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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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Vol. VI, No. 40 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 10 April 1954


Ham Contest Slated

Armed Forces Day

The Army, Navy, and Air Force are co-sponsors of a program for the participation of amateur radio operators in the celebration of Armed Forces Day on 15 May, 1954.
A CW receiving competition will feature a message from the Secretary of Defense. All individuals, amateur radio operators and others are eligible to participate. A certificate of merit will be issued to each participant who makes perfect copy. Transmissions will be made at 25 words per minute on the following schedules:
Time (15 May 1954)
1900 EST
Call Sign Frequencies (KCS)
WAR (Army Radio 14405, 20994 washington, D.C.)
NSS (Navy Radio 121.95, 4390, 9425, washington, D.C.) 12804, 17050.4, 22491 AIR (Air Force Radio washington, D.C.) 3497.5, 6997.5
0100 EST (16 May)
WAR (Army Radio 14405, 20994 Washington, D.C.)
(Continue on Page Eight)


A. I McGowan Stresses

Accident Prevention

ApproximatelY 150 members of the Parent-Teachers Association of the Naval Base heard Mr. A. J. McGowan, Safety Engineer, speak on the "Safety of Our Children" at Tuesday's monthly meeting in the base school auditorium.
Mr. McGowan stressed the fact that there are nearly 100,000 accidental deaths throughout the nation in a year's time, costing the citizens billions of dollars. He pointed out that accidents were the main cause of death in persons from one year old to the age of 35, and that accidental death never ranks lower than fourth place beyond that age.
Mr. McGowan emphasized the fact that 99% of all "accidents" are preventable and stated that it has been proven that most accidents occur in the home where, through either neglect or lack of accident prevention experience, unsafe acts and unsafe conditions exist. He distributed mimeographed memos to all members present listing unsafe conditions and unsafe acts by which children could be injured in the home. He pointed out that the conditions and acts listed were not "occasional happenings".. . but ... "have been listed because they have happened frequently and will continue to happen until children are trained to do otherwise."
Mr. McGowan's speech and the facts and figures he presented were impressive and received strict attention by an intent audience.
At each meeting a banner is awarded to the classroom which has the greatest percentage of parents attending the meeting. At the April meeting Mrs. Usey's third grade class won first place, followed by Mrs. Dunmire's firstgrade class and Mrs. Daughtry's kindergarten class.


RAOM Taylor Opens Jet Fuel Storage


---N.


Monday afternoon, watched by CDR E. W. Sutherling, SC, USN, Supply Depot Commanding Officer, CDR W. M. Gordon, CEC, USN, Resident Officer in Charge of Construction, Guantanamo Bay, LT W. L. Roberts, SC, USN, Supply Depot Fuel Division Officer, Mr. J. R. Connor, Project Manager for Frederick Snare Corporation, and Mr. Carlos Cabal, Naval Supply Depot Fuel Division foreman, RADM E. B. Taylor, Base Commander, pushed the switch "lighting off" the motors and signifying the addition of another valuable facility here at Guantanamo.
The new jet fuel storage system,
part of Naval Supply Depot Guan- ..
tanamo's Fuel Division, was financed by the Bureau of Supplies and accounts, which has the responsibility of supplying all fuels used by the Navy. The Bureau of Yards and Docks, which is the bureau charged with responsibility for construction Building 275 of the Villamar Replacement Housing Project stands of the Naval Establishment ashore, awaiting its occupants. The completely modern cement and concrete authorized construction last June. block duplex home will be the new residence of J. M. Malmay, BM1, and Procurement of pipe and other his family and of S/Sgt. R. C. Rausch. Both families will move in
~~ earl nexL&~
November 1953. At that time the construction workers of the Frederick Snare Corporation, construc-Fam lies Shift
tion engineers, under the direction of Mr. J. R. Connor and the direct supervision of Mr. Sydney Rand, job superintendant, began the
projct. na, a To Villa mar Replacement
Construction of this project was
a very exacting job. It was neces- Next week, building 275 of the new Villamar replacement housing sary to do much welding near exist- project will no longer be empty. The new housing unit, which has only ing gasoline and fuel oil lines. That been completed for a week, will house two families who are moving necessitated very rigid safety pre- in from East Bargo. cautions and expert workmanship.T Since the pipelines will carry jet The first two families to change residence will be those of J. M. fuels at high pressure, close in- Malmay, BM, of the Naval Station and S/Sgt. R. C. Rausch of the spection of all seams and joints Marine Barracks. was of vital importance. These Mr. and Mrs. Malmay are very impressed with the quality and
inspection services were provided arrangement of the new housing. However, they feel that it will be
(Continue on Page Eight) much better a few months from


Monday afternoon, RADM Edmu "lighting off" the motors for the ne at the ceremony were CDR E. W. S W. L. Roberts, Mr. J. R. Connor, and


0


now when construction in that area has been completed, roads have been built, fences erected, and i lawns have been cultivated. Mrs.
Malmay, however, says that from what she. has heard, the kitchen is very nice.
S/Sgt. and Mrs. Rausch are definitely looking forward to movIng into their new home. When asked if she had seen the new apartment, Mrs. Rausch said that she hadn't, but that she likes to be surprised. Although she hasn't yet viewed their new home, Mrs. Rausch says that the kitchen sounds like a "housewife's dream." Sergeant Rausch feels that the new home offers much more privacy for their daughter who at the present time does not have a room of her own. All of the Rausches feel that the new home offers many advantages.
The Malmays and the Rausches will be the first two families to move into the new housing. Meanwhile, four other families have bee, notified of the fact that they will e iovmi g thto one of the new "F units" of the new Villamar housing nd B. Taylor pushed the switch in the near future. They are: V. 0.
w jet fuel storage system. Present Rollins, AD2, and family of VU-10, utherling, CDR W. M. Gordon, LT D. A. Blair, MU1, and family, of Mr. Carlos Cabal. - (Continued on Page Three)


9






THE INDIAN


Saturday, 10 April 1954


Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615
Saturday, 10 April 1954
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay. Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT william R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sandness.-------Officer-Advisor
H. E. Davis, JOC-------------------Editor
H. L. Sisson, JO3--------------------News
Jerry Lewis. J03S----- -----------Features
. C. Dierks. JO --------------Sports
Pierce Lehmbeck.-------------------Sports
F. L. Cannon, JOSN----------Photographer
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFFS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


VU -10 Prop Blast


A great white bird descended on Guantanamo at 2215 on 5 April and presented Lillian and H. 0. Russel, A02 their first child, a little girl, Karen Joy. She weighed . --A 1.r 1/4 ounces and
fine. Pop says he's fine too. Tne Russel's live at CB-16B and they both call Wilmington, Delaware home. Russel was bubbling over most of the day Tuesday 6 April and of course fine Cuban cigars were passed out all around. He has been with VU-10 for fifteen months and our very best "Welcome Aboard" is extended to Karen.
Another bird, same type, came flying in with a daughter for LT and Mrs. E. H. Weiland, Eric and Alice, at 1140 on 6 April. She weighed 4 pounds 12 ounces and no name as yet. Eric requested a cross country flight to Memphis in order to return some of that Souther soil for the baby to touch, but due to circumstances it has been delayed for awhile. Alice is from Memphis, Eric is from Philadelphia, and they now have a Californian son, a Floridian daughter, and a Gtmo daughter. Welcome aboard Baby Weiland.
Three new men reported for duty this week, E. S. Bowling, ATAN from Cincinnati, Ohio; W. H. Scott from Washington, D. C.; and E. W. Watkins Jr. C52 from Wilmington, North Carolina. Welcome to VU-10.
The Mallard golfers had a weekend off from the local tournament but W. M. Narwid, J. C. Mauldin, C. E. Loggins, and D. J. Brough all participated in the Santiago Country Club-Guantanamo Naval Base play over the 3 and 4 April weekend. The local team won back the revolving trophy and will hold it until a return match is held in Santiago. The next match in the intra-command league for VU-10 is Saturday 10 April at 1330 when they meet MCB-8.
A little something borrowed. If you have been missing church on Sunday, maybe a sign posted in front of the chapel saying CH-CH would help. What is missing?

AN-How do you like the date I dug up for you?
AA-Rotten. Throw her back and start digging some place else.


The Lucky Bag
by Betty Radcliffe

This past Tuesday the Little Theater held it's regular monthly meeting and several important issues were discussed and settled. Among those issues was the deciding of the type of play to be presented next by the Little Theater. After much discussion and vote counting it was finally decided that a comedy would be presented next. At this time the Play Reading Committee is hard at work reading and searching for a real rib-tickler comedy.
Another issue decided on was a change of meeting nights from the first Tuesday of the month to the second Tuesday.
Mrs. Norma England was elected Secretary to replace the former Secretary, Mrs. Jenny Bertine, who left for the States this week.
Four new members were welcomed into the group at this meeting and there will always be a welcome and the red carpet rolled out for any prospective members.
RECENTLY I WAS ASKED THIS QUESTION: "When, where and why was Little Theater originated? . . . The only information I could find was this; The chief innovation in Western drama in the early 20th centry was the growth of the Little Theater movement. Dissatisfied with the established commercial theater, Andre Antonie in the late 19th century established a Theatre Libre in Paris. The idea of a theater free from tradition and the demands of immediate commercial success spread throughffer l--nlfporrnt- Ltlre n ater were formed in 1915; the Provincetown Players, the Neighborhood Playhouse and the Washington Souare Players, which later developed into the Theatre Guild. These new groups, stimulated by George Pierce Baker's 47 Workshop ; Harvard, influenced the establishment of Little Theaters throughout the country.



TEENAGE-ROUND-VP
by Barbara Burke and Linda Thurston
If, on Tuesday of last week, you saw a pile of cars parked outside of the Teachers' Quarters, you would have known that it was the starting place of the Progressive Dinner you've been hearing so much about. From T. Q. the party progressed to Renee's, Pat's, and finally ended up at Anita's house. Those present consisted of the boys basketball team and it's managers, the cheerleaders, the basketball queen. Mr. and Mrs. "Coach" McGill, and two players who played for the Pirates in by-gone days; Bill Barrett and Pete Broughton.
The G.A.A. held a picnic at Yateras Beach last week-end and the results are some pretty terrible sunburns. Cavie has been limping around complaining about being fried in baby-oil, but you should see some of the two tone tan jobs that Carol, Eunice, and Pierce are sporting. They are the most! Besides all this, double pneumonia is going around from the dusty ride home, Norman lost his little toe nail at the beach, and Pierce suffered from "southern exposure". All of these minor calamities haven't daunted the spirits of the teenagers however, 'cause the Sunday School plans to hold another one over the Easter Holidays.
HONORABLE MENTIONS GO TO: Eddie (Porcupine) Stafford and his new "long" haircut . . . Roxy Moore and her fire hydrants.


Holy Week Services


PROTESTANT:
April 11 -I1
Thursday, 15 April
1900 - The Lord's Supper Friday, 16 April
1400 - Good Friday Service Sunday, 18 April0600 - Easter Sunrise Service in
Base School Patio Sunday, 18 April
1100 - Easter Service
There will be special Easter music at all services. CATHOLIC:
Tuesday, 13 April
1915 - Rosary and Benediction Thursday, 15 April
0530 - Mass
Friday, 16 April
1500 - Stations of the Cross Saturday, 17 April
0800 - Holy Communion Sunday, 18 April
0700 and 0900 - Mass
Plans are also being made for Jewish Passover Seder on April 17 in the Naval Air Station Mess Hall.


Arch-Bishop Of Santiago

Here For Confirmation

The Most Reverend Enrique Perez Serantes, Arch-Bishop of Santiago, will be at the Naval Base on April 24th and 25th to administer the Sacraments of Holy Eucharist and Confirmation.
The Sacrament of Holy Eucharist
. ..1.,, .0
o'clock Masson Sunday morning, April 25.
The Confirmation ceremony will take place in the chapel at 2:00 o'clock on Sunday afternoon, April 25.
Immediately following the Confirmation there will be a reception in the Base School patio for the Arch-Bishop. All Catholic parents are urged to bring their children to the reception.
Seventeen boys and 12 girls, plus adults, will receive their first Communion this year while 6 boys and 9 girls, plus adults, will be confirmed.


Toasimasters Install

New President

Chaplain M. 0. Stephenson was installed as president of Toastmasters Club 92 at a ladies' night dinner program on 1 April. He succeeds CDR J. N. Lawlor.
Other officers of the Club, who along with Chaplain Stephenson will serve for 6-months, included:
R. J. Hummel, 1st vice-president, LCDR R. J. Matthews, 2nd vicepresident, J. L. Sanborn, secretarytreasurer, L. P. Goldman, educational chairman, D. B. Powers, sergeant at arms, and E. H. Cavanaugh, deputy governor.
RADM and Mrs. E. B. Taylor, CAPT and Mrs. W. R. Caruthers, COL and Mrs. J. B. Hill, and CAPT and Mrs. G. M. Holley were among the guests who attended the installation ceremonies.
Toastmasters Club 92, which is open to both officer and civilian personnel, seeks improvement in public speaking ability.

. . . Jane Hill and her "sticky"; day. . . . Dolores for her swinging hair cut. . . .and to Bill Barrett, "Great White Civilian" (Allah, Allah).


Sunday, 11 April 1954

Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930-2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CRC, USN (Catholic)
LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)




The Chaplain's Corner


Things don't just happen. Pencils, light-bulbs, wars, pianos, hats,
. . 4-. -- . by a
something outside itself. Either that or I'm Napoleon and you're Caesar and we might as well go to the madhouse together; for if anyone can show us something which has no maker, no cause, then there's nothing we can be sure of in this whole world, because our whole system of logic and reasoning has gone haywire.
But since everything has a cause or maker, and since this world is a thing, therefore this world had a cause or a maker, and that maker we call God.
God, the Maker of this world, is intelligent; first of all because we are intelligent, and He couldn't have given us the gift of understanding if, He didn't have it Himself, for no one can give what he doesn't have. The power to make beautiful things and appreciate them show an especially high type of intelligence. Not only have we that power ourselves, but we see natural beauty all around us, in the flowers and blossoms of the fields, in the forests of the Adirondacks and the Pacific Northwest, in the simplicity and dignity of childhood. Again, these things show a master-power in their Creator, since an effect can't be bigger than its cause. We see evidence of planning in this world, in the intricacies of our human body, in the solar system, in the laws of nature.
These are facts which surround our daily life and press in on it. We can't escape them, nor the conclusion they force on us! That there is a God and that the intelligence, the understanding, the wisdom of that God is greater than we can possibly imagine.
It all * goes to show that the Maker of the world, God, as we call Him, acted intelligently when He created this world. He knew what He was doing. He worked like a superb artisan on a scale we can barely imagine!
W. J. Spinney
LCDR, CHC, USN


e


Page Two







Saturday, 10 April 1954


a


THE INDIAN


Teacher, Poet Conducts Language Cla


In one of his weekly classes for personnel of the Naval S Naval Base, Alston G. M. "Professor" Jones points out the co use of a verb. "Professor" Jones has been conducting Spani on the base for nine years.


Spanish teacher, English teacher, school teacher, and part-time poet are just some of the occupations of Alston G. M. Jones of the Industrial Relations Office, Training Division.
For the last nine years, Mr. Jones has been instructing classes in conversational Spanish here on the base, and he claims that if he would have been paid by each student that he would be a "penny millionaire".
At the present time Mr. Jones has a class at the Naval Base school for Naval Station and Naval Base personnel, a class for the Naval Air Station both on this side of the bay and on Leeward Point, and a dozen or so private classes which he holds for smaller groups in private homes.
In regard to his Spanish classes, which are conversational, not grammatical, "Professor" Jones points out that it is a pity that so few have taken advantage of the opportunity offered and do not carry through with their lessons to where they can observe their own progress in speaking Spanish.
The Spanish classes last eight weeks and are held- one night a week for two hours. On April 2nd a new class will begin at the Naval Station, and April 15th will see the beginning of another class at the Naval Air Station, anyone interested in these classes can enroll by calling Mr. Jones at 8822.
Along with his Spanish classes, Professor Jones conducts English classes for Cuban supervisors here on the base, as well as private classes in English.
Professor Jones, who can read, speak, or write in English or Span-


The Indian humbly plucks two feathers from his bonnet and presents them to June Gentry and Lynn Graham for a nis-identification in last week's edition. Lynn won the spelling bee at school and June was the runner-up.


