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Indian

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Indian
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Vol. VI, No. 39 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 3 April 1954


Spare Time Counts Former Base Commander

With This Sailor Heads On-Site Survey
Board Here Next Week


Spare time presents no problems for John H. Schmitt, PR3, of the Base Police. During the past five months since he has been attached to the Naval Base, John has completed five correspondence courses during his off-duty hours, and still he finds time for other interests.
John, who began his correspondence work "to keep up his study habits," is a high school graduate and hails from Manketo, Minn. Being from the "land of a thousand lakes," Schmitt is a rabid trout fisherman and a hunter; and still,


J. H. Schmitt, PR3, of the BasG Police uses a few minutes of his off-duty hours to "keep up his study habits." John is working on his sixth correspondence course.

'even though opportunities for trout fishing and hunting are not coinparable to that around Manketo, it is one of his principal hobbies. Prior to enlisting in the Navy, worked two summers as a trout fisherman's guide in Yellowstone National Park, and before that, he headed a club in Manketo whose interest and purpose was tying fishing flies.
John came to Guantanamo Bay in June of 1952 and was first attached to the Naval Air Station until he was recently assigned to to the Base Police.
To date, Schmitt has completed five U S A F I correspondence courses: Latin American History I & II, Beginning Spanish, Las Cuevas de Arta (The Caves. of Arta,) and Lecturas Escogidas (Chosen Readings.) As well as the regular USAFI courses completed, John studied Spanish under Mr. Jones at his classes conducted at the Naval Base school evenings. As a result of his studies of Spanish, Schmitt speaks the language very fluently. Along with all of his studies, John still manages to find time to make two Cuban liberties a week, attend any "good movies" showing on the base, and "just relax" in (Continued on Page Six)


It has been announced that an on-site survey party will arrive in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Tuesday, 6 April to inspect the Naval Base and all commands. The board, headed by RADM C. L. C. Atkeson, former base commander, will arrive some time Tuesday. The inspection will begin on Wednesday morning with an arrival conference which will be held in the Naval Base board room with the base commander, the inspection party, and commanding officers of all base commands attending.
During the arrival conference, the missions and objectives, the present and projected facilities, and the problems of the respective base commands will be discussed. The commanding officers will present to the base commander and the inspection party any suggestions or advice which they have in respect to these problems. Included in the ins n
senior mem~ber_,flAPe'W*.IffzrWley, executive assistant, CAPT W. R. Millis, BuShips matters, CAPT E. H. Eldredge, BuAer matters, CAPT C. Stiegler, industrial matters, CAPT E. L. Hansen, BuDocks matters, CAPT J. D. Viecelli, medical and dental matters, CAPT G. H. Hamilton, CNO and communication matters, CAPT. T. B. Haley, industrial aviation matters, and COL T. Sheffield, Marine Corps matters.
'Upon completion of the survey here, the inspection party will depart for the Naval Station, San Juan.


First Villamar Replacement Unit


Open To Public Sunday

The long awaited opening of the first unit of the Villamar Replacement Housing Project will take place Sunday, 4 April. According to CDR Roger G. Witherell, Commanding Officer, Mobile Construction Battalion Eight, Building 275, located at the end of 5th Street in Villamar, will be open to military personnel, U.S. Citizens of the Guantanamo Bay area, and their dependents from 1400 to 1600. RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, will officially open the building by cutting the tape, and CAPT W. R. Caruthers will officially receive the building for the Naval Station.
Along with Admiral Taylor, Captain Caruthers and Commander Witherell will be LCDR 0. H. Nicholson, Executive Officer, MCB-8 and LT R. J. Rowsin, Operations Officer, MCB-8. The official ceremonies
will begin at 1400, and from 1400
NavSta Pool Begins to 1600, four seabees of MCB-8 will
be on hand to guide interested perNight Swimming sons through the new housing unit.
these four seabees will be men
who have helped in the construcIt has been brought to the at- tion of Building 275.
tention of all-hands that commenc- The two-story duplex unit, a ing the 1st week of April, the type E building, is complete in Naval Station enlisted men's swim- every construction detail and is ming pool located behind the "ready to move into." During the recreation area building, will be last week, MCB-8 has been workopen for night swimming. ing steadily to put the finishing
Installations of under-water touches on the building; they have
Definite plans for construction of-f-ffKiu" mu., gp ,_,; a soda fountain in addition to the as far as waxing floors. present snack - shack are also Construction of the two-apartunder-way. meant two-bed-room unit began with
Reserved for dependents only MCB-1. MCB-7 carried on construcwill be the following hours: Mon- tion for a time, and MCB-8, with day mornings from 0900 to 1200, the aid of MCB-6 personnel, finishand Thursday evenings from 1200 ed up the new home. to 2100. This unit offers many convenNight swimming will secure at iences to the resident. The kitchen, 2100 throughout the week. All (Continued on Page Six)
hands are cordially invited to take
full advantage of these new facilities for the further recreation of Com UtWing Conducts
white-hats of both forces afloat
and ahore.V U - 10 Inspection


I





Proudly holding the awards presented to them by RADM E. B. Taylor (far left) are the six players selected for the 1954 All-Star team. They are, left to right: Art Hollowell, NAS Flyers; Don Daugherty, Naval Station Indians; Bob Howerton, VU-10 Mallards; Jack Jackson, NAS Flyers; Paul King, Dental Clinic; and Fred Murrell, Marine Leathernecks.
(See story on Page 5)


Capt. L. 0. Fox, Commander Utility Wing, Atlantic Fleet, conducted a surprise administrative inspection of Utility Squadron TEN on 24 March, 1954. Pictured above are Capt. L. 0. Fox, Cdr. T. B. Wolfe, CO of VU-10, (L. to R.) W. E. Hickman AD3, J. C. Teague AN, C.E. Parker AD1, G. V. Smoker AN. The Squadron received an overall mark of excellent on the inspection.


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Page Two




Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9615
Saturday, 3 April 1954
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT william R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sadness - - Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC.-------------------Editor
H. L. Sisson, JO3--------------------News
Jerry Lewis, JO3-----------------Features
J. C. Dierks, JO3-------------------Sports
Pierce Lehmbeck--------------------Sports
F. L. Cannon, JOSN-.---____Photographer R. Naccarato, SN----------------Make-up
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


VU-10 Prop Blast

CAPT L. O. Fox, ComUtWingLant; CDR R. M. Brown, CO, VU-2; CDR J. W. Austin, UtWingLant Staff; LCDR C. E. Van Bibber, VU'Pr T T P,+-L._ TLTO"Uting
aff onducted a suprise administrative inspection of the squadron on Wednesday 24 March. The inspection revealed only a few minor deficiencies and the overall mark of excellent was assigned.
The Mallard golfers found the going rough in golf on Saturday 27 March with NSD. It was the first time this year that VU-10 has not won a match. Final score 12 to 12. On Sunday 28 March, the Mallards came back strong with a 17 to 7 victory over the Hospital team. The boys are right in there pitching, putting and hitting em down the middle.
Lt Fletcher H. Burdett has received his orders to NAS Quonset Point, R. I.. Fletch, Ruth (the Mrs.), and two boys, Scamper age 51/2 and Scooter age 3/ are departing by FLAW on 7 April. They will spend 15 days leave in and around Palisade, N. J. before reporting to Quonset. Fletch has been with VU10 almost 2 years and has been one of our outstanding utility pilots. He has been ordnance officer, asst. operations officer, and is presently flight safety officer. Our best wishes and "God Speed" go with the Burdetts.
A draft of 9 new men reported for duty on 29 March. They are: J. J. McCaffery, AD3, Philadelphia, Penn.; J. R. Mayhill, CS1, from Boston, Mass.; T. E. Vanness, AD2, from Ottumwa, Iowa; G. E. Burrows, ATAN, from Seminole, Okla,; J. T. McDaniel, AE2, from Cleveland, Ohio; R. Graziani, AE2, from Chicago Heights, Illinois; C. W. Shelton, A01, from Washington, D. C.; J. W. Doulin, PR2, from Dumont, N. J.; and R. L. Hall, AE3, from Sanford, Florida, Welcome Aboard.
Feminine pulchitrude graced the VU-10-NAS pay line Tuesday 30 March in an attempt to sell tickets for the Jacksonville Navy Carnival for Charity. The Waves looked nice with the Guantanamo scenery for a background and no report has


4W


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The girls topped the boys in the Naval Base School Spelling Bee last week. Above, June Gentry, winner of the Bee, receives her medal from Mrs. Cecil Cole, President of the American Legion Auxiliary, while Lynne Graham, runner-up, stands by with her medal. There were 13 contestants in all. Words were called by J. E. Roembke.


A. I McGowan Speaks The Lucky Bag

On 'Accident Prevention' by Betty Radcliffe
SCHOOL DAYS IN GUANTANAMO BAY . . '


The principal speaker at the monthly Parent-Teachers AssociaSupervisory Safety Engineer of base.
Mr. McGowan will speak on the prevalence of accidents in regards to children, and will suggest possible methods of preventing child accidents.
The meeting will be held in the Naval Base School auditorium at 7:30 P.M.

been received as to the number of 500 ducats sold for chances on a 1954 Cadillac and a 1954 MG to be given away on 15 May 1954, but to say the least, relations are now more improved between JAX and GTMO.


This is Isiah Green, SD3, USN, Officer's Coffee Mess King of Utility Squadron TEN. Green's home town is Jacksonville, Florida. He resides with his wife and 18 month old daughter at 787-B, Victory Hill. Isiah has been in the Navy for ten years, likes it very much, also his new job as "COFFEE KING" of the Squadron.


In August of 1941 the present NOB S-hl edifice was dedicated session from August to December and was then closed because of the entry of the USA into World War II. In October of 1945 the school reopened with an enrollment of 45 pupils and 5 teachers. By October of 1949 enrollment had increased to approximately 300 pupils and 15 faculty members.
Originally the construction of the building was in the shape of an E and in 1952 seven rooms were added across the front which changed the building into a square shaped around a patio. In 1953 four more rooms were added to the school grounds. Today the school consists of 25 classrooms plus special area rooms such as the library, band and art rooms.
The enrollment of pupils now is approximately 600, including nursery school and kindergarten. With the ever increasing number of pupils it is estimated that there will be the necessity of two additional rooms for the 1955-56 term. Plans are in progress to build a multi-purpose building to be used as an assembly hall and an indoor physical education building.
For the information of those of you who don't know . . . the NOB School of Guantanamo Bay is an Accredited school. The requirements for teachers are set up by BuPers and requires a four year degree from an accredited College or University and two years teaching experience. The teachers coming here are under a one year contract and at the termination of that contract they can sign a new one year contract.
Looking at it from mother's viewpoint . . . I know that our boys and girls are receiving fine educations here in Guantanamo Bay.
First Burglar-Not a thing worth takin', Charlie. Don't it make ye sore?
"Yeh-let's let that mouse outa the trap."


