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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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Vol. VI, No. 41 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 17 April 1954


'54 Carnival Figures NSD Commended Thnw t3 nnn Nt By BuSandA


j

Recently, in an informal ceremony in the Base Commander's office, CAPT Max A. Moon, Commanding Officer, Dental Clinic, and Chairman of the 1954 Guantanamo Bay Carnival, presented the final tabulations of the 1954 Carnival to RADM Edmund B. Taylor. The net proceeds of the carnival, $34,100.94 will go to a joint charity fund for the Naval Relief Society, National Headquarters; American National Red Cross; American Cancer Society, American Heart Society; Salvation Army; National Headquarters, National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, Local Charities, and the Base Community Fund.
Although this year's $34,100.94 is below the record for net proceeds (1952 Carnival, 43,000.00), it is considerably more than the 1953 Carnival which netted $23,000.
The final breakdown of figures is as follows:
RECEIPTS
Cash c a r r i e d forward from 1953 Carnival proceeds ---------------$11,989.03
Sale 1953 Carnival slum goods to scout circus ___ 222.70 Value slum goods inventory ------------------ 2,360.00
$14,571.73
(This amount was carried over from the 1953 Carnival, and in so doing, it can not be counted in the net proceeds of the 1954 Carnival.) Donations from vendors_$ 575.00 Ticket sales ----------- 19,637.25
Gross income from booth operation ------------ 60,781.85
Premium on check ------ 3.00

Gross Receipts for 1954 Carnival --------------$80,997.10
EXPENDITURES
Cost Public Works Construction, GSK supplies, slum prizes, food, drinks, etc .------------------$31,948.02
Cost Major prizes ----- 7,128.22 Cost General operating expenses (not chargeable to individual booths) advertising, plant materials, ticket book printing, surcharge on Public Works labor, and liability insurance ------------------ 7,819.92

Gross Expenditures 1954 Carnival -------------$46,896.16
FINAL TABULATIONS
Gross receipts 1954 Carnival ------------------$80,997.10
Gross expenses 1954 Carnival ----------------- 46,896.16

Net Proceeds 1954 Carnival ------------------$34,100.94
Receipts c a r r i e d over from 1953 Carnival _--- 14,571.73

Total cash on hand -_-$48,672,67
FINAL BALANCE Gross Receipts 1954 Carnival -----------------$80,977.10
Receipts c a r r i e d over
(Continued on Page Three)


Last week at a ceremony witnessed by military and civilian personnel of the Naval Supply Depot and Cargo Handling Battalion FIVE, RADM E. B. Taylor, Base Commander, presented a letter of commendation from RADM M. L. Royar, SC, USN, Chief Bureau of Supplies and Accounts, to CDR E. W. Sutherling, SC, USN, Supply Depot commanding officer. On the speaker's platform were RADM Taylor, CDR Sutherling and CDR J. W. Graham, SC, USN, Supply Depot executive officer.
CDR Sutherling made introductory remarks, both in Spanish and in English, to the assembled depot workers, expressing his pride in their untiring efforts that earned the commendation for their depot. Presentation of the letter and commendatory remarks by the Base Commander followed.
The commendation read in part as follows:
"The condition and operations of the Depot were found to be outstanding. I am happy to commend you and your staff for the exemplary performance of duty evidenced by the excellent administration of your activity."
This commendation was given as the result of a recent comprehensive inspection of the Supply Depot facilities and services conducted by the Inspector General of the Supply Corps. The official inspection rating of "OUTSTANDING" is the sixth such rating given to a Supply Corps managed shore activity by the Inspector General in the past seven, years.
In accordance with the wishes of the Chief, Bureau of Supplies and Accounts, the commendation has been made a part of the personnel records of all Depot employees, military and civilian.


IV I
RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Comm: of commendation from RADM M. Bureau of Supplies and Accounts t Commanding Officer, Naval Supply USN, Supply Depot executive office


Largest, Base Search Finds

Sleeping Boys In NavSta Corral

Early Sunday morning, after being missing for 16 hours, Peter Minard, age 9, and Jeff Henson, age 7, were found sleeping in the Naval Station corral by one of the attendents making his morning rounds feeding the horses. The two boys had been sleeping in comparative safety while the base police, the harbor police, volunteers in private autos, and searching parties had been scouring the base from the North Gate to Phillips Park looking for the two lost lads.
_ The long search for Peter and
Jeff was one of the largest and yJ most extensive of its kind ever
Pix Taken After Mmade on the Naval Base. By the
time they were found, every means Eligible For Photo Contest of searching had been resorted to.
The base police had put a double patrol section on duty, extra harbor Strictly for servicemen the 1954 police units bad been called out, Fifth Annual Inter-Service Photog- searching parties had been organraphy Contest opens May 1. All ized from Bay Hill, Naval Air
photos should be taken after the Station, VU-10, the Cargo Handling first of May, and no official photo- Battalions, and the SeaBees. The graphs are acceptable. Air Station sent out two blimps,
Winners and runnerup pictures two helicopters, and two planes as will be displayed in the Pentagon the sun rose to complete the allfor several weeks. out search.
There will be both black-and- The search began late Saturday
white and color transparency class- afternoon when the Base Police es this year. Black-and-whites will received word from the boys' not be returned to the owners when parents that they could not be the contest is over. located. A radio message was sent
A group of professional photog- out to all patrol units to be alert raphers will select the final contest for two blonde youths both wearing winner from the entries from all dungarees, one with a striped shirt the services. Winners will receive and the other with a white T-shirt. trophies in the ten different classes As night fell and the boys were and there will be a special trophy still not located, patrol units were for the most popular entry as de- doubled, volunteers began to join termined by public ballot at the in the search, and a message giving end of the first week of display. a description of the lads was broadBlack and white entries should cast over radio station WGBY.
be 8 by 10 inches minimum and 16 Roads were constantly patrolled
by 20 inches, unmatted and un- and small out-of-the-way shacks
mounted with a 3 by 5 inch identifi- left open were checked. SeaBees cation card affixed to the back joined the search both with trucks stating name, rank or rate, service and men on foot. number and title of the entry. Meanwhile, the Base Police office
(Continued on Page Three) was a hub of activity with numerous phone calls coming in from persons who had seen small boys whom they thought might be the missing lads. Every lead to their whereabouts was followed up. One lead said that the two boys had been seen getting off a bus at the Fleet Landing saying that they "were going out to a ship." Another said that one horse was still checked out of the corral, and finally a report was turned in that the boys had been seen in Caimanera. Every lead was checked by the Base and Harbor Police, but each one led to nothing as the boys were still not located.
Shortly after midnight, plans
were made for an all-out search. 4Xj. Photographers rushed out special prints of base maps for units that had been alerted and still the search went on. Tired and weary patrol units strained their eyes looking deep into dark, murky shadows or A any place where two young lads
could go or possibly be.
An hour before dawn, everyone
had exhausted any idea as to where two roving lads could be, but still the search continued. Units from Naval Station, Air Station, VU-10, ander, Naval Base, presents a letter SeaBees, and Cargo Handlers were L. Royar, SC, USN, Chief of the transported in trucks, busses, cars,
o CDR E. W. Sutherling, SC, USN, and pickups to every corner of the Depot with CDR J. W. Graham, SC, base. And at the crack of dawn r looking on. (Continued on Page Three)


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Saturday, 17 Ap 1054


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Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615
Saturday, 17 April 1954
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT william R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sadness- Officer-Advisor
H. E. Davis, JOC ------------------- Editor
H. L. Sisson, J03 --------------------News
Jerry Lewis, J03 ----------------- Features
J. C. Dierks, J03 -------------------Sports
Pierce Lehmbeck -------------------Sports
F. L. Cannon, JOSN-____-__ Photographer James DelleMonache, P13----------Makeup

THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given
-to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


An Editorial....

Good Clean Fun

A new baseball playing rule which appears to have created some controversy requires the team in the field to remove their gloves from the playing field each time they come in to bat. The exponents of the rule consider the clearing of possible obstacles and the tidying of the field a desireable feature. The only opposition stems from an objection on the part of the players who feel that the extra running back to the dugout to get their gloves, when they are left on base, is an unnecessary imposition upon the player.
Differences of opinion arising out of such questions are good for the game. Reasonable individuals will generally arrive at a mutually beneficial understanding which will provide the most good for the most people. There is another bit of "tidying up" that our national pastime can well stand. It has to do with the attitude of partisan supporters of the various clubs. While baiting of umpires seems to contribute to the entertainment of the crowd, and razzing of players who have demonstrated lack of sportsmanship, seems to be universally acceptable, such actions are not conducive to good baseball. Similarly hooting or cat-calling to unnerve a pitcher who is in a tight spot, waving of white cloth or flashing of mirrors to confuse batters, and many other (often seen but seldom appreciated) acts of poor sportsmanship tend to lower the standards of the game.
We are approaching a new season of baseball, which if properly supported, will furnish to many players and spectators, a fine means of diversion and enjoyment. Players and spectators alike can contribute to the value that such recreational activity will provide. Let us strive for and receive the same high standard of fair play from our viewers as we demand of our participants.
By RADM E. B. Taylor
ComNavBase


The Naval Station swimming pool, which has been open for night swimming for the past few weeks, glistens in the night like a shining star. This added attraction of nocturnal bathing was made possible by the addition of under-water lights as well as overhead lights. In addition to the lighting facilities, the pool has been completely repainted with an attractive "marine"mural featured on the pool side of the bath house.
The pool is open for all personnel, military, civilian, and their dependents every night until 2100 with Thursday night and Monday morning reserved for dependents only.



