains a length of twelve feet with a steel-blue coloring. All other sharks give this cousin a wide birth!
Endlessly cruising the waters of the tropics is the well-named Tigershark which preys on turtles, fish and other shark. He has a massive head, a convex snout and jaws studded with strong teeth. His length is between twelve and thirty feet. They are much feared in the West Indies although there is no recorded case of human attack.
The Nurse shark is found off the Florida Keyes and the West Indies. They are sluggish and harmless and more than one adventurous youth has climbed aboard his broad back for a thrilling ride. A small barber of whisker on each side of the mouth identifies the species.
Some of the other species are


'0' Bowling


Ends Season

The Naval Base Officers' Club Bowling League finished up its season on Friday evening, 16 April with National Division NAS team No. 2, piloted by LT Dandrea walking off with base championship honors. On 15 April the semi-finals were held between Hospital No. 1 and NAS No. 1 in the American Division, with NAS No. 2 and NavSta No. 1 battling it out for top honors in the National. The following night LT Dandrea's team scuttled Hospital No. 1 to take the title.
The high individual leaders for this year's season of play were: Men's High Average:
CWOHC L. Novak-180
Mr. K. Marabella-178 Women's High Average:
Mrs. Emily Griffin, NSD-163
Mrs. Millie Knilans, FTG-160 Men's High Individual Triple:
LCDR Knilans, FTG-623
CWOHC L. Novak-620
Women's High Individual Triple:
Mrs. Emily Griffin, NSD-536
Mrs. Frankie Staley, FTG-534 Men's High Individual Single:
LTJG R. Hanavan, Hosp.-246
CDR Gash, FTG-245
Women's High Individual Single:
Mrs. Betty Sentz, NAS-203
Mrs. Frankie Staley, FTG-202
Tuesday evening saw a buffet supper held at the Officers' Club patio for members of the League as the teams closed out their season. RADM E. B. Taylor took this occasion for the presentation of the trophies to the teams and individuals who met with the most success during the season. Awards were given to the NAS team No. 2 for the League championship as well as a second place cup to the runner-up American Division squad. Trophies were also given to the individuals mentioned above who led in averages, triples, and high games for the year.


Sport Shots

Boxing experts say there's a hurricane heading for heavyweight champion Rocky Marciano. They are speaking of Tommy "Hurricane" Jackson a scrappy 22-yearold who storms his opponents with lightning lefts and rights-not to mention a two-band uppercut.
Jackson's latest victim, Dan Bucceroni, was ranked third in the heavyweight division this month by The Ring Magazine. Bucceroni, who started boxing while in the Navy, hadn't lost since 1951. He was ready for a crack at the title.
Jackson pounded Bucceroni into submission and the bout was stopped in the sixth round. In addition to Bucceroni, Jackson also defeated Rex Layne and Clarence Henry. Service Highlights
Pfc. Sandy Saddler, w o r I d featherweight champion, recently scored a technical knockout over Augie Salazar in the Boston Arena. This was the third straight TKO for the Ft. Jay, N. Y., soldier, who is due for discharge Apr. 20. . . . Marine Cpl. Bill Kelley of Cherry Point, N. C., recently took first place in the stock car feature race at Soldier Field in Chicago. In three years of racing, Kelley, known as "Wild Bill," has won 36 feaure events in stock cars, hot rods and midgets.
Service Force Atlantic Fleet downed Destroyer Force Atlantic Fleet, 78-70, to win the 1954 Atlantic Fleet basketball crown. . . . The New England National Sports Car Races will be held at Westover AFB, Mass., June 13.
The Pacific Fleet basketball crown was won by Barber's Point NAS, T.H., as it defeated Atsugi NAS, Japan, 84-74.
F o r m e r Illinois quarterback Tommy O'Connell, who played with the Chicago Bears in the National Football League last year, will report for active duty with the Air Force, Apr. 13.


CDR W. G. Winslow admires the bowling trophy presented to him by RADM E. B. Taylor, (second from left). Commander Winslow was captain of the winning team, NAS Team No. 2. Awards were made at the Officers' Club Tuesday night.


Thresher, Dogfish and Sand, Hammerhead, White, Basking and Whale shark.
If ever confronted by one of these fellows, respect him for what he is


and above all, don't underestimate his speed, tenacity or abilities. He is a victim of his own emotions and a difficult fellow to handle when properly aroused!


Little League Holds


Final Tryouts Today

The Guantanamo Bay Little League will hold its final tryouts this afternoon at 1330 and 1530. The boys who have been playing as the Bears and Tigers will begin their session at 1330. The Hawks and Rams will go through their paces at 1530. Propective managers and coaches J. S. Emerson, R. E. Bogan, Dr. Hering, R. J. Rifflard, N. Huddy, and C. C. Hartley will be on hand to evaluate each player according to his ability. At the conclusion of the tryouts, a player selection will be held by the managers under the supervision of a player agent who will endeavor to see that the teams are as evenly balanced as possible.
The teams will be made up of fifteen boys each, with a manager and a coach to run each team. The league officials hope to be able to field six teams for the competition that will start Saturday, May 22nd. The final makeup of the teams and schedule of games will be announced within the next two weeks.
The newly elected officials of the Little League, J. F. Duffy, ADC, President, LT T. H. Cushman, Vice President, Mrs. W. A. Schnake, Secretary, and Mr. R. Groeneveld, Treasurer, have taken up the task of bringing Little League baseball to this Base with the aid of their sponsors, the American Legion, Sojourners Club, and the Fleet Reserve Assn.
These three o r g an i z a t i o n s, through their sponsorship, have raised the necessary funds to cover the cost of the ball field, uniforms, and equipment. RADM Edmund B. Taylor and CAPT W. R. Caruthers have announced that funds will be provided for the erecting of a club house and grandstands to complete the layout of the field in time for the opening game.


Ladies' Golf Shots
by Joyce Simmons
This week the ladies competed in a Blind Five tournament played on the back nine holes of the golf course. Five of the nine holes were chosen at random to be used to total the individual scores. Winners were as follows:
1st Flight
1st place-Mary Ann Pennell
2nd place-Lou Toczko
2nd Flight
1st place-Edna Edwards
2nd place-Mary Spears
Lillian North
3rd Flight
1st place-Clair Suslick
2nd place-Marg Sheehan
Next Wednesday we will play the entire course, which will give all you gals some much needed practice for the 18 hole qualifying round for the Championship which is to take place the following week on May 5.
Don't forget the Scotch Foursome tomorrow, April 25. Again, all couples and partners are to be drawn at random, and the men are generously furnishing beer, coke, and potato chips as an added incentive after completing the 18th hole. Everyone has loved these matches in the past, so why don't a few more of you "golferettes" join us and make this coming Scotch Foursome the biggest one yet?


I


y,24 April 1954


Page Five


THE INDIAN







THE INDIAN


es


Saturday, 24 Ap4P


Friz Catches 'EYEBALL

EXPRESS' To San Juan
by Dick Friz

It has been said that a visit to San Juan is not complete unless ample time is alloted for recuperation.
My jaunt to the Puerto Rican capital can only be construed then, as an "eyeball express." I did, however, touch down at McCalla Field with a fresh respect for its people.
I saw modern hotels and department stores silhoueted against the San Jose Church . . . the Puerto Nuevo housing projects contrast with cribs, ruins, and Fort San Cristobel, which Sir Francis Drake had once found impenetrable.
San Juan, oldest city under the American flag, was first governed by Ponce de Leon, whose "fountain of youth" may be responsible for the doubling of population three times in the last century and a half.
I spent one afternoon strolling through the old part of the city. The district, toughest this side of Singapore, is notorious for straightrazor brawls. It seemed serene at dusk, and I half expected a seniorita, leaning from her balcony, to toss a rose.
I met a comely waitress at the Club Continental-a sailor was one jump ahead of me-it was her husband. . . . I moved hurriedly on to a vers libre poet who waxed eloquently on "freedom."
This modern Don Quixote told me, "Don't call us Puerto Ricans, Senor, we are Americans, you are mainlanders. We Americans are outraged at the misconduct of those radicals, those heretics, who fired at Congress. Communism could never thrive here."
An American couple entered the club, and our literary friend streaked to their table, and smothered the woman's arm with kisses (like Valentino in an old time "flick.") Mr. Randolph introduced himself as a landscape architect, and his wife as a school teacher. I assumed they and the poet had met.
Mrs. Randolph has been highly successful in organizing a Commonwealth School and reported that over half her graduating class had enrolled at either the University Rio Piedras, or an American University.
Mr. Randolph spoke of Operation Bootstrap, and economic revival in San Juan, in which American industry is lending a financial hand. Culture too is invading the city. The Metropolitan Opera will make its first appearance this spring. "We are not quite ready for it, though," his wife said. "We are still in the Stan Kenton stage."
The taxi driver that took me to the boxing matches would make one of Chitwood's daredevils look like a Sunday afternoon motorist . . . and I never quite recovered from that drive. After the matches I walked over the Condado district and sampled the elegant night life. I rubbed shoulders with the hoi poi loi at the Caribe Hilton, got lost in the Voodo Room (it was so dark that I ended up in the washroom), heard the click of roulette wheels at Jacks and watched them dance that famous JackJack Rhumba. I fought off senioritas (rather feebly) at the Key Club and 22.
A remark made by a young student in the 22 Club will be most difficult to take lightly . . . "We admit that we have our shortcomings, we have much housecleaning to do, but we won't rest until our star is also on the blue of Old Glory?'


A Message From Garcia

BARACOA
by Henry Garcia

When Admiral Columbus discovered Cuba, in 1493, he landed in Baracoa. The beauty of the scenery, the mild climate, and the fertility of the land, made the admiral exclaim with enthusiasm that it was "the most beautiful land ever seen by human eyes".
Baracoa was the first capital of Cuba. So, as you can see, this Cuban city has been the first in many things. The first to receive the expedition of Christopher Columbus. The first capital of the island. And the first town of importance when the "Conquistadores" from Spain came to Cuba.
In something has Baracoa been the last, however and it is in getting the necessary official attention to her problems. Not long ago, the only way to get to Baracoa was either by plane or by sea. Now, thanks to the construction of a most important highway that connects Baracoa with the rest of the island, it will be easy for visitors to go in summertime and enjoy their vacations there. The highway. still under construction, is just one of President Batista's projects, tending to attract more tourists from the States.
It is worthwhile, no doubt, to visit Baracoa. Mountains of incredible natural shape, such as "El Yunque", which resembles what its Spanish name indicates, an anvil. Also rivers such as "Rio Miel" (the Honey River), where there is a variety of fishes only found in the Nile and in this river.
Many things that the human is unable to express are there: Sun sets, typical music, and girls whose beauty spells temptation.
How about visiting Baracoa this summer?