, N


Saturday 3 April 1954


9


THE INDIAN


Sunday, 4 April 1954

Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930 - 2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN (Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN
(Catholic)
LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)


*

The Chaplain's Corner


Humans have the greatest admiration for the ant. Looking man's height h-taltitude of a mans eihtthe two ju,_ creature studies the industrious little insects as they scurry about the task of building, carrying and providing for the winter months, and remembers the Scriptural adage, "Go to the ant thou sluggard, consider her ways and be wise". Usually the point of emphasis is the lack of laziness which the ant family possesses. It is the industry of these creatures that causes man to marvel and pause as he observes such busy, brave, little insects of the earth.
However, there is one of their breed which causes much alarm. Its color is pale and its body very soft, but the teeth very powerful, namely the white ant. This insect is a social creature like his earth cousin but in addition is a woodworm and has won notoriety in the field of sawing wood. As a termite he has no compunctions about entering homes and buildings to destroy the timbers so carefully laid to support the roof over man's head. Although this little giant is industrious, there is another lesson to be gleaned from his life, for his job is to disintegrate. The harder the grain of wood the better it pleases him. In the spiritual realm there are forces which if allowed to operate will tear down and take out of the life of man the rights which his forefathers cherished and fought for and even died for. Families should provide instruction for children and see that church attendance is a practice. Parents who neglect this responsibility and privilege are allowing the termites entrance into spiritual life of the soul; and the child, along with the parent suffers. In time the disintegration will reveal itself in weakened timbers of the soul. it is a logical sequence when people leave God out of the foundation of life. Take heed lest the termite of neglect begin his deadly work.
James F. Agnew, LT, CHC, USNR


T1E INDIAN






Saturday, 3 April 1954


Base Regs Change

For Gtmo River

Changes to the Naval Base regulations concerning recreation trips on or near the Guantanamo River are now in effect. Consequently, Navy or privately owned boats will not proceed beyond the Naval Reservation boundary line on the Guantanamo River or North Gate without written authority obtained from the Base Commander. All land areas on both sides of the Guantanamo River are restricted areas within the base. Base personnel will not be allowed within these areas without written authorization from the Base Provost Marshal.
Also, swimming is prohibited in the Guantanamo River at all times. The senior person in each private recreation or hunting party will be held accountable for any infraction of this regulation.
Military personnel, dependents, and United States citizens are allowed to fish in non-restricted waters of the Naval Base during all hours of the day. However, native and alien employees may fish from the shore only in nonrestricted areas during daylight hours.
Air Rifles Restricted
Air rifles and air pistols may not be used within 200 yards of any road, building, or recreation area. Minors are forbidden to use or be in possession of an air rifle or air pistol unless in the presence of an adult.


Billy Whiteman Home

After Delicate Surgery


Billy Whiteman, 8-year-old son of CDR and Mrs. Armand D. Whiteman, last week returned to the Base well on the way to recovery after a serious illness of several weeks, and a delicate cranial operation in the National Naval Medical Center at Bethesda, Md.
Billy suffered a cerebral hemorrhage on 17 January, and was treated in the Naval Hospital here before he was sent to Bethesda. Mrs. Whiteman had been at Bethesda for several weeks past, and returned with Billy to the Base.
Billy expects to resume his studies next Monday in the base school, where be is a student in Mrs. Campbell's 3rd grade room.
The Indian has been requested by Billy and his parents to extend to their many well wishers on the Base their sincere appreciation.


Army Major Wins

'America' Contest

Freedoms Foundation of Valley Forge has announced the winner of the 1953 "What America Means To Me" contest conducted among servicemen all over the world and promoted through the Armed Forces Radio Service. The top award of $1,000 was won by Major Thomas A. Palmer, Signal Corps, USA. His letter is reprinted below as an inspiration to Americans everywhere.
WHAT AMERICA MEANS
TO ME
America is something more to me than coastlines, skylines, mountains, standards of living, Hollywood, gimmicks, gadgets, freedom of opportunity and TV.
America was not an accident. America had to be. America was born of "people living together"
-but of people, people from far and wide-bringing here their protests and fears and frustrations and, in the crucible of freedom, getting stronger, confident, more inter-dependent, and in that process making one grand schoolroom for the rest of the world to see and possibly emulate.
America to me is not the arrival
-but the way-to the time when all bigotry, all hate, all divisions of race or creed will have gone. America cannot be static; neither can Americans. America changes one. To accept a status quo based on expedients of life and effort is not American, America is the impulsion of growth, of freedom of concept and expression-of the grasping of the NOW until the future's promise becomes graspable.
America is not for the timid
-the chronic conservative-the myopic. America is for the vigorous man, the energetic man; the farseeing and the far-seeking man. America is not for the selfish man, for America was born of protest against the selfishness of government and religion.
No, America has not as yet arrived; we are striving in our vigor and fearlessness and hope. We are hard pressed for some of the things America has protested against and are trying hard to settle here.
America should be so infused with the vitality of the spirit of its protestations that it will not permit its triumph through years of honest strife and sacrificing efforts to be deluged in foreign bigotries, and foriegn fears, and foreign hates, and foreign politics
-for it was not only against one, but against all of these things that America was forced into birth.
America is the effort of brotherhood-not a poetic, sentimental ecstacy-but a vigorous, practical common effort-an effort that gripes in its striving-but which, by the gripe, spurs greater effort towards a practical, cooperative humanity.
All those over the world who strive for the good of all share the American spirit-all those who strive for tolerance, and practical, honest facing of issues and seek purposeful action for the good of all are essentially American. Does it matter where they live, or what their color or creed?
For America is a symbol-a generous symbol-which we as a Nation translated into a Way of Life, of liberty and the pursuit of happiness, which eventually, I believe, will be attained for all by the collective effort of mankind seeking freedom from the nameless, and unexplainable myriad of


Oratorical Contest Winners


The winners of the American Legion-sponsored Oratorical Contest at the Naval Base School last week: Judy Yost, left was the winner in the girls division and Paul Sauerbier topped the boys. Other contestants in the finals were Norman Huddy and June Alexander. At right, congratulating Paul Sauerbier, is J. E. Roembke, a judge in the contest.


Navy's I & E Traced To Meetings . . .


U.S. Naval Base, 1944

The Navy's off duty education program had it's official beginning at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in September 1944. At that time an officer was dispatched from the Bureau of Naval Personel with various educational materials to establish a few experimental classes and to offer Education Counseling. The experiment was outstandingly successful. On the basis of that successful experiment it was considered advisable to open a new Bureau of Personnel section to be called the Education Services Section. Since that time, however, the official name has been changed to Information and Education. By September 1942 the facilities of the Army Institute had been made available to the Navy and by February 1943 the Institute's name was changed to the United States Armed Forces Institute (shortened popularly to USAFI).
By the fall of 1943, Educational Services had begun to make its appearance in Naval Hospitals, a development of the program that in time became an extensive and important one.
As the spring of 1946 faded the greatest Navy in history was melting away. By September, demobilization was almost complete, and the question of the continued existence of the Educational Services Program arose in earnest. Everything seemed to point to the liquidation of this program born of war. An affirmative decision was made, and in Washington the program was fitted with a new look to enable it to become a permanent part of the peacetime Navy.
(First of series of articles to appear subsequently in the Indian)

human fears-attained by first dissolving through understanding the fear of man for man. That is what America means to me.


0


Time & Place

Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd & 4th Tuesday each month.
Community Auditorium
Ladies' Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association
2000; 2nd Tuesday each month
Girl Scout Room, Community
Auditorium
Little Theatre Group
2000; 1st Tuesday each month
Marina Point
Hospital Service Volunteers
1000; 2nd Tuesday each month
Hospital Medical Library
American Legion Auxiliary, Unit One
1930; 3rd Tuesday each month
Girl Scout Hut, Marina Point Toastmasters Club No. 92
1930 each Thursday, Officers Club
dining room.
American Legion, Guantanamo Bay Post 1
1930; 3rd Tuesday each month;
Community Auditorium, Marina Point
Parent-Teachers Association
1930; 1st Tuesday of each month
Naval Base School Fellowcraft Club No 1078
2000 each Thursday, Practice,
Business Meeting, 1st Thursday - Community Auditorium National Sojourners, Guantanamo Bay Chapter 320 3rd Monday of every month. National Supervisors Association 1900; 1st Monday each month, Civilian Training Conference Room.


Dinner - Dance

The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Fleet Reserve Association here in Guantanamo Bay will sponsor a dinner-dance at the Community Auditorium next Friday, April 9, at 8 P.M. Tickets may be obtained from any member of the Auxiliary or at the door.


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Saturday, 3 April 1954


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Cage Tournament Champions


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Pictured above are members of the NAS Flyers, winners of the 1954 basketball tournament and runners-up in regular league season play. The Flyers were presented with two trophies for their victories by base commander, RADM E. B. Taylor.
Left to right are: Ring, Hollowell, CAPT McCracken, Commanding Officer, Naval Air Station; Adm. Taylor, Coach Leeper, Allan, Meador and Conti.



Naval Base Honors its

R2Qknthnh Chamninn


Monday evening saw the Naval Base honor its basketball players, coaches and officials with a banquet at the Naval Air Station Enlisted Men's Club that closed out a very successful 1954 cage season.
Besides providing a friendly noncompetitive atmosphere for those rivals wanting to talk over the ups and downs of the late basketball year, the banquet's main purpose was for the presentation of trophies by base commander RADM E. B. Taylor to the outstanding teams and players of 1954.
First on the agenda were the Marine Leathernecks, who wound up on top of the heap with a 14-2 record, one game ahead of the runners-up, NAS. The Marines were presented with a large team trophy and each player with an individual award.
NAS was given an impressive trophy for taking second place in the league standings with 13 wins and 3 losses over the season's play, and the Flyers also copped an award for coming out on top as champs of the post-season tournament.
The Dental Clinic was voted the most sportsmanlike team for the season, for which they were rewarded by Adm. Taylor, and the final presentations were made to those men chosen for the 1954 GTMO Bay All-Star team.
The six honored were: King of the Dental Clinic, the league's leading scorer; Jackson of NAS, Murrell of the Marines, Howerton of the VU-10 Mallards, Daugherty of the Naval Station Indians, and Hollowell also of NAS.
During the program those present who so desired feasted on fried chicken, french fried potatoes, tea or coffee and other refreshments.


New York Yankee second baseman Billy Martin is back in the Army. Martin, last year's World Series hero, was in the Army from November 1950 to March 1951. He got a hardship discharge after claiming four dependents. Word of his induction reached the scrappy ball player at the Yankee spring training camp in St. Petersburg, Fla. Martin, who now has five dependents, flew back to the West Coast and was inducted Mar. 8 in San Francisco. His departure leaves second base wide open for Jerry Coleman, who returned to the Yankees last summer after a second tour of duty with the Marine Corps. Service Highlights
Right-hander Chuck Fowler, discharged from the Army early in January, now is with the New York Giants in Phoenix, Ariz. Chuck played his Service ball with the Ft. Myer Colonials, winning nine games in 1952 and 12 in '53. Willie Mays, recently released from the Army, inked a New York Giant contract for a _reported $13,000. Manager Leo Durocher said, "Sign it." Mays was so happy about returning to major league baseball that he didn't even bother reading the pact. When the Giant pilot saw this he said, "You signed it without even looking at the figures." Mays answered with, "You say sign it, Skip, I sign. You say don't sign, I don't sign." . . . Bill LaRosa, former Burtonwood AB (England) catcher, signed with the Washington Senators and has been farmed to their team in the Class B Piedmont League. LaRosa was discharged from the Air Force last December.
Strange things have happened before in boxing-but this is a lulu. Pfc. Sandy Saddler, featherweight champion of the world now at Ft. Jay, N. Y., was awarded a TKO over Charlie Slaughter in a non-title bout in Akron, Ohio.


Cage League Champions


RADM E. B. Taylor, ComNavBase, presents the Naval Base Basketball Championship trophy to CAPT C. S. Smith and Bob Gatti of the Marine Leathernecks. The Leathernecks wound up a tough league season with 14 wins and 2 losses to nose out the NAS Flyers for the title.


GTMO Golf Hi-Lites Ladies' Golf Shots


by Wright North
The Santiago Golf Team makes its annual visit to the local course this week-end in a challenge match of 36 holes . . . 18 today starting at 1230 and 18 again Sunday morning. They will, of course, bring back the trophy which has never been won by either team on foreign soil. Those players representing Gtmo Bay will be selected from the first low 20-24 handicap throughout the station.
After the second week of Intra Command tournament VU-10, with three victories, has climbed to the top with 45 points. One of the rare occasions in the Intra Command league occurred last Saturday when Supply held VU-10, the first half winner, to a 12-12 score. Fleet Training Group leads the other four teams in this order: FTG ------------------- 32
NAS ------------------- 27
NSD ------------------- 26
Hospital ----------------- 12
MCB ------------------- 10
Light rakes will be placed in all traps in the very near future so in behalf of your fellow golfer, all players are kindly requested to sniooth out the club divot and foot impressions with these rakes before continuing play.