.- .o-O-O-O-O-OO

WAVE-The man I marry must be a hero.
Friend-Oh, come, dear. You are not as bad looking as all that.


ish equally well, has w eral poems. Among works, the one which one of many which he published:
SWEET MEMO
by Alston G. M. J
I felt your presence f
my eyes
To see you standing th And felt a thrill that ev The gods would like to s

My heart stood still ar
sighed....
Twas not so long ago That I looked into y
sweetheart
And learned to love you

I know that nowhere on
There is another you For wise old Mother Na Gave all her charm to

She touched your lips
silvery dew
The day that you were And with a crown of go Your head she did adorr

Your eyes like two lov
rare
Were stars from up abo And with the fragran
flowers
She gave you life, my I

As you were standing t The thrill of loving you And knew also that wa . . . the gods Would like to share it t


sses


Villamar....


(Continued from Page One)
the Naval Base Band, J. R. Hoy, RMC and Mrs. Hoy of Fleet Training Group, and G. A. Kretachmar, ET2, and Mrs. Kretachmar of the
Naval Station.
The moving of these families is
only the beginning of an overall plan which will eventually see the complete "face-lifting" of East,
West, and Central Bargo.
This plan is a part of the policy
to provide better housing for Naval personnel, U.S. Citizens, and their dependents employed at overseas bases. Although when the whole construction plan is complete their will be no more housing units than before, the quality will be greatly
increased.
The unit by unit plan of replacement has been put to use at several overseas bases with very similar projects being constructed on
7 Guam. Here in Guantanamo, 104
family units are under construction in the Villamar area, and these units will replace 104 units of the Bargo area. As the replacement of Bargo housing takes place, these
station and vacated units will be torn down to nversation make room for the 184 new housing nversation units which will be built in the sh classes Bargo area.
In the overall plans, there will ritten sev- always be the same number of his many housing units on the base-never follows is less. Efforts are being made so has had that a replacement unit will be available before construction in a RXT new area begins.
Since the moving of the first ones six families to the Villamar area
will vacate East Bargo -unirs-18, nd raised 20, 22, and 24, construction of a
new unit will begin within a short ere, time.
en they
hare. There are three basic type units
which are being constructed in Vild sweetly lamar and will be constructed in
the Bargo, areas. There is the 'E unit" which is a two-apartment, our eyes, two-bedroom duplex such as building 275. Also, there is the "J unit" SO. which is a four apartment building
with two bedrooms for each apartthis earth ment. Finally, there is the "F
Unit" which is a four apartment ture unit-two apartments having two
you. bedrooms, and two apartments having one bedroom.


with the born; lden sheen
1.

ely jewels ve;
ce of the ove.

here, I felt y on high. 010.


The 1954 Naval Base School yearbook "The Coral Reef" will be available soon for distribution. This year there will be only 300 copies for sale. Miss Barbara Burke, business manager for the annual publication, urges that all persons desiring a copy make reservations as soon as possible. The selling price for the! yearbook is $3.50, and must be paid in advance. Payments will be collected at the school between 1300 and 1500.
- -o-o a- -o o- -o -<.I


Meetings..

Time & Place

Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd & 4th Tuesday each month. Community Auditorium
Ladies' Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Room, Community Auditorium
Little Theatre Group 2000; 1st Tuesday each month Marina Point
Hospital Service Volunteers 1000; 2nd Tuesday each month Hospital Medical Library
American Legion Auxiliary, Unit One 1930 ; 3rd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Hut, Marina Point
Toastmasters Club 92 1930 each Thursday, Officers Club dining room.
American Legion, Guantanamo Bay Post 1 19i; 3rd Tuesday each month; Community Auditorium, Marina Point
Parent-Teachers Association 1920; 1st Tuesday of each month Naval Base School
Felloweraft Club No. 1078 2000 each Thursday, Practice, Business Meeting, ist Thursday - Community
Auditorium
National Sojourners, Guantanamo Bay Chapter 320
3rd Monday of every month.
National Supervisors Association 1900: 1st Monday each month, Civilian Training Conference Room.


Future PO Rates Planned

in Tni-Installment Plan


Promotions to petty officer ratings resulting from the coming examinations in August will be made in three "installments" instead of a blanket promotion date according to information received from the Bureau.
Promotions will be made in three groups according to the highest final multiples achieved in the exams. This will permit more advancements to be made and still keep within budget limitation on petty officer ranks.
Promotions are expected to be made effective on Nov. 16, 1954, Jan. 16, 1955 and March 16, 1955.
Previously all promotions were effective the same date. Men winning promotions in last August's exam were advanced on Nov. 16.
The advancements resulting from the recent February exams are expected to be made on a single date in May, to be announced later.
August 10 will be the examination date for E-4; August 17 for E-5; and August 24 for E-6.


41 Ships, 8,800 Middies

Set For Summer Cruises

Plans have been made for the summer training of more than 8,800 Midshipmen of the U.S. Naval Academy and from Naval Officer Sniin--e--pr uit at~ -2 c5l leges and universities.
All three cruises will have short operational training periods in Guantanamo Bay before returning to the States.
The "learn by doing" training will be divided into three major practice cruises with RAUM R. E. Libby, USN, Commander, Battleship-Cruiser Force, Atlantic Fleet, in overall command of the cruises. He will exercise tactical command of the first cruise, flying his flag in the battleship Missouri.
The first cruise, consisting of approximately 1,690 Naval Academy Midshipmen and 1,320 NROTC Midshipmen, will be cruised together in a training squadron consisting of the battleships Missouri and New Jersey, heavy cruiser Macon and Des Moines, the escort carrier Siboney, eight destroyers, and two minelayers. They will depart Norfolk 7 June, disburse for ports of the Iberian Peninsula and European Channel ports and then stop over in Guantanamo Bay before returning to the United States,
4 August.
The second cruise will consist of 1,760 NROTC Midshipmen. They will make the cruise in a training squadron consisting of the battleship Wisconsin, the light cruiser Worcester, three destroyers, and eight destroyer-type vessels. They will depart Norfolk, 11 July, disburse for ports of the Europear Channel in the British Isles and stop in Guantanamo Bay before returning to Norfolk.
The third cruise of the summer training program will be for 1,360 Contract NROTC seniors who will sail in a squadron consisting of the heavy cruiser Pittsburgh, the antiaircraft cruiser Juneau, four destroyers and seven destroyer-type vessels. The contract NROTC seniors will visit Quebec, Canada, and during the period August 14-18, they will visit Havana, Cuba and then will go through operational training in Guantanamo Bay before returning to Norfolk.


a PaW


I
I


so


Page







Saturday, 10 April 1954


THE INDIAN


g 'u


The Local Angle(r)

Barracuda








by Jerry Lewis

Meet the infamous and supposedly 'killer' of the tropical seas . . . the Barracuda. About twenty species inhabit the waters of tropical and temporate zones. The Picuda of the West Indies is the largest species, reaching a weight of one-hundred pounds and a length of six to eight feet.
The Cuda is feared more than the shark by natives of the Indies. The fish's appearance is matched only by his disposition-both ugly. He is a powerful fish, well-built and fast. He is capable of snapping a hard-boned fish in two with an instantaneous snap of his powerful jaws. He will dart like an arrow after his prey, whether large or small and will attack his own kind if provoked.
The Barracuda will hardly ever attack an under-water spear-fisherman because he can see his entire body but surface swimmers have often fallen victim to his attack while they splash through the mirrned surface of the water, exposing only arms and legs which confuses the fish. A confused Barracuda is as hard to deal with as a wounded one!
The common Cuda is not considered good eating although many people claim that immediate cleaning and proper preparation will make very tasty eating of the younger fish. The larger Cuda are apt to be accompanied by a strong odor and a slimy mucus covering.
If a bather should encounter this fish, his best protection is not to show fear. The Cuda senses this as a mad dog does and acts accordingly. Chase him and see for yourself just how 'brave' this overestimated 'killer' really is, but keep this in mind-bright colors, shiny trinkets or an open cut is your invitation for open attack upon yourself! When this happens, as the spear-fishermen will tell you, it is best to leave the water immediately by the shortest possible route.


SCUTTLEBUTT





4'
'-Mi





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Tjo not smrngyfln anythng naoadsheets mel"#


NavBase Bests

Cuban Linksters

The golf tournament held last Saturday and Sunday on the GTMO links between players from the Guantanamo Bay area and a group from the Santiago Country Club wound up in a victory for the local lads with A. Grego and W. R. North taking first and second places with 145 and 149, respectively.
On Saturday North tied with Posada of Santiago for the low gross score when they both posted 73s, but on Sunday Grego came in with a 71, a score which coupled with his 74 of the previous day, enabled him to take top honors.
Low net scores for Saturday and Sunday were made by Gushanas and Ruffini both of the Naval Base. Both men came in with 65. Gushanas also copped the low net total for two days of play with a 140.
The GTMO-Santiago series was inaugurated in 1947 and in this particular case at least upholds the theory that the team defending its home grounds has a decid' advantage. For eight straight years the home team of the series has emerged victorious.






The Detroit Red Wings have iced the National Hockey League championship or the cixth straight
year. Their flashy right-winger, Gordie Howe, racked up 81 points (33 goals and 48 assists) to finish his fourth consecutive season as the league's leading scorer.
When the American and National League All-Stars clash in the July 13 baseball classic in Cleveland, Yankee pilot Casey Stengel will match wits with Walter Alston, now Dodger manager . . . The Pittsburg Pirates signed an air travel contract for this season, establishing a baseball "first" Primary mission of the "Sky Pirates" will be to fly out of the NL cellar this season . . . Hickok award for the month of February went to the Philadelphia Warrior's Neil Johnston, N a t i o n a 1 Basketball Assn. scoring leader ... Bob Cousy of the Boston Celtics Won the NBA playmaker title this year with 518 assists.
Service Highlights Strategic Air Command will stage a judo tournament at Offutt AFB, Nebr., Apr. 7-8. The winning team will represent SAC at the National AAU meet in May . . . The Ft. McPherson, Ga., Rifle and Pistol Club defends its Georgia State Pistol Championship May 17 . . . 2nd Lt. Clark Scholes, Olympic 100-meter freestyle swimming champion, recently shifted from his swim suit to ski togs as he participated in the Army's "Exercise Ski Jump." . . . The eighth annual East-West College All-Star basketball game was recently played at Madison Square Garden in New York with the West squad winning, 103-95. Army Cadet William Hannon, who played with the East, became the first West Pointer ever to play in an East-West contest. Also on the East squad was Navy's high-scoring ace, Midshipman John Clune.
Guest speaker at the AF WorldWide Basketball Tournament banquet to be held at Patrick AFB, Fla., Apr. 8, wil be Adolph Rupp celebrated coach of the University


USAFI Courses


Expanded; Fee

Remains Standard

The educational offering of USAFI at it's inception were confined to about sixty International Correspondence School Courses and the courses of some 60 Universities working in cooperation with USAFI. Then, as now, one of the prime requisites, for enrolling and completing the course was a $2.00 money order payable to the Treasurer of the United States and a sincere interest to see the course chalked up to your credit. The courses of the cooperating colleges then, as today, were offered to the student at half price. Uncle Sam paid the other half. He wisely speculated, no doubt, that his investment would return tenfold and show itself in a stronger, wiser America.
By March 1944, when the second edition of the USAFI Catalog appeared, the offerings had been enlarged and divided into three categories: Technical, Vocational, High School and College, and a new type of course, the Self-Teaching Course, made it's appearance. This latter type of course is now known generally as an Education Manual.
Subsequent development increased the courses offered by USAFI. Today practically every subject taught in high schools and vocational schools, including college courses, End of Course Tests, subject area tests, and tests of General Educational Development are available to the American Service man on active duty.
USAFI also initiated an accreditation service which through your Information and Education Office stands ready to aid you in attaining credit for service accomplishments.
(Second in a series of articles)

of Kentucky. In 24 years Rupp'r Wilcats have won 496 games and lost 82. This season they were rated tops in the nation . . . Ernie Beck, basketball star for Bainbridge NTC, Mr., was named to Siena College's 1954 All-Opponent team. Beck netted 27 points as the Bainbridge Commodores downed the New York college; 81-70, in the last game of the season.

-- --- - -SCUTTLEBUTT






f m



"Holf~~~~ ~ prc omni nfr)


Jest -A- Second
Weary of the single life, Farmer Boyd went to town, picked a wife and married her. Instead of a honeymoon, he drove her by horse and wagon, back to his farm.
On the way, the horse stumbled. "That's once." said the farmer, as they proceeded along the way. The horse stumbled again. "That's twice," said Boyd. Further along the way, the poor animal stumbled once more. "That's three times," said the farmer, who picked up his gun and shot the horse dead.
The bride was thunder-struck. "Why, you heartless fool!" she cried. "You ought to be ashamed of yourself!" And she promptly slapped her husband across the face.
He studied her silently for a moment, then said: "That's once."
* * *
A sailor reported back from leave, 24 hours late.
He explained: "I'm returning from my leave, and just about to board the train when the band strikes up the 'Star Spangled Banner'. I, of course, freeze to attention, saluting. And while I'm standing there at salute what happens but the train pulls out of the station right in front of my eyes, and nothing I could do about it."
Here's a new excuse:

Glenn Ford, the movie actor, presented his young son Peter with an illustrated edition of the classic "King Arthur". "Gee, Dad", said young Peter as he gazed at a picture of Launcelot and Gallahad in full armor, "Dig those crazy walking tanks."
* * *
An officer was inspecting a southern base when he asked a civilian secretary "what is the normal complement of this office?"
"Ah believe the most usual compliment is 'Howdy, honey, you're sure luscious-lookin' this mawnin'."
* * *
"I would love the share your troubles," she cooed.
"But, darling, I have none."
"No; I mean after we're married."

Newlyweds occupied a hotel bridal suite. A thin wall separated them from a room occupied by two sailors.
"Dearest," said the husband, you are so beautiful. I guess I'll get a sculptor from New York to model you."
A moment later there was a knock at the door. "Who's there," asked the husband.
"Two sculptors from New York."
* * *
A blazing gun battle had broken up the political meeting in a mountain community notorious for feudin' and fightin'.
"What started the shooting?" asked a visitor from the outside.
"Feller made a motion that was out of order", a graybeard told him.
"Well, it was outrageous and undemocratic to start trouble over that," the outlander fumed. "What was the motion."
"Toward his hip pocket", the oldster drawled.


ACEis comi ng

Watch this space

Next Week


4


"-,. 1 106 -






Saturday, 10 April 1954


THE INDIAN


Staff Corps and NAS Fliers



Ready for '54 Season


by Pierce Lehmbeck
The 1954 Naval Base Baseball League will officially come to an opening Monday night as the title defending Naval Station Indians take the field against the VU-10 Mallards. And, as league play gets underway we of the Indian Sport's Staff round out our pre-season survey of the local nines by featuring the newly formed Staff Corps Squad and the NAS Flyers.