How to spend a cheap vacation: "Drop a nickel (or dime) in a telephone and wait for central to answer.

Critical Spectator: "I can't imagine anyone missing a putt as short as that."
Golfer: "Let me remind you, sir, that that hole is only four and one-quarter inches across and the whole world's outside it.


EnameL Etekins

The lengthening daylight hours are adding impetus to the local athletic program. A "golf ladder" has been formed and the qualifiers wound up last Saturday with the sterling tee-demon, George "Red" Fauth as top dog or, should we say, top rung. More of this later. For those outdoormen desiring a taste of adventure be advised to consult F. B. Cooper. He is alleged to be gathering a crew together to enter the next Miami-Nassau predicted log yacht race. It is rumored he is having trouble getting clearance from the Coast Guard, but this is not believed to be true, merely gossip engendered by a malicious oaf, unnamed, who claims Coopers boat, the Maiden Lady, is not seaworthy. To those athletes with a scientific bend of mind Joe Rose's project may appeal. Young Rose is believed to be working on a development enabling paratroopers to complete their mission unencumbered with a heavy, oldfashioned parachute but so far hasn't solved the problem of rapid descent. Observers report that Rose struck the ground with considerable force on his last speed run and was heard to mutter, "I might have been killed."
Additions a n d Subtractions: LCDR J. F. Flood has orders to report here from the U.S. Naval Hospital, Phila., probably to arrive some time in September. CDR E. T. Nealon departs some time in July for duty at Bainbridge, Md.
The dental technicians Bachelors club, that well known group of men-about-town, is well pleased with the progress being made on the new club rooms in Bldg. 4, Bay Hill. The suggestion that a penthouse be added for the exclusive use of the Board of Governors was voted down at an open meeting amidst cat-calls and crys of "shame". R. H. Hamberger, prominent club-man, has threatened to withdraw and leave the local scene entirely, going so far as to consult a travel agency on the availability of a sea cruise.
CDR Frank Etter, executive officer, is practically back to battery, having been discharged this week from the hospital. Claims he no longer needs that air cushion and is considering applying for the job as riding master at the local corral.


ENS David Briggs points out how to find the radius of a circle in the High school-level plane geometry class. The class meets every Tuesday in the testing room at the Information and Education Office. It is now in its third week and is due to run for about twelve weeks.


PUBLIC WORKS CHIPS
by Vic. Gault

It is with regret that this column announces the detachment of our Public Works Officer, who has been the "Jefe de Obras Publicas" since March 1952, when he relieved CDR B. 0. Roessler, CEC, USN.
CDR Jerome N. Lawlor, CEC, USNR, will proceed to his new duties in the Public Works Dept. at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, reporting in June after a well deserved vacation State-side.
The commander has been an officer in the Civil Engineer Corps since early 1942 and has had continuous active duty assignments. He is a veteran of World War I as an enlisted man and is one of the older officers on the Base considering his many years of active and reserve service. CDR Lawlor was Officer-in-Charge of several Seabee Units and Battalions during World War II, serving both in the Atlantic and Pacific areas. One of his outfits was attached to the Fourth Marine Division during the invasion and occupation of the Marianas Islands. Since his return from overseas in May 1946, CDR Lawlor has been the Public Works Officer at the Naval Powder Factory and at St. Albans Hospital. Also, he was on the staff of the District Public Works Office for the Fourth Naval District, and while on that duty was in charge of design and construction for many major naval installations under the congnizance of that District. His record at this base includes the planning, designing and supervision construction of many important projects which were installed by local Public Works forces. The Commander has been one of the active officers on the base, and will be remembered for his bowling, golf and Toastmaster interests as extra activities. All hands in this department wish the commander well, and good duty in his next assignment.
The Public Works organization bids an "Hasta la Vista" to Mrs. Geraldine Narwid, who has held the position of Secretary to the Public Works Officer since April 1953. Mrs. Narwid, due to receipt of orders by her husband, Walter Narwid, ENC, USN, resigned her position last week and will establish her home, temporarily, at Norfolk, Virginia. During her tenure of duty with the organization she gained many friends because of her pleasant manner of dealing with all hands.
Parents are again cautioned in connection with allowing their children to play with and handle construction and other equipment used by the CB Units on the Replacement Housing Program at the Villamar Housing area, or anywhere on the base. To handle and play with this equipment is very dangerous, and a regrettable accident could very easily occur in which your child would be the one so unfortunate as to be affected.
I The difference between a sailor and a seabee is that while the sailor is looking for a park bench the seabee builds one.
** *
Then there was the drunk who arrived late at the cocktail party, hastily threw down six martinis and smiled benignly around the room. "I feel a lot more like I do now than when I came in."

A worried mother telephoned an old Navy man: "My son writes that he is coming home with a hashmark. Is that serious?"


Page Six





24 April 1954 THE INDIAN


Old Timer Worked

For 404-A-Day

HENRY HANSEN

Henry Hansen,
I a native of Haiti,
held his first job on the Base in 1914 as an apprentice in the Ships Repair Department, starting with a salary of only 40 cents
per day.
His deep interest in all matters concerning his job soon won him a Machinist rating. From that position he was promoted to Quarteroman Machinist, then to Assistant Foreman (Machine Division), and from that rating to his present position as Chief Quarterman (Machine Division) in the Ships Department, Naval Station.
His present position allows the Hansens to live in a comfortable home which they rent in Guantanamo City, and to finance the education of their children, two girls and a boy.
Asked about his happiest memory of Navy Employment, he mentioned the day when he received a 30 year award.
"Being presented that award", he said, "made me look back with inner satisfaction to those 30 years of service, each one of which had shown some progress in my job".
Most exciting experience since becoming a Navy employee, according to Mr. Hansen, was a complicated repair job that was performed recently in his shop for the first time on this Base. The shaft of a destroyer had to be changed, and Mr. Hansen, with seven of his men, plus riggers, shipfitters, etc., worked day in and day out, until the work was finally accomplished.
Does he plan to retire soon? No sir! Mr. Hansen says that he loves his job so much that he hopes to keep it until mandatory retirement age.



Meetings ..

Time & Place

Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd & 4th Tuesday each month. Community Auditorium Ladies' Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association 2000 ; 2nd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Room, Community Auditorium Little Theatre Group 2000; 1st Tuesday each month Marina Point
Hospital Service Volunteers 1000; 2nd Tuesday each month Hospital Medical Library
American Legion Auxiliary, Unit One 1930; 3rd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Hut, Marina Point
Toastmasters Club 92 1930 each Thursday, Officers Club dining room.
American Legion, Guantanamo Bay Post 1 1930; 3rd Tuesday each month; Community Auditorium, Marina Point
Parent-Teachers Association 1930 ; 1st Tuesday of each month Naval Base School
Fellowcraft Club No. 1078 2000 each Thursday, Practice, Business Meeting, 1st Thursday - Community
Auditorium
National Supervisors Association 1900; ist Monday each month, Civilian Training Conference Room.


Able Crew Operates Veteran Drones


After six months of gruelling drone operations with the Flee Guantanamo Bay, the Utility Squadron 10 Drone Unit poses with heroes of the "Gitmo wars"-drones (Red Dogs) 4 and 7. The marks on the fusilage depict the number of times that each drone been fired at by Fleet units. Double and triple marks indicate tw three ships firing. The total shows that 29 ships have fired at t two Red Dogs and they're still going up for more. The officers and who control the drones in flight and on the ground are, left to r (standing)--Eugene Crouch, ADC/AP; LT W. H. Rose, LT B. E. Ev CDR T. B. Wolfe (CO-VU-10), C. B. Herndon, ADC/AP, LTJG Hawkins, LT M. J. Dailey, P. S. Woodward, AO1/AP. (Kneeling)-L D. S. Blair, G. C. Pirtle, AOC/AP, ENS R. M. Greenfield and L R. Kaiser.


NAS Crosswinds
by Dick Friz

WHO'S WHO AT THE AIR
STATION
Captain Reginald McCrackenborn in Seymour, Iowa, the "Skipper" attended Iowa State College and graduated from the Naval Academy in 1931 . . . was designated Naval Aviator in '34. Last duty station . . . CO of USS Valcour, AVP 55. Assumed command of Naval Air Station here in February of this year. Wife's name is Alma, and has two sons, Richard (Annapolis, class of '57) and Michael.
Commander Walter G. Winslow
-born in Long Island, New York, the "Exec" received a BA. at the University of Richmond ... entered the Navy in '37 . . . designated Aviator in '37. . . was a Japanese prisoner of war from '42 to '45 ... last duty station was Public Information Officer for CNATRA in Pensacola Fla., Reported here as Operations Officer . . . appointed Executive Officer in May '53. Married Toni in '47, has four children, Delsa, Catherine, Walter III and Mary Dee (born here).
Lieutenant C o m m a n d e r Jack
Parker-born in Jackson Michigan . . . attended Jackson High . . . commissioned Naval Aviator in '41 . . . was formerly with the Naval Administrative Unit at Sandia Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Became Assistant Operation Officer in September of '53. Wife's name is Edith, and has two sons, Jerry and Richard.
NAS and VU-10 collaborated on a party Monday night at the EM Club. Music was provided by a group from the Missouri . . . and


VU-10 Prop Blast

The squadron is losing another
of its stellar characters. LT Billy E. Smith reported to VU-10 on May 12, 1952 and will depart May 12, 1954 via FLAW for 8 weeks GCA schooling in Olathe, Kansas, then to a GCA unit, Quonset Point, Rhode Island. Billy says that he is one of our most outstanding utility pilots. He has done a fine job and his very attractive wife, Ann is going to be sorely missed.
"God Speed" to Billy, Ann,
Skipper, Perry, and Ben.
The Mallard golfers eked through
a 13% to 11 win over the strong Naval Station-Grego team on Saturday 17 April. The next and last match for the Mallards is Sunday 25 April against Fleet Training Group. This match will almost definitely decide the second half champion of the intra-command
league.
On Monday 26 April an All
Hands party will be held at the EM Club. This will be a farewell for CDR and Mrs. T. B. Wolfe and a welcome aboard for CDR and Mrs. D. E. McCoy. The party comnittee says it is going to be a "whiz dinger" with pre-dinner refreshments, dinner, after dinner t at refreshments, and wonderful local two entertainment with our boy Jerry
to Lewis as master of ceremonies. hash One of the rumored events is a foot has race between Brostom and Halse,
0 or two of our faster boys. hese LT Jim H. Goldamer and Gloria
men made the weekend, April 16 to 19, ight trip to Port au Prince on the USS ans, Rollette. They are still singing J. B. praises of the hospitality, good TJG food, and just plain fun enjoyed TJG in the Haitian capital. Gloria says
she spent lots of money on straw goods and saved a lot by keeping
Jim in tow.