TEENAGE-ROUND-UP The Lucky Bag
by Betty Radcliffe


by Barbara Burke and Linda Thurston

The Juniors and the Seniors are off on a mad, far out campaign to entertain each other. First off in the chain was the "Senior to Junior" luncheon held last Wednesday down yonder at Ye 01' Family Restaurant. Next we noticed some puzzled Junior chicks trying to figure out where they could get a barbecued kid for the forthcoming "Junior to Senior" skating party which will he held next Saturday. Barbara D. and Pat W. must have given up because the menu now states a plain barbecue. (We did, however, overhear Cavanaugh mutter something to the effect that he knew plenty of kids he'd like to barbecue.) So much for that, but don't forget the Jr.-Sr. Banquet and the Jr.-Sr. Prom..
Gazing around us we noticed: Wally Grafton diligently repairing his scooter on Sherman Ave. with four minutes to spare before the bell rang. "Sah" Hackworth beating off John Moon last Saturday afternoon. Eddie Stafford counting the days till "his girl" comes down . . . man, she'll never make the trip if you don't cut those crazy card games. Renee Skinner celebrating her fifteenth birthday. Happy, happy! Jimmy Miles making up his own plot for "Julius Ceasar" that resulted in a baseball story. Carol Floyd regaining her natural coloring after the fateful beach party. Eunice Avila assuring us that the whistles heard on Sherman are all for her. Quote: "Are they whistling at me (yawn) again?" Anita Sierra showing off her etchings . . . Niagra Falls at night indeed! Bill Barrett-great white Civilian (Just thought we'd like to see it in print again.) Norman Huddy making like Johnny Appleseed.
You're only as good as your last time at bat.


Have you noticed the work at the Naval Station swimming pool? It is really quite clever. It's an underwater scene showing several types of fish; each one possessing some obvious human expression or characteristic, as the one that suppossedly has run into the electric plug. Seriously though, the painting is very attractive and adds much to the appearance of the pooi. Credit for the art work goes to Wayne Hall of MCB-6.
The Naval Station pool is the largest on the base. It is 150 feet long by approximately 36 feet wide and holds almost 350,000 gallons of water. So you see, there is plenty of room for swimming.
To clarify a recent misunderstanding, the pool is open to dependents every day, but on Monday mornings from 0930 to 1200 and on Thursday nights from 1800 to 2100 the pool is reserved for families ONLY.
The pool is equipped with underwater lights which make for real nice night swimming . . . so come in, the water's fine.
Filed away under "HAVE YOU TOPPED THIS?" is this little item. . . . Last Saturday Paul and Laurel Goldman drove from Guantanamo City to Bargo Point in 39% minutes, plus 3 minutes and 50 seconds for opening and closing of gates! Seems Paul had a golf date and showed up one minute late . . . tch tch. Paul said the road was in fine shape . . . ? I don't know how he knows his
wheels probably never touched the ground. Didn't know Studebakers came equipped with Jet.

Mother (speaking to school teacher): "My Harold is a very sensitive boy. If you need to punsh him, just slap the boy in the next seat. This will frighten Harold."


Sunday, 18 April 1954

Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930-2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.

Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic)
LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)




The Chaplain's Corner


"And entering into the supulchre, they saw a young man sitting on the right side, clothed in a long white garment; and they were affrighted. And he saith unto them, Be not affrighted: Ye seek Jesus of Nazareth, which was crucified: he is risen; he is not here: behold the place where they laid him. But go your way, tell his disciples and Peter that he goeth before you into Galilee: there shall ye see him, as he said unto you."
"If thou be the Son of God, come down from the cross, He saved others himself he cannot save." This was the greatest paradox of the ages that God in the form of man, although the giver of life, could not prevent the death of His Son. The Son of Man had brought newness of life to many. His words had flooded the minds of hundreds with happiness, contentment, and the love of God. His hands had administered healing to afflicted and broken bodies. His teaching had illumined the souls of men and women and his personal counsel relieved many a broken heart. Yet this Man of truth and light and life could not save Himself. He died for man that man might live. His advent was for the welfare of others and he literally spent himself unselfishly for his fellow man. Tomorrow the Christian Church remembers a fact, the greatest one in the history of the world; that death also was conquered by Jesus Christ the Son of God. He overcame hatred, jealousy, envy, strife, and greed; he was the victor over sin in all its ugliness, and finally he overcame death itself. He arose! He lives! And his love still radiates throughout the world with power to touch hearts and souls and to give new life to those who believe God and have faith in His Son to save to the uttermost.
James F. Agnew, ChC
LT, USNR


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THE INDIAN







atuRe y, 17 April 1954


VU-10 Prop Blast Hospital Notes


CDR T. B. Wolfe, LT Henson, and LT J. Bell departed for Norfolk, on Monday 12 April to assist Commander Utility Wing, Atlantic Fleet to conduct an operational readiness inspection of VU-6. The party expects to return on 15 April.
A new arrival was overlooked last week so amends are in order. Chief Ordnanceman and Mrs. F. X. Cotton are the proud parents of a new daughter, Janice Ann, born 6 April weight 6 pounds 4 ounces. Francis 5 and Ferne 4 sort of wanted a little brother but they are happy, anyway, over the new sister. Welcome aboard Janice.
The Mallard golfers c a m e through with a 21 to 2% win over the Seabee team on Saturday 10 April. LT W. H. Rose, manager of the team did a little shifting of the players and came up with a decisive win. The FTG team is breathing down our necks and we have two matches to go. Saturday, 17 April, the Mallards meet the Naval Station and then Sunday 25 April, we meet FTG. Lots can happen in two short weeks.
The opening game of the baseball season saw right-hander
RADM E. B. Taylor Tossing out the first ball and then Naval Station taking the Mallards 6 to 3 on Monday 12 April. We are writing the game off for lots of experience and saying, "watch us come hack".


Heirport News
During the past week the following births were recorded: A daughter, Camile Weiland to LT and Mrs. Eric H. Weiland; a son, Edward Alan Nieliwocki to SN and Mrs. Edward Nieliwocki; a daughter, Janice Ann Cotton to AOC and Mrs. Francis X. Cotton; and son, Kenneth Mark Wind to GM1 and Mrs. George H. Wind; and a daughter, April Dawn Andrews to MMC and Mrs. Alvin A. Andrews.
Bon Voyage
Mrs. B. M. Lanier, wife of HM1 B. M. Lanier USN will depart today for CLUSA. Mrs. Lanier will spend a vacation with her husband's parents while awaiting his arrival in the near future. Mrs. Lanier was an active member of the "Little Theatre Group" and was a member of the cast of "Only An Orphan Girl" and "Strange Bed Fellows" which were considered great successes here on the base.
Distinguished Visitors
Mr. J. R. Grady, spent three days with his nephew LT E. D. Grady,
(MC) USN, during the past week, while awaiting for the USS BALTIMORE (CA-68). Mr. Grady, who is the owner and publisher of three newspapers in Wayne and Dublin Counties, Eastern North Carolina, was flown here by courtesy of the Navy Department to observe the operation and performance of the USS BALTIMORE (CA-68).


Tuesday 6 April saw CDR C. C. Stamm getting a wetting down at the "0" Club. "Chuck" as our new commander is called has assumed the duties of operations officer. He is pictured above being congratulated. L to R CDR R. C. Spears, CDR T. B. Wolfe, Commanding Officer, CDR Stamm, and LCDR M. C. Herold.


Photo Contest....
(Continued from Page One)
It is not necessary to submit a negative.
Color transparencies will be 35 millimeters minimum and 4 by 5 inches maximum in size. They should be submitted in cardboard mounts with identification printed on the cardboard.
The Commandant, 3rd Naval District will conduct the Navy end of the photo contest. Entries from the 10th Naval District should be forwarded to Commandant, 5th Naval District for semi-final judging and submission to ComThree for the finals.


Ballard, Louis F., MR3, Base Police Downes, John W., BU2, MCB-9 Gray, George E., LTJG, FTG Harley, Jesse, SDC, NAS Herold, Mrs. M. C., DEP, QTRS AV-10
Herold, Merlin, C. LCDR, VU-10 Hodges, George L., RM1, NavSta Jayne, William D., ADC, NAS Lackey, Glenn R., AD3, NAS Mickiewickz, William, ADC, NAS Potts, Paul R., PHC, NavSta


p0


The School Bus drivers, of the Public Works Transportation Division, stand before one of their busses in their new uniforms. These uniforms were their own idea, and were bought with their own money. As well as "looking sharp," the drivers have a sharp safety record of no accidents.
Front row, left to right: Lino Cambran, Eladio Pupo, Rafael Perez, supervisor of the group, Lincoln Foster, and Edgar Maynard.
Back row, left to right: Cyrial 0. Scott, Rafael Cala, Eleazar Lewis, and Valmar Burch.



Proud School-Bus Drivers Display


New Uniforms, Safety Record

Recently, on their own volition, the school bus drivers got together and decided that they would make their group even more distinctive and buy their own uniforms. So, with $36.00 of their own pay, the drivers bought new caps, trousers, shirts, and ties. As a result, they are one of the sharpest looking groups on the base.
This group has remained largely
intact for quite some time now.
Search.... Other than the addition of one
man, for eight years, these same
(Continued from Page One) drivers have transported students
two helicopters, two planes, and to school in the morning, back two blimps joined in the search. home for lunch, back to school As light began to penetrate the again, and finally home again at
hills, searchers could be seen cover- the end of the day-not to mention ing every inch of the landscape. The special trips for biology classes, all-out search was in full swing. physical education classes, etc.
At the Base Police office, the Since the beginning of the school
phone rang as it had so many times bus system shortly after World throughout the long watch. As with War II, these drivers have compiled each call, hearts jumped and chills one of the best safety records on ran up spines as the outcome of th base. Thy have driven a total the call was awaited-and then of 400,000 miles and not a single
that last long sigh of relief. . . . accident has been chalked up The boys had been found and were against them. safe. These nine drivers, headed by
In a spot where no light could Rafael Perez, transport quite a few possibly reach them, Peter and passengers a day. Counting each
Jess had been sleeping in a stable ride that a student takes as a among the feed sacks. When asked passenger, they collectively furnish if they were hungry, they said, transportation for 2,000 passengers
"We had a good dinner of corn per day. On the basis of a 180 day
and oats last night." school year, this means a total of
350,000 passengers per year.
During the school's Summer
vacation, the drivers take a three
week vacation, and for the remainder of the school vacation, they
Miles W. White, DCC who has work as "swing" drivers in Public
been assigned quarters in Villa sar Works transportation driving anyb a q uters inl V i 1 fama thing from busses to trucks.


s on eave n or 0 , a. e
White will return on the next THOMAS trip with Mrs. White, Miles Jr. and Gary.
Mrs. Carmen A. Erickson is now filling the position left vacant by Mrs. Beverly Mairo's resignation. Mrs. Erickson is no newcomer to Gtmo. Last time here, she worked at the Naval Hospital.
Mildred DiMascola's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Burgess, left Wednesday for their home in East Wareham, Mass. They were here for a twomonths visit.