STAFF CORPS way to find out for sure is to
The Staff Corps Squads, under watch them as they open up their the direction of LTJG J. Lyons and campaign Wednesday night against LCDR R. C. Henry, is a combine the SeaBees of MCB-8. of the Naval Supply Depot, the
Hospital and the Dental Clinic. NAS FLYERS
Both the Supply Depot and the When the Flyers of the Naval
Hospital had teams entered in Air Station entered the Naval Base
league competition last year and League last year they carried with they will contribute a major part them what looked like the team to of the trio set-up this year. beat. For the first few weeks of
Heading the efforts of this newly play they were virtually untouchformed group will be hurlers Duke able until they lost a host of key Snyder, of the Supply Depot and players by transfer. Then they Red Fauth of the Hospital. Both began to falter until they comwent through an almost unbelieve- pletely fell in the closing nights able 1953 campaign as they all of play to end up in fourth place. but made up the mound staffs of The Flyers return this year with
their respective squads. However, hopes of repeating last year's start their efforts will be combined this but also with intentions of continuyear and they should prove to be ing it throughout the year. a very effective duo. Under the guiding hands of OWO
JA. Hould and Chief T. N.
Local fans will remember "the Douglas, the Flyers efforts will be Duke" for the major role that he headed by hurlers Sutherland, Warplayed in the Base All-Star's vic- ren and Krall. Sutherland is a big tory over the Cuban Fortuna nine right hander who uses a fast breakin the traditional Fourth of July ing curve to his best advantage contest last year. Coming into the along with a good fast ball. Warren ball game with the Cubans on top does all of his throwing from an he proceeded to knock in the tying odd side arm motion which keeps run and score the winning one the ball bobbing and weaving on its
himself while b 1 a n k i n g them rapid trip to the plate. Krall, who throughout the closing sessions. will hold down the starting short Snyder's effectiveness can readily stpoiinwhnoturngha be attributed to his smooth form stop position when not hurlng, has and seemingly tireless motion. He much the same style as Sutherland. combines blazing speed with a good Catching for the Flyers will be change-up to keep batters on their player-coach Douglas, r e t u r n e e chaes-wup te standing in Konkoly, Kurash and California. toes while they are Rounding out the infield, they
against wl remember Fauth, "Lit- will use Snyder on first base, Conti
tie Red" as he is called by his on the pivot sack, Krall and Deere
tle ed" s h is alld byhisat short and Bielitz at third base. team mates, because of the way Conti, Krall and Bielitz all saw would go to the mound game after action with the "fly-boys" last year. game, throw a three hitter, strike Although their mentors have not out thirteen and lose by somehing come to a final decision as the like 3-2. Despite this, Red was one tat th th field the
of the most respected hurlers have the services of Ring, Merriaround the circuit, as he utilized weather, S h e r 1 a c k, Yarbrough, almost uncanny control with a good Smith and Holland to choose from. "high, hard one" to carry out his Whether or not the Flyers will mound chores. Working every other get off to a repeat of last year's game with Snyder, he could easily start will be seen Tuesday night turn into one of the league's best. when they lock horns with the however, asball g things Marine Leathernecks. It should be
have a flaw, both Fauth and Snyder interesting to see. will leave the base during the lat- -nteresting tosee. ter part of July for duty elsewhere-right when the pennant Wee race will be the thickest. First Schedule
Aiding these veterans in the
coining campaign will be Cordetti All week day games will be playof the Hospital who throws from ed at the Recreation Center and the starboard side. He is a new- will commence promptly at 7:00 comer to local play. P.M.
Receiving the serves of Staff Saturday's and Sunday's will be
hurlers will be returnees Hart and played at the Marine Site diamond Webb, who saw action with the and will begin at 2:00 P.M.
Corpsmen last year. Friday evening wil be reserved
Comprising the Staff infield will for the playing of make-up games be Shoskins, a farm hand of the on the Recreation Center field. Athletics, on the initial sack, play- The schedule for the first week er-coach Lyons at the pivot spot, of play Bozarth at short stop and Tracy Monday, 12 April: in the hot corner. They will be VU 10 vs Naval Station
supported by utility men Gad and Tuesday, 13 April: Marx. Marine vs NAS
In the pastures this combine will Wednesday, 14 April: have Rogers, Cordetti, O'Brien, MCB-8 vs Staff Corps
Galino and Canning. As is typical Thursday, 15 April: of the rest of the local nines, the Marines vs VU-10 starting three have not been picked. Saturday, 17 April:
With such a talented combine, MCB-8 vs NAS
the Staff Corps Squad should prove Sunday, 18 April: to be plenty tough, but the best Staff Corps vs Naval Station


Buss

Probable starter for the Naval Station Indians in the league opener Monday night against the Mallards of VU-10 will be Buss, hefty right - hander. Buss has thrown consistently well during the pre-season practices despite a discovery of small chips in his right elbow. X-rays showed no immediate danger or concern.


Royal
The other possible starter for the Braves Monday night is Bill Royal, a hold-over from last season's campaign. Royal started the practice game against the Marines last week, but on the second pitch a line drive hit him in the stomach and put him out of action.


Huber
The Mallards of VU-10 will have either Huber or Breske on the mound for the first toss of the league opener. Both have displayed good control and speed and Breske has been serving up a good change of pace ball that has baffled hitters.


Friz Casts


A Wa ry Eye


At Cuban Ring

by Dick Friz

It was dark when I entered the Parque Sixto Escobar, behind the Hotel Normandie in San Juan, and I'll never know how I located a seat. I nudged the guy next to me and asked, "When will they bring in the bull?" After a brief intermission of unrestrained laughter, he said, "This is no bool fight, Senor, is Boxeo." I soon discovered that in Puerto Rico, there is little difference.
I was informed that the lights weren't turned on until the matches began, something about the sport being just recently revived, and the management having financial difficulties.
When the first event was to begin, a young welter named Santana couldn't find the ring at first and almost wound up in a tennis tournament being held down the street at the Caribe Hilton. (He might have fared better there, at that.)
One thing I can say for these pugilists, they "toss leather;" They haven't learned to "ham" before television cameras, although once I spotted a rhumba step. A chap named Maldonado knocked Santana to the canvas three times, went down twice himself, and being the least groggy at the end of three rounds, won the decision.
In later events, the. famous bolo punch of the Kid Gavilan, was much copied, although gusts from wild misses almost matched the breeze from the adjacent Condado Lagoon.
The audience, through all this, seemed completely enthralled, on their feet most of the time yelling "knock heem out'' "knock heem out" in a relentless staccato.
The climax, for me, was the semi-final between local favorite, Juan Rios Fuentes, and Eddie Williams of New York. One round of light "powder puffing" by this boy Williams, convinced me that he hadn't gotten much further than Stiliman's Gym in the States. I wasn't astounded when he was "tapped" for the count in the second. They held him upended by the feet; his second slapped him in the face in an effort to revive him (the hardest blows of the evening, incidentally.) He eventually came around.
In the distance, the pleasant strain of dance music wafted over from the Club Calibar, and wooed me out of the arena before I remembered that the main event between Garcia and Charlie De Bow was next. As I departed, I'd swear I heard the fight crowd yell "ole, ole, ole" (an ovation usually reserved for matadors when they have been particularly b r a v e against El Toro, and are presented for his ears.) I'll never know whether Garcia. . . . or De Bow rated the "ole's".






Saturday, 10 April 1954


ao


Hams Keep World-Wide Contacts


by Jerry Lewis

"This is KG4AJ calling YT5AA". Silence for a few seconds. The static clears and from over thousands of miles away comes the reply.
"YT5AA to KG4AJ. Go ahead."
The voice comes through loud and clear and two ham operators seated in two corners of the globe thousands of miles apart carry on a conversation as though they were speaking over a telephone to their next-door neighbor.
Scattered over the naval base area at Guantanamo Bay are fourteen of these hobbyists to whom distance means nothing at all. They sit at home-made radio sets and discuss everything from the weather in their area to electronics to the trading of new ideas via radio.
Strictly controlled by the FCC (Federal Communication Commission) these licensed operators devote their every spare moment in keen competition to attain the greatest amount of contacts over the longest distances. These contacts are acknowledged by distant stations with DX cards (Distance) sent through the mail which attests to the fact that contact has been made.
While interviewing LCDR O. L. Bramlett at his home on Marina Point where his ham-station is located, I was handed DX cards sent to him by contacts all over the world. Among them were cards from Yugoslavia, Northern Italy, Florida, Arizona, Pennsylvania, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, Ohio, Detroit and Texas.


a7


Jim Yost readying for contact with stateside ham while sitting in specially constructed ham-shack in back of Villamar home.

Mr. J. R. Yost, civilian technical engineer, has contacted a station at French Morocco from his small ham-shack set up at the rear of the Yost home at 1st street in Villamar.
At the present time, there are approximately 75,000 active hamoperators within the continental limits of the United States. There are no available estimates as to the number of operators throughout the entire world but it is known however, that there are 'hams' in almost every corner of the globe no matter how remote.
It's an expensive hobby! But a person seated in his own home can carry on a conversation with members of all races of people all over the world. Hardly anything else comes close to being as fascinating as that " said LCDR Bramlett. LCDR Bramlett also brags about being a member of the 'Rag Chewer's Club'. The members of


LCDR 0. L. Bramlett scans band on receiver in ham-shack located in the rear of home at Marina Point. The shack is equipped with transmitter operating at 600-watts input, built by himself.

this club must be able to maintain constant chatter with another ham operator for over half-an-hour at a time.
The main club-room of the ham radio operators aboard the Naval base is located in the naval air station administration building and is open to all qualified operators from both forces ashore and afloat.
These operators must have valid licenses and must be checked out on the operation of the gear by a club member.
Among some of the operators throughout the world with whom contact has been established and 'schedules made up' from Guantanamo Bay is a blind man in Key West who operates a dial set specially constructed with braille (raised) numbers so that he can 'feel' the frequencies when he scans the dial. There is a 16-year old high school girl from Florida who operates during her recess hours from school, also an invalid who operates his set while flat on his back in bed.
The fourteen ham operators aboard the base have been doing a great service by contacting relatives in cases of emergency and having the parties speak to one another through a special phone patch by which phone lines are employed along with the transmitter. This device has been known to operate satisfactorily for distances of 2000 miles and more.
Mr. L. J. Davie, civilian electronics technician and an avid hamoperator aboard the base, recently contacted Mrs. A. D. Whiteman who remained at the bedside of her son Billy during his delicate brain operation in Washington D. C. CDR A. D. Whiteman kept in constant contact with the station in D. C. and was informed daily of his son's condition thanks to Mr. Davie and the stateside ham-operator at the other end of the line.
There are many recorded instances where a ham operator has saved a life. Such a case was the recent distress call from an invalid operator in Portugal who established contact with a Florida operator who in turn relayed the message to New York. Special serum needed to save a little girl's life was on a plane that same night, on the way to Portugal. As a direct result of a 'hobby', the girl's life was saved! That ham operator was certainly deserving of a welldone!
Here are the names and call let(Continue on Page Eight)


Join The Payroll


Savings Plan
President Dwight D. Eisenhower sent a recent memorandum to the heads of executive departments and agencies, reactivating the Interdepartmental Savings Bond Committee for the voluntary purchase of United States Savings Bonds by military and civilian personnel of the United States Government which stated: "The nation's economic welfare requires the widest possible distribution of the national debt through the continued sale of United States Savings Bonds to the people. To this end it is important that Government ,
ployees continue their leadership in the purchase of Savings Bonds through the Payroll Savings Plan."
The Department of the Navy has led federal agencies in supporting the Savings Bond Program for the last five years. The latest available comparative report of the Interdepartmental Savings Bond Committee for November 1953 shows that Navy employees represented only 20.4 per cent of the total number of federal employees but held 29.5 per cent of the federal Payroll Savings accounts and 35.5 per cent of the November bond investment from the federal payroll. Members of the Navy and Marine Corps accounted for 61.6 per cent of all the Savings Bond allotments in effect by members of the Armed Forces and 51.9 per cent of the November bond investment from military pay. In November 1953 73.8 per cent of Navy employees were enrolled in the Payroll Savings Plan in contrast to the federal average of 51 per cent which has increased 3.8 per cent in the last year. A number of federal agencies currently are conducting vigorous Payroll Savings promotion campaigns and soon may challenge the Navy's leadership.
This is the first of a series of messages which will be brought to you from the Base Savings Bond Officer with the strong desire that all eligible employees of the base will actively participate in this easy method of saving.
You have an opportunity now to make a decision you will never regret. The Navy expects everyone who serves it to make personal progress-and prosper, and it looks after the best interests of its personnel in many ways, including maintenance of the safest and surest way for everyone on its payroll to save money to meet inevitable future needs.
Everyone wants to save money. We all know that we are not likely to prosper unless we spend less than we earn, and learn to keep the difference. The Navy Payroll Savings Plan is the certain way tt keep a part of your pay so you may always have a "nest egg" for those unforeseen and urgent needs.
The Payroll Savings Plan is an automatic way to save money. More than 72 per cent of all Navy employees are payroll savers. We are proud of our payroll savings record here. We want you to share in its benefits. It can do as much for you as it has done for the great majority of Navy workers. It takes the "if" out of thrift. You make one decision now to keep a certain part of your pay-the part that belongs to you-and then our payroll office will keep that money for you each pay day. It's automatic and systematic.
The best part about this savings plan is that you hardly miss the money which is withheld from your


9


USS Baltimore Plans

Open House Sunday

The U.S.S. Baltimore, (CA-68) has planned an open house to be held on Sunday, 11 April, 1954 between the hours of 1330 and 1630 on the occasion of the completion of her underway training and her departure from Guantanamo Bay.
Invitations have been sent to the Commander, Naval Base and the commanders of the components of the base. Other guests invited are the staffs of the aforementioned officers; Officers, enlisted personnel, and civilian employees who are American citizens serving in base activities, and their families.
Guests will be picked up in ship's boats at the Fleet Landing and the Officers' Landing. Escorts will be provided and visitors will be guided on tours of the ship. Guests of ship's officers and visiting officers will be entertained in the wardroom; guests of warrant officers, chief petty officers and first class petty officers will be entertained in their respective messes, while refreshments will be available for all others in the mess halls.
During the afternoon it is planned to present a Baltimore plaque to commemorate the ship's visit to Guantanamo Bay.

pay. Income tax payments are less painless when your tax is withheld from your pay a little at a time. Now that taxes are reduced, you can accumulate personal savings for your own benefit. It really is surprising how even a small amount of money will grow quickly into big money when it is saved systematically. Even as small amount as $3.75 a week kept in a Payroll Savings account will give you $195.60 to spend or keep in just one year, or $1,025.95 in only five years!
Payroll Savings is the safest way to save because the part of pay you determine to keep is invested for you in U. S. Defense Bonds. No investment is safer. Your bonds make you a stockholder in the United States Government. Ownership of Defense Bonds is a vital patriotic service. It helps finance our National Defense, and reduces inflation. Defense Bonds pay a good interest yield on your savings every six months. They mature in nine years and eight months now and the yield at maturity is three per cent compounded semi-annually. If you want to keep them an additional ten years after maturity you will earn 80 per cent on your original investment.
Defense Bonds are better thqr currency for personal savings. As soon as you pay for a bond, the Navy will issue it for you. Without loss to the owner, the Treasury will replace any bond that may be lost, stolen or destroyed. When you need quick cash, you can take any bond two months or more after its issue date to any bank without advance notice, and get cash in the full amount of its purchase price, plus accrued interest. For long term or short term savings you can't lose in Defense Bonds. And you can't beat the Payroll Savings Plan as the sure way to accumulate the money you need for the things you want. What part of your pay will you keep this way?
Farmer-Will you sell me your mule?
Rancher-Nope, absolutely not.
Farmer-Why so emphatic?
Rancher-Well he kicked my last wife to death and I'm going to get married again one of these days.