The Smith's are departing GTMO for Quonset on 12 May after two years to the day with VU-10. Skipper 9, LT B. E. Smith, Ben 2, Ann, and Perry 5.


chaperoned USO girls from Guantanamo City were the guests of honor. The combination of dancing and imbibing made for an enjoyable evening.
NAS Bowling team No. 2 captured the league playoff title defeating NAS No. 1. CDR Winslow, Mr. Serig (who wore mismatched socks), LCDR Vanderhoff, LT Dandrea, LT Canalejo, Mrs. Dandrea, and Mrs. Leach comprise the winning team. Ten pins separated the two teams, in the finale. The trophies were awarded at the bowling banquet held at the Officers Club Monday night.


"Do you believe in clubs for women ?"
"Only when kindness fails."
,. *
Barber: "Will you have anything on your face when I finish shaving you?"
Customer: "If you don't mind, you can leave my nose."

Overheard in a small town, "What do you natives do for amusement around here." "Hunt and drink." "What do you hunt?"
"Something to drink."


ow


PaW






q.P ONDPPO-Gtmo.-4824D


THE INDIAN


a


Saturday, 24 -0 4


NavSta Photo Hobby Shop


"Dodo"


Open for 'Came
Photo fans who have been anxio photo lab to open can now breathe e business last Saturday under the Transportation Dept.
The lab is located in the rear of the hobby shop, which is in back of Bay Hill, near the Naval Station Boat Shed.
The hours of operation are weekdays, 1700 to 2130, except Thursday and 0900 to 2130 Saturday. It will be closed Thursday and open from 1300 to 1600 on Sunday.
Here are a few of the features


Two photo enthusiasts prepare to print a picture with the Omega D-6 enlarger in the newly-opened Hobby Shop photo lab.

of the newly-opened lab. It has two enlargers, an Omega D6 and Omega D2. The D6 will accept negatives up to 214 x 314 inches, and the D2 will accept negatives up to 4 x 5 inches. Three gradations of printing paper are available, F1, F2 and F3. It is sold in both enlarging and contact types for 5 cents per 8 x 10 inch sheet. 3'/4 x 414 contact paper is sold for 1 cent per sheet. You pay for each sheet used, not just the good ones.
The lab can accommodate a total of nine people at a time: two enlarging, one contact printing and six developing film.
The type of developer available at present is D-76 for film and D-72 for paper. D-76 is a 20 minute


"Well, how does it look?" asks one of the photo hobbyists as they consider the merits of a picture they have just printed.


ra Bugs'
usly waiting for the Hobby Shop asier. The lab opened its doors for supervision of Pete Broughton of


deveolper, fine grain type.
For drying film there is a "hotbox", heated by two 300 watt bulbs. This hotbox was built by S. E. Cobbs, PHAN, former "Indian" photographer now on the USS Bennington, and will dry negatives in a little more than an hour.
For drying prints there is a drum ferrotype dryer which can be heated to 300 degrees.
Lets take a man through the whole process of walking in with a roll of exposed film and emerging with a finished print in his hand.
First, he takes the roll of film into the loading room, a small, lightproof room, in which he loads a film tank with the exposed roll.
The lab is air conditioned to keep the chemicals at the proper temperature of 68 degrees at all times.
Them he pours developer in the tank, allows it to work for about 20 minutes, pours in a stop solution, then hypo to de-sensitize the film. This takes about thirty minutes.
The film must then be washed for thirty minutes, then hung up the dry.
After drying he takes his negatives to one of the enlargers or the contact printer, exposes a piece of printing paper to the negative image, then develops it. This takes him about twenty minutes, including fixing. Then after he washes the print for about thirty minutes, he brings it to the dryer room and walks out with a finished print.
But if you are unfamiliar with the photographic process, Pete Broughton will give needed assistance.
Pete has been a photo hobbyist himself for several years and during his high school days at Guantanamo Bay was Photo Editor of the school yearbook.
In the first three days of the lab's operation more than twenty used its facilities. In order to use the lab just walk in and see Pete. There are no appointments or reservations.


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Doris Day, the beautiful singing star of Warner Bros. Pictures, is our pin-up for this week. Dodo is currently the number one pin-up for "Our Navy" magazine for the month of April. too. Her version of "Secret Love" hit the top bracket on the musical hit parade and remained for several weeks.


Movies.... cont'd
Friday, 30 April EASY TO LIVE
Esther Williams Van Johnson
Everyone is in love with an aqua-queen except her boss who is so busy with his show that he forgets that his prize beauty is human.


And here's the final stage, the drying of the finished print. Here two more fans place a wet print on the drum dryer.


S a0


MOVIES


Saturday, 24 April THE NEBRASKAN
Phil Carey Roberta Haynes
Western Drama. Philip Carey tries to get a fair trial for his friend who is accused of murdering an Indian chief.
Sunday, 25 April
MONEY FROM HOME
Dean Martin Jerry Lewis
A gambler gets into trouble with a syndicate because he cannot pay his horse racing debts.
Monday, 26 April SKY COMMANDO
Dan Duryea Frances Gifford
Story takes place in Korea when an Air Force commanding officer directs his men to carry out a mission which seems to mean sure death.
Tuesday, 27 April
GLENN MILLER STORY
James Stewart June Allyson
The story of the famous band leader who lost his life while serving his country in World War II.
Wednesday, 28 April
THEY DIED WITH THEIR
BOOTS ON
Errol Flynn Olivia DeHavilland
The story of General Custer from the time he entered the Academy until his death at Little Big Horn.
Thursday, 29 April
EL ALAMEIN
Scott Brady Rita Moreno
The experience of an American serving with a British armored unit at the battle of El Alamein.


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"Govers q TMO Like The Sunshine" Vol. VI, No. 42 New RPIO Building Culminates 2 Years of Design & Planning Firmly situated to the right of the fleet landing boatshed is a square stone building with a sign that reads, 'Registered Publications Issuance Office'. One might view it while coming aboard and wonder what is significant about the carefully constructed and solidly reinforced walls. The record books will have it as the main RPIO building of the entire 10th naval district with an approximate worth of $260,000. The facts will go on to say that $45,000 was appropriated for it's construction by various Mobile Construction Battalions and local labor, that it stands eleven-feet above sea-level, .LT V. M. Ornelas, designer and spark-plug of the new RPIO building. sports 8-inch reinforced concrete bulkheads, is sound proof, fire, hurricane, bomb and flood proof and is air-conditioned throughout. Further details will point out that the interior of the building contains onethird office space and two-thirds vault space and that it serves the forces both ashore and afloat with all classified communications publications. But these are just statistics. Where did it come from and how did it get there? That's a different story and quite a human one. LT V. M. Ornelus, Officer-InCharge of the registered publications issuing office and a veteran in this highly specialized field, dreamed of such a 'model' building over two years ago. The building is a dream product, taken bit by bit from all other RPIO buildings of it's kind. There is one found in each of the naval districts all over the world. The finished product is the culmination of many years of experience with classified publications and the service of which is of the utmost importance to the navy. Much of the material LT Ornelus and his staff handle is classified and because of strict governing regulations cannot be discussed here but little need be said of the great importance of such work. After two years of planning, designing and off-and-on construction, the building has finally been completed. A visualization, pursued and completed but not without that ironic twist that has a way of sneaking into the last act. Late next month, LT Ornelus and his family will be on the way to San Diego, California for further assignment. When the lieutenant leaves however, he will leave aboard the naval base at Guantanamo Bay, one of the finest RPIO buildings found anywhere in the world, something that will remain as a credit to his initiative and ingenuity. Truly deserving of a well-done is the man who built from a dream something that will serve the navy and the country well for many years to come. Saturday, 24 April 1954 Armed Forces Offered Navy Lengthens Gift Shopping Service EM Early Outs The Armed Services Hospitality Service has once again offered its services to military personnel stationed overseas. This extended service, at no extra cost is offered so that men may purchase gifts for Mother's Day, May 9. To take advantage of this shopping service, personnel should mail their request to the Hospitality Committee stating the type and approximate cost of the desired gift along with a money order and the address to which the gift is to be sent. The committee will purchase the gift, send it to the addressee, and refund any money over and above the cost of the gift. For faster service, the Hospitality Committee has two main offices for serving both east and west of the Mississippi River. Personnel desiring to send gifts to persons living east of the Mississippi should address their requests to the Armed Services Hospitality Committee, 1350 Pennsylvania Ave, Washington 4, D. C. For addressees living west of the Mississippi, requests should be sent to the American Women's Voluntary Services, 3rd and El Camino Streets, San Mateo, Calif. To Jan. 20, '55 Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has extended its program of early separations for enlisted personnel to include all who normally would have been separated by Jan. 20, 1955. Personnel affected by this announcement will be released two months early. According to the extension to BuPers Notice 1910, this action is mandatory and will not require any special requests on the part of the individual EM. This announcement applies to personnel of the regular Navy, the Naval Reserve and the Fleet Reserve who now are on active duty. Certain reservists had agreed to remain on active duty for 24 months and were scheduled for release by Jan. 20, 1955. They may now accept an early release. With the exception of the extension of the period to Jan. 20, 1955, this announcement is the same as the one which took effect Jan. 1, 1953, and would have expired Aug. 31, 1954. The recently completed Registered Publication Issuing Office, located across from the Fleet Landing, serves forces both ashore and afloat with all classified communications. The new building is sound, fire, bomb, and flood proof to provide absolute security. This new building culminates many years of study of RPIO functions and it results in a "dream" building. Standing before the plaque marking the spot where the Japanese surrender was signed on the quarterdeck of the USS Missouri are CAPT Robert T. S. Kieth, Commanding Officer, USS Missouri, ADM Sadik Altincan, Commander in Chief, Turkish Navy, RADM Seref Karapinar of the admiral's staff, and CAPT F. L. Tedder, Commanding Officer, Fleet Training Group. UJ. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba -"