Carnival....
(Continued from Page One)
from 1953 Carnival ___-$14,571.73

Balance ---------------_$95,568.83
Net Proceeds 1954 Carnival ----------------- $34,100.94
Receipts e a r r i e d over 1953 Carnival --------- 14,571.73 Total Expenditures --_- 46,896.16

Balance -------------- $95,568.83


01


17 April 1954 THE INDIAN Pa


Page WI ,


THE INDIAN






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Saturday, 17 A*pril 4


The Angle(R)
Sea Urchin


Mrs. Dekle's kindergarten class visits the Little Peoples' library, an addition to the regular Naval Station Library. The idea for the little library was originated and executed by Mrs. Barbara Broughton, station librarian, shown here in the left of the picture. The childrens' section contains popular children's books which may be checked out just the same as the main library.


Turkish Admiral Ladies' Golf Shots


Visits Nav Base

Admiral Sadik Altincan, Commander-in-Chief, Turkish Naval Forces, arrived in Guantanamo Bay at 1600 last Wednesday, 14 April. The Turkish Commander-in-Chief's day and a half stay at the Naval Base was one of many stops in a tour arranged for him by the Chief of Naval Operations, U.S. Navy.
Admiral Altincan is making a tour of Naval Bases all along the eastern seaboard of the United States. His only stop in the Caribbean was in Guantanamo Bay.
As the guest of the United States Navy, he has gone from Washington, D.C. to NAS Anacostia, NTC Bainbridge, Norfolk, Yorktown, Jacksonville, and then here.
Friday morning the admiral left Guantanamo Bay with his next stop in his tour being Pensacola. From Pensacola he will continue his long journey to Philadelphia, New London, New York, the U.S. Naval Academy, and finally back to Washington.
While in Guantanamo Bay, Admiral Altincan was guided about the base and visited various commands and divisions in the company of RADM Edmund E. Taylor.


I & E Unified In 1949

Servicewide unification came to the Information and Education programs of the several branches of the Armed Forces in 1949. The Chief of the Armed Forces Information and Education (AFFED) was established in the Office of the Secretary of Defense with the position of Chief of the Division to be rotated among the services at the rank of Major or Rear Admiral. Shortly after the arrival of unification, the Navy changed the name of it's program from "Educational Services" to Information and Education in order to achieve conformity in this respect with the other services. Navy organization places the I & E section under the Standards and Curriculum Branch of the Training Division in the Bureau


by Ann Smith
The quarterly luncheon meeting of the Ladies' Golf Club was held on 7 April at the Family Restaurant. Peg Bittel and Teresa Moseley were introduced as new members, and Edith Houston, Helen King, and Susan Murray were visitors.
Qualifying rounds for the Ladies' Base Championship Tournament will be played on 5 May. This tournament is for all ladies, whether members of the club or not.
Balls were awarded for the putting contest on 7 April as follows:
First Flight:
1st place-Jane McElroy
2nd place-Lou Toczko
(tie) Corky Henning
Eloise Gushanas
Second Flight:
1st place-Marian Caruthers
2nd place-Mary Spears
(tie) Edna Edwards Third Flight:
1st place-Claire Suslick
2nd place-Pat Tolbert
(tie) Hazel Quimby
Nita Roberts Toni Winslow
14 April brought us all out for gross and net and winners were:
First Flight:
Gross-Jane McElroy Net-Eloise Gushanas
Second Flight:
Gross-Marie Aslin Net-Fran Dykeman
(tie) Pat Tolbert
Third Flight:
Gross-Claire Suslick
Net-Sue Strauss
Next week we'll have a Blind Five Tournament on the back nine. There will be a Scotch Foursome on 25 April so sign up in the golf shack. We will draw for partners and foursomes. You don't have to be a member of the club to play in this, so come on out and join us.

of Naval Personnel. This organizational location emphasizes I & E's close relationship with Naval training. United States Armed Forces Institute correspondence and selfteaching courses are available, among other things, to aid servicemen and women in training to be able to perform their assignments with increased knowledge and skill.


by Jerry Lewis
Meet the Sea Urchin, surprisingly enough, the most harmful creature in the Caribbean! There are many swimmers that will attest to that fact and show scars to add still further proof.
The urchin resembles grandmother's pin-cushion in color. Resplendent in purple, red or green, the creature possesses tube-feet and a centrally located mouth much the same as the starfish, his distant cousin. There are approximately four-hundred species nearly all equipped with spines that may vary from needly sharp to flat blunt. The spines are capable of being moved in every direction on a ball and socket joint.
The urchin feeds on minute marine life found in sand, coral or on mud-dry bottoms. They are often found enclosed in coral pockets or sea shells.
A female urchin is estimated to span twenty-million eggs a year! Talk about prolific creatures!
Professional skin-drivers consider the urchin to be one of the greatest hazards to be encountered in the depths of tropical seas. The cuts inflicted by the spines are not poisonous but became immediately infected if not thoroughly distinfected and properly cared for.
Having had personal contact with this species of fish, I have had the chance to watch certain homing instincts peculiar to them that are hard to believe. Amongst a coral formation off the beach at Port Antonio, Jamaica, I pulled a few loose from their coral beds with my knife and dragged them along


CAPT J. B. Taylor, Commanding Officer of the USS Baltimore is shown presenting a plaque bearing the ships insignia to CAPT C. E. Bull, senior member of the Commissioned Officers Mess (Open) House Committee. This plaque was presented on Sunday 11 April as a token of appreciation for the many pleasant hours that the officers of the USS Baltimore have spent in the Mess. It will be mounted on the wall in the "0" club.

the bottom several yards from their respective pockets.
When released from the blade, which apparently did no damage to the structure at all, they pogo'd back to the bed on long spiny legs and climbed the side of the coral, right into the very holes they were pulled from.
Though innocent and beautiful, they are Mother Nature's living warnings to trespassers. They are to be admired but not touched-it isn't worth the pain!

Many a tombstone is carved by chiseling in traffic.


Former ComNavBase Here for Inspection


RADM C. L. C. Atkeson, left, and RADM E. B. Taylor render a hand salute as the National Anthem is played by the Base Band honoring the arrival of RADM Atkeson for a tour of inspection last week. The inspection was a working inspection, not formal. RADM Atkeson was formerly Commander of the Naval Base. He was ordered to the office of the Inspector General in the Bureau of Naval Operations last December.


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THE INDIAN







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THE INDIAN


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Sounds As Base Opens Season


Eight Round

>r Title

Lehinbeck
mague officially came to an opening ling Naval Station Indians met and

is was the first of five games a week, the week at Fleet Recreation Area lights and the other two being tys and Sundays in the afternoon. the Staff Corps team the league five teams remaining participating I approximately 28 July.


by Mandy Mandis and a couple of infield boots by Mallard's Klienhans and Clark. They continued to extend their lead as they picked up two more runs in the fourth and then salted it away in the ninth when initial sacker Beries laid the wood to one for about 350 feet with no one on. The Mallards notched their third run when Bob Dieden stole home in the bottom of the ninth.
Winning pitcher was Bill Royal who turned in a fine seven hit performance while holding the Mallard bats to no extra base blows. He struck out six in going the full nine innings.
The Mallards started with trickster Harry Breske who gave up four hits in four innings while striking out four. He was relieved by Huber who finished the game by holding the Braves to one run on two hits while striking out four also. Breske was credited with the loss.
MARINE EDGE FLYERS
A towering fly ball to deep center field off the bat of Tom Felak with one out in the bottom of the ninth sent the winning run scurrying across the plate Tuesday night as the Marine Leathernecks edged the NAS Flyers, 5-4.
With the score knotted at 1-1 at the end of the first session the Leathernecks first went ahead in the bottom of the second as they used age-old game strategy along with a couple of well placed singles to score two runs. However, the Flyers came back in the top of the third to knot it up again as they scored two runs on a Leatherneck boot and a booming double by second sacker Deere. From that point on it was nip and tuck as the Leathernecks scored what looked to be the winning run in the cellar half of the seventh with the Flyers retaliating with one on a near disastrous collision by left fielder Gatti and short stop Androvich in the top of the ninth. Quick thinking and a good arm by third sacker Romano pulled the Marines out of this predicament as he nipped what could have been the winning run at the plate after the ball squirted free from the collision. The Marines came to bat in the bottom of the ninth and Androvich started the rally off by doubling and being advanced on a bunt by Adams. He was replaced on the paths by Downy who came across the plate with the needed run on Felak's sacrifice fly.
Winning pitcher was veteran team manager "Smitty" Smith


Third baseman Bob Dieden of VU-10 is in and under Naval Station catcher Kennedy as he steals in one of the Mallards vain attempts to come from behind in the league opener Monday night. The Braves went on to win, 6-3. Cabral of the Mallards stands by watching the play.


Base Commander RADM E. B.
Taylor unleashes a high hard one as he throws out the first ball in the ceremonies opening the 1954 Naval Base League baseball season Monday night.