I,


my1


THE INDIAN






af


Saturday, 10 April 1954


THE INDIAN


af


Pagel'


NATO Observes

5th Anniversary

In five years, the United States and 13 of her allies have built out of the lessons of two world wars an 80-division bulwark against aggression in Europe.
This is NATO-the North Atlantic Treaty Organization-which celebrated its fifth anniversary Sunday, 4 April. Its effectiveness drew an oblique salute week before last when Russia offered to consider joining it.
To NATO leaders, this was like an outlaw robber trying to don a policeman's uniform, for it was against potential Soviet aggression that NATO was organized. The Soviet bid was rejected as an attempt to undermine the West's security.
Toward that security in the past five years, the United States has appropriated 14 thousand million dollars, of which seven thousand million dollars have been spent. The other NATO nations have come up with 30 to 35 thousand million.
With the United States contributing one-third the cost and the other 13 nations putting up four-fifths of the forces, NATO's military might now stands at:
Between 80 and 90 divisions which could reach combat effectiveness within 30 days, 275 squadrons totaling 4,000 planes, half of them modern jets-and thousands of mine sweepers, coastal vessels, and warships.
Six of North America's 20 divisions are detailed with NATO forces in Europe. Percentagewise, the United States contributes 15 percent of NATO's ground forces, 25 percent of its air arm, and 30 percent of its navy.
For the United States, it means a vast defense system-including 400 bases with 9,000 foot runways to handle jets-being forged around the perimeter of Communist Russia. This defense shield ranges from ice-capped Norway to sunny Turkey.
With North America's defense bill running 35 to 40 thousand million dollars a year, this NATO shield costs the United States about 15 percent of its total security program.
NATO was signed in Washington on April 4, 1949, by the United States, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Iceland, Italy, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, and the United Kingdom. Greece and Turkey came into NATO in February, 1952.
It was truly a historic move. The Atlantic community nations had banded together in two world wars to fight back against agression. But both times this happened after the shooting began. Now, for the first time, they set up a collective security system before an aggression.
They were spurred on by Russia's rough tactics in Europe and in the United Nations-from the seizure of Czechoslovakia to repeated use of the veto.
Militarily, NATO started practically from scratch.
In December, 1949, the West I~ 12 effective divisions in Europe, that is the U.S., British and French occupation forces in Germany.
Now the 1954 goals, approved by the NATO ministers last December, call for:
1. An increase in airpower to give NATO close to 5700 planes.
2. An increase in naval craft, for a total of about 1,900.
3. An increase in ground forces to give NATO 103 front line and reserve divisions.
Backing up this force is NATO's


PUBLIC WORKS CHIPS
by Vic. Gault
More About Public Works
Organization
A new branch has been established and added as one of the nine branches that composes the Maintenance Division. This branch which was formerly under "section" status is the Pest Control Branch. It is under the direct supervision, insofar as operation is concerned, of Mr. Adolphus Collymore, Leadingman Exterminator of the department. However it is supervised on a technical basis by the Base Medical Officer, Naval Hospital, who provides a qualified medical officer and an environmental sanitation officer for the purpose of rendering technical advise and assistance in the operation of this insect and rodent control program for the entire base. The Public Works Department has been charged with the responsibility of providing all necessary equipment, supplies and personnel for the program, hence the establishment of the Pest Control Branch was in order.
The branch is divided into two sections, ie. Field Section and the Inspection Section. The field section's responsibility includes - fogging in all residential areas, ditching, spraying of manholes and vegetation, extermination of insects, set and bait rodent traps and place poison bait for rats and other v e r m i n. Destroy vermin such as roaches, beetles, moths, ants, and bedbugs by spraying or dusting infected areas with poisonous chemicals in liquid, gas, or powder form. Where required, seals off areas to be treated and introduces fumigates, such as sulfur dioxide, cyanide, and other germ and vermin killing agents or gases. Collects and disposes of exterminated vermin. Identifies these by species so far as possible in order to obtain information on probable source of infestation and additional measures to be taken. In specified or unusual cases reports to appropriate health officials, as for instance upon discovery of foreign species of vermin probably brought in by ships. Prepares poisons used in exterminating rodents and other vermin by compounding mixtures of poison ingredients in accordance with formulas. Adjusts and makes minor repairs to traps and spray pumps. May select specific poisons for a particular task for several different approved types, in accordance with particular circumstances. The Inspection Section inspects and checks all barracks both civilian and military and also all living quarters and ascertains that all approved health measures are being carried out. Takes and recommends measures to be taken in case of infestation of rats or other vermin. Reports all suspected places and all violations to proper authorities.

The demure young bride, her face a revelation of winsome innocence, slowly walked down the church aisle clinging to the arm of her father. As she reached the platform, before the altar, her dainty foot brushed a potted flower, upsetting it. She looked at the spilled dirt gravely, then raised her childlike eyes to the sedate face of the minister . . . . "That's a helluva place to put a lily."system of pipe lines to pump jet fuel to its base, scores of depots and stock piles, a communication network, a system of inland waterways, a mobilization plan, and even a civil defense set-up.


Message From Garcia
by Henry Garcia
WEEKEND IN SANTIAGO
Going to Santiago for a nice week-end is not so expensive. There are taxis which leave about every three hours' from "El Suizo" in Guantanamo City and arrive at Santiago in approximately three hours. The fare costs $3.00 per person (one way). There are, of course, other means of transportation, such as plane, train, and bus.
If you are one of those who go for historical points, don't forget to visit San Juan Hill, where the American Troops wrote unforgettable chapters of heroism during the Spanish-American War. As you stroll along the statues and monuments at San Juan, and notice the reverent silence always prevalent in that place, you cannot help but see in your mind "Teddy" Roosevelt's Rough Riders, and listen to the tales told by the mute mouths of the old cannons that seem to be taking a nap under the shade of the trees. You will then remember that you are an Aierican, and your imagination will surely make you perceive in your ears the caressing and vibrant notes of "The Star Spangled Banner", while your heart will feel truer than ever before to the principle of freedom and democracy.
A place no visitor should miss in Santiago is the Bacardi Museum and Library, in front of the "Plalacio Provincial", in the heart of the city.
For a nice evening you can visit "Rancho Club", by the main highway, or "Puerto Boniato" (Sweet Potato lo-rnutaln), many feet abn6 sea level, where they have cafes with juke boxes that have a fine selection of good records, a wonderful breeze and a nice view of the city. Another place you would like to stay in forever is "San Pedro del Mar", an aristocratic club in the outskirts of the city, which has good music, floor shows and a very refine environment.
"Copa Club" is another popular night club, featuring a show with Cuban dancers that will shake the living daylights out of you.
If you go to Santiago on working days, you may request in the "Compania Bacardi", near the waterfront, a pass to visit the "Bacardi Gardens". In the Gardens you-can take nice pictures and drink as much as you can, without any cost to you, of the best Cuban beer and rum.


NSD Supply Line

Cries of "Surprise, Surprise" greeted Sue Lightfoot, Rose Marie Holder and Peggy May as they entered the Family Room of the Chief's Club last Saturday to attend a triple baby shower luncheon given in their honor, by the girls from the depot. Those present were the honor guests, Mrs. Marta Johnson, Mrs. Ann Sheridan, Mrs. Beverly Mairo, Mrs. Margaret Emory, Mrs. Mildred DiMascola, Mrs. Evelyn McDonald, Mrs. Pat Spetz and Mrs. Helen Beman.
LTJG Robert G. Whitman returned from TAD in Washington last Monday, he was fortunate in seeing the Annual Washington Cherry Blossom Festival but is glad to be back in warm, sunny Gtmo.
A hearty welcome aboard is extended to Marvin E. Cote, SK2 whose hometown is Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Cote reported to the depot from the USS Rehoboth, AGS-50.
Miss Frances Abbot, personal


Hospital Notes

Heirport News
The following births were recorded during the past week: It was "girls" week with two daughters being born; on 30 March 1954 Cynthia Karen was delivered to SH2 and Mrs. Richard D. Holm, and on 5 April 1954 Karen Joy to A02 and Mrs. Harvey 0. Russell.
Reports Aboard
LT George V. Hering (MC) USN reported aboard for duty in the surgical service on 31 March 1954 from the U. S. Naval Hospital, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Doctor Hering is a graduate of the University of Minnesota and is the brother of Captain Eugene R. Hering, Jr. (MC) USN who is presently attached to the U. S. Marine Corps Headquarters, Washington, D. C.
Aboard On TAD
LT Thomas A. McDowell (MC) USN reported aboard 1 April 1954 for a period of temporary duty from MCB-8.
Items of Interest
LCDR and Mrs. I. V. King and son, and LCDR and Mrs. R. L. Henry have just returned from the round trip to Panama aboard the USNS Thomas.
EM Transferred
HM3 D. H. Fowler, USN was transferred to the U. S. Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina for duty on 3 April 1954.
IPM2 A. Vanore, Jr., USN was transferred to the U. S. Naval Receiving Station, Brooklyn, New York for separation from the Naval Service.
SN A. H. Lowenhagen, USN was transferred to the U. S. Naval Receiving Station, Newport, R. I. for further transfer to the USS Rush (DDR-714) for duty.


CAPT R. R. McCracken, Commanding Officer, Naval Air Station, presents awards to three NAS employees. Altius Joseph, Clerk, GS-2, receives a beneficial suggestion check. Following Mr. Joseph are Manuel A. Lores, Clerk, GS-2, also a suggestion check winner, and Selvin Reid, Supr. Storekeeper, GS-5, who received a Meritorious Civilian Service Award based on his outstanding performance of duties at the NAS Supply.

secretary to United States Ambassador to France, left this week to resume her duties after spending two weeks in our tropical paradise as the houseguest of LCDR and Mrs. Richard W. Brown of Marina Point.






avy-10NDPPO-Gtma.4824A


TE INDIAN


MOVIES


Saturday, 10 April
FORBIDDEN
Tony Curtis Joanne Dru
Lyle Bettger Marvin Miller
Gangsterism reaches halfway around the world following a Chicago vice lord's murder and the search for his widow.
Sunday, 11 April PARIS MODEL
Marilyn Maxwell Eva Gabor
Paulette Goddard
Barbara Lawrence
A story about a ravishing Paris gown that costs a fortune and its effect on the four women who bought it and wore it for their own particular reasons. A four-episode story. Monday, 12 April
VIGILANTE TERROR
Bill Elliott Mary Ellen Kay
Myron Healey Fuzzy Knight
A group of masked vigilantes terrorizes a western town. Wild Bill Elliot is appointed sheriff and works to bring the culprits to justice.
Tuesday, 13 April FLIGHT NURSE
Joan Leslie Forrest Tucker
Arthur Franz Jeff Donnell
Flight nurse asks to be assigned to Korean War duty hoping to find the man she loves.
Wednesday, 14 April
WINGS OF THE HAWK
Van Heflin Julia Adams
George Dolenz Antonio Moreno
This story takes place in Mexico during the regime of Porfirio Diaz. Van Heflin combats the unjust local military element.
Thursday, 15 April
FLIGHT TO TANGIER
Joan Fontaine Jack Palance
Corinne Calvet Robert Douglas
A $3,000,000 letter of credit is being flown to Tangier. International black market operators are trying to obtain it.
Friday, 16 April
THE STRANGER WORE A GUN Randolph Scott Claire Trevor
Joan Weldon George MacReady
When a former Quantrell spy discovers that the notorious guerilla leader is murdering and plundering for his own gain, he joins the Confederate Army and fights the rest of the Civil War in orthodox fashion.

GTMO Ham Operators
(Continued from Page Six)
ters of the fourteen operators aboard the naval base in Guantanamo Bay: D. E. Pomeroy CTC (KG4AC), R. M. Cousins ET1 (KG4AD), LCDR F. N. Vanderhoef (KG4AE), G. H. Anger AM2 (KG4AG), A. R. McLemore ATC (KG4AH), R. C. Wigg RMC (KG4AI), LCDR 0. L. Bramlett (KG4AJ), B. R. McKinnies ALC (KG4AK), G. H. Kraft RM3 (KG4AM) Naval Air Station Amateur Club (KG4AO), J. R. Yost, Western Electric Supervisor (KG4AP), V. H. Hardy ATC (KG4AT) and L. J. Davie, C i v ili a n Electronics Engineers (KG4AU).


NAS Crosswinds AA(e esu\6


by Dick Friz
The following new men reported aboard the Air Station this past week; Jesse Stokes, ACC and Robert Phillips, ACAN, from U.S. Natechtrau, NAS, Olethe, Kansas. John Livingston, TDAN, is a recent graduate of "A" school at Memphis, Tenn. Alton Sparks, AM3, is a transfer from NAS Whiting Field, Florida.
The VF-83 jet squadron out of Oceana, Virginia, reported aboard Leeward Point, Wednesday. The squadron, one of two on the Atlantic Coast that will get the new Cutlasses, (F7U3's), has recently set a new rocket projectile record VF-103, the Club-Leaf Squadron has been aboard for several weeks, out of Cecil Field in Jax. The 174th returned to Jax last Saturday, VF83 was the first squadron to utilize the new jet strip here in January 1953.
A deferred emergency interrupted a Captain's inspection held at Leeward Point Saturday. The crews went into action, and the inspection party held a recess until the plane landed safely. A formal inspection was also held at McCalla Field by Captain R. R. McCracken; Executive Officer CDR W. G. Winslow; Operations Officer CDR R. T. Boyd, Jr. and LCDR A. D. Nelson.
A huge sign at McCalla Field states, "Through these portals pass the world's greatest crosswind pilots." LCDR J. B. Gaines, pilot of an R4D8 brought RADM C. L. C. Atkeson aboard, Tuesday, has ample season to reafirm that motto as a result of a controlled ground loop against vicious 25 knot easterly crosswind.
News Briefs
CDR Allen Rothenberg, new Operations Officer, arrived with his family on Thursday. He will have temporary quarters at 310-B. . . . LTJG J. J. Byer will be detached from NAS sometime in June, and he and his wife (plus an extra passenger born here) will depart for West Hartford, Conn. . . . Jim Wade, AC3, from Leeward's control tower, has been attached TAD to WGBY as a radio announcer. . . . quote from female "ham" operator in States to one of local "hamsters." " - . '.come up some time and see my rig."


Jet Fuel....

(Continued from Page One)
under contract by the Shilstone Testing Laboratory. Mr. Abbot Smith, the testing laboratory's representative, was much impressed with the skill of the Snare Corporation's employees, not of whom are native Cuban artisans. Despite the exacting nature of the work, and some unavoidable delays in material procurement, the project was completed within the time specified in the contract.
Responsibility for administering the contract for the Navy rested with the Officer in Charge of Construction, TENTH Naval District, CAPT N. J. Dustrup, CEC, USN. Local administration was exercised by CDR Gordon, assisted by ENS E. 0. Pfrang, CEC, USN.
The completed system consists of bulk storage tanks, pipelines, a surge tank, and a concrete pumphouse the powerful pumps, motors, controllers and switches. This system will enable the Naval Supply Depot to maintain bulk stocks of Jet Fuel, thereby effecting possible savings of up to $2,000,000.00 annually and rendering improved service to the fleet and the expanded jet operations at Leeward Point.


by Sgt. William J. McDowell, Jr., UsMC
Reporting aboard this week was Sgt. T. R. Bushong and Pfc J. G. Howe who came from Marine Corps Schools Quantico, Va. for duty at the Barracks. Both men will work for Special Services as movie projectionists. We hope you enjoy your stay here at Marine Barracks and we know you will like being stationed at the best post of the Corps.
As we mentioned in our column last week a field meet was held with all members enjoying themselves to the fullest extent. There were numerous contest's held with prizes awarded for each event.
Tuesday 13 April see Marine Barracks pitted against Naval Station in a baseball game at Naval Station so don't forget to get out and cheer your team to victory. The game starts at 1900 so make sure you are out there. Have You Ever Wondered About?
The beginning of Military Courtesies ? . . .
Military Courtesies are said to have originated with the practice in the days of knighthood when warriors would raise the visors on their armor to verify opponents.
The purpose of the salute: it is an act of recognition and an indication of respect for authority.


Ham Contest
(Continued from Page One)
2200 PST
NPG (Navy Radio 114.95, 6428.5, San Francisco, Calif.) 92277.5, 12966,
17055.2
0100 EST (16 May)
AIR (Air Force Radio 3497.5, 6997.5 Washington, D.C.)
Each transmission will commence with a five minute CQ call. it is not necessary to copy more than one station, and no extra credit will be given for so doing. Transcriptions should be submitted "as received". No attempt should be made to correct possible transmission errors. Copies should be mailed to Armed Forces Day Contest, Room BE 1000, The Pentagon, Washington, D. C. Time, frequency, and call letters of the station copied should be indicated.
Military stations WAR, NSS, and AIR will be on the air between 1800 and 2400 EST on 15 May 1954 to contact and test with amateur radio stations. The military stations will operate on spot frequencies outside the amateur bands as follows:
Frequency (KCS)
WAR (Army Radio 4025 (Voice)
Washington) 6997.5 (CW)
NSS (Navy Radio 4015 (CW)
washington) 7375 (CW)
14385 (SW)
AIR (Air Force Radio 3497.5 (CW) Washington) 7635 (Voice)
14405 (Voice)
Contacts will consist of a brief exchange of location and signal report. No traffic handling or message exchange will be permitted. An acknowledgement (QSL) card will be sent to each amateur station worked. Each of the stations will acknowledge separately.
In addition to the program outlined above, it is considered to be in the spirit of the occasion for amateur radio stations at naval activities to engage extensively in contact with other amateur stations on Armed Forces Day and to handle bona fide amateur traffic. However, artificial generation of messages such as "Greetings on Armed Forces Day" should be avoided. Operation by the special K-call amateur stations at Naval Reserve activities is particularly encouraged.


If you see spots in front of your eyes instead of Mara, then you really need glasses.


Ertctmet ]Ztkt]9.