Why? Well, in the fourth round Slaughter threw up his hands and walked out of the ring mumbling, "I was outclassed." . . . Odds and Ends
The AL Baltimore Orioles begin their first major league home season in 51 years when they face the Chicago White Sox at Memorial Stadium, Apr. 15. Tossing out the first ball will be Vice President Richard M. Nixon. Prior to the ball game Vice President and Mrs. Nixon will lead a gala opening-day parade. . . . Paddy De Marco, new lightweight champion of the world, collected about $14,000 for his upset victory over Jimmy Carter. Carter r e c e i v e d approximately $28,000. DeMarco is the first Brooklyn-born pugilist ever to win a world championship.


by Ann Smith

The results of the "Three Club Tournament" in March were:
1st Flight
Gross- Tie Ann Smith
Corky Herring
Net- Mary Ann Pennell
2nd Flight
Gross- Bessy Manning
Net- Tie Edna Edwards Marian Caruthers
3rd Flight
Gross- Joyce Simmons
Net- Sue Strauss
We all had a real fine time in the mixed up-I mean Scotch Foursome, played on Sunday, March 28, results being:
1st Low Gross- McElroy, Snyder 2nd Low Gross- Aslin, North 3rd Low Gross- Grego, Collins 1st Low Net- Pennell, Manning 2nd Low Net- Toczko, Monte 3rd Low Net- McCracken, Toczco
Closest to pin on 8 for men was CAPT McCracken. Closest to pin on 18 for men was LCDR Simmons. Closest to pin on 3 for women was Mary Ann Pennell. Closest to pin on 18 for women for 2nd shot was Lucille Burke. Largest putt on 9 for men or women was Alma McCracken. High Gross, Narwid, Agnew.
Results for 18 holes, gross and net played March 31st were: First Flight
Gross- Jane McElroy
Net- Eloise Gushanas
Second Flight
Gross- Jane Gentry
Net- Fran Dykeman
3rd Flight
Gross- Claire Suslick
Net- Sue Strauss
Don't forget to sign up in the Golf Shack for the luncheon to be held April 7 at the Family Restaurant. And practice up on your putting because next week is a putting contest on the back nine.


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*Wir


THE INDIAN







Saturday, 3 April 1954


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THE INDIAN


Skeet Champion

Keeps 'A Sharp Eye'
by Dick Friz

I paid a visit to the firing range at NAS recently to be checked in on the model 97 Riot gun and the .45 cal. pistol . . . and I met a tall gangling youth with a red ordance cap pulled down over his eyes.
He briefed me on safety precautions and then gave a shooting demonstration I'll not soon forget. He aimed the .45 at a small piece of coral rock about 45 yards away, and sent pieces flying into infinity.
"Well Shane, you've shot before?"I asked. "Yes, Edward Buckwalter the III has been down that road before," he said, and broke out with a wide Midwestern grin. (How was I to know that he was a national skeet champ!)


Edward III, or "Buck" won the National All-gauge Class D chainpionship at Dallas in 1950, posting a perfect 100x100 the first day of firing. That same year, he was Southern Ohio All-bore champ, and in '51 he won the Ohio Hi-Over-all title. In his most recent meet, while on leave from the Navy, in '52 he edged his dad, Ed II and won the class A trophy. Later, that day, the pair teamed to win the two-man award, and the Springfield, Ohio five man team, of which he was a member, was also victorious. Hiover all man for the meet with a 240 x 250 was Ed Buckwalter III.
"Buck" learned skeet from his dad, and the two own 6 patents on a compensator which controls the shot pattern. In winning one of his earlier meets, he devised a gun which had a glued part of a yardstick for a rib sight, and a match head for a bead.
"Buck" graduated from Springfield High School and starred on the frosh track squad at Ohio State. Then came the Navy. At boot camp in San Diego he tied for company honors with the 30 cal. MI. Later, he was sent to "A" School at Jax, and shot on the skeet team there; (he also won the expert carbine medal). Early in 1952 he was sent to ordnance at NAS Gitmo, where he keeps in practice by firing at hand targets and demonstrating to the "boots" that arrive aboard the station.
"Buck" takes much joshing about his short career as an entomologist for the state of Ohio. Actually, he collected japanese beetles from the


Base Bowling
Standings


Team Won
FTG #1 ---------- 45
Hospital ---------- 40
5th Division ------- 31 11th Division ------ 31 MCB-8 #2 -------- 29
MCB-8 #3 -------- 31
MCB-8 #1 -------- 29
2nd Division ------ 27 1st Division ------- 26 FTG #2 ---------- 25
4th Division ------- 23 ACFP ------------ 21
NSD -------------- 16
MCB-8 #5---------16
FBP--------------12
Boatshed ---------- 12
MCB-8 #4 ----- 11
6th Division ------- 11


Lost
6 5
17
22 19
20 25
21 22 26 28 27 32 26 36 30
34 40


OFFICER'S BOWLING
American Division
(Final results)
Team Won Lost
NAS #1 W--36 12
CabMarDen ------34 14
Hosp #1 ---------33 15
FTGOPAIR ------28 20
NSD #1 ---------24 24
Hosp #3 --------- 24 24
NavBase -------- 22 26 VU-10 #2 ------- 21 27 FTGENG -------- 19 29
NAS #3 --------- 19 29
NavSta #6 ------ 18 30 FTGADM #2 .--- 17 .31
NavSta #2 ------ 17 31
National Division
(Week of 25-26 March) Team Won Lost
NavSta #1 ------ 34 10 VU-10 #1 ------- 27 13 NSD #2 -------- 26 14
FTGGUN #1 ---- 28 16
NavSta #5 ------ 24 16 NavSta #4 ------ 22 18 NAS #2 -------- 21 19
FTGCIC --------- 21 19
VU-10 #3 ------- 22 22 MCB-8 ---------- 17 23
Hosp #2 -------- 15 29 FTGGUN #2 ---- 12 28
FTGADM #1 ____ 10 30
FTGDC --------- 9 31


Pet. 61
54 52
44 40 40 38 37
34 33 30 27
21 19 16 15 15
14



Pct. .750 .708 .688 .583 .500 .500
.458 .438 .396 .396 .375
.354 .354

Pet. .773 .675 .650 .636 .600 .550 .525 .525 .500
.425 .341 .300 .250 .225


Manager Wanted I

Anyone with photographic
experience desiring to manage the Naval Station Hobby Shop Photo Lab may turn spare time into profit by contacting the editor of "The
Indian." Call 9615.

LONGOSTA SEASON CLOSES

It has been announced that since this is the height of the breeding season for langosta, the period from 1 April until 1 June will be closed for langosta fishing here in Guantanamo Bay.
The langosta at this time of year may be unfit for human consumption, so play it safe and be a good sportsman -leave them alone until June first.

traps and soon he .was publicised as one of the top "bug" men in the state.
No more beetles, for "Buck" though, when he is discharged. He plans to help his grandfather farm in South Charleston. One of his first purchases will be a Winchester pigeon grade Model 12 and he'll be ready for competition.
It's coincidental that he will be discharged 8 months before the Olympics. What are his chances for the skeet team? He shakes his head and grins. But after seeing the coral rock spatter, I wouldn't put it past him, not by a long shot!


1*4


Sea Bee, VU-10 Outlook Bright


For Coming Baseball Season
by Pierce Lehmbeck
With but two short weeks remaining before the season opener between the Naval Station Indians and the VU-10 Mallards on 12 April, the various coaches and managers around the local circuit begin to tighten up on their pre-season drills, and we of the Indian sports staff continue our visits to their training areas. This week our travels took us out to the SeaBee area where BM1 C. M. Robinson was running his crew through their wind-hampered drills, and over to the Naval Air Station's Hatuey Field where we found the VU-10 Mallards, under the guiding hand of Chief E. Crouch, going through their paces.


MCB-8 SEABEES
The SeaBees of MCB-8 can readily be called one of the most mobile SeaBee units in the Navy. They came here from the far north, Argentia, Newfoundland to be precise, where they won 12 and lost 6 while finishing in second place during their '53 campaign. Playing under extremely - different conditions, the SeaBees will enter the Naval Base league with much of the same squad that they fielded last year.
Under the direction of Robinson, they are using the big right arms of Bigby, Dodson, Cart and Shackleton to mold a well rounded mound staff. Bigby was their big gun during the 1953 season.
Holding down the number two spot in the SeaBee batteries will be Mayer and Haron. Robinson readily predicts that Mayer may well develop into one of the league's most respected back stops as he possesses a powerful defensive arm and is one of the team's most consistent hitters.
In building his infield Robinson has Harvey Frey at third base, Don Stacke at short stop, newcomer Oke Layman at second base and Jim Dodson on the initial bag.
Robinson states that he has not as of yet decided on the starting three in the outfield. Battling it out for these positions will be Reynolds, Golden, Westsinger, Brown, Stewart and Taylor. These spots are still completely wide open.
In commenting on the team's chances during the coming season, Robinson was quick to predict that . . . "If we can mold that outfield to coincide with the rest of the team, I think that I can safely say we're going to be plenty tough." And we of the Indian sports staff say that if the SeaBees of MCB-8 show the same fighting spirit as that of the units that have preceded them, they will be, as Robinson predicts, "plenty tough".
VU-10 MALLARDS
The VU-10 Mallards had probably the most hard-luck of any team competing in the pennant race last year. They lost several key players at crucial stages and their pitchers had a lot of trouble pacing themselves.
However, as they came back this year they bring with them more returning first stringers than any other team on the base.
In our visit to the Mallard camp this past week, we talked with a v e r y non - committal Chief E. Crouch. But remembering that this same Chief Crouch led the Mallard softball team to the league title last year, we decided that perhaps his attitude was more that of modesty rather than uncertainty. Let's look at them on paper.
The Mallards will enter league play this year with a very well balanced mound staff. Heading their efforts will be trickster Harry Breske who combines speed with a large assortment of trickery to


carry out his mound duties. With little improvement and a few breaks, Breske could easily become one of the circuit's leading hurlers. With Breske will be Persutti, who was out most of last year with an injured pivot foot, Huber who also took care of a lot of the Mallard serving chores last year and a newcomer, Raduski, who hurls from the starboard side.
These hurlers will be throwing at the same pair, Rea and Price, that did most of the VU-10 catching during their '53 venture.
The Mallard infield will be much the same with Dieden, an all-star selection last year, at third base, Klienhans, who joined them during the 1953 post season play-offs, at short stop, Ferris, returning at second base again this year, and Stewart, a newcomer, on first base.
The only seemingly shady side to the Mallard outlook is their outfield. Chief Crouch is still completely undecided as to this part of his defensive setup . . . a pang which seems to be bothering most of the other managers and coaches around the base. Out for these positions he has Edgar, Fucci, Foster and Annette, who won the league batting crown last year with an average of well over the .400 mark.
When asked what he would like to have to add to his team's chances in the coming race, Chief Crouch said that he could certainly use a couple of good fast outfielders and one more reliable infielder.
Well as manager of the Mallards, Chief Crouch may be in a much better position to know than we, but if they look as good under heat as they do now, we think that they're going to be a top flight club.
NEW RULES
In a recent discussion with Chief Umpire, J. F. O'Connor, we came across three rule changes which we thought might be of interest to local fans.
Number one is a rule requiring that the base runner remain firmly planted on his bag while a fly ball to the outfield is in the air until it has been caught. In past years a runner on third base would back up for a few yards along the foul line and get a flying start, crossing the bag as the ball was caught and be halfway home before the fielder could get set for his throw.
Another rule change is one requiring that the offensive team completely remove all their gear from the playing field, both fair and foul. This eliminates the possibility of a defensive player's being hindered by unnecessary obstacles cluttering the area while making a play.
The third big change is one what gives the team at bat an option whenever a pitcher commits a balk. To explain this, if a pitcher commits a balk and the batter gets a hit, the manager can elect to take the hit rather then resort to the usual punishment.


4


Page Five







Page Six


Eddie Tullock, manager, master of ceremonies, and "hypnotist" of the USO show which played here at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum last Saturday, holds Carl Benedetto, CS3, of Service Craft, under his "complete control" in an exhibition of his super-natural powers.


A Navy Weddrgq

"Wilt thou, John Have this woman
for thy wedded wife?
To live together insofar as BuPers
will allow? Will
thou love her, comfort her, honor
her, take her to the
movies, and come home on all 48's?