Whizzer Baries of the Naval Station Indians rounds third on his last stretch home Monday night after smashing out a 350 foot drive over the right field wall to aid the Braves in defeating the VU-10 Mallards, 6-3.

who went the full nine innings giving up seven hits and striking out ten. He gave up but two free passes while his team committed three miscues.
Woren started for the Flyers and was relieved by Sutherland in the bottom of the ninth. In his eight innings Woren gave up five hits while striking out ten and walking eight. Sutherland, in his one inning, gave up but one hit and was charged with the loss.
SeaBees Down Indians
The SeaBees of MCB-8 banged



9


An important part of the national pastime, whether of the World Series or the sandlot variety is that of having a competent umpiring staff .The base league here at Guantanamo will have seven men in blue available this year under the direction of John F. X. O'Connor, who will act as chief umpire for the second year.
Returning from last year for duty are O'Connor, R. F. Richter, and C. H. Richards, all members of the National Association of Umpires. These three form the nucleus of a staff that will include J. P. Smith, J. F. Duffy, P. P. DiGennaro, E. J. Devlin, and M. R. Tarrell.
The official scorers for the 1954 season will be headed by William Mickiewicz, who will have W. F. Covell, J. W. Dexter, and T. J. Hollywood to assist him in this capacity.


out eight safeties, two of them drives of better than 320 feet, Thursday night to defeat the Naval Station Indians in a three hour battle, 9-6.
This new coming outfit, of which no one knew too much about, really came to town with a splash as they climbed all over Brave starter Buss for eight of their nine runs in the first four innings. Their slugging efforts were paced by two round trippers by initial sacker Dodson and catcher Mayer which accounted for four runs.
The Braves, although thoroughly hurt by the long ball hitting of the SeaBees, added to their disadvantage by committing six mis9


cues. They too did their share of the poling around the park as first sacker Baries slammed out his second round tripper in as many games, but the SeaBees committed but three misplays and none of them were in crucial spots.
Shackleton was credited with the win, although he had to give way to Bigby in the cellar half of the eighth. In the seven innings that he completed, he gave up but five safeties while fanning out seven. Bigby held the Braves to one hit while fanning two in the last two sessions.
Buss went the distance for the Braves to take the loss. He gave up eight while striking out seven.


me Page Five







Navy--10NDPPO-Gtmo.-4824C


S*


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 17 Apri->4


MOVIES


NAS Crosswinds mepOC eos(es
by Dick Friz


Saturday, 17 April BORDER RIVER
Joel McCrea Yvonne De Carlo
Pedro Armendariz Alfonso Bedoya
Confederate captain escapes into Mexico free zone with two million dollars to buy arms to be shipped to New Orleans. A Mexican general seeks the gold without furnishing the arms.
Sunday, 18 April
AFFAIR WITH A STRANGER Jean Simmons Victor Mature
Mary Jo Tarola Monica Lewis
Story of a young model's marriage to and life with her playright husband.
Monday, 19 April
ROYAL AFRICAN RIFLES
Louis Hayward Veronica Hurst
Michael Pate Angela Greene
A shipment of machine guns is stolen from a British warship off Africa in 1914. Louis Hayward is assigned to track them down so he poses as a hunter which leads him into the interior.
Tuesday, 20 April
TORCH SONG
Joan Crawford Michael Wilding Gig Young Marjorie Rambeau
A tempestuous, bitter Broadway musical star is upset over the fact that her regular arranger has left and a new one has taken his place.
Wednesday, 21 April
GIVE A GIRL A BREAK
Marge Champion Gower Champion Debbie Reynolds Helen Wood
When the regular star walks out on the show, Debbie Reynolds and Marge Champion are contenders for the part.
Thursday, 22 April
CEASE FIRE
Roy Thompson Henry Gowskowski Richard K. Elliot Albert B. Cook
First motion picture to be filmed under actual battle conditions. The actors are picked from the ranks of the 7th Infantry Division.
Friday, 23 April
INFERNO
Robert Ryan Rhonda Fleming
William Lundigan Larry Keating
A spoiled millionaire is left to die in the desert by his unfaithful wife and her lover, after he breaks his leg in a fall from his horse.


Who's Who at the Air Station
Commander Randall T. Boyd Jr., Operations Officer: Born in Hingham, Mass. Holds a B. S. in Electrical Engineering, a masters in Aeronautical Engineering at M.I.T. Graduated from Naval Academy in 1941 . . . entered flight training soon thereafter. Commander Boyd's last -duty station was as Intelligence Analyst for CNO. Reported aboard as Operations Officer in 1953, and will leave soon for N.A.S. Trinidad as C.O. of UP-34. He married Mary Jane (Dee) in '42, and has four sons, Randall III, Steve, Brian, and Owen.
LCDR William K. Woodard, Supply and Distribution: Born in Atlanta, Ga. Holds a B.S. in Industrial Engineering at Georgia Tech. . . . Commissioned ensign in N.R.O.T.C. in '42. A former line officer, he has received several letters of commendation for his work at N.A.S. Gitmo. . . . He was formerly with the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts. He and his wife Barbara have three children, Dee Anne, William Jr., and John Dixon.
LT Frank Dandrea, Engineering and Maintenance: Born in St. Paul, Minn. Entered the Navy on Friday, 13, of '42. Received commission upon completion of flight training. Married Elaine in '50 and has two children, Marie, and Michael (born here) He will be detached on 1 May for duty under instruction at GCA School, Olathe, Kansas.
The Naval Air Station and VU10 will hold an All Hands dance at the EM club on Monday, April 10 . . . featuring music, refreshments and hostesses.
Any N.A.S. personnel interested in participating in tennis competition are urged to turn in their names to either LTJG T. H. Cushman, or Dick Friz at the Administration Building. Efforts are being made to organize a ladder tournament.
News Briefs
A group of Canadian midshipmen and their O.I.C., LT J. D. McRuer, R.C.N. from the H.M.C.S.
QUEBEC, were aboard the air station Saturday, and watched flight operations at McCalla and Leeward Point Fields. The middies will enter flight training as air observers and aviators as soon as their 6 month hitch on the cruiser is ended.
Dependents of Canal Zone personnel, flying through on their way back to the states, found N.A.S. Dispensary an unexpected sanctuary as the plane developed engine trouble and they were forced to spend the night. N.A.S. officers and wives assisted in transforming the wards into a combination nursery and hotel.
* Several of the newly arrived wives, including Mrs. Vauden, Mrs.


by Sgt. William J. McDowell, Jr., USMC

Departing for the States by FLAW last Wednesday were Cpl. Richard N. Price and Pfc Leopoldo H. Hernandez, both men will report to Marine Barracks, Norfolk, Virginia for duty until they are released from active duty in the early part of May. Pfc's Norberto Ramirez - Torres and Francisco Villegas-Burgos departed on the 16th for San Juan Puerto Rico to report to Marine Barracks there for duty pending release from active duty in the early part of May. Cpl. Price worked for Special Services as a movie projectionist, Pfc's Hernandez Torres, and Burgos were members of the Guard Co.
Last Tuesday saw the Marines pitted against Naval Air Station Fleet Recreation Park. The Marines won their first game of the season by a score of 5-4. It was a very close game all the way. Jess Downey went in to run for Joe Androvich who along with Bob Gatti was hurt in the top of the ninth. Gatti has a sore leg and Androvich a sore jaw, both are doing pretty well. It was a great game, fellows, keep it up.
There will be plenty of sore arms and backs starting next Monday as members of Marine Barracks start snapping in for rifle requalification. The first detail will start firing on the 26th and woe unto the men that don't qualify.
. . . "Man cannot live without some great purpose outside himself" . . . Andre Maurol.

A very tall sailor with very long feet stopped for a shine. The shoe-shine boy took one look at the expanse of leather and called to his partner: "Hey, come here and give me a hand. I just got a Navy contract."

Badford, and Mrs. Evelyn Leach, were observed being indoctrinated at the Commissary Tuesday morn. Someone neglected to inform them that after the arrival of the Yippee Boat, it was advisable to wear crash helmets and shoulder pads to avoid being trampled. ( A report from the dispensary indicates they survived after being treated for minor cuts and bruises.)
J. B. Gosnell, BMC, acting 1st LT of the Air Station reported aboard last week Chief Gosnell spent 5 years aboard the Mighty Mo (USS Missouri) before reporting here. His wife and daughter hope to join him in June.
Lyle Smith, FN, recently of the Boatshed, is newly married and transferred (in one fell swoop). He reports to the USS PARLE (DE708) at Jax.


EnameL Etdkings


The old saying "When it Rains, it Pours", is being demonstrated at this activity, as regards change of duty. This week, CDR Frank Etter was the recipient of orders to Great Lakes, to be succeeded by CDR John Stoll, coming here from the Naval Gun Factory, Washington, D. C. sometime in July. Looks like we are turning over personnel faster than the ferris wheel at Coney Island.
In case you have lost track of the National Baseball picture, the major leagues opened this week, which puts Walt Howard, DN, back in business. If you are wondering about the life time batting and fielding averages of Ted Williams or where Eddie Stankys' grandmother was born, don't bother to contact the Indian, New York Times or Chicago Tribune, just phone Howard, the walking, talking baseball encyclopedia.
It is rumored in the cracker barrel circuit that the Dental Technicians Bachelor Club is considering moving the club rooms from Barracks No. 1 to building No. 4, Bay Hill, Same landlord, and a mighty good landlord, indeed, but the boys have been promised a complete renovation in their new quarters and the Board of Governors feels that a more central location overlooking the waterfront of historic Guantanamo Bay would be more salubrious for tired members after a hard day at the office.
Looks like this outfit is practically out of the Carnival business at last. Outside of the jobs of Chairman, Procurenent Coordinator, Auditor, running the share sales booth for a couple of months at Fleet Landing and manning two Keno booths at the Carnival, the local lads really didn't have much to do except spend their money. LT Ricker, the Carnival Committee coordinator stated, when interviewed that he was anxiously awaiting the last of the comments from interested Base parties in order to close the file on the 1954 Carnival.
CDR Etter, Executive Officer, is making a fine recovery from his recent operation. While he was not accepting invitations to go horseback riding last week, he is now open for engagements for an elephant ride providing you furnish a tractor inner tube to pad the saddle.