It is rumored in these parts that J. C. Carlson, DT2, USN is contemplating requesting an extension of his allotted tour of duty in the area, since he is having trouble tearing himself away.
CDR Frank Etter is spending a few days in the local hospital. It is hoped that nothing serious will ensue. Latest reports are that movement is rather painful, but it is felt that Frank will be able to move more freely upon his recovery. However, no horseback riding engagements are being accepted at the present time.
The closed season on langosta has seriously interferred with the night sports endeavor of some of the local citizens. Chief Kerslake is complaining bitterly, not that he has any quarrel with the ruling, but he claims he had just gotten zero-ed in on the 'gusters.' It is alleged that the Guantanamo Bay Fish Union, Local 281 will appeal the ruling, pleading discrimination. Chief Kerslake was overheard to have sworn vengeance against all members of the equatic species since he was bested in a contest with a tarpon from Guantanamo River.
Jay Sickels, DT2, the mastermind of the front office has been notified that his days on this Naval Base are numbered and his services are required at Bethesda, Md. We'll miss the Sickels and hate to see them go. It's good duty tho' and spring is here, so we know they are happy.
Old "Long-stay" Fitzpatrick will be overjoyed upon his return from the states to find that he is the lucky winner of a European Cruise, courtesy of Uncle Sugar.
The prospective CO of the Naval Dental Clinic, CAPT W. F. D. Stagner, is expected to arrive on or about 12 June 1954, accompanied by Mrs. Stagner and son, which means CAPT Max A. Moon, Mrs. Moon and son John will depart some time thereafter for CAPT Moon's new duty station at Hunters' Point, San Francisco Naval Shipyard.


Saturday 3 April 1 4


THE INDIAN




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Vol. VI, No. 40 Ul. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 10 April 1954 Ham Contest Slated Armed Forces Day The Army, Navy, and Air Force are co-sponsors of a program for the participation of amateur radio operators in the celebration of Armed Forces Day on 15 May, 1954. A CW receiving competition will feature a message from the Secretary of Defense. All individuals, amateur radio operators and others are eligible to participate. A certificate of merit will be issued to each participant who makes perfect copy. Transmissions will be made at 25 words per minute on the .following schedules: Time (15 May 1954) 1900 EST Call Sign Frequencies (KCS) WAR (Army Radio 14405, 20994 Washington, D.C.) NSS (Navy Radio 121.95, 4390, 9425, Washington, D.C.) 12804, 17050.4, 22491 AIR (Air Force Radio Washington, D.C.) 3497.5, 6997.5 0100 EST (16 May) WAR (Army Radio 14405, 20994 Washington, D.C.) (Continue on Page Eight) A. J. McGowan Stresses Accident Prevention Approximately 150 members of the Parent-Teachers Association of the Naval Base heard Mr. A. J. McGowan, Safety Engineer, speak on the "Safety of Our Children" at Tuesday's monthly meeting in the base school auditorium. Mr. McGowan stressed the fact that there are nearly 100,000 accidental deaths throughout the nation in a year's time, costing the citizens billions of dollars. He pointed out that accidents were the main cause of death in persons from one year old to the age of 35, and that accidental death never ranks lower than fourth place beyond that age. Mr. McGowan emphasized the fact that 99% of all "accidents" are preventable and stated that it has been proven that most accidents occur in the home where, through either neglect or lack of accident prevention experience, unsafe acts and unsafe conditions exist. He distributed mimeographed memos to all members present listing unsafe conditions and unsafe acts by which children could be injured in the home. He pointed out that the conditions and acts listed were not "occasional happenings". but. "have been listed because they have happened frequently and will continue to happen until children are trained to do otherwise." Mr. McGowan's speech and the facts and figures he presented were impressive and received strict attention by an intent audience. At each meeting a banner is awarded to the classroom which has the greatest percentage of parents attending the meeting. At the April meeting Mrs. Usey's third grade class won first place, followed by Mrs. Dunmire's firstgrade class and Mrs. Daughtry's kindergarten class. RADM Taylor Opens Jet Fuel Storage Monday afternoon, watched by CDR E. W. Sutherling, SC, USN, Supply Depot Commanding Officer, CDR W. M. Gordon, CEC, USN, Resident Officer in Charge of Construction, Guantanamo Bay, LT W. L. Roberts, SC, USN, Supply Depot Fuel Division Officer, Mr. J. R. Connor, Project Manager for Frederick Snare Corporation, and Mr. Carlos Cabal, Naval Supply Depot Fuel Division foreman, RADM E. B. Taylor, Base Commander, pushed the switch "lighting off" the motors and signifying the addition of another valuable facility here at Guantanamo. The new jet fuel storage system, part of Naval Supply Depot Guantanamo's Fuel Division, was financed by the Bureau of Supplies and accounts, which has the responsibility of supplying all fuels used by the Navy. The Bureau of Yards and Docks, which is the bureau charged with responsibility for construction of the Naval Establishment ashore,. authorized construction last June. Procurement of pipe and other A Is hld u ofeomme November 1953. At that time the construction workers of the Frederick Snare Corporation, construction engineers, under the direction of Mr. J. R. Connor and the direct supervision of Mr. Sydney Rand, job superintendant, began the project. Construction of this project was a very exacting job. It was necessary to do much welding near existing gasoline and fuel oil lines. That necessitated very rigid safety precautions and expert workmanship. Since the pipelines will carry jet fuels at high pressure, close inspection of all seams and joints was of vital importance. These inspection services were provided (Continue on Page Eight) Monday afternoon, RADM Edmu "lighting off" the motors for the ne at the ceremony were CDR E. W. S W. L. Roberts, Mr. J. R. Connor, and Building 275 of the Villamar Replacement Housing Project stands awaiting its occupants. The completely modern cement and concrete block duplex home will be the new residence of J. M. Malmay, BM1, and his family and of S/ Sgt. R. C. Rausch. Both families will move in First Bargo Families Shift To Villamar Replacement Next week, building 275 of the new Villamar replacement housing project will no longer be empty. The new housing unit, which has only been completed for a week, will house two families who are moving in from East Bargo. The first two families to change residence will be those of J. M. Malmay, BM1, of the Naval Station and S/Sgt. R. C. Rausch of the Marine Barracks. Mr. and Mrs. Malmay are very impressed with the quality and arrangement of the new housing. However, they feel that it will be much better a few months from now when construction in that area has been completed, roads have been built, fences erected, and lawns have been cultivated. Mrs. Malmay, however, says that from what she has heard, the kitchen is very nice. S/Sgt. and Mrs. Rausch are definitely looking forward to moving into their new home. When asked if she had seen the new ,.x i apartment, Mrs. Rausch said that she hadn't, but that she likes to be surprised. Although she hasn't yet viewed their new home, Mrs. Rausch says that the kitchen sounds like a "housewife's dream." Sergeant Rausch feels that the new .: home offers much more privacy for their daughter who at the present time does not have a room of her own. All of the Rausches feel that the new home offers many advantages. The Malmays and the Rausches will be the first two families to move into the new housing. Meanwhile, four other families have beer notified of the fact that they will be moving into one of the new "F units" of the new Villamar housing Lnd B. Taylor pushed the switch in the near future. They are: V. 0. w jet fuel storage system. Present Rollins, AD2, and family of VU-10, utherng CDR W. M. Gordon, LT D. A. Blair, MU1, and family, of Mr. Carlos Cabal. (Continued on Page Three) 9 9 earl next

PAGE 2

TTE INDIAN Page Two Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 10 April 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sandness -------Officer-Adviso H. E. Davis, JOC---r-----H. L. Sisson, JO3----------------News Jerry Lewis, JOB---------Features J. C. Dierks, JOB-----------Sporto Fierce Lehmbeck--a--Sports LF. L. Cannon. JOSN---Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NovEos Pn36, -evised Nov. me, and financed with sontappropriated fnds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces uress Service, and AFS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local newo may be reprinted provided credit is given to TEE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. VU -10 Prop Blast A great white bird descended on Guantanamo at 2215 on 5 April and presented Lillian and H. 0. Russel, A02 their first child, a little girl, Karen Joy. She weighed s.man.15 1/4 ounces and fine. Pop says he's fine too. Tne Russel's live at CB-16B and they both call Wilmington, Delaware home. Russel was bubbling over most of the day Tuesday 6 April and of course fine Cuban cigars were passed out all around. He has been with VU-10 for fifteen months and our very best "Welcome Aboard" is extended to Karen. Another bird, same type, came flying in with a daughter for LT and Mrs. E. H. Weiland, Eric and Alice, at 1140 on 6 April. She weighed 4 pounds 12 ounces and no name as yet. Eric requested a cross country flight to Memphis in order to return some of that Souther soil for the baby to touch, but due to circumstances it has been delayed for awhile. Alice is from Memphis, Eric is from Philadelphia, and they now have a Californian son, a Floridian daughter, and a Gtmo daughter. Welcome aboard Baby Weiland. Three new men reported for duty this week, E. S. Bowling, ATAN from Cincinnati, Ohio; W. H. Scott from Washington, D. C.; and E. W. Watkins Jr. CS2 from Wilmington, North Carolina. Welcome to VU-10. The Mallard golfers had a weekend off from the local tournament but W. M. Narwid, J. C. Mauldin, C. E. Loggins, and D. J. Brough all participated in the Santiago Country Club-Guantanamo Naval Base play over the 3 and 4 April weekend. The local team won back the revolving trophy and will hold it until a return match is held in Santiago. The next match in the intra-command league for VU-10 is Saturday 10 April at 1330 when they meet MCB-8. A little something borrowed. If you have been missing church on Sunday, maybe a sign posted in front of the chapel saying CH-CH would help. What is missing? AN-How do you like the date I dug up for you? AA-Rotten. Throw her back and start digging some place else. The Lucky Bag by Betty Radcliffe This past Tuesday the Little Theater held it's regular monthly meeting and several important issues were discussed and settled. Among those issues was the deciding of the type of play to be presented next by the Little Theater. After much discussion and vote counting it was finally decided that a comedy would be presented next. At this time the Play Reading Committee is hard at work reading and searching for a real rib-tickler comedy. Another issue decided on was a change of meeting nights from the first Tuesday of the month to the second Tuesday. Mrs. Norma England was elected Secretary to replace the former Secretary, Mrs. Jenny Bertine, who left for the States this week. Four new members were welcomed into the group at this meeting and there will always be a welcome and the red carpet rolled out for any prospective members. RECENTLY I WAS ASKED THIS QUESTION: "When, where and why was Little Theater originated?" ...The only information I could find was this; The chief innovation in Western drama in the early 20th centry was the growth of the Little Theater movement. Dissatisfied with the established commercial theater, Andre Antonie in the late 19th century established a Theatre Libre in Paris. The idea of a theater free from tradition and the demands of immediate commercial success spread throughwere formed in 1915; the Provincetown Players, the Neighborhood Playhouse and the Washington Souare Players, which later developed into the Theatre Guild. These new groups, stimulated by George Pierce Baker's 47 Workshop Harvard, influenced the establishment of Little Theaters throughout the country. TEENAGE-ROUND-UP by Barbara Burke and Linda Thurston If, on Tuesday of last week, you saw a pile of cars parked outside of the Teachers' Quarters, you would have known that it was the starting place of the Progressive Dinner you've been hearing so much about. From T. Q. the party progressed to Renee's, Pat's, and finally ended up at Anita's house. Those present consisted of the boys basketball team and it's managers, the cheerleaders, the basketball queen. Mr. and Mrs. "Coach" McGill, and two players who played for the Pirates in by-gone days; Bill Barrett and Pete Broughton. The G.A.A. held a picnic at Yateras Beach last week-end and the results are some pretty terrible sunburns. Cavie has been limping around complaining about being fried in baby-oil, but you should see some of the two tone tan jobs that Carol, Eunice, and Pierce are sporting. They are the most! Besides all this, double pneumonia is going around from the dusty ride home, Norman lost his little toe nail at the beach, and Pierce suffered from "southern exposure". All of these minor calamities haven't daunted the spirits of the teenagers however, 'cause the Sunday School plans to hold another one over the Easter Holidays. HONORABLE MENTIONS GO TO: Eddie (Porcupine) Stafford and his new "long" haircut ... Roxy Moore and her fire hydrants. Holy Week Services PROTESTANT: Aprill 11 -18 Thursday, 15 April 1900 -The Lord's Supper Friday, 16 April 1400 -Good Friday Service Sunday, 18 April 0600 -Easter Sunrise Service in Base School Patio Sunday, 18 April 1100 -Easter Service There will be special Easter music at all services. CATHOLIC: Tuesday, 13 April 1915 -Rosary and Benediction Thursday, 15 April 0530 -Mass Friday, 16 April 1500 -Stations of the Cross Saturday, 17 April 0800 -Holy Communion Sunday, 18 April 0700 and 0900 -Mass Plans are also being made for Jewish Passover Seder on April 17 in the Naval Air Station Mess Hall. Arch-Bishop Of Santiago Here For Confirmation The Most Reverend Enrique Perez Serantes, Arch-Bishop of Santiago, will be at the Naval Base on April 24th and 25th to administer the Sacraments of Holy Eucharist and Confirmation. The Sacrament of Holy Eucharist o'clock Mass oni ^uday morning, April 25. The Confirmation ceremony will take place in the chapel at 2:00 o'clock on Sunday afternoon, April 25. Immediately following the Confirmation there will be a reception in the Base School patio for the Arch-Bishop. All Catholic parents are urged to bring their children to the reception. Seventeen boys and 12 girls, plus adults, will receive their first Communion this year while 6 boys and 9 girls, plus adults, will be confirmed. Toastmasters Install New President Chaplain M. 0. Stephenson was installed as president of Toastmasters Club 92 at a ladies' night dinner program on 1 April. He succeeds CDR J. N. Lawlor. Other officers of the Club, who along with Chaplain Stephenson will serve for 6-months, included: R. J. Hummel, 1st vice-president, LCDR R. J. Matthews, 2nd vicepresident, J. L. Sanborn, secretarytreasurer, L. P. Goldman, educational chairman, D. B. Powers, sergeant at arms, and E. H. Cavanaugh, deputy governor. RADM and Mrs. E. B. Taylor, CAPT and Mrs. W. R. Caruthers, COL and Mrs. J. B. Hill, and CAPT and Mrs. G. M. Holley were among the guests who attended the installation ceremonies. Toastmasters Club 92, which is open to both officer and civilian personnel, seeks improvement in public speaking ability. ...Jane Hill and her "sticky" day. ...Dolores for her swinging hair cut. ...and to Bill Barrett, "Great White Civilian" (Allah, Allah). Sunday, 11 April 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner Things don't just happen. Pencils, light-bulbs, wars, pianos, hats, something outside itself. Either that or I'm Napoleon and you're Caesar and we might as well go to the madhouse together; for if anyone can show us something which has no maker, no cause, then there's nothing we can be sure of in this whole world, because our whole system of logic and reasoning has gone haywire. But since everything has a cause or maker, and since this-world is a thing, therefore this world had a cause or a maker, and that maker we call God. God, the Maker of this world, is intelligent; first of all because we are intelligent, and He couldn't have given us the gift of understanding if. He didn't have it Himself, for no one can give what he doesn't have. The power to make beautiful things and appreciate them show an especially high type of intelligence. Not only have we that power ourselves, but we see natural beauty all around us, in the flowers and blossoms of the fields, in the forests of the Adirondacks and the Pacific Northwest, in the simplicity and dignity of childhood. Again, these things show a master-power in their Creator, since an effect can't be bigger than its cause. We see evidence of planning in this world, in the intricacies of our human body, in the solar system, in the laws of nature. These are facts which surround our daily life and press in on it. We can't escape them, nor the conclusion they force on us! That there is a God and that the intelligence, the understanding, the wisdom of that God is greater than we can possibly imagine. It all goes to show that the Maker of the world, God, as we call Him, acted intelligently when He created this world. He knew what He was doing. He worked like a superb artisan on a scale we can barely imagine! W. J. Spinney LCDR, CHC, USN Saturday, 10 April 1954 THE INDIAN