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Iagwo The Indian's mission-To inform and entertain all hands; to serve as a positive factor in promoting the efficiency, welfare, and contentment of personnel. Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 24 April 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sadness --Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC----------------Editor H. L. Sisson, JO3----------------News Jerry Lewis, JOL--------------Features J. C. Dierks, JO3------------------Sports Pierce Lehnmbeck---------Spurts F. L. Cannen, JOSN---Photographer James DelleMsnache, P13--Makeup THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. .THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Porces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must nut be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. News-Shy Sailors Affect Folks at Home Why the reluctance of Naval Station military personnel to get their names in their home-town newspapers? LTJG John McMahon, Information and Education Officer, would like to lnow the answer. A dearth of news from Naval Station personnel is depriving the Fleet Home Town News Center of valuable stories, he said this week. His efforts to obtain more news have included the periodic distribution of a public information form to be filled out by all hands. The form is intended to provide information for routine news stories, reporting that so-and-so is now serving at the Naval Station, as well as special features which may be warranted in connection with unusual achievements. Few of the forms had been returned this week, and LTJG McMahon fears that next week will be no different in this respect, because-well, have you returned YOURS? Why should you bother? Here's why. Not only do stories in your home town paper make the home folks feel good, but they also contribute materially to the major objectives of Navy public relations. As listed in the handbook for Fleet Home Town News Center, these are: To stimulate interest in Naval activities; To procure for personnel of the Navy and Marine Corps public recognition commensurate with their accomplishments; To build good public relations. LTJG McMahon says his office could process a minimum of ten stories per day-if only he could get those forms from the publicityshy people who are still hanging on to them. TEENAGE-ROUND-UP by Barbara Burke and Linda Thurston Outside of the three R's-the razor, the rope, and the revolver, we know of only one sure-fire method of coping with the coming play, "Girl Shy". That is, to get it over with. Right now you'll find the cast in a hub-bub over the collecting of props, costumes, and cues. Pat Wormwood can be seen chasing about looking for her dust cloth, while "Caroline" Sierra sashays around in her "o, la-la" rhumba costume. But what's this we see up center stage? It's "Cecil" Lehmbeck in full blush, practicing his stage kiss on "Peaches" Davie. And there, over in a corner, is Cavanaugh floating off with his "muse". If you'd like to see how these situations form a hilarious plot, we'd advise you to see the swarms of kats that are selling tickets. Sounds paradoxical doesn't it? (That is if there aren't any other paradoxes around.) Last Monday after the lo-o-o-ng weekend, the Seniors piled into George MacMichaels car and took off on their annual Skip Day. The gig was held at Windmill Beach where the crew, plus Mrs. Angie DiBella (who was the marvelous chaperone), tried their skill in volley ball, swimming, drinking, eating and relaxing. Eddie Stafford proved to be quite the boy in his ability to put up the volley ball net. We heard via Norman W. Huddy that Pierce (cheshire cat) Leahmbeck found some interesting species of seeds while on a pictorial mountain climbing expedition. The day was brought to a glorious close as those involved stopped on their homeward bound trip to spy for a moment on the P. E. class whose eager young minds were absorbed in trying to concentrate on whacking a few golf balls out of the driving range. One of the strangest contradictions to beset contradiction fanciers recently was the situation confronting anybody who was seeking mustaches in Gtmo Bay. Certain kats should have an experience that would forever dispell the notion (cherished from boyhood no doubt) that a mustache makes one irresistible to the opposit sex. After all, a few hundred hairs on the upper lip, no matter how silky, cannot supplant a triple-A rating in Bradstreet. So ends the bitter pill to our foxy brethren. Well, hasta luego, kiddies, keep your noses clean and don't take any wooden rhetoric. The Lucky Bag by Betty Radcliffe I shall sail right into this column by telling you a few things about the Naval Station Sailboat Landing. ...The Sailboat Landing has eight sailboats; 7 Seagulls and one Snipe, they also have 8 rowboats. These boats can be checked out between the hours of 0800 and 1500. Each boat is equipped with life jackets and other necessary gear. It is necessary to have a Skipper's Card to check out a boat. Skiiper's cards can be obtained by passing a written test of 15 questions. Also available at the Sailboat Landing is a complete line of fishing gear. Rods and reels can be checked out and kits of hooks and sinkers, etc. can be purchased. Rods and reels checked out have to be returned by 0900 the following day. Fresh bait is also available and can be purchased between the hours of 0800 and 1700. Recently LT Sandness received An Editorial. One Minute-A-Day GITMO is UNIQUE, "KILL THEM WITH KINDNESS," "SLAY THEM WITH SERVICE" and "SERVICIO A LA FLOTA" are three well known slogans of organizations based at Guantanamo. They each have a god story, which is one of presenting a concise picture of their organizations. If we would all stop one minute of every day and quote the Golden Rule and then say over and over "I am going to practice it today", what a wonderful place Gtmo would be. More would happen on this base in a short period of time than has ever happened before. It might be called a revolution or in this day of "isms" the practice could be better tabbed Golden Ruleism. When the hammer hits the finger, a wheel just doesn't seem to fit the toy, or an incident upsets our child, how many of us tell our children to count 10 before taking some action. It is a good rule, but better, practice Golden Ruleism and instruct them to say the Golden Rule ten times. Explain the meaning of the famous saying and as that child or any man or woman stands in front of you for judgement, issue the medicine that is deserving but way back in the rear of the old noggin keep this in mind, "deal wisely with others by imitating those who have dealt wisely with you." SO fOK NOOK by Jerry Lewis Why do men climb mountains? "Because it is there," said a great mountaineer. Now the greatest mountain of them all has been conquered: Read the only authorized story of THE CONQUEST OF EVEREST by Sir John Hunt, leader of the British Everest Expedition of 1953. It is a complete story of the undertaking with 8 pages of full color photographs and 48 pages in black and white maps, sketches and drawings. Read the story of this century's greatest conflict between man and Nature! Humor by E. B. White in the form of the SECOND TREE FROM THE CORNER, containing stories, poems, sketches, parodies, essays and comments, covering the past, the present, the future, the city and the country. It's a must! THE MAN WHO WOULDN'T T A L K by Quentin Reynolds. George DuPre's story was too good to be true. It grew each time it was repeated. By the time DuPre told it to Quentin Reynolds, it was a whopper! It's an example of one of the most ingenious literary hoaxes perpetrated in many a day! Theatre lovers! The Burns Mantle Yearbook, THE BEST PLAYS OF 1952-1953 edited by Louis Kronenberger and beautifully illustrated by Hirschfeld, is ready to be checked out. Utilize your spare time by exploring new worlds by reading! a letter from Mrs. Anna M. Ackelbein. Mom Ackelbein, as she was known to her many friends, lived at CB 27B before returning to her home in Cambridge, Ohio. Mrs. Ackelbein would like to be remembered to her friends and wishes they would write to her at P. 0. Box 129 Cambridge, Ohio. Sunday, 25 April 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday:, 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner It's all very well for preachers and philosophers to tell us that something has gone wrong with humanity, that a monkey-wrench has been dropped into the works somewhere along the line, but it never seems to mean much to any one of us individually. That is, we can read about famines in China and earthquakes in South America with a benign sort of detachment, because we aren't affected personally. We go on eating, sleeping, working, and collecting our paycheck as usual. Then one day we get a cold in the head. Our nose runs and our eyes water. We start fussing with aspirin and hot lemonade and quinine, but always with a feeling of futility, our cold will just have to run its course. We have a feeling or resentment, too. This cold in the head is a direct attack on our personal liberty. And that is the precise spot in which we begin to realize that God's in His heaven, to be sure, but all's not right with the world. As long as men keep on having colds, as long as dogs go on biting people, as long as one person can still say, "I'm ashamed of myself," as long as we have wars and epidemics and toothaches, then we'll have to admit that things aren't running smoothly, although, as we look over the setup in the universe, we can't see any earthly reason why they shouldn't be running smoothly. We Christians and Jews know the answer to that. God did plan a perfect world and actually had it running that way for awhile. Every creature on earth took orders from man; even plant life was kind to him. We had that outer harmony, but besides that, we had the promise of God's friendship. We were to walk through life with our hand in His hand; we were never to know such words as shame and remorse. Our dignity, our integrity and common sense were to be inborn. W. J. Spinney CHC, USN THE INDIAN Saturday, 24 Al4