"Wilt thou, Mary, take this sailor
as thy wedded husband?
Bearing in mind liberty hours, ship
schedules, night
watches, sudden orders, uncertain
mail connections, and
all other problems of Navy life?
Wilt thou obey him, love
him, honor and wait for him . . .
learn to wash, fold and
press his uniforms, and keep the
smoking lamp lit for him at home?

"I John, take thee, Mary, as my
wedded wife, from 1630 to
0730 as far as I'm permitted by my
Commanding Officer,
liberty hours subject to change
without notice, for better
or for worse, for earlier or later,
and I promise to write at least once a week . . .

"I Mary, take thee, John, as my
wedded husband, subject to
the orders of the OOD, changing residence whenever your ship moves, to have and to hold as
long as my allotment
comes through regularly, and
thereto I give my troth.

"Then not let man put asunder
what God and BuPers have
put together, by virtue of Navy
regulations of BuPers
Manual, the latest Bureau directive,
and the Commanding
Officer, I now pronounce you, man
and wifec! !

Old Lady-Poor man. Is there a way to get rid of those cooties ?
Tramp-Dat's easy. I take a bath in de sand and den rubs down with alcohol. De cooties den gets drunk and kills each other t'rowin' rocks.


Marjorie Kiewitt of the Fran Stewart Quartette "takes off" on a few paradiddles, flams and strokes during a smooth little number called "Lemon Drop". Marjorie's drum break was one of the highlights of the USO show which was presented to White Hats at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum.


The World Is Mine


Today, upon a bus, I saw a lovely
girl with golden hair,
Envied her, she seemed so gay, and
wished I were as fair;
When suddenly she rose to leave. I
saw her hobble down the aisle. She had one leg, and wore a crutch,
and as she passed-a smile.
OH, GOD FORGIVE ME WHEN
I WHINE.
I HAVE TWO LEGS. THE
WORLD IS MINE!

And then I stopped to buy some
sweets.
The lad who sold them had such
charm,
I talked with him-he seemed so
glad
If I were late 'Twould do no harm. And as I left, he said to me: "I
thank you. You have been so
kind.
It's nice to talk to folks like you.
You see, he said, "I'm blind." OH, GOD, FORGIVE ME WHEN
I WHINE.
I HAVE TWO EYES. THE
WORLD IS MINE!

Later, walking down the street, I
saw a child with eyes of blue. He stood and watched the others
play;
It seemed he knew not what
to do.
I stopped a moment, then I said:
"Why don't you join the others,
dear?"
He looked ahead without a word,
and then
I knew he could not hear.
OH, GOD, FORGIVE ME WHEN
I WHINE.
I HAVE TWO EARS. THE
WORLD IS MINE!

With legs to take me where I'd
go
With eyes to see the sunset's
glow
With ears to hear what I would
know
Oh, God forgive me when I whine. I'm blessed indeed. The world is
mine!


4


USO Show 'Big Success'


c



x





- -


4


Saturday, 3 April 1954


Villamar Housing .. .
(Continued from Page One)
which should be especially attractive to the house-wife, is equipped with stove, refrigerator, automatic hot water heater, and a laundry sink as well as space allotted for the installation of the resident's washer. The kitchen has many large cabinets for dishes, pots, pans, and canned goods; a large closet for brooms, linen, and general storage; and plenty of drawer space. Also, one corner of the kitchen is well arranged for a kitchenette.
The combination living-dining room is large, well lighted, and well ventilated. It features ventilation from three sides without the burning heat of the sun coming in. A closet is located close to the front entry, it has a spacious bookcase built in, and the dining room is just a few steps from the kitchen. Most important, it offers many possibilities for homey arrangements.
Upsirs both bedrooms have cross ventilation as well as large closets. The master bedroom, or the front bedroom, has an extremely large walk-in closet while the back bedroom has a 6' x 2' closet.
In view of the completion of one replacement housing unit, it has been announced by the housing director that every effort will be made to assign replacement housing on a permanent basis.
However, several factors will be taken into consideration. The number of dependents will be a major consideration, and unless other factors are paramount, people with less than six months remaining on tour in Guantanamo Bay will not normally be moved to the new replacement units.
Insofar as possible and consistent with problems involved, the desires of people being moved will be given every consideration. In this respect, if a family wishes to remain in Bargo, every consideration will be given their desire.
In respect to moving, assistance will be given whenever possible to move plants, etc. to replacement units.


NAS Crosswind
by Dick Friz

Admiral Sadik Alitincan, Commander-in-Chief of the Turkish Navy, will arrive at the Air Station on April 13 and will inspect the various departments on the base. He will depart on the 26th.
Spring looms near, and some of the "swallows" are heading back north. The following men received orders to depart NAS Guantanamo this w e e k: George Hamilton, ATAN; Billy Epley, AT3; to
Corpus Christi. Thomas Ames, AL3; Delbert Holton, AM3; Galen Trapp, AK2; Stewart Atkinson, ADAN, to Norfolk. Bernard Worden, AN; Richard Elrod, AM2; Raymond Meyers, AN; James Jones, AN; to Pax River. John Rouse, AK2; James Nafziger, AK2; John Dapp, ADAN; to NAS Jax. Gordon Jacobs, AN; Julius Shafer, AM3; Robert Morley, AN to Quonset Point. George Azar, ADAN; Anthony Pawlooski, AK2 to Atlantic City ... Robert Brown. AD3 to NAF, Weeksville, and Carl Burton, ATAN to Westover Falls, Mass.
Twenty two men arrived on the Thomas this week to fill the vacancies. . . .
Also aboard the Thomas were dependents of LCDR J. D. Bedford, Personnel Officer, and Chief Dowd.
Six New York staters arrived


me


THE INDIAN


You Can Save $65,000

This article is for those of you who would like to enjoy the benefits of $65,000 savings account within the next 20 years. Would you like to? If so, just read on and find out how you can do it.
Suppose as a civilian you work at an unusually well-paying job where you are able to put aside an average of over $200 every month. This sum would have to be what you had left over after paying for such essentials as housing, food, clothing, medical expenses, taxes and so forth. At the end of 20 years you would have banked approximately $65,000.
The monthly dividend which you would receive from a savings account of this size-computed at the standard interest rate of two-anda-half percent per year-would be about $137.
Now let's see what would happen if you had spent these 20 years in Service ending up as an E-7. During this time you wouldn't have to contribute to a pension fund, you would have received added allotments for you wife and children, and you would have had many of your essential expenses covered by Service benefits.
A check of the latest table for retirement pay shows that you would receive a monthly retirement income of $137 a month- or the same amount that you would get from a savings account of $65,000.
Stop and think about this before you get out of Service. You'll go a long way before you will find a deal that will match up to this one. (AFPS)

Spare Time ...
(Continued from Page One)
his bunk. At the present time, John is well into Introductory Sociology and has applied for the college level GED test.
In regards to his scholastic studies, John says that it is surprising as to the small number of persons who have taken advantage of the educational opportunities offered by the Information and Education Office. He states that as far as the course being difficult, "the courses are constructed so as to make the examinations comparatively easy."

at Guantanamo on Tuesday, the last stop in an over water navigational training flight in the Naval Air Reserve Program. The group, part of the Weekend Warriors of Unit 835 at Schenectady, N. Y., flew down in F-G's (Corsairs). Sport Briefs
Team NAS No. 1, captained by CHGUN Sentz won the second half of the American League race in the Officer's Bowling League. NAS No. 2 won the 1st half play off in the National League, so there is a strong possibility that the two may meet for the title after the rolloffs. Sentz's team includes: LCDR Bedford, LT Jack Hamilton, Dr. A. D. Nelson, BOSN A. Hould and CHGUN Sentz and Mrs. Sentz . . . Jose, the Cuban coffee brewer in the Ad Building, has a new job polishing the Basketball Tournament Championship Trophy and the League Runner-up Trophy, both presented to NAS at M o n d a y night's Banquet ... Ten New Krisscraft boats will be launched for NAS (Leeward included) as soon as the fibre glass coating can be applied . . . the boats will have the latest model Evinrude 71/2 h.p. motors. Fishes' school won't keep long now!






saturday, 3 April 1954


Pare Seven


THE INDIAN


a


A Message From Garcia
by Henry Garcia

Love, the whole world round, is the same thing: walking with head in the clouds and feet on earth with a body that has two heads, four arms, four legs and two hearts. Love has been defined as "the only sentiment which ennobles and justifies the human existence", "tremor of hearts and fire of bodies, etc., etc. But, whatever you call it, love-genuine, true, pure love-is a boon, a benediction, something that we have to be grateful to God for, and whichever might be its manifestations, it commands respect and admiration.
In Cuba the love-making technique (if we may use this rather cynical expression) differs slightly from the one used in the States. Of course it sometimes takes just one look to fall in love, but the steps to be taken after the "tic" is felt should, in most cases, follow the routine which is customary in the country or place where the wooeing is to be done. In a peaceful and quite Cuba village, for instance, the boy who has a special liking for a girl throws a pebble at her feet. If she picks it up and returns it, a marriage is most likely to take place, but if she ignores the pebble, it means that the boy will have to find himself some other girl.
Although, due to the influence of our American neighbors some of the customs and traditions of the Cuban people are disappearing, we still have, in some small villages, girls who refuse to date any man unless they have a reason to believe that the man with whom they go out will marry them. Incidentally, "taking her out" means in this case taking also two or three additional members of her family who thus vouch that her honor has not in the least been smeared . . . because to them a respectable girl should only allow a man to kiss her after he has become her husband.
When a couple is in love, the man visits her home and talks to her father about it. Not always is he accepted on the first visit, because the proud father thinks that if he consents too soon to the marriage the boy will get the idea that the girl's parents were too eager to get rid of her. Consequently, he will have to try a few more times, until he is finally accepted as a prospective member of the family. The couple then exchange engagement rings, which are worn on the left hand until they marry. After the marriage, they move the rings to the right hand.
"Breaking it off" is not so easy.
. The boy would have to give account to the girl's family about what has happened between the two, and only after he has given acceptable reasons can he escape from it without trouble. Because the angry parent's fists or knife are the Cuban substitute for the "Breach of Promise" suit, which does not exist in Cuba.

Salt-You remind me of the wild sea waves.
Gal-Because I am so restless and unconquered ?
Salt-No. because you're all wet and you make me sea sick.

"Repeat the words the defendant used," said counsel for the plaintiff in a case of slander.
"I'd rather not," said the witness timidly; "they were hardly words to tell a gentleman."
"I see," said counsel. "Then whisper them to the judge."


Two beneficial suggestion checks and a Meritorious Civilian Service Award were recently presented by the Commanding Officer, Naval Station, to employees of this activity. In the above picture appear (left to right) Oscar Ventura, CAPT W. R. Caruthers, C. 0. Naval Station, Decoroso Pena, Emilio Soto Palerno and the Executive Secretary of the Committee on Awards to Civilian Employees, Mr. Garcia. Winners of the Ben. Sugg. checks were Messrs. Ventura and Pena. The Meritorious Award was presented to Mr. Soto Palermo.