PAGE 3

Saturday, 10 April 1954 m Pa Teacher, Poet Conducts Language Classes In one of his weekly classes for personnel of the Naval Station and Naval Base, Alston G. M. "Professor" Jones points out the conversation use of a verb. "Professor" Jones has been conducting Spanish classes on the base for nine years. Spanish teacher, English teacher, ish equally well, has written sevschool teacher, and part-time poet wrks te one hf s is are just some of the occupations of oe of m n which helhas ha Alston G. M. Jones of the Industrial pled c Relations Office, Training Division. For the last nine years, Mr. SWEET MEMORY Jones has been instructing classes by Alston G. M. Jones in conversational Spanish here on the base, and he claims that if I felt your presence and raised he would have been paid by each my eyes student that he would be a "penny To see you standing there millionaire". And felt a thrill that even they At the present time Mr. Jones The gods would like to share. has a class at the Naval Base school for Naval Station and Naval My heart stood still and sweetly Base personnel, a class for the sighed. Naval Air Station both on this side Twas not so long ago of the bay and on Leeward Point, That I looked into your eyes, and a dozen or so private classes sweetheart which he holds for smaller groups And learned to love you so. in private homes. in pivae hoes.I know that nowhere on this earth In regard to his Spanish classes, There is another you. which are conversational, not For wise old Mother Nature grammatical, "Professor" Jones points out that it is a pity that so few have taken advantage of She touched your lips with the the opportunity offered and do not carry through with their lessons silvery dew to where they can observe their The day that you were born; own progress in speaking Spanish. And with a crown of golden sheen 'Your head she did adorn. The Spanish classes last eight weeks and are held one night a Your eyes like two lovely jewels week for two hours. On April 2nd rare a new class will begin at the Were stars from up above; Naval Station, and April 15th will And with the fragrance of the see the beginning of another class flowers at the Naval Air Station, anyone She gave you life, my love. interested in these classes can enroll by calling Mr. Jones at 8822. As you were standing there, I felt Along with his Spanish classes, The thrill of loving you. Professor Jones conducts English And knew also that way on high. classes for Cuban supervisors here .the gods on the base, as well as private Would like to share it too. classes in English. Professor Jones, who can read, speak, or write in English or SpanThe Indian humbly plucks g two feathers from his bonnet Iand presents them to June Gentry and Lynn Graham for a mis-identification in last week's edition. Lynn won the spelling bee at school and -June was the runner-up. WAVE-The man I marry must be a hero. Friend-Oh, come, dear. You are not as bad looking as all that. The 1954 Naval Base School yearbook "The Coral Reef" will be available soon for distribution. This year there will be only 300 copies for sale. Miss Barbara Burke, business manager for the annual pub-lication, urges that all per-sons desiring a copy make reservations as soon as possible. The selling price for the yearbook is $3.50, and must be paid in advance. Payments will be collected at the school I between 1300 and 1500. Villamar. (Continued from Page One) the Naval Base Band, J. R. Hoy, RMC and Mrs. Hoy of Fleet Training Group, and G. A. Kretachmar, ET2, and Mrs. Kretachmar of the Naval Station. The moving of these families is only the beginning of an overall plan which will eventually see the complete "face-lifting" of East, West, and Central Bargo. This plan is a part of the policy to provide better housing for Naval personnel, U.S. Citizens, and their dependents employed at overseas bases. Although when the whole construction plan is complete ther will be no more housing units than before, the quality will be greatly increased. The unit by unit plan of replacement has been put to use at several overseas bases with very similar projects being constructed on Guam. Here in Guantanamo, 104 family units are under construction in the Villamar area, and these units will replace 104 units of the Bargo area. As the replacement of Bargo housing takes place, these vacated units will be torn down to make room for the 184 new housing units which will be built in the Bargo area. In the overall plans, there will always be the same number of housing units on the base-never less. Efforts are being made so that a replacement unit will be available before construction in a new area begins. Since the moving of the first six families to the Villamar area wi va~t East -Bngc 9o-nlr -I& 20, 22, and 24, construction of a new unit will begin within a short time. There are three basic type units which are being constructed in Villamar and will be constructed in the Bargo areas. There is the "E unit" which is a two-apartment, two-bedroom duplex such as building 275. Also, there is the "J unit" which is a four apartment building with two bedrooms for each apartment. Finally, there is the "F Unit" which is a four apartment unit-two apartments having two bedrooms, and two apartments having one bedroom. Meetings Time & Place Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd & 4th Tuesday each month. Community Auditorium Ladies' Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Room, Community Auditorium Little Theatre Group 2000; 1st Tuesday each month Marina Point Hospital Service Volunteers 1000; 2nd Tuesday each month Hospital Medical Library American Legion Auxiliary, Unit One 1920; 3rd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Hut, Marina Point Toastmasters Club 92 1920 each Thursday, Officers Club dining American Legion, Guantanamo Bay Post 1 1930;. 3rd Tuesday each month; Community Auditorium, Marina Point Parent-Teachers Association 1930; 1st Tuesday of each month Naval Base School Felloweraft Club No. 1078 2000 each Thursday, Practice, Business Meeting, 1st Thursday -Community Auditorium National Sojourners, Guantanamo Bay Chapter 320 3rd Monday of every month. National Supervisors Association 1900: 1st Monday each month, Civilian Training Conference Room. Future PO Rates Planned in Tr-Installment Plan Promotions to petty officer ratings resulting from the coming examinations in August will be made in three "installments" instead of a blanket promotion date according to information received from the Bureau. Promotions will be made in three groups according to the highest final multiples achieved in the exams. This will permit more advancements to be made and still keep within budget limitation on petty officer ranks. Promotions are expected to be made effective on Nov. 16, 1954, Jan. 16, 1955 and March 16, 1955. Previously all promotions were effective the same date. Men winning promotions in last August's exam were advanced on Nov. 16. The advancements resulting from the recent February exams are expected to be made on a single date in May, to be announced later. August 10 will be the examination date for E-4; August 17 for E-5; and August 24 for E-6. 41 Ships, 8,800 Middies Set For Summer Cruises Plans have been made for the summer training of more than 8,800 Midshipmen of the U.S. Naval Academy and from Naval Officer leges and universities. All three cruises will have short operational training periods in Guantanamo Bay before returning to the States. The "learn by doing" training will be divided into three major practice cruises with RADM R. E. Libby, USN, Commander, Battleship-Cruiser Force, Atlantic Fleet, in overall command of the cruises. He will exercise tactical command of the first cruise, flying his flag in the battleship Missouri. The first cruise, consisting of approximately 1,690 Naval Academy Midshipmen and 1,320 NROTC Midshipmen, will be cruised together in a training squadron consisting of the battleships Missouri and New Jersey, heavy cruiser Macon and Des Moines, the escort carrier Siboney, eight destroyers, and two minelayers. They will depart Norfolk 7 June, disburse for ports of the Iberian Peninsula and European Channel ports and then stop over in Guantanamo Bay before returning to the United States, 4 August. The second cruise will consist of 1,760 NROTC Midshipmen. They will make the cruise in a training squadron consisting of the battleship Wisconsin, the light cruiser Worcester, three destroyers, and eight destroyer-type vessels. They will depart Norfolk, 11 July, disburse for ports of the European Channel in the British Isles and stop in Guantanamo Bay before returning to Norfolk. The third cruise of the summer training program will be for 1,360 Contract NROTC seniors who will sail in a squadron consisting of the heavy cruiser Pittsburgh, the antiaircraft cruiser Juneau, four destroyers and seven destroyer-type vessels. The contract NROTC seniors will visit Quebec, Canada, and during the period August 14-18, they will visit Havana, Cuba and then will go through operational training in Guantanamo Bay before returning to Norfolk. m0 THE INDIAN 01110 pag

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age our The Local Angle(r) Barracuda by Jerry Lewis Meet the infamous and supposedly 'killer' of the tropical seas ...the Barracuda. About twenty species inhabit the waters of tropical and temperate zones. The Picuda of the West Indies is the largest species, reaching a weight of one-hundred pounds and a length of six to eight feet. The Cuda is feared more than the shark by natives of the Indies. The fish's appearance is matched only by his disposition-both ugly. He is a powerful fish, well-built and fast. He is capable of snapping a hard-boned fish in two with an instantaneous snap of his powerful jaws. He will dart like an arrow after his prey, whether large or small and will attack his own kind if provoked. The Barracuda will hardly ever attack an under-water spear-fisherman because he can see his entire body but surface swimmers have often fallen victim to his attack while they splash through the mirrnred surface of the water, exposing only arms and legs wvhil, confuses the fish. A confused Barracuda is as hard to deal with as a wounded one! The common Cuda is not considered good eating although many people claim that immediate cleaning and proper preparation will make very tasty eating of the younger fish. The larger Cuda are apt to be accompanied by a strong odor and a slimy mucus covering. If a bather should encounter this fish, his best protection is not to show fear. The Cuda senses this as a mad dog does and acts accordingly. Chase him and see for yourself just how 'brave' this overestimated 'killer' really is, but keep this in mind-bright colors, shiny trinkets or an open cut is your invitation for open attack upon yourself! When this happens, as the spear-fishermen will tell you, it is best to leave the water immediately by the shortest possible route. NavBase Bests Cuban Linksters The golf tournament held last Saturday and Sunday on the GTMO links between players from the Guantanamo Bay area and a group from the Santiago Country Club wound up in a victory for the local lads with A. Grego and W. R. North taking first and second places with 145 and 149, respectively. On Saturday North tied with Posada of Santiago for the low gross score when they both posted 73s, but on Sunday Grego came in with a 71, a score which coupled with his 74 of the previous day, enabled him to take top honors. Low net scores for Saturday and Sunday were made by Gushanas and Ruffini both of the Naval Base. Both men came in with 65. Gushanas also copped the low net total for two days of play with a 140. The GTMO-Santiago series was inaugurated in 1947 and in this particular case at least upholds the theory that the team defending its home grounds has a decide advantage. For eight straight years the home team of the series has emerged victorious. The Detroit Red Wings have iced the National Hockey League championship or the ixth straight year. Their flashy right-winger, Gordie Howe, racked up 81 points (33 goals and 48 assists) to finish his fourth consecutive season as the league's leading scorer. When the American and National League All-Stars clash in the July 13 baseball classic in Cleveland, Yankee pilot Casey Stengel will match wits with Walter Alston, now Dodger manager .. The Pittsburg Pirates signed an air travel contract for this season, establishing a baseball "first" Primary mission of the "Sky Pirates" will be to fly out of the NL cellar this season ...Hickok award for the month of February went to the Philadelphia Warrior's Neil Johnston, Nationa 1 Basketball Assn. scoring leader .Bob Cousy of the Boston Celtics won the NBA playmaker title this year with 518 assists. Service Highlights Strategic Air Command will stage a judo tournament at Offutt AFB, Nebr., Apr. 7-8. The winning team will represent SAC at the National AAU meet in May .The Ft. McPherson, Ga., Rifle and Pistol Club defends its Georgia State Pistol Championship May 17 ...2nd Lt. Clark Scholes, Olympic 100-meter freestyle swimming champion, recently shifted from his swim suit to ski togs as he participated in the Army's "Exercise Ski Jump." .. The eighth annual East-West College All-Star basketball game was recently played at Madison Square Garden in New York with the West squad winning, 103-95. Army Cadet William Hannon, who played with the East, became the first West Pointer ever to play in an East-West contest. Also on the East squad was Navy's high-scoring ace, Midshipman John Clune. Guest speaker at the AF WorldWide Basketball Tournament banquet to be held at Patrick AFB, Fla., Apr. 8, wil be Adolph Rupp celebrated coach of the University USAFI Courses Expanded; Fee Remains Standard The educational offering of USAFI at it's inception were confined to about sixty International Correspondence School Courses and the courses of some 60 Universities working in cooperation with USAFI. Then, as now, one of the prime requisites, for enrolling and completing the course was a $2.00 money order payable to the Treasurer of the United States and a sincere interest to see the course chalked up to your credit. The courses of the cooperating colleges then, as today, were offered to the student at half price. Uncle Sam paid the other half. He wisely speculated, no doubt, that his investment would return tenfold and show itself in a stronger, wiser America. By March 1944, when the second edition of the USAFI Catalog appeared, the offerings had been enlarged and divided into three categories: Technical, Vocational, High School and College, and a new type of course, the Self-Teaching Course, made it's appearance. This latter type of course is now known generally as an Education Manual. Subsequent development increased the courses offered by USAFI. Today practically every subject taught in high schools and vocational schools, including college courses, End of Course Tests, subject area tests, and tests of General Educational Development are available to the American Service man on active duty. USAFI also initiated an accreditation service which through your Information and Education Office stands ready to aid you in attaining credit for service accomplishments. (Second in a series of articles) of Kentucky. In 24 years Rupp'r Wilcats have won 496 games and lost 82. This season they were rated tops in the nation ...Ernie Beck, basketball star for Bainbridge NTC, Mr., was named to Siena College's 1954 All-Opponent team. Beck netted 27 points as the Bainbridge Commodores downed the New York college, 81-70, in the last game of the season. Jest -ASecond Weary of the single life, Farmer Boyd went to town, picked a wife and married her. Instead of a honeymoon, he drove her by horse and wagon, back to his farm. On the way, the horse stumbled. "That's once." said the farmer, as they proceeded along the way. The horse stumbled again. "That's twice," said Boyd. Further along the way, the poor animal stumbled once more. "That's three times," said the farmer, who picked up his gun and shot the horse dead. The bride was thunder-struck. "Why, you heartless fool!" she cried. "You ought to be ashamed of yourself!" And she promptly slapped her husband across the face. He studied her silently for a moment, then said: "That's once." A sailor reported back from leave, 24 hours late. He explained: "I'm returning from my leave, and just about to board the train when the band strikes up the 'Star Spangled Banner'. I, of course, freeze to attention, saluting. And while I'm standing there at salute what happens but the train pulls out of the station right in front of my eyes, and nothing I could do about it." Here's a new excuse: Glenn Ford, the movie actor, presented his young son Peter with an illustrated edition of the classic "King Arthur". "Gee, Dad", said young Peter as he gazed at a picture of Launcelot and Gallahad in full armor, "Dig those crazy walking tanks." An officer was inspecting a southern base when he asked a civilian secretary "what is the normal complement of this office?" "Ah believe the most usual compliment is 'Howdy, honey, you're sure luscious-lookin' this mawnin'." "I would love the share your troubles," she cooed. "But, darling, I have none." "No; I mean after we're married." Newlyweds occupied a hotel bridal suite. A thin wall separated them from a room occupied by two sailors. "Dearest," said the husband, "you are so beautiful. I guess I'll get a sculptor from New York to model you." A moment later there was a knock at the door. "Who's there," asked the husband. "Two sculptors from New York." SCUTTLEBUTT # A blazing gun battle had broken up the political meeting in a mountain community notorious for feudin' and fightin'. "What started the shooting?" l asked a visitor from the outside. "Feller made a motion that was out of order", a graybeard told him. "Well, it was outrageous and undemocratic to start trouble over that," the outlander fumed. "What was the motion." "Toward his hip pocket", the oldster drawled. AC E is coming Watch this space "Hf pie ome n nfom"N ext W eek! Saturday, 10 April 1954 'PilE INDIAN