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-W, .2-Ani -18 Page Fiv Page Three THE INDIAN Junior-Senior Play 'Girl Shy'Opens Santiago de Cuba VU-10 Party Honors Monday Night for 2-Day Run Comedies about college boys and their troubles with college girls are usually a dime a dozen. Not so with "Girl Shy." This terrific litttle piece of college humor with criss-crossing plots and embarrassing situations will hold the. attention of the most critical of audiences. Pat Wormwood, Pierce Lehmbeck, John Moon and Mrs. Dunmire, the director, go through their lines during rehearsal for the Junior-Senior play. "Girl Shy" will be presented in arena style rather than conventional stage. Written by Katharine Kavanaugh, the noted New York authoress, the play enjoyed a successful Broadway season some years back. Revived now and brought up to date by the Junior-Senior class of the Naval Base High School it will be presented Monday and Tuesday nights for the enjoyment of all comers. And enjoyed it will be for the first twist that takes "Girl Shy" out of the ordinary comes in the first few lines of Act One and continues throughout all three acts. Enough suspense is created to make the audience wish it could shout the answer to the actors, and yet, enough sympathy is created to make it keep quiet and let the actors find out for themselves. There is a touch of nostalgia, too, as the turmoil and characters of "school daze" are reincarnated. Mrs. P. H. Dunmire, First Grade teacher, and who has been in professional theatrics, herself, is directing "Girl Shy." Mrs. Dunmire is attempting something new with this version of the play. Instead of the conventional stage with the audience in front, the comedy will be presented in the "arena." The audience will be seated on three sides of a raised platform in the school patio. The front row of seats will be literally touching the stage. The cast of characters in "Girl Shy" includes: Pierce Lehmbeck in the leading role as "Tom Arsdale" who is "girl shy;" Norman Huddy as "Oke Stimson", his buddy who isn't; Pat Wormwood as the opposite lead, "Barbara Stanford;" Anita Sierra, John Moon, Linda Thurston, Wallace Grafton, Barbara Davie, Glenna Wright, Barbara Burke, James Cavanaugh and James Beaman. Barbara Burke and Pat Wormwood rehearse a scene in Act I of "Girl Shy" being presented Monday and Tuesday ni ts in the school patio. (This is the first of a series of articles on Santiago written by the American VceConsul). CORsWolfe and McCo By Authur W. Feldman American Vice Consul Santiago de Cuba This picturesque and historical city of about 150,000 on a beautiful and almost landlocked bay on the southern coast of Cuba is little visited by tourists. These pleasureseekers come to Havana and there remain, little realizing that a picturesque Cuba is found in this city, 601 miles away. The city is built on many hills sloping down to the bay. Around and about the suburbs is a mountain range which offers a perpetual symphony of shades of green and blue as the light varies. Quite often the peaks are capped by low-lying white clouds which give the impression of being snow-blanketed. The mean temperature is tolerable being 82' F in the winter and 88' F in the summer. However, there are pleasant breezes which offer some relief to those who mind the heat. To all intents and purposes there are only the summer and winter seasons with no evident intermediate periodic change s. Thus, the local Chamber of Comcerce could easily claim the title "The city of constant warmth and sunshine" for Santiago de Cuba. Santiago, as it is called in short, is an important commercial port because of its location near the Windward Passage entrance to the Caribbean Sea. Here, one can find vessels either unloading cargoes from Europe, Japan and the Western Hemisphere or loading sugar, manganese ore,rum, tobacco, honey and molasses for worldwide destinations on our side of the Iron Curtain. It is not a strain on one's imagination to visualize the ghost of Governor Diego Velazquez, who founded the city in 1514 as the capital of the Island, conferring with that of Hernan Cortes, who was its mayor in 1514, about the expedition the latter was to lead to Mexico where gold and conquests awaited him. It was from Santiago that the expedition, sponsored and outfitted by Governor Velazqeuz, set sail in 1518. It was also from here that Governor Velazquez later sent a force to subdue Cortes since it appeared that Cortes had taken the bit in his teeth and had gone off on his own without even expressing some sentiment of appreciation for his sponsor's confidence and assistance. Plaza Cespedes, renamed after Carlos Manuel de Cespedes, one of the leaders in Cuba's fight for independence, is the center of the past and present social and commercial life of the city. This square marks off the low part of the city from the high and the streets radiating from the square are known by the suffix "alto" for high or "bajo" for low, depending upon which direction they take. The new municipal building on the north side of the Plaza (formerly known as the Plaza de Armas) is being built on the site of the original city hall. In digging the foundation, an old cistern was found which had painted in it a cross with the date 1643. For a wild moment, there was the hope among the Santiagueros that a treasure trove had been found. Only the firm stand taken by the local museum director, the city historian and the mayor stayed the desire of the disrespectful from destroying this memento of the dim past. The cistern has now been made part of the city hall and will be available for insp tion. Monday night, 26 April, beginning at 1830 at the Naval Air Station Enlisted Men's club a change of command party will be held for the officers and enlisted men of VU-10 and their dependents. Principal guests of honor at the dinner-dance will be CDR T. B. Wolfe, Commanding Officer, CDR D. E. McCoy, who has been assigned to relieve Commander Wolfe, CDR R. C. Spears, Executive Officer, LCDR W. K. Woodard, and LCDR A. D. Nelson. Besides the dinner and dance, there will be a floor show featuring VU-10 personnel with Jerry Lewis as master of ceremonies. Commander McCoy will arrive Monday morning on the USNS Thomas, and the change of command ceremonies have been planned for 0830 the following Saturday, 1 May at the VU-10 hanger. All commanding officers and executive officers of base commands have been invited, and the Naval Base band will be on hand to add full color to the ceremony. Commander Wolfe, who has received notice that his next assignment will be with Chief of Naval Operations, Na v y Department, Washington D. C., has commanded VU-10 since September 1952. He graduated from the Naval Academy in 1941 with a Bachelor of Science Degree and first served on board the USS Herbert, DD 160. Prior to his assignment as Commanding Officer, VU-10, Commander Wolfe was navigator on board the USS Coral Sea, and before that he was Executive Officer of VPMS 3 and Fasron 117. Commander Wolfe will depart from Guantanamo sometime in May with his wife, Mary Kay, and their two daughters Mary and Kathrine. CDR R. C. Spears, executive officer of VU-10, will also be relieved and reassigned in May. His next assignment will take him to Corpus Christi, Tex. for duty under the Chief of Naval Air Advanced Training. CDR C. C. Stamm has already reported aboard to relieve Commander Spears. With the arrival Monday of CDR D. E. McCoy as Commander Wolfe's relief, Utility Squadron 10 has the unique distinction of being the only utility squadron in the Atlantic with four full commanders attached -even if only for a short time. Henry Garcia Wins Slogan Contest Henry Garcia, employee relations assistant in the Industrial Relations Office, was this week adjudged winner of the $5 prize offered for a slogan for the Indian. Mr. Garcia's entry, "The expression of America under the sky of Cuba," was picked as the best entry by the Editorial Sub-Committee. Because of the requirement for a shorter slogan, Mr. Garcia's entry will not actually be used as the Indian slogan. Instead, the slogan "Covers Gtmo like the sunshine." suggested by CDR R. C. Spears, a member of the committee, will be used. In addition to the entry of Mr. Garcia, contest entries were received from Mrs. Marina Heimer, LTJG John McMahon, John F. Arguello, YN3, Richard J. Modrow, YN3, Pierce Lehmbeck, and James Dexter. ay 24 April 1954

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Marine Leathernecks Top League in First Round by Pierce Lehmbeck As the Marine Leathernecks marched to a 5-3 victory over the Naval Station Indians Tuesday night they notched their third straight win against no defeats to lead the local nines into their third week of play. Leading the Leathernecks, who exhibited some fine hurling in holding the Braves to but three hits, was outfielder Chuck Mason who found the left field fence twice in succession to establish a new local mark for homeruns in one game. To add to this performance, he finished out the evening by singling and reaching first on an infield error to score three of the Marine's five runs. Starting on the mound for the Leathernecks was veteran hurler and manager, "Smitty" Smith. Smith showed near perfect control during the first four innings by holding the Braves hitless and walking only one. However, in the top of the fifth they seemingly figured out his odd style and hopping serve to slap him for three runs on three hits to go ahead of the earlier two run margin which had been provided by Mason's round-trippers. To get out of this predicament, Smith called on his staff ace Rollie Santos who finished the last four innings by holding the Braves hitless and striking out nine. The breaking point came when the Marines finally caught Brave starter Bill Royal, who until this point had thrown a near flawless game in giving up but four hits, by tagging him for three runs on four singles and a couple of costly infield boots Buss came in to put out the fire and from that point on, both teams went scoreless with the Leathernecks banging out two more hits in the bottom of the eighth. Santos was credited with the win after relieving Smith in the fifth. This ran his record to two wins against no defeats. For the Braves, Royal was credited with the loss to give him a one and one mark. He was relieved by Buss in the seventh. Mallards Nudge Flyers The VU-10 Mallards, cruising behind the hurling efforts of Dutch Huber and Harry Breske, pushed to a 4-2 win over the NAS Flyers Wednesday night, to notch their first victory of this young '54 campaign. Starting for the Mallards, Huber had the Flyers completely under his control for the first seven innings as he held them scoreless while giving up but six hits. However, in the top of the eighth the Flyers finally caught him and promptly scored two runs on two well placed singles. Harry Breske came in to relieved Huber and set the Flyers down in order via the strikeout route. He finished the tilt by giving up but one safety during the last session. The Mallards scored the deciding runs in the fourth and fifth innings. Led by clean-up batter Bob Dieden who collected a double and two singles in four times at the plate, they tagged starter Sutherland for one run in the fourth and three in the fifth. Huber was credited with the win, his first against no defeats while Sutherland was charged with the loss, his third in as many starts. The Flyers committed five miscues while the Mallards made three misplays. Leathernecks-SeaBees Win Over Weekend Last weekend at the Marine Site field, over capacity crowds turned out to see the Marine Leathernecks edge the VU-10 Mallards and the SeaBees of MCB-8 down the NAS Flyers in two beatiful pitching exhibitions. In the 3-1 Leatherneck win over the Mallards on Saturday afternoon, Rollie Santos, in his first appearance on the local scene was at his best as he held VU-10 to three hits while striking out fourteen. Starter Buzz Presutti of the Mallards was also having a good day as he blanked the Leathernecks for the first seven innings while giving up but two safeties. The breaking point in this duel cane when the Mallards clipped Santos for one run on two hits in the bottom of the seventh, only to have them come back in the top of the eighth and knot the score with one run also. In the ninth the Leathernecks salted the game away by chasing Presutti off the mound and then belting reliever Harry Breske for two more runs. In Sunday's game, it was the big right arm of Bigby which made all the difference as the SeaBees edged the NAS Flyers, 4-3. The big fellow with the odd windup had the Flyers coming and going as he held them to but five hits in going the distance-none of them going for extra bases. Meanwhile, the SeaBee batting order tagged starter Sutherland for two runs in the bottom of the seventh to notch an early lead for the big right wander. They came back to score one more in the third with the fourth and deciding run being scored in the sixth. The Flyers made an attempt to come from behind in the closing innings as they tagged Bigby for two in the seventh but fell short as they pushed across only one in the top of the ninth. Next week's Schedule Saturday, 24 April Naval Station vs NAS Sunday, 25 April Marines vs MCB-8 Tuesday, 27 April Naval Station vs VU-10 Wednesday, 28 April NAS vs Marines Thursday, 29 April MCB-8 vs Naval Station Top Ten Batters Player Team AB Dieden VU-10 11 Layman MCB-8 8 Konkley NAS 11 Yarbrough NAS 9 Dotson MCB-8 7 Pace Marines 5 Foster VU-10 5 Young NavSta 9 Androvich Marines 9 Stoeckle MCB-8 9 H 6 4 5 4 3 2 2 3 3 3 Pitching Records Player Team Santos Marines Bigby MCB-8 Shackleton MCB-8 Smith Marines Huber VU-10 Royal NavSta Presutti VU-10 Buss NavSta Breske VU-10 Sutherland WAS Won 2 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 AVG .545 .500 .454 .444 .428 .400 .400 .333 .333 .333 Lost 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 3 Tom Felak, Marine catcher, lays the wood to one for a two bagger which proved to be the keynote in the home-standing Leatherneck's 3-1 victory over the VU-10 Mallards last Saturday afternoon. The Mallard catcher is Richard Rea. Puttin' Around by Wright North The Intra-Command Golf tournament goes into the last week-end of double matches today when NAS meets Hospital at 1300 and Naval Station, striving to hold 3rd place, closes out the season against the team from MCB. VU-10, first half winner and presently leading in the second half, will complete their schedule tomorrow morning against FTG. This match could very likely decide the second half since VU-10, with 80 points in five matches, is only 91A points ahead of FTG with 70 points in a 4 matches. FTG will play their 6th and final match on Saturday, May 1st. against NAS and this, too, could be the deciding factor for the eventual winner. Trophies Move to Adbldg The 1953 ComTen trophy and the Santiago Challenge Cup, now on display in the golf shop, will be moved to the Administration Building Monday due to insufficient space in the golf shop. However, when better facilities are available, these golf trohpies from past years will probably be retained in the proposed new club house. Traps Require Raking All traps now have at least one rake, and all golfers are requested to use them in smoothing out their footprints and divots. There are also signs on each par 3 tee that read, "Please allow following players to hit tee shot on all par 3 holes after you have marked your ball on the green and removed bags and carts from line of play." Leaving a bag or cart in front of a green, or by not marking the ball on the green, particularly near the cup, may be the reason your fellow golfer does not hole out for a hole-in-one. Congratulations Congratulations to Bill Foulk, AOC, at the VU-10 detachment in Key West, for winning the City Championship. I wonder if we could be seeing him in the local course today and especially tomorrow in VU-10's drive to retain the IntraCommand cup? League Standings Team Won L Marine Leathernecks 3 MCB-8 Seabees 2 Naval Station Indians 1 VU-10 Mallards 1 NAS Flyers 0 Teen-age Bowling ost 0 0 2 2 3 Team Standings GW GL Lehmbeck's -----------22 5 MacMichael's ----------16 11 Beman's -------------14 13 Huddy's --------------2 25 High Average (Boys) Pierce Lehmbeck --------162.28 George MacMichael -154.11 High Average (girls) Renee Skinner ----------117.27 Roxanna Moore -----106.14 High Game (Boys Pierce Lehmbeck ----------212 High Game (Girls) Renee Skinner --------------167 Scotch Foursome All contestants in the Scotch foursome tomorrow are requested to be on time, and if possible early, in order to assign. Caddies Pairings for partners and starting time are available in the golf shop if you desire to call 9619. Page-Pour Saturday, 24 Apr b THE INDIAN