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PAGE 1

Vol. VI, No. 41 (. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 17 April 1954 '54 Carnival Figures NSD Commended Show $34,000 Not Recently, in an informal ceremony in the Base Commander's office, CAPT Max A. Moon, Commanding Officer, Dental Clinic, and Chairman of the 1954 Guantanamo Bay Carnival, presented the final tabulations of the 1954 Carnival to RADM Edmund B. Taylor. The net proceeds of the carnival, $34,100.94 will go to a joint charity fund for the Naval Relief Society, National Headquarters; American National Red Cross; American Cancer Society, American Heart Society; Salvation Army; National Headquarters, National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, Local Charities, and the Base Community Fund. Although this year's $34,100.94 is below the record for net proceeds (1952 Carnival, 43,000.00), it is considerably more than the 1953 Carnival which netted $23,000. The final breakdown of figures is as follows: RECEIPTS Cash c a r r i e d forward from 1953 Carnival proceeds -----------------$11,989.03 Sale 1953 Carnival slum goods to scout circus 222.70 Value slum goods inventory -----------------2,360.00 $14,571.73 (This amount was carried over from the 1953 Carnival, and in so doing, it can not be counted in the net proceeds of the 1954 Carnival.) Donations from vendors_$ 575.00 Ticket sales ----------19,637.25 Gross income from booth operation ------------60,781.85 Premium on check ___ 3.00 Gross Receipts for 1954 Carnival --------------$80,997.10 EXPENDITURES Cost Public Works Construction, GSK supplies, slum prizes, food, drinks, etc. -------------------$31,948.02 Cost Major prizes --_ 7,128.22 Cost General operating expenses (not chargeable to individual booths) advertising, plant materials, ticket book printing, surcharge on Public Works labor, and liability insurance -----------------7,819.92 Gross Expenditures 1954 Carnival ------------$46,896.16 FINAL TABULATIONS Gross receipts 1954 Carnival -----------------$80,997.10 Gross expenses 1954 Carnival -----------------46,896.16 Net Proceeds 1954 Carnival ---------------$34,100.94 Receipts carried over from 1953 Carnival ___ 14,571.73 Total cash on hand _$48,672,67 FINAL BALANCE Gross Receipts 1954 Carnival ----------------$80,977.10 Receipts carried over (Continued on Page Three) ByBu Sand A Last week at a ceremony witnessed by military and civilian personnel of the Naval Supply Depot and Cargo Handling Battalion FIVE, RADM E. B. Taylor, Base Commander, presented a letter of commendation from RADM M. L. Royar, SC, USN, Chief Bureau of Supplies and Accounts, to CDR E. W. Sutherling, SC, USN, Supply Depot commanding officer. On the speaker's platform were RADM Taylor, CDR Sutherling and CDR J. W. Graham, SC, USN, Supply Depot executive officer. CDR Sutherling made introductory remarks, both in Spanish and in English, to the assembled depot workers, expressing his pride in their untiring efforts that earned the commendation for their depot. Presentation of the letter and commendatory remarks by the Base Commander followed. The commendation read in part as follows: "The condition and operations of the Depot were found to be outstanding. I am happy to commend you and your staff for the exemplary performance of duty evidenced by the excellent administration of your activity." This commendation was given as the result of a recent comprehensive inspection of the Supply Depot facilities and services conducted by the Inspector General of the Supply Corps. The official inspection rating of "OUTSTANDING" is the sixth such rating given to a Supply Corps managed shore activity by the Inspector General in the past seven years. In accordance with the wishes of the Chief, Bureau of Supplies and Accounts, the commendation has been made a part of the personnel records of all Depot employees, military and civilian. RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Comm of commendation from RADM M. Bureau of Supplies and Accounts t Commanding Officer, Naval Supply USN, Supply Depot executive office Largest Base Search Finds Sleeping Boys In NavSta Corral Early Sunday morning, after being missing for 16 hours, Peter Minard, age 9, and Jeff Henson, age 7, were found sleeping in the Naval Station corral by one of the attendants making his morning rounds feeding the horses. The two boys had been sleeping in comparative safety while the base police, the harbor police, volunteers in private autos, and searching parties had been scouring the base from the North Gate to Phillips Park looking for the two lost lads. The long search for Peter and Jeff was one of the largest and Pi Iae fte a most extensive of its kind ever Pix Taken Ater 1 May made on the Naval Base. By the Eligibletime they were found, every means EligbleFor hot Conest of searching had been resorted to. The base police had put a double ________patrol section on duty, extra harbor Strictly for servicemen the 1954 police units had been called out, Fifth Annual Inter-Service Photogsearching parties had been organraphy Contest opens May 1. All sized from Bay Hill, Naval Air photos should be taken after the Station, VU-10, the Cargo Handling first of May, and no official photoBattalions, and the SeaBees. The graphs are acceptable. Air Station sent out two blimps, Winners and runnerup pictures two helicopters, and two planes as will be displayed in the Pentagon the sun rose to complete the allfor several weeks. out search. There will be both black-andThe search began late Saturday white and color transparency classafternoon when the Bass Police es this year. Black-and-whites will received word from the boys' not be returned to the owners when parents that they could not be the contest is over. located. A radio message was sent A group of professional photogout to all patrol units to be alert raphers will select the final contest for two blonde youths both wearing winner from the entries from all dungarees, one with a striped shirt the services. Winners will receive and the other with a white T-shirt. trophies in the ten different classes As night fell and the boys were and there will be a special trophy still not located, patrol units were for the most popular entry as dedoubled, volunteers began to join termined by public ballot at the in the search, and a message giving end of the first week of display. a description of the lads was broadBlack and white entries should cast over radio station WGBY. be 8 by 10 inches minimum and 16 Roads were constantly patrolled by 20 inches, unmatted and unand small out-of-the-way shacks mounted with a 3 by 5 inch identifileft open ware checked. SeaBees cation card affixed to the back joined the search both with trucks stating name, rank or rate, service and men on foot. number and title of the entry. Meanwhile, the Base Police office (Continued on Page Three) was a hub of activity with numerous phone calls coming in from persons who had seen small boys whom they thought might be the missing lads. Every lead to their whereabouts was followed up. One lead said that the two boys had been seen getting off a bus at the Fleet Landing saying that they "were going out to a ship." Another said that one horse was still checked out of the corral, and finally a report was turned in that the boys had been seen in Caimanera. Every lead was checked by the Base and G' Harbor Police, but each one led to nothing as the boys wee still not located. Shortly after midnight, plans were made for an all-out search. Photographers rushed out special S prints of base maps for units that r# had been alerted and still the search went on. Tired and weary patrol ot units strained their ayes looking ~ Z deep into dark, murky shadows or any place where two young lads could go or possibly be. An hour before dawn, everyone had exhausted any idea as to where tobledngolades cudbea bt still i the search continued. Units fim a dscrptin o th las wsfrod Naval Station, Air Station, VU-10, anderl Naval Base, pesents a letter SeaBees, and Cargo Handlers were L Royar SC USNj Chief of the transported in trucks, busses, cars, o CDR E. W. Sutherling, SC, USN, and pickups to every corner of the Depot with CDR J W. Graham, SC, base. And at the crack of dawn looking on. (Continued on Page Three) Y