Public Works Chips
by Vic. Gault

A going away party, which will long be remembered, was given to the Roembke's, Jim and Anita, last Monday night at the CPO Club. Practically every supervisor of the department as well as representatives of other departments of the Base were present to give this popular couple a splendid send off. After drinks and a succulent dinner, which was enjoyed by all of the guests, "Chris" Agdamag, who incidentally made all arrangements in connection with the party, ably assisted by Mrs. Narwid, acted as MC of the evening and introduced the speakers who were charged with the pleasant duty of reminising on their experience while connected with the department, working with Jim Roembke or their experience in social contacts with the Roembke family during Jim's tenure of duty on the base. The speakers of the evening were in the order listed. Mr. Goldman, who spoke of Jim as a co-worker, Mr. Thurston, who has worked with Jim both here on the base as well as in the States, spoke of him as a supervisor, Mr. McNeal, who spoke very glowingly about Jim's social activities and civic leadership during his stay on the Base, CDR Lawlor, who made a nice speech and mentioned some of the high qualities possessed and demonstrated by Jim in his duties here as Civil Engineer of the department, Mr. Adams, who spoke of Jim's activities as a student and Mr. Ward, who spoke of his high qualities as a true and faithful friend. Mr. Roembke then took over the "mike" and thanked all of those present as well as his Cuban friends not present for their cooperation and understanding, and mentioned that he really did not know that he was that much appreciated. After the speeches every one enjoyed dancing to the excellent music furnished by the Naval Base Band, Unit No. 197. The party lasted until approximately 2300 and a nice time was had by all.
Mrs. W. H. Mathews, who resides in the Villamar Housing area is


Hospital Notes


Heirport News
Only two births were recorded during the past week: A daughter, Liloni Delores Harrell, to SD3 and Mrs. Namaan R. Harrell; and a daughter, Linda Louise Driver, to HM1 and Mrs. E. L. Driver.
New Arrivals
Two new men reported aboard this week, having come down on the Thomas. G. E. Deveny, HM3, from the Receiving Station, Brooklyn; and W. A. Dal, HN, from the U. S. Naval Hospital, Charleston.
Go Pullman
CWOHC H. W. Colt and family arrived at the Naval Base on 25 March. Arriving in Miami from Portsmouth, New 'Hampshire, they took the overnight car ferry from Miami to Havana and drove through Cuba. Mr. Colt states that the trip was very interesting and very likely something a person can well remember for "the rest of his life." Any one who would care to make this trip may secure pertinent data from Mr. Colt at the Personnel Office, Naval Hospital. (Note: He does not recommended this trip to any one over 25, or without the pioneer spirit.)
Thanks
The Blood Donor List is beginning to grow, but many more names are needed. Let's not let it return to the recent low level.

enjoying the visit of her mother, Mrs. Collins, who has been on the base visiting Mr. and Mrs. Mathews since last month. Mrs. Collins flew to the base from Montreal, Canada by way of Camaguey, Cuba. This is Mrs. Collins' second visit to the base and she says that she really enjoys her visits here because of the pleasant tropical climate and because of the nice friends that she has made during her stay. She plans to make side trips to other islands of the Caribbean area prior to her return to Canada, and expects to remain here for approximately three months longer.


TEENAGE- ROUND-UP
By Barbara Burke
Here it is Saturday again, and tonight up at the Little Theater, a frantic dance is going to be held. The purpose of this rollicking affair is to raise money for the year-book. Tickets will be on sale at the door, so come on up and support your school's activities.
A very weird happening took place last week. Four chicks piled into Pat's car after play rehearsal and left for the Naval Station Lyceum. Unknown to the girls, a brown grasshopper had decided to bum a ride too. Before long his presence was discovered, and much to the amazement of the pedestrians, all havoc broke loose. It was quite a sight to see four doors fly open and four flying females come sailing out of each one. As the saying goes, though, "all that starts well, ends well" (maybe it doesn't go quite that way) and the unwelcome party was quickly disposed of.
On tap next Saturday is the G. A. A. beach party. At the last meeting a vote taken to decide where and when. All were in favor of taking a truck loaded with hay out to the Yateras beach. The truck will leave the school at 8:00 A.M.


NSO Supply Line

Two beaming faces here at NSD this week-LT Woolard and Chief Johnson-and both from North Carolina. LT Woolard's family arrived Monday on the Thomas. Mrs. Woolard, Ken Jr. and Roddy are all settled in their quarters at RP726B.
Chief and Mrs. Johnson were assigned quarters at 110 Villamar. They will have no more daily round-trips to Guantanamo City. After a tour of stateside duty, Glen and Marta Elena have returned to her native country. Her home town is Santiago de Cuba.
Welcome aboard to Vernon D. Muehler, EN1, who reported to the Depot from the USS LST 1164. Mrs. Muehler and son, George, are patiently waiting in Fall River, Massachusetts, until quarters become available in Guantanamo.
LCDR and Mrs. W. J. Sheehan accompanied by their sons, Pat, Mike and Tom are on the round robin trip to Panama. Reminder to Mr. Sheehan's neighbor-please remember to water Bill's vegetable garden!


SCUTTLEBUTT











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TWE INDIAN


Saturday 3 AprE1J54


MOVIES


Saturday, 3 April
CHARGE AT FEATHER RIVER Guy Madison Frank Lovejoy
Helen Westcott Vera Miles
Frontiersman Guy Madison is assigned to the task of rescuing two white girls who have been held captive by the Indians for five years.
Sunday, 4 April
ALL THE BROTHERS WERE VALIANT
Ann Blyth Robert Taylor
Stewart Granger Betta St. John
The story of two brothers who are rival captains of sailing ships. They have no love for each other but when one learns the other is lost at sea while drunk, he sets out to clear the family name.
Monday, 5 April
GERALDINE
John Carroll Mala Powers
Jim Backus Stan Freberg
A musical comedy about Tin Pan Alley and its inhabitants.
Tuesday, 6 April
OUTLAW WOMEN
Marie Windsor Richard Rober
Carla Balenda Julie Cougan
Law and order are brought by men into a western town run by women. Women cannot vote so the men have their say.
Wednesday, 7 April
SAILOR OF THE KING
Jeffrey Hunter Michael Rennie Wendy Miller Bernard Lee
Story of a navy man and his son, both battle heroes of World War II.
Thursday, 8 April JULIUS CAESAR
Marlon Brando James Mason
John Gielgud Louis Calhern
One of Shakespeare's more popular plays. Plot concerns the overthrow of a dictator and the motives of the persons immediately concerned.
Friday, 9 April
AFFAIR IN MONTE CARLO Merle Oberon Richard Todd
Leo Genn Stephan Murray
Wealthy novelist, visiting in Monte Carlo, tells friends story of love at first sight between wealthy young widow and h a n d s o m e gambler.


by Sgt. William J. McDowell, Jr., USMC

We would like to take this time to say "HELLO" to Mrs. Dorothy Jean Schuler and her daughter Elizabeth Susan. Mrs. Schuler arrived on the 29th of March from Rapid City South Dakota where she was waiting for transportation to join her husband TSgt. G. 0. Schuler who is stationed here at Marine Barracks. Also we say welcome aboard to Pfc Richard M. McIver who has joined us here at the Barracks.
Departing for the States this week was Cpl Joseph C. Beal who was transferred to the 2nd Marine Division at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Cpl Beal will spend his leave at Cumberland Ky. So-long and lots of Luck to you at Camp Lejeune.
Basketball trophies were awarded to members of the Marine Championship Team last Monday by RADM E. B. Taylor at the Basketball banquet.
Members of the Staff NCO Club elected new Officers and a board of governors; they are as follows: M/Sgt. Alphonse J. Lembo President; M/Sgt. Anthony Krekman, Vi c e - President; S/Sgt. Joseph Bonsignore, Secretary; Members of the board of governors: T/Sgt. Andrew P. Gradus, S/Sgt. Ottis D. Williams, S/Sgt. Richard W. Dwyer, S/Sgt. Robert C. Rauch.
On the 21st of February 1945 units of the 28th Marine Regiment captured Mount Suribachi and thus eliminated enemy fire on the landing beaches and secured an observation post dominating the entire island. The raising of the flag was recorded in what was to become the most famous combat photograph of the war.
In honor of this occasion a Memorial Statue will be unveiled on November 10th 1954, the 179th anniversary of the birth of the United States Marine Corps. This monument to all Marines stands 134 feet high and covers a seven and one half acre tract of land. it was financed entirely by donations from members of the U.S. Marine Corps.
The monument will be erected in Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia and will be seen from almost any part of the Capitol. It will also be one of the largest bronze cast statues in the area.
The Commanding officer wishes to extend a "Well-Done" to the officers and men of Marine Barracks for their 100% contribution to this memorial.
A field meet will be held today with plenty of chicken and beer for all hands of the Barracks and there will be plenty of baseball, volleyball and other sports.


--WGBY HLites


by John Hull

The big news this week is BASEBALL as WGBY begins an expanded coverage of the coming baseball season including major league exhibition games, season openers, local league play-by-play and a new local "Sportscast".
The AFRS "Parade of Sports" from New York has already taken over a two hour block, seven days a week, in order to bring you the major league pre-season exhibition games from the "grapefruit league", plus interviews with the stars, rookies and managers of the teams in training.
The major league season starts on Tuesday, 13 April, with the Yankees playing the Washington Senators at Griffith Stadium. The nation's top sportscasters, plus the AFPS New York sports staff, will bring you baseball all season long over the "Parade of Sports".
Navy Chief Hal Davis brings a new "Sportscast" to the air five times a week beginning Monday. 5 April at 6:30 P.M. Along with the major league news you'll hear the latest developments in the Base league, plus interviews with the base team coaches.
Now under construction at the Fleet Recreation Area Diamond number one is a new baseball broadcast booth and from it you'll hear the top games played locally during the season, brought to you by Chief Davis and the WGBY staff .
Watch the daily program schedule in the "Papoose" for your favorite programs and any changes in the schedule presented each day over your local Armed Forces Radio Service Station, WGBY 1450 on your dial.


EnamelEttcl 98

Now that the Officers Bowling League is over we are proud to mention that Cab-Mar-Den (CableMarines-Dental) team placed a close second in both the first and second half of the American League. Our Dr. Lyons and Mr. Dote, with Dr. Pepin, were the Dental representatives-thanks for the old pepper in there. They enjoyed teaming up with Mrs. Housson, CAPT Miles and team captain "Kelly" Marabella.
Official word is out that Captain W. D. F. Stagner, (DC), USN is to be the new commanding Officer of our Naval Dental Clinic here in GTMO-come this July. May we extend an advanced welcome to the Captain and his family. Captain Stagner is now District Dental Officer, 8th Naval District (at New Orleans).
Don't let a dry tooth brush cause you to have water under your bridge. Swab your choppers.


STUFFY


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See - Worthy


Donna Gardner, as see-worthy a young miss as we've seen lately, waves from the rigging of one of the craft entered in the Sunshine Sailing Regatta in Miami, Fla. Donna was named the queen of the event.


FTG Bulletin

Notice to all snakes: Beware! Fleet Training Group Master-atArms Chief W. I. Hamm is on the loose. Walking out in Villamar last week, Chief Hamm observed a five and one-half-foot boa constrictor coiled by the side of the road. Picking up the nearest available weapon, a four foot two-by-four board, Chief Hamm polished off the snake in short order, and is now on the lookout for any others foolish enough to sun bathe while he is about.
FTG Families Report
It was a big week for seven FTG personnel, whose families arrived in the Guantanamo area. FTG extends a welcome to Mrs. Elizabeth Saunders, wife of LT George Saunders of the Operations Department, and daughters Alva and Gail; to Mrs. Katharine M. Rostan, wife of LT David Rostan of the CIC Department; to Mrs. Bebe Miles, wife of LT Bernard L. Miles, also in the CIC Department; to Mrs. Marjorie Bates, wife of LTJG George M. Bates, Personnel Officer and Administrative Department Division Officer; and to Mrs. May Clay, wife of Chief Clay, Damage Control shiprider-instructor.
Mr. and Mrs. Saunders will live on Radio Point Road, Mr. and Mrs. Bates and Mr. and Mrs. Rostan will live in Villamar, Mr. and Mrs. Miles will live at Oil Point while Chief and Mrs. Clay have housing in Bargo.
Two GM1's from the FTG Gunnery Department, C. Thornall and H. Burgess have brought their families to Caimanera while awaiting housing on the Base.
Congratulations
William Emmet Yarbrough, EM2, TAD to Base Police, is the proud father of a 6-pound 12-ounce baby boy, Timothy Lamar Yarbrough, born March 17 at the Naval Hospital.