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W~,2 prl 94 NT~E NIA&PWFv The Angle(R) SHARK by Jerry Lewis Meet the shark. Nothing that swims is as well-known or as widely feared as the carnivora known as the shark. There is something about the sleek easy power of this bullet-shaped creature with its wicked little eyes and razor sharp teeth that brings cold clammy fear to the heart of the bravest swimmer. There are recorded cases of sharks attacking and killing human beings but these are quite rare. The fact is that your chances of shark bite while swimming on the average beach are so small that you are more apt to be struck by lightning! Science estimates that sharks have existed for three-hundred and fifty-million years! The common belief is that the only two living creatures that have not changed their original form from the dark ages to the present are the shark and ants. A few peculiarities of this fish is that he has no bladder as other fish do. He must therefore continually swim or sink to the bottom. He also has a keen sense of smell which is the principal reason why a cut and bleeding skin-diver or swimmer should waste no time leaving the water. The power behind the sharks teeth is sufficient to shear off an arm or leg at ease. For example, once a harpooned shark weighing 1500-pounds was being towed in close to a schooner. Suddenly it rushed the ship and seizing the solid oak rudder post it chewed its way through the five and-a-half inch beam in a few seconds thus disabling the ship. He is considered a coward by authorities. This has been proven by professional divers with years of swimming in shark-infested waters of the world. The skin of the shark is almost like sandpaper. His hide is tanned and used in todays modern leather industry for the manufacture of shoes, belts, leather bags and other items on the market. Of the ten general species of shark, here are a few commonly found in the waters of the West Indies: The blue shark (pictured) is a member of the mackerel shark family. He has a stout nose and attains a length of twelve feet with a steel-blue coloring. All other sharks give this cousin a wide birth! Endlessly cruising the waters of the tropics is the well-named Tigershark which preys on turtles, fish and other shark. He has a massive head, a convex snout and ja-vs studded with strong teeth. His length is between twelve and thirty feet. They are much feared in the West Indies although there is no recorded case of human attack. The Nurse shark is found off the Florida Keyes and the West Indies. They are sluggish and harmless and more than one adventurous youth has climbed aboard his broad back for a thrilling ride. A small barber of whisker on each side of the mouth identifies the species. Some of the other species are '0' Bowling Ends Season The Naval Base Officers' Club Bowling League finished up its season on Friday evening, 16 April with National Division NAS team No. 2, piloted by LT Dandrea walking off with base championship honors. On 15 April the semi-finals were held between Hospital No. 1 and NAS No. 1 in the American Division, with NAS No. 2 and NavSta No. 1 battling it out for top honors in the National. The following night LT Dandrea's team scuttled Hospital No. 1 to take the title. The high individual leaders for this year's season of play were: Men's High Average: CWOHC L. Novak-180 Mr. K. Marabella-178 Women's High Average: Mrs. Emily Griffin, NSD-163 Mrs. Millie Knilans, FTG-160 Men's High Individual Triple: LCDR Knilans, FTG-623 CWOHC L. Novak-620 Women's High Individual Triple: Mrs. Emily Griffin, NSD-536 Mrs. Frankie Staley, FTG-534 Men's High Individual Single: LTJG R. Hanavan, Hosp.-246 CDR Gash, FTG-245 Women's High Individual Single: Mrs. Betty Sentz, NAS-203 Mrs. Frankie Staley, FTG-202 Tuesday evening saw a buffet supper held at the Officers' Club patio for members of the League as the teams closed out their season. RADM E. B. Taylor took this occasion for the presentation of the trophies to the teams and individuals who met with the most success during the season. Awards were given to the NAS team No. 2 for the League championship as -well as a second place cup to the runner-up American Division squad. Trophies were also given to the individuals mentioned above who led in averages, triples, and high games for the year. Sport Shots Boxing experts say there's a hurricane heading for heavyweight champion Rocky Marciano. They are speaking of Tommy "Hurricane" Jackson a scrappy 22-yearold who storms his opponents with lightning lefts and rights-not to mention a two-hand uppercut. Jackson's latest victim, Dan Bucceroni, was ranked third in the heavyweight division this month by The Ring Magazine. Bucceroni, who started boxing while in the Navy, hadn't lost since 1951. He was ready for a crack at the title. Jackson pounded Bucceroni into submission and the bout was stopped in the sixth round. In addition to Bucceroni, Jackson also defeated Rex Layne and Clarence Henry. Service Highlights Pfc. Sandy Saddler, w o r 1 d featherweight champion, recently scored a technical knockout over Augie Salazar in the Boston Arena. This was the third straight TKO for the Ft. Jay, N. Y., soldier, who is due for discharge Apr. 20. ... Marine Cpl. Bill Kelley of Cherry Point, N. C., recently took first place in the stock car feature race at Soldier Field in Chicago. In three years of racing, Kelley, known as "Wild Bill," has won 36 feaure events in stock cars, hot rods and midgets. Service Force Atlantic Fleet downed Destroyer Force Atlantic Fleet, 78-70, to win the 1954 Atlantic Fleet basketball crown. ... The New England National Sports Car Races will be held at Westover AFB, Mass., June 13. The Pacific Fleet basketball crown was won by Barber's Point NAS, T.H., as it defeated Atsugi NAS, Japan, 84-74. ... Former Illinois quarterback Tommy O'Connell, who played with the Chicago Bears in the National Football League last year, will report for active duty with the Air Force, Apr. 13. CDR W. G. Winslow admires the bowling trophy presented to him by RADM E. B. Taylor, (second from left). Commander Winslow was captain of the winning team, NAS Team No. 2. Awards were made at the Officers' Club Tuesday night. Thresher, Dogfish and Sand, Hammerhead, White, Basking and Whale shark. If ever confronted by one of these fellows, respect him for what he is and above all, don't underestimate his speed, tenacity or abilities. He is a victim of his own emotions and a difficult fellow to handle when properly aroused! Little League Holds Final Tryouts Today The Guantanamo Bay Little League will hold its final tryouts this afternoon at 1330 and 1530. The boys who have been playing as the Bears and Tigers will begin their session at 1330. The Hawks and Rams will go through their paces at 1530. Propective managers and coaches J. S. Emerson, R. E. Bogan, Dr. Hering, R. J. Rifflard, N. Huddy, and C. C. Hartley will be on hand to evaluate each player according to his ability. At the conclusion of the tryouts, a player selection will be held by the managers under the supervision of a player agent who will endeavor to see that the teams are as evenly balanced as possible. The teams will be made up of fifteen boys each, with a manager and a coach to run each team. The league officials hope to be able to field six teams for the competition that will start Saturday, May 22nd. The final makeup of the teams and schedule of games will be announced within the next two weeks. The newly elected officials of the Little League, J. F. Duffy, ADC, President, LT T. H. Cushman, Vice President, Mrs. W. A. Schnake, Secretary, and Mr. R. Groeneveld, Treasurer, have taken up the task of bringing Little League baseball to this Base with the aid of their sponsors, the American Legion, Sojourners Club, and the Fleet Reserve Assn. These three or gani z nation s, through their sponsorship, have raised the necessary funds to cover the cost of the ball field, uniforms, and equipment. RADM Edmund B. Taylor and CAPT W. R. Caruthers have announced that funds will be provided for the erecting of a club house and grandstands to complete the layout of the field in time for the opening game. Ladies' Golf Shots by Joyce Simmons This week the ladies competed in a Blind Five tournament played on the back nine holes of the golf course. Five of the nine holes were chosen at random to be used to total the individual scores. Winners were as follows: 1st Flight 1st place-Mary Ann Pennell 2nd place-Lou Toczko 2nd Flight 1st place-Edna Edwards 2nd place-Mary Spears Lillian North 3rd Flight 1st place-Clair Suslick 2nd place-Marg Sheehan Next Wednesday we will play the entire course, which will give all you gals some much needed practice for the 18 hole qualifying round for the Championship which is to take place the following week on May 5. Don't forget the Scotch Foursome tomorrow, April 25. Again, all couples and partners are to be drawn at random, and the men are generously furnishing beer, coke, and potato chips as an added incentive after completing the 18th hole. Everyone has loved these matches in the past, so why don't a few more of you "golferettes" join us and make this coming Scotch Foursome the biggest one yet? y24 April 1954 THE INDIAN Page Five U