PAGE 2

THE INDIAN Saturday, 17 Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 17 April 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sandness------Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JO ---Editor H. L. Sisson, JO3 ---News Jerry Lewis, J03OS ---------Features J. C. Dierks, J0 OS ------Sporto Pierce Lehmbeck ---Sports F. L. Cannon, JOSN -Photographer James DelleMonache, PI3-.Makeup THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. An Editorial. Good Clean Fun A new baseball playing rule which appears to have created some controversy requires the team in the field to remove their gloves from the playing field each time they come in to bat. The exponents of the rule consider the clearing of possible obstacles and the tidying of the field a desireable feature. The only opposition stems from an objection on the part of the players who feel that the extra running back to the dugout to get their gloves, when they are left on base, is an unnecessary imposition upon the player. Differences of opinion arising out of such questions are good for the game. Reasonable individuals will generally arrive at a mutually beneficial understanding which will provide the most good for the most people. There is another bit of "tidying up" that our national pastime can well stand. It has to do with the attitude of partisan supporters of the various clubs. While baiting of umpires seems to contribute to the entertainment of the crowd, and razzing of players who have demonstrated lack of sportsmanship, seems to be universally acceptable, such actions are not conducive to good baseball. Similarly hooting or cat-calling to unnerve a pitcher who is in a tight spot, waving of white cloth or flashing of mirrors to confuse batters, and many other (often seen but seldom appreciated) acts of poor sportsmanship tend to lower the standards of the game. We are approaching a new season of baseball, which if properly supported, will furnish to many players and spectators, a fine means of diversion and enjoyment. Players and spectators alike can contribute to the value that such recreational activity will provide. Let us strive for and receive the same high standard of fair play from our viewers as we demand of our participants. By RADM E. B. Taylor ComNavBase The Naval Station swimming pool, which has been open for night swimming for the past few weeks, glistens in the night like a shining star. This added attraction of nocturnal bathing was made possible by the addition of under-water lights as well as overhead lights. In addition to the lighting facilities, the pool has been completely repainted with an attractive "marine"mural featured on the pool side of the bath house. The pool is open for all personnel, military, civilian, and their dependents every night until 2100 with Thursday night and Monday morning reserved for dependents only. TEENAGE-ROUND-UP The Lucky Bag by Betty Radcliffe by Barbara Buebe and Linda Thueston ____ The Juniors and the Seniors are off on a mad, far out campaign to entertain each other. First off in the chain was the "Senior to Junior" luncheon held last Wednesday down yonder at Ye 01' Family Restaurant. Next we noticed some puzzled Junior chicks trying to figure out where they could get a barbecued kid for the forthcoming "Junior to Senior" skating party which will he held next Saturday. Barbara D. and Pat W. must have given up because the menu now states a plain barbecue. (We did, however, overhear Cavanaugh mutter something to the effect that he knew plenty of kids he'd like to barbecue.) So much for that, but don't forget the Jr.-Sr. Banquet and the Jr.-Sr. Prom. Gazing around us we noticed: Wally Grafton diligently repairing his scooter on Sherman Ave. with four minutes to spare before the bell rang. "Sah" Hackworth beating off John Moon last Saturday afternoon. Eddie Stafford counting the days till "his girl" comes down ...man, she'll never make the trip if you don't cut those crazy card games. Renee Skinner celebrating her fifteenth birthday. Happy, happy! Jimmy Miles making up his own plot for "Julius Ceasar" that resulted in a baseball story. Carol Floyd regaining her natural coloring after the fateful beach party. Eunice Avila assuring us that the whistles heard on Sherman are all for her. Quote: "Are they whistling at me (yawn) again?" Anita Sierra showing off her etchings ...Niagra Falls at night indeed! Bill Barrett-great white Civilian (Just thought we'd like to see it in print again.) Norman Huddy making like Johnny Appleseed. You're only as good as your last time at bat. Have you noticed the work at the Naval Station swimming pool? It is really quite clever. It's an underwater scene showing several types of fish; each one possessing some obvious human expression or characteristic, as the one that suppossedly has run into the electric plug. Seriously though, the painting is very attractive and adds much to the appearance of the pool. Credit for the art work goes to Wayne Hall of MCB-6. The Naval Station pool is the largest on the base. It is 150 feet long by approximately 36 feet wide and holds almost 350,000 gallons of water. So you see, there is plenty of room for swimming. To clarify a recent misunderstanding, the pool is open to dependents every day, but on Monday mornings from 0930 to 1200 and on Thursday nights from 1800 to 2100 the pool is reserved for families ONLY. The pool is equipped with underwater lights which make for real nice night swimming ...so come in, the water's fine. Filed away under "HAVE YOU TOPPED THIS?" is this little item. ...Last Saturday Paul and Laurel Goldman drove from Guantanamo City to Bargo Point in 39% minutes, plus 3 minutes and 50 seconds for opening and closing of gates! Seems Paul had a golf date and showed up one minute late ...tch tch. Paul said the road was in fine shape ...? I don't know how he knows .'. .his wheels probably never touched the ground. Didn't know Studebakers came equipped with Jet. Mother (speaking to school teacher): "My Harold is a very sensitive boy. If you need to punsh him, just slap the boy in the next seat. This will frighten Harold." Sunday, 18 April 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner "And entering into the supulchre, they saw a young man sitting on the right side, clothed in a long white garment; and they were affrighted. And he saith unto them, Be not affrighted: Ye seek Jesus of Nazareth, which was crucified: he is risen; he is not here: behold the place where they laid him. But go your way, tell his disciples and Peter that he goeth before you into Galilee: there shall ye see him, as he said unto you." "If thou be the Son of God, come down from the cross, He saved others himself he cannot save." This was the greatest paradox of the ages that God in the form of man, although the giver of life, could not prevent the death of His Son. The Son of Man had brought newness of life to many. His words had flooded the minds of hundreds with happiness, contentment, and the love of God. His hands had administered healing to afflicted and broken bodies. His teaching had illumined the souls of men and women and his personal counsel relieved many a broken heart. Yet this Man of truth and light and life could not save Himself. He died for man that man might live. His advent was for the welfare of others and he literally spent himself unselfishly for his fellow man. Tomorrow the Christian Church remembers a fact, the greatest one in the history of the world; that death also was conquered by Jesus Christ the Son of God. He overcame hatred, jealousy, envy, strife, and greed; he was the victor over sin in all its ugliness, and finally he overcame death itself. He arose! He lives! And his love still radiates throughout the world with power to touch hearts and souls and to give new life to those who believe God and have faith in His Son to save to the uttermost. James F. Agnew, ChC LT, USNR I THE INDIAN Saturday, 17 A004

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VU-10 Prop Blast Hospital Notes CDR T. B. Wolfe, LT Henson, and LT J. Bell departed for Norfolk, on Monday 12 April to assist Commander Utility Wing, Atlantic Fleet to conduct an operational readiness inspection of VU-6. The party expects to return on 15 April. A new arrival was overlooked last week so amends are in order. Chief Ordnanceman and Mrs. F. X. Cotton are the proud parents of a new daughter, Janice Ann, born 6 April weight 6 pounds 4 ounces. Francis 5 and Ferne 4 sort of wanted a little brother but they are happy, anyway, over the new sister. Welcome aboard Janice. The Mallard golfers c a m e through with a 21% to 21/2 win over the Seabee team on Saturday 10 April. LT W. H. Rose, manager of the team did a little shifting of the players and came up with a decisive win. The FTG team is breathing down our necks and we have two matches to go. Saturday, 17 April, the Mallards meet the Naval Station and then Sunday 25 April, we meet FTG. Lots can happen in two short weeks. The opening game of the baseball season saw right-hander RADM E. B. Taylor Tossing out the first ball and then Naval Station taking the Mallards 6 to 3 on Monday 12 April. We are writing the game off for lots of experience and saying, "watch us come back". Heirport News During the past week the following births were recorded: A daughter, Camile Weiland to LT and Mrs. Eric H. Weiland; a son, Edward Alan Nieliwocki to SN and Mrs. Edward Nieliwocki; a daughter, Janice Ann Cotton to AOC and Mrs. Francis X. Cotton; and son, Kenneth Mark Wind to GM1 and Mrs. George H. Wind; and a daughter, April Dawn Andrews to MMC and Mrs. Alvin A. Andrews. Bon Voyage Mrs. B. M. Lanier, wife of HM1 B. M. Lanier USN will depart today for CLUSA. Mrs. Lanier will spend a vacation with her husband's parents while awaiting his arrival in the near future. Mrs. Lanier was an active member of the "Little Theatre Group" and was a member of the cast of "Only An Orphan Girl" and "Strange Bed Fellows" which were considered great successes here on the base. Distinguished Visitors Mr. J. R. Grady, spent three days with his nephew LT E. D. Grady, (MC) USN, during the past week, while awaiting for the USS BALTIMORE (CA-68). Mr. Grady, who is the owner and publisher of three newspapers in Wayne and Dublin Counties, Eastern North Carolina, was flown here by courtesy of the Navy Department to observe the operation and performance of the USS BALTIMORE (CA-68). Tuesday 6 April saw CDR C. C. Stamm getting a wetting down at the "0" Club. "Chuck" as our new commander is called has assumed the duties of operations officer. He is pictured above being congratulated. L to R CDR R. C. Spears, CDR T. B. Wolfe, Commanding Officer, CDR Stamm, and LCDR M. C. Herold. Photo Contest'. (Continued from Page One) It is not necessary to submit a negative. Color transparencies will be 35 millimeters minimum and 4 by 5 inches maximum in size. They should be submitted in cardboard mounts with identification printed on the cardboard. The Commandant, 3rd Naval District will conduct the Navy end of the photo contest. Entries from the 10th Naval District should be forwarded to Commandant, 5th Naval District for semi-final judging and submission to ComThree for the finals. Ballard, Louis F., MR3, Base Police Downes, John W., BU2, MCB-8 Gray, George E., LTJG, FTG Harley, Jesse, SDC, NAS Herold, Mrs. M. C., DEP, QTRS AV-10 Herold, Merlin, C. LCDR, VU-10 Hodges, George L., RM1, NavSta Jayne, William D., ADC, NAS Lackey, Glenn R., AD3, NAS Mickiewickz, William, ADC, NAS Potts, Paul R., PIIC, NavSta p The School Bus drivers, of the Public Works Transportation Division, stand before one of their busses in their new uniforms. These uniforms were their own idea, and were bought with their own money. As well as "looking sharp," the drivers have a sharp safety record of no accidents. Front row, left to right: Lino Cambran, Eladio Pupo, Rafael Perez, supervisor of the group, Lincoln Foster, and Edgar Maynard. Back row, left to right: Cyrial 0. Scott, Rafael Cala, Eleazar Lewis, and Valmar Burch. Proud School-Bus Drivers Display New Uniforms, Safety Record Recently, on their own volition, the school bus drivers got together and decided that they would make their group even more distinctive and buy their own uniforms. So, with $36.00 of their own pay, the drivers bought new caps, trousers, shirts, and ties. As a result, they are one of the sharpest looking groups on the base. This group has remained largely intact for quite some time now. Search.Other than the addition of one Searc.man, for eight years, these same (Continued from Page One) drivers have transported students two helicopters, two planes, and to school in the morning, back two blimps joined in the search. home for lunch, back to school As light began to penetrate the again, and finally home again at hills, searchers could be seen coverthe end of the day-not to mention ing every inch of the landscape. The special trips for biology classes, all-out search was in full swing. physical education classes, etc. At the Base Police office, the Since the beginning of the school phone rang as it had so many times bus system shortly after World throughout the long watch. As with War II, these drivers have compiled each call, hearts jumped and chills one of the best safety records on ran up spines as the outcome of th base. Thy have driven a total the call was awaited-and then of 400,000 miles and not a single that last long sigh of relief. ...accident has been chalked up The boys had been found and were against them. safe. These nine drivers, headed by In a spot where no light could Rafael Perez, transport quite a few possibly reach them, Peter and passengers a day. Counting each Jess had been sleeping in a stable ride that a student takes as a among the feed sacks. When asked passenger, they collectively furnish if they were hungry, they said, transportation for 2,000 passengers "We had a good dinner of corn per day. On the basis of a 180 day and oats last night." school year, this means a total of 350,000 passengers per year. During the school's Summer NSD Supply Line vacation, the drivers take a three week vacation, and for the remainder of the school vacation, they Miles W. White, DCC who has work as "swing" drivers in Public been assigned quarters in Villamar, t rans to ringay ting N f lk V Cht is on eave n or o a. le White will return on the next THOMAS trip with Mrs. White, Miles Jr. and Gary. Mrs. Carmen A. Erickson is now filling the position left vacant by Mrs. Beverly Mairo's resignation. Mrs. Erickson is no newcomer to Gtmo. Last time here, she worked at the Naval Hospital. Mildred DiMascola's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Burgess, left Wednesday for their home in East Wareham, Mass. They were here for a twomonths visit. Carnival. (Continued from Page One) from 1953 Carnival .$14,571.73 Balance --------------$95,568.83 Net Proceeds 1954 Carnival ---------------$34,100.94 Receipts carried over 1953 Carnival --------14,571.73 Total Expenditures 46,896.16 Balance -------------$95,568.83 w 4r ay, 17 April 1954 THE INDIAN Pa e 1e