9


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Vol. VI, No. 39 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 3 April 1954 Spare Time Counts Former Base Commander With This Sailor Heads On3-8Site Surey Board Here Next Week Spare time presents no problems for John H. Schmitt, PR3, of th Base Police. During the past five months since he has been attached to the Naval Base, John has completed five correspondence courses during his off-duty hours, and still he finds time for other interests. John, who began his correspondence work "to keep up his study habits," is a high school graduate and hails from Manketo, Minn. Being from the "land of a thousand lakes," Schmitt is a rabid trout fisherman and a hunter; and still, J. H. Schmitt, PR3, of the Bas Police uses a few minutes of his off-duty hours to "keep up his study habits." John is working o his sixth correspondence course. 'even though opportunities for trou fishing and hunting are not com parable to that around Manketo it is one of his principal hobbies Prior to enlisting in the Navy, worked two summers as a trou fisherman's guide in Yellowston National Park, and before that, h headed a club in Manketo whose interest and purpose was tyin fishing flies. John came to Guantanamo Ba in June of 1952 and was first a tacked to the Naval Air Statio until he was recently assigned to the Base Police. To date, Schmitt has complete five U S A F I correspondence courses: Latin American Histor I & II, Beginning Spanish, La Cuevas de Arta (The Caves Arta,) and Lecturas Escogid (Chosen Readings.) As well as the regular USAI courses completed, John studio Spanish under Mr. Jones at h classes conducted at the Nay Base school evenings. As a res of his studies of Spanish, Schmi speaks the language very fluent Along with all of his studi John still manages to find time make two Cuban liberties a we attend any "good movies" show on the base, and "just relax" (Continued on Page Six) It has been announced that an on-site survey party will arrive in d Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Tuesday, 6 April to inspect the Naval Base sand all commands. The board, headed by RADM C. L. C. Atkeson, former base commander, will arrive some time Tuesday. The inspection will begin on Wednesday morning with an arrival conference which will be held in the Naval Base board room with the base commander, the inspection party, and commanding officers of all base commands attending. During the arrival conference, the missions and objectives, the present and projected facilities, and the problems of the respective base commands will be discussed. The commanding officers will present to the base commander and the inspection party any suggestions or advice which they have in respect to these problems. Included in th inspf party -senior member, CAPTW -L ley, executive assistant, CAPT W. R. Millis, BuShips matters, CAPT E. H. Eldredge, BuAer matters, CAPT C. Stiegler, industrial matters, CAPT E. L. Hansen, BuDocks matters, CAPT J. D. Viecelli, medical and dental matters, CAPT G. H. Hamilton, CNO and communication matters, CAPT. T. B. Haley, industrial aviation matters, and COL T. Sheffield, Marine Corps matters. Upon completion of the survey here, the inspection party will despart for the Naval Station, San Juan. t s. t e e e g y tn to d ce ry s of as I ed is al lt tt y. es, to ek, ig in First Villamar Replacement Unit Open To Public Sunday The long awaited opening of the first unit of the Villamar Replacement Housing Project will take place Sunday, 4 April. According to CDR Roger G. Witherell, Commanding Officer, Mobile Construction Battalion Eight, Building 275, located at the end of 5th Street in Villamar, will be open to military personnel, U.S. Citizens of the Guantanamo Bay area, and their dependents from 1400 to 1600. RADM Edmund B. Taylor, Commander, Naval Base, will officially open the building by cutting the tape, and CAPT W. R. Caruthers will officially receive the building for the Naval Station. Along with Admiral Taylor, Captain Caruthers, and Commander Witherell will be LCDR 0. H. Nicholson, Executive Officer, MCB-8 and LT R. J. Rowsin, Operations Officer, MCB-8. The official ceremonies will begin a 1400, and from 140,futebeso C ~ 00 NavSta Pool Begins toi160o, fur andMCB8 10 be on hand to guide interested perNight Swimming n through the new housing unit. These four seabees will be men It has been brought to the atwho have helped in the construcIt hs ~ben rougt t theattion of Building 275. tention of all-hands that commencThe two-story duplex unit, a ing the 1st week of April, the type E building, is complete in Naval Station enlisted men's swimevery construction detail and is ming pool located behind the "ready to move into." During the recreation area building, will be last week, MCB-8 has been workopen for night swimming. ing steadily to put the finishing Installations of under-water touches on the building; they have Definite plans for construction ot -aI' lmr g p a soda fountain in addition to the as far as waxing floors. present snack -shack are also Construction of the two-apartunder-way. ment two-bed-room unit began with Reserved for dependents only MCB-1. MCB-7 carried on construcwill be the following hours: Montion for a time, and MCB-8, with day mornings from 0900 to 1200, the aid of MCB-6 personnel, finishand Thursday evenings from 1200 ed up the new home. to 2100. This unit offers many convenNight swimming will secure at iences to the resident. The kitchen, 2100 throughout the week. All (Continued on Page Six) hands are cordially invited to take full advantage of these new facilities for the further recreation of i n ct and ashore. Cr iig C nut VU10 Inspection Proudly holding the awards presented to them by RADM E. B. Taylor (far left) are the six players selected for the 1954 All-Star team. They are, left to right: Art Hollowell, NAS Flyers; Don Daugherty, Naval Station Indians; Bob Howerton, VU-10 Mallards; Jack Jackson, NAS Flyers; Paul King, Dental Clinic; and Fred Murrell, Marine Leathernecks. (See story on Page 5) Capt. L. 0. Fox, Commander Utility Wing, Atlantic Fleet, conducted a surprise administrative inspection of Utility Squadron TEN on 24 March, 1954. Pictured above are Capt. L. O. Fox, Cdr. T. B. Wolfe, CO of VU-10, (L. to R.) W. E. Hickman AD3, J. C. Teague AN, C.E. Parker AD1, G. V. Smoker AN. The Squadron received an overall mark of excellent on the inspection. 10 0

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Saturday 3 April 1954 Page Two THE INDIAN Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Depsrtmnent Fieet Recreation Center Telephone 9615 Saturday, 3 April 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. SandnessOfficer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC--------------Editor H. L. Sisson, J03---------------News Jerry Lewis, JOS---------Features J. C. Dierks, JOS-----------Spurts Pierce Lehmbeck---Ph Sports F. L. Cannon. JOaN---Photographer R. Naccarato, SN-------Make-up THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. A photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. VU-10 Prop Blast CAPT L. 0. Fox, ComUtWingLant; CDR R. M. Brown, CO, VU-2; CDR J. W. Austin, UtWingLant Staff; LCDR C. E. Van Bibber, VUTI I T Pulesnobl., UtWing Staff conducted a suprise administrative inspection of the squadron on Wednesday 24 March. The inspection revealed only a few minor deficiencies and the overall mark of excellent was assigned. The Mallard golfers found the going rough in golf on Saturday 27 March with NSD. It was the first time this year that VU-10 has not won a match. Final score 12 to 12. On Sunday 28 March, the Mallards came back strong with a 17 to 7 victory over the Hospital team. The boys are right in there pitching, putting and hitting em down the middle. Lt Fletcher H. Burdett has received his orders to NAS Quonset Point, R. I. Fletch, Ruth (the Mrs.), and two boys, Scamper age 51/2 and Scooter age 31/2 are departing by FLAW on 7 April. They will spend 15 days leave in and around Palisade, N. J. before reporting to Quonset. Fletch has been with VU10 almost 2 years and has been one of our outstanding utility pilots. He has been ordnance officer, asst. operations officer, and is presently flight safety officer. Our best wishes and "God Speed" go with the Burdetts. A draft of 9 new men reported for duty on 29 March. They are: J. J. McCaffery, AD3, Philadelphia, Penn.; J. R. Mayhill, CS1, from Boston, Mass.; T. E. Vanness, AD2, from Ottumwa, Iowa; G. E. Burrows, ATAN, from Seminole, Okla,; J. T. McDaniel, AE2, from Cleveland, Ohio; R. Graziani, AE2, from Chicago Heights, Illinois; C. W. Shelton, AO1, from Washington, D. C.; J. W. Doulin, PR2, from Dumont, N. J.; and R. L. Hall, AE3, from Sanford, Florida, Welcome Aboard. Feminine pulchitrude graced the VU-10-NAS pay line Tuesday 30 March in an attempt to sell tickets for the Jacksonville Navy Carnival for Charity. The Waves looked nice with the Guantanamo scenery for a background and no report has The girls topped the boys in the Naval Base School Spelling Bee last week. Above, June Gentry, winner of the Bee, receives her medal from Mrs. Cecil Cole, President of the American Legion Auxiliary, while Lynne Graham, runner-up, stands by with her medal. There were 13 contestants in all. Words were called by J. E. Roembke. A, J. McGowan Speaks On 'Accident Prevention' The principal speaker at the monthly Parent-Teachers AssociaSupervisory Safety Engineer of the base. Mr. McGowan will speak on the prevalence of accidents in regards to children, and will suggest possible methods of preventing child accidents. The meeting will be held in the Naval Base School auditorium at 7:30 P.M. been received as to the number of 500 ducats sold for chances on a 1954 Cadillac and a 1954 MG to be given away on 15 May 1954, but to say the least, relations are now more improved between JAX and GTMO. This is Isiah Green, SD3, USN, Officer's Coffee Mess King of Utility Squadron TEN. Green's home town is Jacksonville, Florida. He resides with his wife and 18 month old daughter at 787-B, Victory Hill. Isiah has been in the Navy for ten years, likes it very much, also his new job as "COFFEE KING" of the Squadron. The Lucky Bag by Betty Radcliffe SCHOOL DAYS IN GUANTANAMO BAY .. In August of 1941 the present NOB Sehnnl edifice was dedicated session from August to December and was then closed because of the entry of the USA into World War II. In October of 1945 the school reopened with an enrollment of 45 pupils and 5 teachers. By October of 1949 enrollment had increased to approximately 300 pupils and 15 faculty members. Originally the construction of the building was in the shape of an E and in 1952 seven rooms were added across the front which changed the building into a square shaped around a patio. In 1953 four more rooms were added to the school grounds. Today the school consists of 25 classrooms plus special area rooms such as the library, band and art rooms. The enrollment of pupils now is approximately 600, including nursery school and kindergarten. With the ever increasing number of pupils it is estimated that there will be the necessity of two additional rooms for the 1955-56 term. Plans are in progress to build a multi-purpose building to be used as an assembly hall and an indoor physical education building. For the information of those of you who don't know ...the NOB School of Guantanamo Bay is an Accredited school. The requirements for teachers are set up by BuPers and requires a four year degree from an accredited College or University and two years teaching experience. The teachers coming here are under a one year contract and at the termination of that contract they can sign a new one year contract. Looking at it from mother's viewpoint ...I know that our boys and girls are receiving fine educations here in Guantanamo Bay. First Burglar-Not a thing worth takin', Charlie. Don't it make ye sore? "Yeh-let's let that mouse outa the trap." 9. Sunday, 4 April 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. O. Stephenson, CHC, USN (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR (Protestant) The Chaplain's Corner Humans have the greatest admiration for the ant. Looking man' heiht -at-altitude of a man's hght the two eCKSi creature studies the industrious little insects as they scurry about the task of building, carrying and providing for the winter months, and remembers the Scriptural adage, "Go to the ant thou sluggard, consider her ways and be wise". Usually the point of emphasis is the lack of laziness which the ant family possesses. It is the industry of these creatures that causes man to marvel and pause as he observes such busy, brave, little insects of the earth. However, there is one of their breed which causes much alarm. Its color is pale and its body very soft, but the teeth very powerful, namely the white ant. This insect is a social creature like his earth cousin but in addition is a woodworm and has won notoriety in the field of sawing wood. As a termite he has no compunctions about entering homes and buildings to destroy the timbers so carefully laid to support the roof over man's head. Although this little giant is industrious, there is another lesson to be gleaned from his life, for his job is to disintegrate. The harder the grain of wood the better it pleases him. In the spiritual realm there are forces which if allowed to operate will tear down and take out of the life of man the rights which his forefathers cherished and fought for and even died for. Families should provide instruction for children and see that church attendance is a practice. Parents who neglect this responsibility and privilege are allowing the termites entrance into spiritual life of the soul; and the child, along with the parent suffers. In time the disintegration will reveal itself in weakened timbers of the soul. it is a logical sequence when people leave God out of the foundation of life. Take heed lest the termite of neglect begin his deadly work. James F. Agnew, LT, CHC, USNR Saturday 3 Aprl 1954