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Saturday, 10 April 1954 Staff Corps and NAS Fliers Ready for '54 Season by Pierce Lehmbeck The 1954 Naval Base Baseball League will officially come to an opening Monday night as the title defending Naval Station Indians take the field against the VU-10 Mallards. And, as league play gets underway we of the Indian Sport's Staff round out our pre-season survey of the local nines by featuring the newly formed Staff Corps Squad and the NAS Flyers. STAFF CORPS way to find out for sure is to The Staff Corps Squads, under watch them as they open up their the direction of LTJG J. Lyons and campaign Wednesday night against LCDR R. C. Henry, is a combine the SeaBees of MCB-8. of the Naval Supply Depot, the Hospital and the Dental Clinic. NAS FLYERS Both the Supply Depot and the When the Flyers of the Naval Hospital had teams entered in Air Station entered the Naval Base league competition last year and League last year they carried with they will contribute a major part them what looked like the team to of the trio set-up this year. beat. For the first few weeks of Heading the efforts of this newly play they were virtually untouchformed group will be hurlers Duke able until they lost a host of key Snyder, of the Supply Depot and players by transfer. Then they Red Fauth of the Hospital. Both began to falter until they comwent through an almost unbelievepletely fell in the closing nights able 1953 campaign as they all of play to end up in fourth place. but made up the mound staffs of The Flyers return this year with their respective squads. However, hopes of repeating last year's start their efforts will be combined this but also with intentions of continuyear and they should prove to be ing it throughout the year. a very effective duo. Under the guiding hands of CWO Local fans will remember "theT. N. Duke" for the major role that he Douglas, the Flyers efforts will be played in the Base All-Star's vicread b rler Sutherland iahi tory over the Cuban Fortuna nine rih andr whesla fa ba in the traditional Fourth of July contest last year. Coming into the ing curve to his best advantage along with a good fast ball. Warren ball game with the Cubans on top he proceeded to knock in the tying odd side arm motion which keeps run and score the winning one himself while b I an k ing them throughout the closing sessions. wl do the tatin sho Snyder's effectiveness can readily be attributed to his smooth form stop position when not hurling, has and seemingly tireless motion. He the same style as Sutherland. combines blazing speed with a good Catching for the Flyers will be change-up to keep batters on their staring n Knkol, KrashandCalifornia. toes while they are standing inout the infield, they against him. Fans will remember Fauth, "Liton the pivot sc Krat and Deere t~e Red" as he is called by his at shot a B reit a d be. team mates, because of the way Conti and Bielit asw would go to the mound game after Ct with the "fl t ar. game, throw a three hitter, strike atough the menos aveano out thirteen and lose by somehing cmto ahfi decis as t like 3-2. Despite this, Red was one starting threefin tecoutiel, they of the most respected hurlers have the sevces ofig, around the circuit, as he utilized w er oheriack Yarbrough almost uncanny control with a good Smth' g out is Sithand Holland to choose from. "high, hard one" to carry out his mound chores. Working every other gtoft eeto atya' game with Snyder, he could easily start will be seen Tuesday night turn into one of the league's best. However, as all good things must Leathernecks. It should be have a flaw, both Fauth and Snyder interesting to see. will leave the base during the latter part of July for duty elsewhere-right when the pennant race will be the thickest. Aiding these veterans in the coming campaign will be Cordetti All week day games will be playof the Hospital who throws from ed at the Recreation Center and the starboard side. He is a newwill commence promptly at 7:00 comer to local play. P.M. Receiving the serves of Staff Saturday's and Sunday's will be hurlers will be returnees Hart and played at the Marine Site diamond Webb, who saw action with the and will begin at 2:00 P.M. Corpsmen last year. Friday evening wil be reserved Comprising the Staff infield will for the playing of make-up games be Shoskins, a farm hand of the on the Recreation Center field. Athletics, on the initial sack, playThe schedule for the first week er-coach Lyons at the pivot spot, of play Bozarth at short stop and Tracy Monday, 12 April: in the hot corner. They will be VU 10 vs Naval Station supported by utility men Gad and Tuesday, 13 April: Marx. Marine vs NAS In the pastures this combine will Wednesday, 14 April: have Rogers, Cordetti, O'Brien, MCB-8 vs Staff Corps Galino and Canning. As is typical Thursday, 15 April: of the rest of the local nines, the Marines vs VU-10 starting three have not been picked. Saturday, 17 April: With such a talented combine, MCB-8 vs NAS the Staff Corps Squad should prove Sunday, 18 April: to be plenty tough, but the heat Staff Corps vs Naval Station Buss Probable starter for the Naval Station Indians in the league opener Monday night against the Mallards of VU-10 will be Buss, hefty right -wander. Buss has thrown consistently well during the pre-season practices despite a discovery of small chips in his right elbow. X-rays showed no immediate danger or concern. Royal The other possible starter for the Braves Monday night is Bill Royal, a hold-over from last season's campaign. Royal started the practice game against the Marines last week, but on the second pitch a line drive hit him in the stomach and put him out of action. Huber The Mallards of VU-10 will have either Huber or Breske on the mound for the first toss of the league opener. Both have displayed good control and speed and Breske has been serving up a good change of pace ball that has baffled hitters. Friz Casts A Wary Eye At Cuban Ring by Dick Friz It was dark when I entered the Parque Sixto Escobar, behind the Hotel Normandie in San Juan, and I'll never know how I located a seat. I nudged the guy next to me and asked, "When will they bring in the bull?" After a brief intermission of unrestrained laughter, he said, "This is no bool fight, Senor, is Boxeo." I soon discovered that in Puerto Rico, there is little difference. I was informed that the lights weren't turned on until the matches began, something about the sport being just recently revived, and the management having financial difficulties. When the first event was to begin, a young welter named Santana couldn't find the ring at first, and almost wound up in a tennis tournament being held down the street at the Caribe Hilton. (He might have fared better there, at that.) One thing I can say for these pugilists, they "toss leather;" They haven't learned to "ham" before television cameras, although once I spotted a rhumba step. A chap named Maldonado knocked Santana to the canvas three times, went down twice himself, and being the least groggy at the end of three rounds, won the decision. In later events, the. famous bolo punch of the Kid Gavilan, was much copied, although gusts from wild misses almost matched the breeze from the adjacent Condado Lagoon. The audience, through all this, seemed completely enthralled, on their feet most of the time yelling "knock heem out" "knock heem out" in a relentless staccato. The climax, for me, was the semi-final between local favorite, Juan Rios Fuentes, and Eddie Williams of New York. One round of light "powder puffing" by this boy Williams, convinced me that he hadn't gotten much further than Stillman's Gym in the States. I wasn't astounded when he was "tapped" for the count in the second. They held him upended by the feet; his second slapped him in the face in an effort to revive him (the hardest blows of the evening, incidentally.) He eventually came around. In the distance, the pleasant strain of dance music wafted over from the Club Calibar, and wooed me out of the arena before I remembered that the main event between Garcia and Charlie De Bow was next. As I departed, I'd swear I heard the fight crowd yell "ole, ole, ole" (an ovation usually reserved for matadors when they have been particularly b r a v e against El Toro, and are presented for his ears.) I'll never know whether Garcia. ...or De Bow rated the "ole's". THE INDIAN 1

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Saturday, 10 April 1954 THE INDIAN -v Hams Keep World-Wide Contacts by Jerry Lewis "This is KG4AJ calling YT5AA". Silence for a few seconds. The static clears and from over thousands of miles away comes the re "YT5AA to KG4AJ. Go ahead." The voice comes through loud and clear and two ham operators seated in two corners of the globe thousands of miles apart carry on a conversation as though they were speaking over a telephone to their next-door neighbor. Scattered over the naval base area at Guantanamo Bay are fourteen of these hobbyists to whom distance means nothing at all. They sit at home-made radio sets and discuss everything from the weather in their area to electronics to the trading of new ideas via radio. Strictly controlled by the FCC (Federal Communication Commission) these licensed operators devote their every spare moment in keen competition to attain the greatest amount of contacts over the longest distances. These contacts are acknowledged by distant stations with DX cards (Distance) sent through the mail which attests to the fact that contact has been made. While interviewing LCDR O. L. Bramlett at his home on Marina Point where his ham-station is located, I was handed DX cards sent to him by contacts all over the world. Among them were cards from Yugoslavia, Northern Italy, Florida, Arizona, Pennsylvania, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, Ohio, Detroit and Texas. Jim Yost readying for contact with stateside ham while sitting in specially constructed ham-shack in back of Villamar home. Mr. J. R. Yost, civilian technical engineer, has contacted a station at French Morocco from his small ham-shack set up at the rear of the Yost home at 1st street in Villamar. At the present time, there are approximately 75,000 active hamoperators within the continental limits of the United States. There are no available estimates as to the number of operators throughout the entire world but it is known however, that there are 'hams' in almost every corner of the globe no matter how remote. It's an expensive hobby! But a person seated in his own home can carry on a conversation with members of all races of people all over the world. Hardly anything else comes close to being as fascinating as that said LCDR Bramlett. LCDR Bramlett also brags about being a member of the 'Rag Chewer's Club'. The members of LCDR 0. L. Bramlett scans band on receiver in ham-shack located in the rear of home at Marina Point. The shack is equipped with transmitter operating at 600-watts input, built by himself. this club must be able to maintain constant chatter with another ham operator for over half-an-hour at a time. The main club-room of the ham radio operators aboard the Naval base is located in the naval air station administration building and is open to all qualified operators from both forces ashore and afloat. These operators must have valid licenses and must be checked out on the operation of the gear by a club member. Among some of the operators throughout the world with whom contact has been established and 'schedules made up' from Guantanamo Bay is a blind man in Key West who operates a dial set specially constructed with braille (raised) numbers so that he can 'feel' the frequencies when he scans the dial. There is a 16-year old high school girl from Florida who operates during her recess hours from school, also an invalid who operates his set while flat on his back in bed. The fourteen ham operators aboard the base have been doing a great service by contacting relatives in cases of emergency and having the parties speak to one another through a special phone patch by which phone lines are employed along with the transmitter. This device has been known to operate satisfactorily for distances of 2000 miles and more. Mr. L. J. Davie, civilian electronics technician and an avid hamoperator aboard the base, recently contacted Mrs. A. D. Whiteman who remained at the bedside of her son Billy during his delicate brain operation in Washington D. C. CDR A. D. Whiteman kept in constant contact with the station in D. C. and was informed daily of his son's condition thanks to Mr. Davie and the stateside ham-operator at the other end of the line. There are many recorded instances where a ham operator has saved a life. Such a case was the recent distress call from an invalid operator in Portugal who established contact with a Florida operator who in turn relayed the message to New York. Special serum needed to save a little girl's life was on a plane that same night, on the way to Portugal. As a direct result of a 'hobby', the girl's life was saved! That ham operator was certainly deserving of a welldone! Here are the names and call let(Continue on Page Eight) Join The Payroll Savings Plan President Dwight D. Eisenhower sent a recent memorandum to the heads of executive departments and agencies, reactivating the Interdepartmental Savings Bond Committee for the voluntary purchase of United States Savings Bonds by military and civilian personnel of the United States Government which stated: "The nation's economic welfare requires the widest possible distribution of the national debt through the continued sale of United States Savings Bonds to the people. To this end it is important that Government ployees continue their leadership in the purchase of Savings Bonds through the Payroll Savings Plan." The Department of the Navy has led federal agencies in supporting the Savings Bond Program for the last five years. The latest available comparative report of the Interdepartmental Savings Bond Committee for November 1953 shows that Navy employees represented only 20.4 per cent of the total number of federal employees but held 29.5 per cent of the federal Payroll Savings accounts and 35.5 per cent of the November bond investment from the federal payroll. Members of the Navy and Marine Corps accounted for 61.6 per cent of all the Savings Bond allotments in effect by members of the Armed Forces and 51.9 per cent of the November bond investment from military pay. In November 1953 73.8 per cent of Navy employees were enrolled in the Payroll Savings Plan in contrast to the federal average of 51 per cent which has increased 3.8 per cent in the last year. A number of federal agencies currently are conducting vigorous Payroll Savings promotion campaigns and soon may challenge the Navy's leadership. This is the first of a series of messages which will be brought to you from the Base Savings Bond Officer with the strong desire that all eligible employees of the base will actively participate in this easy method of saving. You have an opportunity now to make a decision you will never regret. The Navy expects everyone who serves it to make personal progress-and prosper, and it looks after the best interests of its personnel in many ways, including maintenance of the safest and surest way for everyone on its payroll to save money to meet inevitable future needs. Everyone wants to save money. We all know that we are not likely to prosper unless we spend less than we earn, and learn to keep the difference. The Navy Payroll Savings Plan is the certain way t< keep a part of your pay so you may always have a "nest egg" for those unforeseen and urgent needs. The Payroll Savings Plan is an automatic way to save money. More than 72 per cent of all Navy employees are payroll savers. We are proud of our payroll savings record here. We want you to share in its benefits. It can do as much for you as it has done for the great majority of Navy workers. It takes the "if" out of thrift. You make one decision now to keep a certain part of your pay-the part that belongs to you-and then our payroll office will keep that money for you each pay day. It's automatic and systematic. The best part about this savings plan is that you hardly miss the money which is withheld from your '* USS Baltimore Plans Open House Sunday The U.S.S. Baltimore, (CA-68) has planned an open house to be held on Sunday, 11 April, 1954 between the hours of 1330 and 1630 on the occasion of the completion of her underway training and her departure from Guantanamo Bay. Invitations have been sent to the Commander, Naval Base and the commanders of the components of the base. Other guests invited are the staffs of the aforementioned officers; Officers, enlisted personnel, and civilian employees who are American citizens serving in base activities, and their families. Guests will be picked up in ship's boats at the Fleet Landing and the Officers' Landing. Escorts will be provided and visitors will be guided on tours of the ship. Guests of ship's officers and visiting officers will be entertained in the wardroom; guests of warrant officers, chief petty officers and first class petty officers will be entertained in their respective messes, while refreshments will be available for all others in the mess halls. During the afternoon it is planned to present a Baltimore plaque to commemorate the ship's visit to Guantanamo Bay. pay. Income tax payments are less painless when your tax is withheld from your pay a little at a time. Now that taxes are reduced, you can accumulate personal savings for your own benefit. It really is surprising how even a small amount of money will grow quickly into big money when it is saved systematically. Even as small amount as $3.75 a week kept in a Payroll Savings account will give you $195.60 to spend or keep in just one year, or $1,025.95 in only five years! Payroll Savings is the safest way to save because the part of pay you determine to keep is invested for you in U. S. Defense Bonds. No investment is safer. Your bonds make you a stockholder in the United States Government. Ownership of Defense Bonds is a vital patriotic service. It helps finance our National Defense, and reduces inflation. Defense Bonds pay a good interest yield on your savings every six months. They mature in nine years and eight months now and the yield at maturity is three per cent compounded semi-annually. If you want to keep them an additional ten years after maturity you will earn 80 per cent on your original investment. Defense Bonds are better then currency for personal savings. As soon as you pay for a bond, the Navy will issue it for you. Without loss to the owner, the Treasury will replace any bond that may be lost, stolen or destroyed. When you need quick cash, you can take any bond two months or more after its issue date to any bank without advance notice, and get cash in the full amount of its purchase price, plus accrued interest. For long term or short term savings you can't lose in Defense Bonds. And you can't beat the Payroll Savings Plan as the sure way to accumulate the money you need for the things you want. What part of your pay will you keep this way? Farmer-Will you sell me your mule? Rancher-Nope, absolutely not. Farmer-Why so emphatic? Rancher-Well he kicked my last wife to death and I'm going to get married again one of these days.