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our THE INDIAN Mrs. Dekle's kindergarten class visits the Little Peoples' library, an addition to the regular Naval Station Library. The idea for the little library was originated and executed by Mrs. Barbara Broughton, station librarian, shown here in the left of the picture. The childrens' section contains popular children's books which may be checked out just the same as the main library. Turkish Admiral Ladies' Golf Shots Visits Nav Base Admiral Sadik Altincan, Commander-in-Chief, Turkish Naval Forces, arrived in Guantanamo Bay at 1600 last Wednesday, 14 April. The Turkish Commander-in-Chief's day and a half stay at the Naval Base was one of many stops in a tour arranged for him by the Chief of Naval Operations, U.S. Navy. Admiral Altincan is making a tour of Naval Bases all along the eastern seaboard of the United States. His only stop in the Caribbean was in Guantanamo Bay. As the guest of the United States Navy, he has gone from Washington, D.C. to NAS Anacostia, NTC Bainbridge, Norfolk, Yorktown, Jacksonville, and then here. Friday morning the admiral left Guantanamo Bay with his next stop in his tour being Pensacola. From Pensacola he will continue his long journey to Philadelphia, New London, New York, the U.S. Naval Academy, and finally back to Washington. While in Guantanamo Bay, Admiral Altincan was guided about the base and visited various commands and divisions in the company of RADM Edmund E. Taylor. I & E Unified In 1949 Servicewide unification came to the Information and Education programs of the several branches of the Armed Forces in 1949. The Chief of the Armed Forces Information and Education (AFFED) was established in the Office of the Secretary of Defense with the position of Chief of the Division to be rotated among the services at the rank of Major or Rear Admiral. Shortly after the arrival of unification, the Navy changed the name of it's program from "Educational Services" to Information and Education in order to achieve conformity in this respect with the other services. Navy organization places the I & E section under the Standards and Curriculum Branch of the Training Division in the Bureau by Ann Smith The quarterly luncheon meeting of the Ladies' Golf Club was held on 7 April at the Family Restaurant. Peg Bittel and Teresa Moseley were introduced as new members, and Edith Houston, Helen King, and Susan Murray were visitors. Qualifying rounds for the Ladies' Base Championship Tournament will be played on 5 May. This tournament is for all ladies, whether members of the club or not. Balls were awarded for the putting contest on 7 April as follows: First Flight: 1st place-Jane McElroy 2nd place-Lou Toczko (tie) Corky Henning Eloise Gushanas Second Flight: 1st place-Marian Caruthers 2nd place-Mary Spears (tie) Edna Edwards Third Flight: 1st place-Claire Suslick 2nd place-Pat Tolbert (tie) Hazel Quimby Nita Roberts Toni Winslow 14 April brought us all out for gross and net and winners were: First Flight: Gross-Jane McElroy Net-Eloise Gushanas Second Flight: Gross-Marie Aslin Net-Fran Dykeman (tie) Pat Tolbert Third Flight: Gross-Claire Suslick Net-Sue Strauss Next week we'll have a Blind Five Tournament on the back nine. There will be a Scotch Foursome on 25 April so sign up in the golf shack. We will draw for partners and foursomes. You don't have to be a member of the club to play in this, so come on out and join us. of Naval Personnel. This organizational location emphasizes I & E's close relationship with Naval training. United States Armed Forces Institute correspondence and selfteaching courses are available, among other things, to aid servicemen and women in training to be able to perform their assignments with increased knowledge and skill. The Angle(R) Sea Urchin by Jerry Lewis Meet the Sea Urchin, surprisingly enough, the most harmful creature in the Caribbean! There are many swimmers that will attest to that fact and show scars to add still further proof. The urchin resembles grandmother's pin-cushion in color. Resplendent in purple, red or green, the creature possesses tube-feet and a centrally located mouth much the same as the starfish, his distant cousin. There are approximately four-hundred species. nearly all equipped with spines that may vary from needly sharp to flat blunt. The spines are capable of being moved in every direction on a ball and socket joint. The urchin feeds on minute marine life found in sand, coral or on mud-dry bottoms. They are often found enclosed in coral pockets or sea shells. A female urchin is estimated to span twenty-million eggs a year! Talk about prolific creatures! Professional skin-drivers consider the urchin to be one of the greatest hazards to be encountered in the depths of tropical seas. The cuts inflicted by the spines are not poisonous but became immediately infected if not thoroughly distinfected and properly cared for. Having had personal contact with this species of fish, I have had the chance to watch certain homing instincts peculiar to them that are hard to believe. Amongst a coral formation off the beach at Port Antonio, Jamaica, I pulled a few loose from their coral beds with my knife and dragged them along CAPT J. B. Taylor, Commanding Officer of the USS Baltimore is shown presenting a plaque bearing the ships insignia to CAPT C. E. Bull, senior member of the Commissioned Officers Mess (Open) House Committee. This plaque was presented on Sunday 11 April as a token of appreciation for the many pleasant hours that the officers of the USS Baltimore have spent in the Mess. It will be mounted on the wall in the "O" club. the bottom several yards from their respective pockets. When released from the blade, which apparently did no damage to the structure at all, they pogo'd back to the bed on long spiny legs and climbed the side of the coral, right into the very holes they were pulled from. Though innocent and beautiful, they are Mother Nature's living warnings to trespassers. They are to be admired but not touched-it isn't worth the pain! Many a tombstone is carved by chiseling in traffic. Former ComNavBase Here for Inspection RADM C. L. C. Atkeson, left, and RADM E. B. Taylor render a hand salute as the National Anthem is played by the Base Band honoring the arrival of RADM Atkeson for a tour of inspection last week. The inspection was a working inspection, not formal. RADM Atkeson was formerly Commander of the Naval Base. He was ordered to the office of the Inspector General in the Bureau of Naval Operations last December. 9 Saturday, 1Aprl 4

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y17 April 1954 THE INDIAN Sounds As Base Opens Season i Eight Round >r Title Lehmbeck ;ague officially came to an opening ling Naval Station Indians met and .s was the first of five games a week, the week at Fleet Recreation Area lights and the other two being Lys and Sundays in the afternoon. the Staff Corps team the league five teams remaining participating I approximately 28 July. by Mandy Mandis and a couple of infield boots by Mallard's Klienhans and Clark. They continued to extend their lead as they picked up two more runs in the fourth and then salted it away in the ninth when initial sacker Beries laid the wood to one for about 350 feet with no one on. The Mallards notched their third run when Bob Dieden stole home in the bottom of the ninth. Winning pitcher was Bill Royal who turned in a fine seven hit performance while holding the Mallard bats to no extra base blows. He struck out six in going the full nine innings. The Mallards started with trickster Harry Breske who gave up four hits in four innings while striking out four. He was relieved by Huber who finished the game by holding the Braves to one run on two hits while striking out four also. Breske was credited with the loss. MARINE EDGE FLYERS A towering fly ball to deep center field off the bat of Tom Felak with one out in the bottom of the ninth sent the winning run scurrying across the plate Tuesday night as the Marine Leathernecks edged the NAS Flyers, 5-4. With the score knotted at 1-1 at the end of the first session the Leathernecks first went ahead in the bottom of the second as they used age-old game strategy along with a couple of well placed singles to score two runs. However, the Flyers came back in the top of the third to knot it up again as they scored two runs on a Leatherneck boot and a booming double by second sacker Deere. From that point on it was nip and tuck as the Leathernecks scored what looked to be the winning run in the cellar half of the seventh with the Flyers retaliating with one on a near disastrous collision by left fielder Gatti and short stop Androvich in the top of the ninth. Quick thinking and a good arm by third sacker Romano pulled the Marines out of this predicament as he nipped what could have been the winning run at the plate after the ball squirted free from the collision. The Marines came to bat in the bottom of the ninth and Androvich started the rally off by doubling and being advanced on a bunt by Adams. He was replaced on the paths by Downy who came across the plate with the needed run on Felak's sacrifice fly. Winning pitcher was veteran team manager "Smitty" Smith Third baseman Bob Dieden of VU-10 is in and under Naval Station catcher Kennedy as he steals in one of the Mallards vain attempts to come from behind in the league opener Monday night. The Braves went on to win, 6-3. Cabral of the Mallards stands by watching the play. Base Commander RADM E. B. Taylor unleashes a high hard one as he throws out the first ball in the ceremonies opening the 1954 Naval Base League baseball season Monday night. Whizzer Baries of the Naval Station Indians rounds third on his last stretch home Monday night after smashing out a 350 foot drive over the right field wall to aid the Braves in defeating the VU-10 Mallards, 6-3. who went the full nine innings giving up seven hits and striking out ten. He gave up but two free passes while his team committed three miscues. Woren started for the Flyers and was relieved by Sutherland in the bottom of the ninth. In his eight innings Woren gave up five hits while striking out ten and walking eight. Sutherland, in his one inning, gave up but one hit and was charged with the loss. SeaBees Down Indians The SeaBees of MCB-8 banged 0 An important part of the national pastime, whether of the World Series or the sandlot variety is that of having a competent umpiring staff .The base league here at Guantanamo will have seven men in blue available this year under the direction of John F. X. O'Connor, who will act as chief umpire for the second year. Returning from last year for duty are O'Connor, R. F. Richter, and C. H. Richards, all members of the National Association of Umpires. These three form the nucleus of a staff that will include J. P. Smith, J. F. Duffy, P. P. DiGennaro, E. J. Devlin, and M. R. Tarrell. The official scorers for the 1954 season will be headed by William Mickiewicz, who will have W. F. Covell, J. W. Dexter, and T. J. Hollywood to assist him in this capacity. out eight safeties, two of them drives of better than 320 feet, Thursday night to defeat the Naval Station Indians in a three hour battle, 9-6. This new coming outfit, of which no one knew too much about, really came to town with a splash as they climbed all over Brave starter Buss for eight of their nine runs in the first four innings. Their slugging efforts were paced by two round trippers by initial sacker Dodson and catcher Mayer which accounted for four runs. The Braves, although thoroughly hurt by the long ball hitting of the SeaBees, added to their disadvantage by committing six miscues. They too did their share of the poling around the park as first sacker Baries slammed out his second round tripper in as many games, but the SeaBees committed but three misplays and none of them were in crucial spots. Shackleton was credited with the win, although he had to give way to Bigby in the cellar half of the eighth. In the seven innings that he completed, he gave up but five safeties while fanning out seven. Bigby held the Braves to one hit while fanning two in the last two sessions. Buss went the distance for the Braves to take the loss. He gave up eight while striking out seven. P