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Saturday, 3 April 1954 THE ~ Base Regs Change For Gtmo River Changes to the Naval Base regulations concerning recreation trips on or near the Guantanamo River are now in effect. Consequently, Navy or privately owned boats will not proceed beyond the Naval Reservation boundary line on the Guantanamo River or North Gate without written authority obtained from the Base Commander. All land areas on both sides of the Guantanamo River are restricted areas within the base. Base personnel will not be allowed within these areas without written authorization from the Base Provost Marshal. Also, swimming is prohibited in the Guantanamo River at all times. The senior person in each private recreation or hunting party will be held accountable for any infraction of this regulation. Military personnel, dependents, and United States citizens are allowed to fish in non-restricted waters of the Naval Base during all hours of the day. However, native and alien employees may fish from the shore only in nonrestricted areas during daylight hours. Air Rifles Restricted Air rifles and air pistols may not be used within 200 yards of any road, building, or recreation area. Minors are forbidden to use or be in possession of an air rifle or air pistol unless in the presence of an adult. Billy Whiteman Home After Delicate Surgery Billy Whiteman, 8-year-old son of CDR and Mrs. Armand D. Whiteman, last week returned to the Base well on the way to recovery after a serious illness of several weeks, and a delicate cranial operation in the National Naval Medical Center at Bethesda, Md. Billy suffered a cerebral hemorrhage on 17 January, and was treated in the Naval Hospital here before he was sent to Bethesda. Mrs. Whiteman had been at Bethesda for several weeks past, and returned with Billy to the Base. Billy expects to resume his studies next Monday in the base school, where he is a student in Mrs. Campbell's 3rd grade room. The Indian has been requested by Billy and his parents to extend to their many well wishers on the Base their sincere appreciation. Army Major Wins 'America' Contest Freedoms Foundation of Valley Forge has announced the winner of the 1953 "What America Means To Me" contest conducted among servicemen all over the world and promoted through the Armed Forces Radio Service. The top award of $1,000 was won by Major Thomas A. Palmer, Signal Corps, USA. His letter is reprinted below as an inspiration to Americans everywhere. WHAT AMERICA MEANS TO ME America is something more to me than coastlines, skylines, mountains, standards of living, Hollywood, gimmicks, gadgets, freedom of opportunity and TV. America was not an accident. America had to be. America was born of "people living together" -but of people, people from far and wide-bringing here their protests and fears and frustrations and, in the crucible of freedom, getting stronger, confident, more inter-dependent, and in that process making one grand schoolroom for the rest of the world to see and possibly emulate. America to me is not the arrival -but the way-to the time when all bigotry, all hate, all divisions of race or creed will have gone. America cannot be static; neither can Americans. America changes one. To accept a status quo based on expedients of life and effort is not American, America is the impulsion of growth, of freedom of concept and expression-of the grasping of the NOW until the future's promise becomes graspable. America is not for the timid -the chronic conservative-the myopic. America is for the vigorous man, the energetic man; the farseeing and the far-seeking man. America is not for the selfish man, for America was born of protest against the selfishness of government and religion. No, America has not as yet arrived; we are striving in our vigor and fearlessness and hope. We are hard pressed for some of the things America has protested against and are trying hard to settle here. America should be so infused with the vitality of the spirit of its protestations that it will not permit its triumph through years of honest strife and sacrificing efforts to be deluged in foreign bigotries, and foriegn fears, and foreign hates, and foreign politics -for it was not only against one, but against all of these things that America was forced into birth. America is the effort of brotherhood-not a poetic, sentimental ecstacy-but a vigorous, practical common effort-an effort that gripes in its striving-but which, by the gripe, spurs greater effort towards a practical, cooperative humanity. All those over the world who strive for the good of all share the American spirit-all those who strive for tolerance, and practical, honest facing of issues and seek purposeful action for the good of all are essentially American. Does it matter where they live, or what their color or creed? For America is a symbol-a generous symbol-which we as a Nation translated into a Way of Life, of liberty and the pursuit of happiness, which eventually, I believe, will be attained for all by the collective effort of mankind seeking freedom from the nameless, and unexplainable myriad of Oratorical Contest Winners The winners of the American Legion-sponsored Oratorical Contest at the Naval Base School last week: Judy Yost, left was the winner in the girls division and Paul Sauerbier topped the boys. Other contestants in the finals were Norman Huddy and June Alexander. At right, congratulating Paul Sauerbier, is J. E. Roembke, a judge in the contest. Navy's I & E Traced To M eetings .. U. S. Naval Base, 1944 The Navy's off duty education program had it's official beginning at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in September 1944. At that time an officer was dispatched from the Bureau of Naval Personel with various educational materials to establish a few experimental classes and to offer Education Counseling. The experiment was outstandingly successful. On the basis of that successful experiment it was considered advisable to open a new Bureau of Personnel section to be called the Education Services Section. Since that time, however, the official name has been changed to Information and Education. By September 1942 the facilities of the Army Institute had been made available to the Navy and by February 1943 the Institute's name was changed to the United States Armed Forces Institute (shortened popularly to USAFI). By the fall of 1943, Educational Services had begun to make its appearance in Naval Hospitals, a development of the program that in time became an extensive and important one. As the spring of 1946 faded the greatest Navy in history was melting away. By September, demobilization was almost complete, and the question of the continued existence of the Educational Services Program arose in earnest. Everything seemed to point to the liquidation of this program born of war. An affirmative decision was made, and in Washington the program was fitted with a new look to enable it to become a permanent part of the peacetime Navy. (First of series of articles to appear subsequently in the Indian) human fears-attained by first dissolving through understanding the fear of man for man. That is what America means to me. Time & Place Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd & 4th Tuesday each month. Community Auditorium Ladies' Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Room, Community Auditorium Little Theatre Group 2000; 1st Tuesday each month Marina Point Hospital Service Volunteers 1000; 2nd Tuesday each month Hospital Medical Library American Legion Auxiliary, Unit One 1930; 3rd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Hut, Marina Point Toastmasters Club No. 92 1930 each Thursday, Officers Club dining room. American Legion, Guantanamo Bay Post 1 1930; 3rd Tuesday each month; Community Auditorium, Marina Point Parent-Teachers Association 1930; 1st Tuesday of each month Naval Base School Felloweraft Club No 1078 2000 each Thursday, Practice, Business Meeting, 1st Thursday -Community Auditorium National Sojourners, Guantanamo Bay Chapter 320 3rd Monday of every month. National Supervisors Association 1900; 1st Monday each month, Civilian Training Conference Room. Dinner -Dance The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Fleet Reserve Association here in Guantanamo Bay will sponsor a dinner-dance at the Community Auditorium next Friday, April 9, at 8 P.M. Tickets may be obtained from any member of the Auxiliary or at the door. 4 Saturday, 3 April 1954 rk$ f

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Saturday, 3 April 1954 THE INDIAN Cage Tournament Champions Cage League Champions Pictured above are members of the NAS Flyers, winners of the 1954 RADM E. B. Taylor, ComNavBase, presents the Naval Base Basketball basketball tournament and runners-up in regular league season play. Championship trophy to CAPT C. S. Smith and Bob Gatti of the Marine The Flyers were presented with two trophies for their victories by base Leathernecks. The Leathernecks wound up a tough league season with commander, RADM E. B. Taylor. 14 wins and 2 losses to nose out the NAS Flyers for the title. Left to right are: Ring, Hollowell, CAPT McCracken, Commanding Officer, Naval Air Station; Adm. Taylor, Coach Leeper, Allan, Meador and Conti. GTMO Golf Hi-Lites Ladies' Golf Shots Naval Base Honors Its Basketball Champions Monday evening saw the Naval Base honor its basketball players, coaches and officials with a banquet at the Naval Air Station Enlisted Men's Club that closed out a very successful 1954 cage season. Besides providing a friendly noncompetitive atmosphere for those rivals wanting to talk over the ups and downs of the late basketball year, the banquet's main purpose was for the presentation of trophies by base commander RADM E. B. Taylor to the outstanding teams and players of 1954. First on the agenda were the Marine Leathernecks, who wound up on top of the heap with a 14-2 record, one game ahead of the runners-up, NAS. The Marines were presented with a large team trophy and each player with an individual award. NAS was given an impressive trophy for taking second place in the league standings with 13 wins and 3 losses over the season's play, and the Flyers also copped an award for coming out on top as champs of the post-season tournament. The Dental Clinic was voted the most sportsmanlike team for the season, for which they were rewarded by Adm. Taylor, and the final presentations were made to those men chosen for the 1954 GTMO Bay All-Star team. The six honored were: King of the Dental Clinic, the league's leading scorer; Jackson of NAS, Murrell of the Marines, Howerton of the VU-10 Mallards, Daugherty of the Naval Station Indians, and Hollowell also of NAS. During the program those present who so desired feasted on fried chicken, french fried potatoes, tea or coffee and other refreshments. New York Yankee second baseman Billy Martin is back in the Army. Martin, last year's World Series hero, was in the Army from November 1950 to March 1951. He got a hardship discharge after claiming four dependents. Word of his induction reached the scrappy ball player at the Yankee spring training camp in St. Petersburg, Fla. Martin, who now has five dependents, flew back to the West Coast and was inducted Mar. 8 in San Francisco. His departure leaves second base wide open for Jerry Coleman, who returned to the Yankees last summer after a second tour of duty with the Marine Corps. Service Highlights Right-hander Chuck Fowler, discharged from the Army early in January, now is with the New York Giants in Phoenix, Ariz. Chuck played his Service ball with the Ft. Myer Colonials, winning nine games in 1952 and 12 in '53. Willie Mays, recently released from the Army, inked a New Yorl' Giant contract for a reported $13,000. Manager Leo Durocher said, "Sign it." Mays was so happy about returning to major league baseball that he didn't even bother reading the pact. When the Giant pilot saw this he said, "You signed it without even looking at the figures." Mays answered with, "You say sign it, Skip, I sign. You say don't sign, I don't sign." Bill LaRosa, former Burtonwood AB (England) catcher, signed with the Washington Senators and has been farmed to their team in the Class B Piedmont League. LaRosa was discharged from the Air Force last December. Strange things have happened before in boxing-but this is a lulu. Pfc. Sandy Saddler, featherweight champion of the world now at Ft. Jay, N. Y., was awarded a TKO over Charlie Slaughter in a non-title bout in Akron, Ohio. by Wright North The Santiago Golf Team makes its annual visit to the local course this week-end in a challenge match of 36 holes ...18 today starting at 1230 and 18 again Sunday morning. They will, of course, bring back the trophy which has never been won by either team on foreign soil. Those players representing Gtmo Bay will be selected from the first low 20-24 handicap throughout the station. After the second week of Intra Command tournament VU-10, with three victories, has climbed to the top with 45 points. One of the rare occasions in the Intra Command league occurred last Saturday when Supply held VU-10, the first half winner, to a 12-12 score. Fleet Training Group leads the other four teams in this order: FTG ------------------32/2 NAS -----------------27 NSD -----------------26 Hospital --------------12 MCB ------------------10 Light rakes will be placed in all traps in the very near future so in behalf of your fellow golfer, all players are kindly requested to smooth out the club divot and foot impressions with these rakes before continuing play. Why? Well, in the fourth round Slaughter threw up his hands and walked out of the ring mumbling, "I was outclassed." .. Odds and Ends The AL Baltimore Orioles begin their first major league home season in 51 years when they face the Chicago White Sox at Memorial Stadium, Apr. 15. Tossing out the first ball will be Vice President Richard M. Nixon. Prior to the ball game Vice President and Mrs. Nixon will lead a gala opening-day parade. ...Paddy De Marco, new lightweight champion of the world, collected about $14,000 for his upset victory over Jimmy Carter. Carter received approximately $28,000. DeMarco is the first Brooklyn-born pugilist ever to win a world championship. by Ann Smith The results of the "Three Club Tournament" in March were: 1st Flight GrossTie Ann Smith Corky Herring NetMary Ann Pennell 2nd Flight GrossNetTie 3rd Flight GrossNetBessy Manning Edna Edwards Marian Caruthers Joyce Simmons Sue Strauss We all had a real fine time in the mixed up-I mean Scotch Foursome, played on Sunday, March 28, results being: 1st Low GrossMcElroy, Snyder 2nd Low GrossAslin, North 3rd Low GrossGrego, Collins 1st Low NetPennell, Manning 2nd Low NetToczko, Monte 3rd Low NetMcCracken, Toczco Closest to pin on 8 for men was CAPT McCracken. Closest to pin on 18 for men was LCDR Simmons. Closest to pin on 3 for women was Mary Ann Pennell. Closest to pin on 18 for women for 2nd shot was Lucille Burke. Largest putt on 9 for men or women was Alma McCracken. High Gross, Narwid, Agnew. Results for 18 holes, gross and net played March 31st were: First Flight GrossJane McElroy NetEloise Gushanas Second Flight GrossJane Gentry NetFran Dykeman 3rd Flight GrossClaire Suslick NetSue Strauss Don't forget to sign up in the Golf Shack for the luncheon to be held April 7 at the Family Restaurant. And practice up on your putting because next week is a putting contest on the back nine.