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Saturday, 24 AprP Friz Catches 'EYEBALL EXPRESS' To San Juan by Dick Friz It has been said that a visit to San Juan is not complete unless ample time is alloted for recuperation. My jaunt to the Puerto Rican capital can only be construed then, as an "eyeball express." I did, however, touch down at McCalla Field with a fresh respect for its people. I saw modern hotels and department stores silhoueted against the San Jose Church ...the Puerto Nuevo housing projects contrast with cribs, ruins, and Fort San Cristobel, which Sir Francis Drake had once found impenetrable. San Juan, oldest city under the American flag, was first governed by Ponce de Leon, whose "fountain of youth" may be responsible for the doubling of population three times in the last century and a half. I spent one afternoon strolling through the old part of the city. The district, toughest this side of Singapore, is notorious for straightrazor brawls. It seemed serene at dusk, and I half expected a seniorita, leaning from her balcony, to toss a rose. I met a comely waitress at the Club Continental-a sailor was one jump ahead of me-it was her husband. ...I moved hurriedly on to a vers libre poet who waxed eloquently on "freedom." This modern Don Quixote told me, "Don't call us Puerto Ricans, Senor, we are Americans, you are mainlanders. We Americans are outraged at the misconduct of those radicals, those heretics, who fired at Congress. Communism could never thrive here." An American couple entered the club, and our literary friend streaked to their table, and smothered the woman's arm with kisses (like Valentino in an old time "flick.") Mr. Randolph introduced himself as a landscape architect, and his wife as a school teacher. I assumed they and the poet had met. Mrs. Randolph has been highly successful in organizing a Commonwealth School and reported that over half her graduating class had enrolled at either the University Rio Piedras, or an American University. Mr. Randolph spoke of Operation Bootstrap, and economic revival in San Juan, in which American industry is lending a financial hand. Culture too is invading the city. The Metropolitan Opera will make its first appearance this spring. "We are not quite ready for it, though," his wife said. "We are still in the Stan Kenton stage." The taxi driver that took me to the boxing matches would make one of Chitwood's daredevils look like a Sunday afternoon motorist and I never quite recovered from that drive. After the matches I walked over the Condado district and sampled the elegant night life. I rubbed shoulders with the hoi poi loi at the Caribe Hilton, got lost in the Voodo Room (it was so dark that I ended up in the washroom), heard the click of roulette wheels at Jacks and watched them dance that famous JackJack Rhumba. I fought off senioritas (rather feebly) at the Key Club and 22. A remark made by a young student in the 22 Club will be most difficult to take lightly .. "We admit that we have our shortcomings, we have much housecleaning to do, but we won't rest until our star is also on the blue of Old Glory." A Message From Garcia BARACOA by Henry Garcia When Admiral Columbus discovered Cuba, in 1493, he landed in Baracoa. The beauty of the scenery, the mild climate, and the fertility of the land, made the admiral exclaim with enthusiasm that it was "the most beautiful land ever seen by human eyes". Baracoa was the first capital of Cuba. So, as you can see, this Cuban city has been the first in many things. The first to receive the expedition of Christopher Columbus. The first capital of the island. And the first town of importance when the "Conquistadores" from Spain came to Cuba. In something has Baracoa been the last, however and it is in getting the necessary official attention to her problems. Not long ago, the only way to get to Baracoa was either by plane or by sea. Now, thanks to the construction of a most important highway that connects Baracoa with the rest of the island, it will be easy for visitors to go in summertime and enjoy their vacations there. The highway. still under construction, is just one of President Batista's projects, tending to attract more tourists from the States. It is worthwhile, no doubt, to visit Baracoa. Mountains of incredible natural shape, such as "El Yunque", which resembles what its Spanish name indicates, an anvil. Also rivers such as "Rio Miel" (the Honey River), where there is a variety of fishes only found in the Nile and in this river. Many things that the human is unable to express are there: Sun sets, typical music, and girls whose beauty spells temptation. How about visiting Baracoa this summer? How to spend a cheap vacation: "Drop a nickel (or dime) in a telephone and wait for central to answer. Critical Spectator: "I can't imagine anyone missing a putt as short as that." Golfer: "Let me remind you, sir, that that hole is only four and one-quarter inches across and the whole world's outside it. Ename l Etc hngs The lengthening daylight hours are adding impetus to the local athletic program. A "golf ladder" has been formed and the qualifiers wound up last Saturday with the sterling tee-demon, George "Red" Fauth as top dog or, should we say, top rung. More of this later. For those outdoormen desiring a taste of adventure be advised to consult F. B. Cooper. He is alleged to be gathering a crew together to enter the next Miami-Nassau predicted log yacht race. It is rumored he is having trouble getting clearance from the Coast Guard, but this is not believed to be true, merely gossip engendered by a malicious oaf, unnamed, who claims Coopers boat, the Maiden Lady, is not seaworthy. To those athletes with a scientific bend of mind Joe Rose's project may appeal. Young Rose is believed to be working on a development enabling paratroopers to complete their mission unencumbered with a heavy, oldfashioned parachute but so far hasn't solved the problem of rapid descent. Observers report that Rose struck the ground with considerable force on his last speed run and was heard to mutter, "I might have been killed." Additions a n d Subtractions: LCDR J. F. Flood has orders to report here from the U.S. Naval Hospital, Phila., probably to arrive some time in September. CDR E. T. Nealon departs some time in July for duty at Bainbridge, Md. The dental technicians Bachelors club, that well known group of men-about-town, is well pleased with the progress being made on the new club rooms in Bldg. 4, Bay Hill. The suggestion that a penthouse be added for the exclusive use of the Board of Governors was voted down at an open meeting amidst cat-calls and crys of "shame". R. H. Hamberger, prominent club-man, has threatened to withdraw and leave the local scene entirely, going so far as to consult a travel agency on the availability of a sea cruise. CDR Frank Etter, executive officer, is practically back to battery, having been discharged this week from the hospital. Claims he no longer needs that air cushion and is considering applying for the job as riding master at the local corral. ENS David Briggs points out how to find the radius of a circle in the High school-level plane geometry class. The class meets every Tuesday in the testing room at the Information and Education Office. It is now in its third week and is due to run for about twelve weeks. PUBLIC WORKS CHIPS by Vic. Gault It is with regret that this column announces the detachment of our Public Works Officer, who has been the "Jefe de Obras Publicas" since March 1952, when he relieved CDR B. 0. Roessler, CEC, USN. CDR Jerome N. Lawlor, CEC, USNR, will proceed to his new duties in the Public Works Dept. at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, reporting in June after a well deserved vacation State-side. The commander has been an officer in the Civil Engineer Corps since early 1942 and has had continuous active duty assignments. He is a veteran of World War I as an enlisted man and is one of the older officers on the Base considering his many years of active and reserve service. CDR Lawlor was Officer-in-Charge of several Seabee Units and Battalions during World War II, serving both in the Atlantic and Pacific areas. One of his outfits was attached to the Fourth Marine Division during the invasion and occupation of the Marianas Islands. Since his return from overseas in May 1946, CDR Lawlor has been the Public Works Officer at the Naval Powder Factory and at St. Albans Hospital. Also, he was on the staff of the District Public Works Office for the Fourth Naval District, and while on that duty was in charge of design and construction for many major naval installations under the congnizance of that District. His record at this base includes the planning, designing and supervision construction of many important projects which were installed by local Public Works forces. The Commander has been one of the active officers on the base, and will be remembered for his bowling, golf and Toastmaster interests as extra activities. All hands in this department wish the commander well, and good duty in his next assignment. The Public Works organization bids an "Hasta la Vista" to Mrs. Geraldine Narwid, who has held the position of Secretary to the Public Works Officer since April 1953. Mrs. Narwid, due to receipt of orders by her. husband, Walter Narwid, ENC, USN, resigned her position last week and will establish her home, temporarily, at Norfolk, Virginia. During her tenure of duty with the organization she gained many friends because of her pleasant manner of dealing with all hands. Parents are again cautioned in connection with allowing their children to play with and handle construction and other equipment used by the CB Units on the Replacement Housing Program at the Villamar Housing area, or anywhere on the base. To handle and play with this equipment is very dangerous, and a regrettable accident could very easily occur in which your child would be the one so unfortunate as to be affected. The difference between a sailor and a seabee is that while the sailor is looking for a park bench the seabee builds one. Then there was the drunk who arrived late at the cocktail party, hastily threw down six martinis and smiled benignly around the room. "I feel a lot more like I do now than when I came in." A worried mother telephoned an old Navy man: "My son writes that he is coming home with a hashmark. Is that serious?" Page Six THE INDIAN 0*