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6* Saturday, 10 April 1954 NATO Observes 5th Anniversary In five years, the United States and 13 of her allies have built out of the lessons of two world wars an 80-division bulwark against aggression in Europe. This is NATO-the North Atlantic Treaty Organization-which celebrated its fifth anniversary Sunday, 4 April. Its effectiveness drew an oblique salute week before last when Russia offered to consider joining it. To NATO leaders, this was like an outlaw robber trying to don a policeman's uniform, for it was against potential Soviet aggression that NATO was organized. The Soviet bid was rejected as an attempt to undermine the West's security. Toward that security in the past five years, the United States has appropriated 14 thousand million dollars, of which seven thousand million dollars have been spent. The other NATO nations have come up with 30 to 35 thousand million. With the United States contributing one-third the cost and the other 13 nations putting up four-fifths of the forces, NATO's military might now stands at: Between 80 and 90 divisions which could reach combat effectiveness within 30 days, 275 squadrons totaling 4,000 planes, half of them modern jets-and thousands of mine sweepers, coastal vessels, and warships. Six of North America's 20 divisions are detailed with NATO forces in Europe. Percentagewise, the United States contributes 15 percent of NATO's ground forces, 25 percent of its air arm, and 30 percent of its navy. For the United States, it means a vast defense system-including 400 bases with 9,000 foot runways to handle jets-being forged around the perimeter of Communist Russia. This defense shield ranges from ice-capped Norway to sunny Turkey. With North America's defense bill running 35 to 40 thousand million dollars a year, this NATO shield costs the United States about 15 percent of its total security program. NATO was signed in Washington on April 4, 1949, by the United States, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Iceland, Italy, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, and the United Kingdom. Greece and Turkey came into NATO in February, 1952. It was truly a historic move. The Atlantic community nations had banded together in two world wars to fight back against agression. But both times this happened after the shooting began. Now, for the first time, they set up a collective security system before an aggression. They were spurred on by Russia's rough tactics in Europe and in the United Nations-from the seizure of Czechoslovakia to repeated use of the veto. Militarily, NATO started practically from scratch. In December, 1949, the West l12 effective divisions in Europe, that is the U.S., British and French occupation forces in Germany. Now the 1954 goals, approved by the NATO ministers last December, call for: 1. An increase in airpower to give NATO close to 5700 planes. 2. An increase in naval craft, for a total of about 1,900. 3. An increase in ground forces to give NATO 103 front line and reserve divisions. Backing up this force is NATO's PUBLIC WORKS CHIPS by Vic. Gault More About Public Works Organization A new branch has been established and added as one of the nine branches that composes the Maintenance Division. This branch which was formerly under "section" status is the Pest Control Branch. It is under the direct supervision, insofar as operation is concerned, of Mr. Adolphus Collymore, Leadingman Exterminator of the department. However it is supervised on a technical basis by the Base Medical Officer, Naval Hospital, who provides a qualified medical officer and an environmental sanitation officer for the purpose of rendering technical advise and assistance in the operation of this insect and rodent control program for the entire base. The Public Works Department has been charged with the responsibility of providing all necessary equipment, supplies and personnel for the program, hence the establishment of the Pest Control Branch was in order. The branch is divided into two sections, ie. Field Section and the Inspection Section. The field section's responsibility includes fogging in all residential areas, ditching, spraying of manholes and vegetation, extermination of insects, set and bait rodent traps and place poison bait for rats and other v e r m i n. Destroy vermin such as roaches, beetles, moths, ants, and bedbugs by spraying or dusting infected areas with poisonous chemicals in liquid, gas, or powder form. Where required, seals off areas to be treated and introduces fumigates, such as sulfur dioxide, cyanide, and other germ and vermin killing agents or gases. Collects and disposes of exterminated vermin. Identifies these by species so far as possible in order to obtain information on probable source of infestation and additional measures to be taken. In specified or unusual cases reports to appropriate health officials, as for instance upon discovery of foreign species of vermin probably brought in by ships. Prepares poisons used in exterminating rodents and other vermin by compounding mixtures of poison ingredients in accordance with formulas. Adjusts and makes minor repairs to traps and spray pumps. May select specific poisons for a particular task for several different approved types, in accordance with particular circumstances. The Inspection Section inspects and checks all barracks both civilian and military and also all living quarters and ascertains that all approved health measures are being carried out. Takes and recommends measures to be taken in case of infestation of rats or other vermin. Reports all suspected places and all violations to proper authorities. The demure young bride, her face a revelation of winsome innocence, slowly walked down the church aisle clinging to the arm of her father. As she reached the platform, before the altar, her dainty foot brushed a potted flower, upsetting it. She looked at the spilled dirt gravely, then raised her childlike eyes to the sedate face of the minister .."That's a helluva place to put a lily." system of pipe lines to pump jet fuel to its base, scores of depots and stock piles, a communication network, a system of inland waterways, a mobilization plan, and even a civil defense set-up. Message From Garcia by Henry Garcia WEEKEND IN SANTIAGO Going to .Santiago for a nice week-end is not so expensive. There are taxis which leave about every three hours' from "El Suizo" in Guantanamo City and arrive at Santiago in approximately three hours. The fare costs $3.00 per person (one way). There are, of course, other means of transportation, such as plane, train, and bus. If you are one of those who go for historical points, don't forget to visit San Juan Hill, where the American Troops wrote unforgettable chapters of heroism during the Spanish-American War. As you stroll along the statues and monuments at San Juan, and notice the reverent silence always prevalent in that place, you cannot help but see in your mind "Teddy" Roosevelt's Rough Riders, and listen to the tales told by the mute mouths of the old cannons that seem to be taking a nap under the shade of the trees. You will then remember that you are an American, and your imagination will surely make you perceive in your ears the caressing and vibrant notes of "The Star Spangled Banner", while your heart will feel truer than ever before to the principle of freedom and democracy. A place no visitor should miss in Santiago is the Bacardi Museum and Library, in front of the "Plalacio Provincial", in the heart of the city. For a nice evening you can visit "Rancho Club", by the main highway, or "Puerto Boniato" (Sweet Potato Mrmtir), manyfet~bove sea level, where they have cafes with juke boxes that have a fine selection of good records, a wonderful breeze and a nice view of the city. Another place you would like to stay in forever is "San Pedro del Mar", an aristocratic club in the outskirts of the city, which has good music, floor shows and a very refine environment. "Copa Club" is another popular night club, featuring a show with Cuban dancers that will shake the living daylights out of you. If you go to Santiago on working days, you may request in the "Compania Bacardi", near the waterfront, a pass to visit the "Bacardi Gardens". In the Gardens you can take nice pictures and drink as much as you can, without any cost to you, of the best Cuban beer and rum. NSD Supply Line Cries of "Surprise, Surprise" greeted Sue Lightfoot, Rose Marie Holder and Peggy May as they entered the Family Room of the Chief's Club last Saturday to attend a triple baby shower luncheon given in their honor, by the girls from the depot. Those present were the honor guests, Mrs. Marta Johnson, Mrs. Ann Sheridan, Mrs. Beverly Mairo, Mrs. Margaret Emory, Mrs. Mildred DiMascola, Mrs. Evelyn McDonald, Mrs. Pat Spetz and Mrs. Helen Beman. LTJG Robert G. Whitman returned from TAD in Washington last Monday, he was fortunate in seeing the Annual Washington Cherry Blossom Festival but is glad to be back in warm, sunny Gtmo. A hearty welcome aboard is extended to Marvin E. Cote, SK2 whose hometown is Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Cote reported to the depot from the USS Rehoboth, AGS-50. Miss Frances Abbot, personal Hospital Notes Heirport News The following births were recorded during the past week: It was "girls" week with two daughters being born; on 30 March 1954 Cynthia Karen was delivered to SH2 and Mrs. Richard D. Holm, and on 5 April 1954 Karen Joy to A02 and Mrs. Harvey 0. Russell. Reports Aboard LT George V. Hering (MC) USN reported aboard for duty in the surgical service on 31 March 1954 from the U. S. Naval Hospital, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Doctor Hering is a graduate of the University of Minnesota and is the brother of Captain Eugene R. Hering, Jr. (MC) USN who is presently attached to the U. S. Marine Corps Headquarters, Washington, D. C. Aboard On TAD LT Thomas A. McDowell (MC) USN reported aboard 1 April 1954 for a period of temporary duty from MCB-8. Items of Interest LCDR and Mrs. I. V. King and son, and LCDR and Mrs. R. L. Henry have just returned from the round trip to Panama aboard the USNS Thomas. EM Transferred HM3 D. H. Fowler, USN was transferred to the U. S. Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina for duty on 3 April 1954. HM2 A. Vanore, Jr., USN was transferred to the U. S. Naval Receiving Station, Brooklyn, New York for separation from the Naval Service. SN A. H. Lowenhagen, USN was transferred to the U. S. Naval Receiving Station, Newport, R. I. for further transfer to the USS Rush (DDR-714) for duty. CAPT R. R. McCracken, Commanding Officer, Naval Air Station, presents awards to three NAS employees. Altius Joseph, Clerk, GS-2, receives a beneficial suggestion check. Following Mr. Joseph are Manuel A. Lores, Clerk, GS-2, also a suggestion check winner, and Selvin Reid, Supr. Storekeeper, GS-5, who received a Meritorious Civilian Service Award based on his outstanding performance of duties at the NAS Supply. secretary to United States Ambassador to France, left this week to resume her duties after spending two weeks in our tropical paradise as the houseguest of LCDR and Mrs. Richard W. Brown of Marina Point. THE INDIAN Pages

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avy-loNDPro-Gtmb.-4824A S,atrdav 3 Apil 1954 MOVIES Saturday, 10 April FORBIDDEN Tony Curtis Joanne Dru Lyle Bettger Marvin Miller Gangsterism reaches halfway around the world following a Chicago vice lord's murder and the search for his widow. Sunday, 11 April PARIS MODEL Marilyn Maxwell Eva Gabor Paulette Goddard Barbara Lawrence A story about a ravishing Paris gown that costs a fortune and its effect on the four women who bought it and wore it for their own particular reasons. A four-episode story. Monday, 12 April VIGILANTE TERROR Bill Elliott Mary Ellen Kay Myron Healey Fuzzy Knight A group of masked vigilantes terrorizes a western town. Wild Bill Elliot is appointed sheriff and works to bring the culprits to justice. Tuesday, 13 April FLIGHT NURSE Joan Leslie Forrest TuckeArthur Franz Jeff Donnell Flight nurse asks to be assigned to Korean War duty hoping to find the man she loves. Wednesday, 14 April WINGS OF THE HAWK Van Heflin Julia Adams George Dolenz Antonio Moreno This story takes place in Mexico during the regime of Porfirio Diaz. Van Heflin combats the unjust local military element. Thursday, 15 April FLIGHT TO TANGIER Joan Fontaine Jack Palance Corinne Calvet Robert Douglas A $3,000,000 letter of credit is being flown to Tangier. International black market operators are trying to obtain it. Friday, 16 April THE STRANGER WORE A GUN Randolph Scott Claire Trevor Joan Weldon George MacReady When a former Quantrell spy discovers that the notorious guerilla leader is murdering and plundering for his own gain, he joins the Confederate Army and fights the rest of the Civil War in orthodox fashion. GTMO Ham Operators (Continued from Page Six) ters of the fourteen operators aboard the naval base in Guantanamo Bay: D. E. Pomeroy CTC (KG4AC), R. M. Cousins ET1 (KG4AD), LCDR F. N. Vanderhoef (KG4AE), G. H. Anger AM2 (KG4AG), A. R. McLemore ATC (KG4AH), R. C. Wigg RMC (KG4AI), LCDR 0. L. Bramlett (KG4AJ), B. R. McKinnies ALC (KG4AK), G. H. Kraft RM3 (KG4AM) Naval Air Station Amateur Club (KG4AO), J. R. Yost, Western Electric Supervisor (KG4AP), V. H. Hardy ATC (KG4AT) and L. J. Davie, Civi li an Electronics Engineers (KG4AU). NAS Crosswinds by Dick Friz The following new men reported aboard the Air Station this past week; Jesse Stokes, ACC and Robert Phillips, ACAN, from U.S. Natechtrau, NAS, Olethe, Kansas. John Livingston, TDAN, is a recent graduate of "A" school at Memphis, Tenn. Alton Sparks, AM3, is a transfer from NAS Whiting Field, Florida. The VF-83 jet squadron out of Oceana, Virginia, reported aboard Leeward Point, Wednesday. The squadron, one of two on the Atlantic Coast that will get the new Cutlasses, (F7U3's), has recently set a new rocket projectile record. VF-103, the Club-Leaf Squadron has been aboard for several weeks, out of Cecil Field in Jax. The 174th returned to Jax last Saturday, VF83 was the first squadron to utilize the new jet strip here in January 1953. A deferred emergency interrupted a Captain's inspection held at Leeward Point Saturday. The crews went into action, and the inspection party held a recess until the plane landed safely. A formal inspection was also held at McCalla Field by Captain R. R. McCracken; Executive Officer CDR W. G. Winslow; Operations Officer CDR R. T. Boyd, Jr. and LCDR A. D. Nelson. A huge sign at McCalla Field states, "Through these portals pass the world's greatest crosswind pilots." LCDR J. B. Gaines, pilot of an R4D8 brought RADM C. L. C. Atkeson aboard, Tuesday, has ample season to reafirm that motto as a result of a controlled ground loop against vicious 25 knot easterly crosswind. News Briefs CDR Allen Rothenberg, new Operations Officer, arrived with his family on Thursday. He will have temporary quarters at 310-B. LTJG J. J. Byer will be detached from NAS sometime in June, and he and his wife (plus an extra passenger born here) will depart for West Hartford, Conn. ...Jim Wade, AC3, from Leeward's control tower, has been attached TAD to WGBY as a radio announcer. quote from female "ham" operator in States to one of local "hamsters." ."come up some time and see my rig." Jet Fuel. (Continued from Page One) under contract by the Shilstone Testing Laboratory. Mr. Abbot Smith, the testing laboratory's representative, was much impressed with the skill of the Snare Corporation's employees, not of whom are native Cuban artisans. Despite the exacting nature of the work, and some unavoidable delays in material procurement, the project was completed within the time specified in the contract. Responsibility for administering the contract for the Navy rested with the Officer in Charge of Construction, TENTH Naval District, CAPT N. J. Dustrup, CEC, USN. Local administration was exercised by CDR Gordon, assisted by ENS E. 0. Pfrang, CEC, USN. The completed system consists of bulk storage tanks, pipelines, a surge tank, and a concrete pumphouse the powerful pumps, motors, controllers and switches. This system will enable the Naval Supply Depot to maintain bulk stocks of Jet Fuel, thereby effecting possible savings of up to $2,000,000.00 annually and rendering improved service to the fleet and the expanded jet operations at Leeward Point. MAq(C Wusioes by Sgt. William J. McDowell, Jr., USMC Reporting aboard this week was Sgt. T. R. Bushong and Pfc J. G. Howe who came from Marine Corps Schools Quantico, Va. for duty at the Barracks. Both men will work for Special Services as movie projectionists. We hope you enjoy your stay here at Marine Barracks and we know you will like being stationed at the best post of the Corps. As we mentioned in our column last week a field meet was held with all members enjoying themselves to the fullest extent. There were numerous contest's held with prizes awarded for each event. Tuesday 13 April see Marine Barracks pitted against Naval Station in a baseball game at Naval Station so don't forget to get out and cheer your team to victory. The game starts at 1900 so make sure you are out there. Have You Ever Wondered About? The beginning of Military Courtesies? .. Military Courtesies are said to have originated with the practice in the days of knighthood when warriors would raise the visors on their armor to verify opponents. The purpose of the salute: it is an act of recognition and an indication of respect for authority. Ham Contest (Continued from Page One) 2200 PST NPG (Navy Radio 114.95. 6428.5, San Francisco, Calif.) 92277.5, 12966, 17055.2 0100 EST (16 May) AIR (Air Force Radio 3497.5, 6997.5 Washington, D.C.) Each transmission will commence with a five minute CQ call. it is not necessary to copy more than one station, and no extra credit will be given for so doing. Transcriptions should be submitted "as received". No attempt should be made to correct possible transmission errors. Copies should be mailed to Armed Forces Day Contest, Room BE 1000, The Pentagon, Washington, D. C. Time, frequency, and call letters of the station copied should be indicated. Military stations WAR, NSS, and AIR will be on the air between 1800 and 2400 EST on 15 May 1954 to contact and test with amateur radio stations. The military stations will operate on spot frequencies outside the amateur bands as follows: Frequncy (KCS) WAR (Army Radio 4025 (Voice) Washington) 6997.5 (CW) NSS (Navy Radio 4015 (CW) Washington) 7375 (CW) 14385 (CW) AIR (Air Force Radio 3497.5 (CW) Washington) 7635 (Voice) 14405 (Voice) Contacts will consist of a brief exchange of location and signal report. No traffic handling or message exchange will be permitted. An acknowledgement (QSL) card will be sent to each amateur station worked. Each of the stations will acknowledge separately. In addition to the program outlined above, it is considered to be in the spirit of the occasion for amateur radio stations at naval activities to engage extensively in contact with other amateur stations on Armed Forces Day and to handle bona fide amateur traffic. However, artificial generation of messages such as "Greetings on Armed Forces Day" should be avoided. Operation by the special K-call amateur stations at Naval Reserve activities is particularly encouraged. If you see spots in front of your eyes instead of Mara, then you really need glasses. Enamet Edctings It is rumored in these parts that J. C. Carlson, DT2, USN is contemplating requesting an extension of his allotted tour of duty in the area, since he is having trouble tearing himself away. CDR Frank Etter is spending a few days in the local hospital. It is hoped that nothing serious will ensue. Latest reports are that movement is rather painful, but it is felt that Frank will be able to move more freely upon his recovery. However, no horseback riding engagements are being accepted at the present time. The closed season on langosta has seriously interferred with the night sports endeavor of some of the local citizens. Chief Kerslake is complaining bitterly, not that he has any quarrel with the ruling, but he claims he had just gotten zero-ed in on the 'gusters.' It is alleged that the Guantanamo Bay Fish Union, Local 281 will appeal the ruling, pleading discrimination. Chief Kerslake was overheard to have sworn vengeance against all members of the equatic species since he was bested in a contest with a tarpon from Guantanamo River. Jay Sickels, DT2, the mastermind of the front office has been notified that his days on this Naval Base are numbered and his services are required at Bethesda, Md. We'll miss the Sickels and hate to see them go. It's good duty tho' and spring is here, so we know they are happy. Old "Long-stay" Fitzpatrick will be overjoyed upon his return from the states to find that he is the lucky winner of a European Cruise, courtesy of Uncle Sugar. The prospective CO of the Naval Dental Clinic, CAPT W. F. D. Stagner, is expected to arrive on or about 12 June 1954, accompanied by Mrs. Stagner and son, which means CAPT Max A. Moon, Mrs. Moon and son John will depart some time thereafter for CAPT Moon's new duty station at Hunters' Point, San Francisco Naval Shipyard. Saturday 3 Apri 4 THE INDIAN