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m THE INDIAN Saturday, 17 A~!o4 Navy-INDPPO-Gtmo.-4824C MOVIES Saturday, 17 April BORDER RIVER Joel McCrea Yvonne De Carlo Pedro Armendariz Alfonso Bedoya Confederate captain escapes into Mexico free zone with two million dollars to buy arms to be shipped to New Orleans. A Mexican general seeks the gold without furnishing the arms. Sunday, 18 April AFFAIR WITH A STRANGER Jean Simmons Victor Mature Mary Jo Tarola Monica Lewis Story of a young model's marriage to and life with her playright husband. Monday, 19 April ROYAL AFRICAN RIFLES Louis Hayward Veronica Hurst Michael Pate Angela Greene A shipment of machine guns is stolen from a British warship off Africa in 1914. Louis Hayward is assigned to track them down so he poses as a. hunter which leads him into the interior. Tuesday, 20 April TORCH SONG Joan Crawford Michael Wilding Gig Young Marjorie Rambeau A tempestuous, bitter Broadway musical star is upset over the fact that her regular arranger has left and a new one has taken his place. Wednesday, 21 April GIVE A GIRL A BREAK Marge Champion Gower Champion Debbie Reynolds Helen Wood When the regular star walks out on the show, Debbie Reynolds and Marge Champion are contenders for the part. Thursday, 22 April CEASE FIRE Roy Thompson Henry Gowskowski Richard K. Elliot Albert B. Cook First motion picture to be filmed under actual battle conditions. The actors are picked from the ranks of the 7th Infantry Division. Friday, 23 April INFERNO Robert Ryan Rhonda Fleming William Lundigan Larry Keating A spoiled millionaire is left to die in the desert by his unfaithful wife and her lover, after he breaks his leg in a fall from his horse. NAS Crosswinds MA e(C Muosles by Dick Friz Who's Who at the Air Station Commander Randall T. Boyd Jr., Operations Officer: Born in Hingham, Mass. Holds a B. S. in Electrical Engineering, a masters in Aeronautical Engineering at M.I.T. Graduated from Naval Academy in 1941 ...entered flight training soon thereafter. Commander Boyd's last duty station was as Intelligence Analyst for CNO. Reported aboard as Operations Officer in 1953, and will leave soon for N.A.S. Trinidad as C.O. of UP-34. He married Mary Jane (Dee) in '42, and has four sons, Randall III, Steve, Brian, and Owen. LCDR William K. Woodard, Supply and Distribution: Born in Atlanta, Ga. Holds a B.S. in Industrial Engineering at Georgia Tech. ... Commissioned ensign in N.R.O.T.C. in '42. A former line officer, he has received several letters of commendation for his work at N.A.S. Gitmo. ...He was formerly with the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts. He and his wife Barbara have three children, Dee Anne, William Jr., and John Dixon. LT Frank Dandrea, Engineering and Maintenance: Born in St. Paul, Minn. Entered the Navy on Friday, 13, of '42. Received commission upon completion of flight training. Married Elaine in '50 and has two children, Marie, and Michael (born here) He will be detached on 1 May for duty under instruction at GCA School, Olathe, Kansas. The Naval Air Station and VU10 will hold an All Hands dance at the EM club on Monday, April 10 ...featuring music, refreshments and hostesses. Any N.A.S. personnel interested in participating in tennis competition are urged to turn in their names to either LTJG T. H. Cushman, or Dick Friz at the Administration Building. Efforts are being made to organize a ladder tournament. News Briefs A group of Canadian midshipmen and their O.I.C., LT J. D. McRuer, R. C. N. from the H. M. C. S. QUEBEC, were aboard the air station Saturday, and watched flight operations at McCalla and Leeward Point Fields. The middies will enter flight training as air observers and aviators as soon as their 6 month hitch on the cruiser is ended. Dependents of Canal Zone personnel, flying through on their way back to the states, found N.A.S. Dispensary an unexpected sanctuary as the plane developed engine trouble and they were forced to spend the night. N.A.S. officers and wives assisted in transforming the wards into a combination nursery and hotel. .Several of the newly arrived wives, including Mrs. Vauden, Mrs. by Sgt. William J. McDowell, Jr., USMC Departing for the States by FLAW last Wednesday were Cpl. Richard N. Price and Pfe Leopoldo H. Hernandez, both men will report to Marine Barracks, Norfolk, Virginia for duty until they are released from active duty in the early part of May. Pfe's Norberto Ramirez -Torres and Francisco Villegas-Burgos departed on the 16th for San Juan Puerto Rico to report to Marine Barracks there for duty pending release from active duty in the early part of May. Cpl. Price worked for Special Services as a movie projectionist, Pfe's Hernandez Torres, and Burgos were members of the Guard Co. Last Tuesday saw the Marines pitted against Naval Air Station Fleet Recreation Park. The Marines won their first game of the season by a score of 5-4. It was a very close game all the way. Jess Downey went in to run for Joe Androvich who along with Bob Gatti was hurt in the top of the ninth. Gatti has a sore leg and Androvich a sore jaw, both are doing pretty well. It was a great game, fellows, keep it up. There will be plenty of sore arms and backs starting next Monday as members of Marine Barracks start snapping in for rifle requalification. The first detail will start firing on the 26th and woe unto the men that don't qualify. ..."Man cannot live without some great purpose outside himself" ...Andre Mauroi. A very tall sailor with very long feet stopped for a shine. The shoe-shine boy took one look at the expanse of leather and called to his partner: "Hey, come here and give me a hand. I just got a Navy contract." Badford, and Mrs. Evelyn Leach, were observed being indoctrinated at the Commissary Tuesday morn. Someone neglected to inform them that after the arrival of the Yippee Boat, it was advisable to wear crash helmets and shoulder pads to avoid being trampled. ( A report from the dispensary indicates they survived after being treated for minor cuts and bruises.) J. B. Gosnell, BMC, acting 1st LT of the Air Station reported aboard last week Chief Gosnell spent 5 years aboard the Mighty Mo (USS Missouri) before reporting here. His wife and daughter hope to join him in June. Lyle Smith, FN, recently of the Boatshed, is newly married and transferred (in one fell swoop). He reports to the USS PARLE (DE708) at Jax. Enamel Etchngs The old saying "When it Rains, it Pours", is being demonstrated at this activity, as regards change of duty. This week, CDR Frank Etter was the recipient of orders to Great Lakes, to be succeeded by CDR John Stoll, coming here from the Naval Gun Factory, Washington, D. C. sometime in July. Looks like we are turning over personnel faster than the ferris wheel at Coney Island. In case you have lost track of the National Baseball picture, the major leagues opened this week, which puts Walt Howard, DN, back in business. If you are wondering about the life time batting and fielding averages of Ted Williams or where Eddie Stankys' grandmother was born, don't bother to contact the Indian, New York Times or Chicago Tribune, just phone Howard, the walking, talking baseball encyclopedia. It is rumored in the cracker barrel circuit that the Dental Technicians Bachelor Club is considering moving the club rooms from Barracks No. 1 to building No. 4, Bay Hill, Same landlord, and a mighty good landlord, indeed, but the boys have been promised a complete renovation in their new quarters and the Board of Governors feels that a more central location overlooking the waterfront of historic Guantanamo Bay would be more salubrious for tired members after a hard day at the office. Looks like this outfit is practically out of the Carnival business at last. Outside of the jobs of Chairman, Procurement Coordinator, Auditor, running the share sales booth for a couple of months at Fleet Landing and manning two Keno booths at the Carnival, the local lads really didn't have much to do except spend their money. LT Ricker, the Carnival Committee coordinator stated, when interviewed that he was anxiously awaiting the last of the comments from interested Base parties in order to close the file on the 1954 Carnival. CDR Etter, Executive Officer, is making a fine recovery from his recent operation. While he was not accepting invitations to go horseback riding last week, he is now open for engagements for an elephant ride providing you furnish a tractor inner tube to pad the saddle. p THE INDIAN Saturday, 17 Aprl 54