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24 1954 THE INDIAN -Pa~ Old Timer Worked For 404-A-Day HENRY HANSEN Henry Hansen, a native of Haiti, held his first job on the Base in 1914 as an apprentice in the Ships Repair Department, startng with a salary of only 40 cents per day. His deep interest in all matters concerning his job soon won him a Machinist rating. From that position he was promoted to Quarterman Machinist, then to Assistant Foreman (Machine Division), and from that rating to his present position as Chief Quarterman (Machine Division) in the Ships Department, Naval Station. His present position allows the Hansens to live in a comfortable home which they rent in Guantanamo City, and to finance the education of their children, two girls and a boy. Asked about his happiest memory of Navy Employment, he mentioned the day when he received a 30 year award. "Being presented that award", he said, "made me look back with inner satisfaction to those 30 years of service, each one of which had shown some progress in my job". Most exciting experience since becoming a Navy employee, according to Mr. Hansen, was a complicated repair job that was performed recently in his shop for the first time on this Base. The shaft of a destroyer had to be changed, and Mr. Hansen, with seven of his men, plus riggers, shipfitters, etc., worked day in and day out, until the work was finally accomplished. Does he plan to retire soon? No sir! Mr. Hansen says that he loves his job so much that he hopes to keep it until mandatory retirement age. Meetings ... Time & Place Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd & 4th Tuesday each month. Community Auditorium Ladies' Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Room, Community Auditorium Little Theatre Group 2000; 1st Tuesday each month Marina Point Hospital Service Volunteers 1000; 2nd Tuesday each month Hospital Medical Library American Legion Auxiliary, Unit One 1930; 3rd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Hut, Marina Point Toastmasters Club 92 1980 each Thursday, Officers Club dining American Legion, Guantanamo Bay Post 1 1930; 3rd Tuesday each month; Community Auditorium, Marina Point Parent-Teachers Association 1930; 1st Tuesday of each month Naval Base School Fellowcraft Club No. 1078 2000 each Thursday, Practice, Business Meeting. 1st Thursday -Community Auditorium National Supervisors Association 1900: 1st Monday each month, Civilian Training Conference Room. Able Crew Operates Veteran Drones After six months of gruelling drone operations with the Fleet Guantanamo Bay, the Utility Squadron 10 Drone Unit poses with heroes of the "Gitmo wars"-drones (Red Dogs) 4 and 7. The h marks on the fusilage depict the number of times that each drone been fired at by Fleet units. Double and triple marks indicate two three ships firing. The total shows that 29 ships have fired at th two Red Dogs and they're still going up for more. The officers and a who control the drones in flight and on the ground are, left to ri (standing)-Eugene Crouch, ADC/AP; LT W. H. Rose, LT B. E. Eva CDR T. B. Wolfe (CO-VU-10), C. B. Herndon, ADC/AP, LTJG J Hawkins, LT M. J. Dailey, P. S. Woodward, AO1/AP. (Kneeling)-LT D. S. Blair, G. C. Pirtle, AOC/AP, ENS R. M. Greenfield and LT R. Kaiser. NAS Crosswinds by Dick Friz WHO'S WHO AT THE AIR STATION Captain Reginald McCrackenborn in Seymour, Iowa, the "Skipper" attended Iowa State College and graduated from the Naval Academy in 1931 ...was designated Naval Aviator in '34. Last duty station ...CO of USS Valcour, AVP 55. Assumed command of Naval Air Station here in February of this year. Wife's name is Alma, and has two sons, Richard (Annapolis, class of '57) and Michael. Commander Walter G. Winslow -born in Long Island, New York, the "Exec" received a BA. at the University of Richmond .entered the Navy in '37 ...designated Aviator in '37. ..was a Japanese prisoner of war from '42 to '45 last duty station was Public Information Officer for CNATRA in Pensacola Fla., Reported here as Operations Officer ...appointed Executive Officer in May '53. Married Toni in '47, has four children, Delsa, Catherine, Walter III and Mary Dee (born here). Lieutenant Commander Jack Parker-born in Jackson Michigan .attended Jackson High commissioned Naval Aviator in '41 ...was formerly with the Naval Administrative Unit at Sandia Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Became Assistant Operation Officer in September of '53. Wife's name is Edith, and has two sons, Jerry and Richard. NAS and VU-10 collaborated on a party Monday night at the EM Club. Music was provided by a group from the Missouri ...and VU-10 Prop Blast ofThe squadron is losing another ofits stellar characters. LT Billy E. Smith reported to VU-10 on May 12, 1952 and will depart May 12, 1954 via FLAW for 8 weeks GCA schooling in Olathe, Kansas, then to a GCA unit, Quonset Point, Rhode Island. Billy says that he is one of our most outstanding utility pilots. He has done a fine job and his very attractive wife, Ann is going to he sorely missed. "God Speed" to Billy, Ann, Skipper, Perry, and Ben. The Mallard golfers eked through a 13/2 to 11 / win over the strong Naval Station-Grego team on Saturday 17 April. The next and last match for the Mallards is Sunday 25 April against Fleet Training Group. This match will almost defietely decide the second half champion of the intra-command league. On Monday 26 April an All Hands pasty will he held at the EM Club. This will he a farewell for CDR and Mrs. T. B. Wolfe and a welcome aboard for CDR and Mrs. D. H. McCoy. The party committee says it is going to he a "whiz dinger" with pre-dinner refreshments, dinner, after dinner at refreshments, and wonderful local 1wo entertainment with our hoy Jerry Lewis as master of ceremonies. ash One of the rumored events is a foot has race between Brostom and Halse, os two of our faster boys. uese LT Jim H. Goldamer and Gloria men made the weekend, April 16 to 19, ght trip to Port au Prince on the USS ns, Rollette. They are still singing B. praises of the hospitality, good SJG food, and just plain fun enjoyed JG in the Haitian capital. Gloria says she spent lots of money on straw goods and saved a lot by keeping Jim in tow. The Smith's are departing GTMO for Quonset on 12 May after two years to the day with VU-10. Skipper 9, LT B. E. Smith, Ben 2, Ann, and Perry 5. chaperoned USO girls from Guantanamo City were the guests of honor. The combination of dancing and imbibing made for an enjoyable evening. NAS Bowling team No. 2 captured the league playoff title defeating NAS No' 1. CDR Winslow, Mr. Serig (who wore mismatched socks), LCDR Vanderhoff, LT Dandrea, LT Cana 1 e j o, Mrs. Dandrea, and Mrs. Leach comprise the winning team. Ten pins separated the two teams, in the finale. The trophies were awarded at the bowling banquet held at the Officers Club Monday night. "Do you believe in clubs for women ?" "Only when kindness fails." Barber: "Will you have anything on your face when I finish shaving you?" Customer: "If you don't mind, you can leave my nose." Overheard in a small town, "What do you natives do for amusement around here." "Hunt and drink." "What do you hunt?" "Something to drink." 4Api 94TEIDA 4ft Pag

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ONDPPO-Gtmo.4824D NavSta Photo Hobby Shop "Dodo" Open for 'Came Photo fans who have been anxio photo lab to open can now breathe business last Saturday under the Transportation Dept. The lab is located in the rear of the hobby shop, which is in back of Bay Hill, near the Naval Station Boat Shed. The hours of operation are weekdays, 1700 to 2130, except Thursday and 0900 to 2130 Saturday. It will be closed Thursday and open from 1300 to 1600 on Sunday. Here are a few of the features Two photo enthusiasts prepare to print a picture with the Omega D-6 enlarger in the newly-opened Hobby Shop photo lab. of the newly-opened lab. It has two enlargers, an Omega D6 and Omega D2. The D6 will accept negatives up to 21/4 x 3Y4 inches, and the D2 will accept negatives up to 4 x 5 inches. Three gradations of printing paper are available, Fl, F2 and F3. It is sold in both enlarging and contact types for 5 cents per 8 x 10 inch sheet. 314 x 414 contact paper is sold for 1 cent per sheet. You pay for each sheet used, not just the good ones. The lab can accomodate a total of nine people at a time: two enlarging, one contact printing and six developing film. The type of developer available at present is D-76 for film and D-72 for paper. D-76 is a 20 minute "Well, how does it look?" asks one of the photo hobbyists as they consider the merits of a picture they have just printed. ra Bugs' usly waiting for the Hobby Shop asier. The lab opened its doors for supervision of Pete Broughton of deveolper, fine grain type. For drying film there is a "hotbox", heated by two 300 watt bulbs. This hotbox was built by S. E. Cobbs, PHAN, former "Indian" photographer now on the USS Bennington, and will dry negatives in a little more than an hour. For drying prints there is a drum ferrotype dryer which can be heated to 300 degrees. Lets take a man through the whole process of walking in with a roll of exposed film and emerging with a finished print in his hand. First, he takes the roll of film into the loading room, a small, lightproof room, in which he loads a film tank with the exposed roll. The lab is air conditioned to keep the chemicals at the proper temperature of 68 degrees at all times. Them he pours developer in the tank, allows it to work for about 20 minutes, pours in a stop solution, then hypo to de-sensitize the film. This takes about thirty minutes. The film must then be washed for thirty minutes, then hung up the dry. After drying he takes his negatives to one of the enlargers or the contact printer, exposes a piece of printing paper to the negative image, then develops it. This takes him about twenty minutes, including fixing. Then after he washes the print for about thirty minutes, he brings it to the dryer room and walks out with a finished print. But if you are unfamiliar with the photographic process, Pete Broughton will give needed assistance. Pete has been a photo hobbyist himself for several years and during his high school days at Guantanamo Bay was Photo Editor of the school yearbook. In the first three days of the lab's operation more than twenty used its facilities. In order to use the lab just walk in and see Pete. There are no' appointments or reservations. Doris Day, the beautiful singing star of Warner Bros. Pictures, is our pin-up for this week. Dodo is currently the number one pin-up for "Our Navy" magazine for the month of April. too. Her version of "Secret Love" hit the top bracket on the musical hit parade and remained for several weeks. Movies. cont'd Friday, 30 April EASY TO LIVE Esther Williams Van Johnson Everyone is in love with an aqua-queen except her boss who is so busy with his show that he forgets that his prize beauty is human. And here's the final stage, the drying of the finished print. Here two more fans place a wet print on the drum dryer. 4 4 MOVIES Saturday, 24 April THE NEBRASKAN Phil Carey Roberta Haynes Western Drama. Philip Carey tries to get a fair trial for his friend who is accused of murdering an Indian chief. Sunday, 25 April MONEY FROM HOME Dean Martin Jerry Lewis A gambler gets into trouble with a syndicate because he cannot pay his horse racing debts. Monday, 26 April SKY COMMANDO Dan Duryea Frances Gifford Story takes place in Korea when an Air Force commanding officer directs his men to carry out a mission which seems to mean sure death. Tuesday, 27 April GLENN MILLER STORY James Stewart June Allyson The story of the famous band leader who lost his life while serving his country in World War II. Wednesday, 28 April THEY DIED WITH THEIR BOOTS ON Errol Flynn Olivia DeHavilland The story of General Custer from the time he entered the Academy until his death at Little Big Horn. Thursday, 29 April EL ALAMEIN Scott Brady Rita Moreno The experience of an American serving with a British armored unit at the battle of El Alamein. m THE INDIAN Saturday, 24 4