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Saturday, 3 April 1954 THE INDIAN Page Five Skeet Champion Keeps 'A Sharp Eye' by Dick Friz I paid a visit to the firing range at NAS recently to be checked in on the model 97 Riot gun and the .45 cal. pistol ...and I met a tall gangling youth with a red ordance cap pulled down over his eyes. He briefed me on safety precautions and then gave a shooting demonstration I'll not soon forget. He aimed the .45 at a small piece of coral rock about 45 yards away, and sent pieces flying into infinity. "Well Shane, you've shot before?" I asked. "Yes, Edward Buckwalter the III has been down that road before," he said, and broke out with a wide Midwestern grin. (How was I to know that he was a national skeet champ!) Edward III, or "Buck" won the National All-gauge Class D championship at Dallas in 1950, posting a perfect 100x100 the first day of firing. That same year, he was Southern Ohio All-bore champ, and in '51 he won the Ohio Hi-Over-all title. In his most recent meet, while on leave from the Navy, in '52 he edged his dad, Ed II and won the class A trophy. Later, that day, the pair teamed to win the two-man award, and the Springfield, Ohio five man team, of which he was a member, was also victorious. Hiover all man for the meet with a 240 x 250 was Ed Buckwalter III. "Buck" learned skeet from his dad, and the two own 6 patents on a compensator which controls the shot pattern. In winning one of his earlier meets, he devised a gun which had a glued part of a yardstick for a rib sight, and a match head for a bead. "Buck" graduated from Springfield High School and starred on the frosh track squad at Ohio State. Then came the Navy. At boot camp in San Diego he tied for company honors with the 30 cal. M1. Later, he was sent to "A" School at Jax, and shot on the skeet team there; (he also won the expert carbine medal). Early in 1952 he was sent to ordnance at NAS Gitmo, where he keeps in practice by firing at hand targets and demonstrating to the "boots" that arrive aboard the station. "Buck" takes much joshing about his short career as an entomologist for the state of Ohio. Actually, he collected japanese beetles from the Base Bowling Standings Team Won FTG #1 ----------45 Hospital ----------40 5th Division -31 11th Division -31 MCB-8 #2 --------29 MCB-8 #3 --------31 MCB-8 #1 --------29 2nd Division -27 1st Division26 FTG #2 ----------25 4th Division -23 ACFP ----------21 NSD ------------16 MCB-8 #5 --------16 FBP ------------12 Boatshed ----------12 MCB-8 #4 -------11 6th Division -11 Lost Pct. 6 61 5 54 17 52 22 44 19 40 20 40 25 38 21 37 22 34 26 33 28 30 27 27 32 21 26 19 36 16 30 15 34 15 40 14 OFFICER'S BOWLING American Division (Final results) Team Won Lost NAS #1 ---------36 12 CabMarDen -34 14 Hosp #1 ---------33 15 FTGOPAIR -28 20 NSD #1 ---------24 24 Hosp #3 ---------24 24 NavBase --------22 26 VU-10 #2 -21 27 FTGENG --------19 29 NAS #3 ---------19 29 NavSta #6 -18 30 FTGADM #2 17 .31 NavSta #2 -17 31 National Division (Week of 25-26 March) Team Won Lost NavSta #1 -34 10 VU-10 #1 -27 13 NSD #2 -------26 14 FTGGUN #1 28 16 NavSta #5 -24 16 NavSta #4 -22 18 NAS #2 --------21 19 FTGCIC ---------21 19 VU-10 #3 -22 22 MCB-8 ----------17 23 Hosp #2 --------15 29 FTGGUN #2 12 28 FTGADM #1 10 30 FTGDC ---------9 31 Pct. .750 .708 .688 .583 .500 .500 .458 .438 .396 .396 .375 .354 .354 Pct. .773 .675 .650 .636 .600 .550 .525 .525 .500 .425 .341 .300 .250 .225 Manager Wanted Anyone with photographic -experience desiring to manage the Naval Station Hobby Shop Photo Lab may turn spare time into profit by contacting the editor of "The Indian." Call 9615. LONGOSTA SEASON CLOSES It has been announced that since this is the height of the breeding season for langosta, the period from 1 April until 1 June will be closed for langosta fishing here in Guantanamo Bay. The langosta at this time of year may be unfit for human consumption, so play it safe and be a good sportsman -leave them alone until June first. traps and soon he was publicised as one of the top "bug" men in the state. No more beetles, for "Buck" though, when he is discharged. He plans to help his grandfather farm in South Charleston. One of his first purchases will be a Winchester pigeon grade Model 12 and he'll be ready for competition. It's coincidental that he will be discharged 8 months before the Olympics. What are his chances for the skeet team? He shakes his head and grins. But after seeing the coral rock spatter, I wouldn't put it past him, not by a long shot! Sea Bee, VU-10 Outlook Bright For Coming Baseball Season by Pierce Lehmbeck With but two short weeks remaining before the season opener between the Naval Station Indians and the VU-10 Mallards on 12 April, the various coaches and managers around the local circuit begin to tighten up on their pre-season drills, and we of the Indian sports staff continue our visits to their training areas. This week our travels took us out to the SeaBee area where BM1 C. M. Robinson was running his crew through their wind-hampered drills, and over to the Naval Air Station's Hatuey Field where we found the VU-10 Mallards, under the guiding hand of Chief E. Crouch, going through their paces. MCB-8 SEABEES The SeaBees of MCB-8 can readily be called one of the most mobile SeaBee units in the Navy. They came here from the far north, Argentia, Newfoundland to be precise, where they won 12 and lost 6 while finishing in second place during their '53 campaign. Playing under extremely different conditions, the SeaBees will enter the Naval Base league with much of the same squad that they fielded last year. Under the direction of Robinson, they are using the big right arms of Bigby, Dodson, Cart and Shackleton to mold a well rounded mound staff. Bigby was their big gun during the 1953 season. Holding down the number two spot in the SeaBee batteries will be Mayer and Haron. Robinson readily predicts that Mayer may well develop into one of the league's most respected back stops as he possesses a powerful defensive arm and is one of the team's most consistent hitters. In building his infield Robinson has Harvey Frey at third base, Don Stacke at short stop, newcomer Oke Layman at second base and Jim Dodson on the initial bag. Robinson states that he has not as of yet decided on the starting three in the outfield. Battling it out for these positions will be Reynolds, Golden, Westsinger, Brown, Stewart and Taylor. These spots are still completely wide open. In commenting on the team's chances during the coming season, Robinson was quick to predict that "If we can mold that outfield to coincide with the rest of the team, I think that I can safely say we're going to be plenty tough." And we of the Indian sports staff say that if the SeaBees of MCB-8 show the same fighting spirit as that of the units that have preceded them, they will be, as Robinson predicts, "plenty tough". VU-10 MALLARDS The VU-10 Mallards had probably the most hard-luck of any team competing in the pennant race last year. They lost several key players at crucial stages and their pitchers had a lot of trouble pacing themselves. However, as they came back this year they bring with them more returning first stringers than any other team on the base. In our visit to the Mallard camp this past week, we talked with a ver y non -committal Chief E. Crouch. But remembering that this same Chief Crouch led the Mallard softball team to the league title last year, we decided that perhaps his attitude was more that of modesty rather than uncertainty. Let's look at them on paper. The Mallards will enter league play this year with a very well balanced mound staff. Heading their efforts will be trickster Harry Breske who combines speed with a large assortment of trickery to carry out his mound duties. With little improvement and a few breaks, Breske could easily become one of the circuit's leading hurlers. With Breske will be Persutti, who was out most of last year with an injured pivot foot, Huber who also took care of a lot of the Mallard serving chores last year and a newcomer, Raduski, who hurls from the starboard side. These hurlers will be throwing at the same pair, Rea and Price, that did most of the VU-10 catching during their '53 venture. The Mallard infield will be much the same with Dieden, an all-star selection last year, at third base, Klienhans, who joined them during the 1953 post season play-offs, at short stop, Ferris, returning at second base again this year, and Stewart, a newcomer, on first base. The only seemingly shady side to the Mallard outlook is their outfield. Chief Crouch is still completely undecided as to this part of his defensive setup ...a pang which seems to be bothering most of the other managers and coaches around the base. Out for these positions he has Edgar, Fucci, Foster and Annette, who won the league batting crown last year with an average of well over the .400 mark. When asked what he would like to have to add to his team's chances in the coming race, Chief Crouch said that he could certainly use a couple of good fast outfielders and one more reliable infielder. Well as manager of the Mallards, Chief Crouch may be in a much better position to know than we, but if they look as good under heat as they do now, we think that they're going to be a top flight club. NEW RULES In a recent discussion with Chief Umpire, J. F. O'Connor, we came across three rule changes which we thought might be of interest to local fans. Number one is a rule requiring that the base runner remain firmly planted on his bag while a fly ball to the outfield is in the air until it has been caught. In past years a runner on third base would back up for a few yards along the foul line and get a flying start, crossing the bag as the ball was caught and be halfway home before the fielder could get set for his throw. Another rule change is one requiring that the offensive team completely remove all their gear from the playing field, both fair and foul. This eliminates the possibility of a defensive player's being hindered by unnecessary obstacles cluttering the area while making a play. The third big change is one what gives the team at bat an option whenever a pitcher commits a balk. To explain this, if a pitcher commits a balk and the batter gets a hit, the manager can elect to take the hit rather then resort to the usual punishment. Saturday, 3 April 1954 THE INDIAN Page Five

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Page Six Pade Six TEE INDIAN Saturday, 3 April 1954 USO Show 'Big Success' FIddie Tullock, manager, master Marjorie Kiewitt of the Fran of ceremonies, and "hypnotist" of Stewart Quartette "takes off" on a the USO show which played here few paradiddles, fiams and strokes during a smooth little number at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum called "Lemon Drop". Marjorie's last Saturday, holds Carl Benedetdrum break was one of the highto, CS3, of Service Craft, under his lights of the USO show which was "complete control" in an exhibition presented to White Hats at the of his super-natural powers. Naval Station Movie Lyceum. A Navy Wecdtrng "Wilt thou, John Have this woman for thy wedded wife? To live together insofar as BuPers will allow? Will thou love her, comfort her, honor her, take her to the movies, and come home on all 48's? "Wilt thou, Mary, take this sailor as thy wedded husband? Bearing in mind liberty hours, ship schedules, night watches, sudden orders, uncertain mail connections, and all other problems of Navy life? Wilt thou obey him, love him, honor and wait for him .. learn to wash, fold and press his uniforms, and keep the smoking lamp lit for him at home? "I John, take thee, Mary, as my wedded wife, from 1630 to 0730 as far as I'm permitted by my Commanding Officer, liberty hours subject to change without notice, for better or for worse, for earlier or later, and I promise to write at least once a week ... "I Mary, take thee, John, as my wedded husband, subject to the orders of the OOD, changing residence whenever your ship moves, to have and to hold as long as my allotment comes through regularly, and thereto I give my troth. "Then not let man put asunder what God and BuPers have put together, by virtue of Navy regulations of BuPers Manual, the latest Bureau directive, and the Commanding Officer, I now pronounce you, man and wife! ! Old Lady-Poor man. Is there a way to get rid of those cooties? Tramp-Dat's easy. I take a bath in de sand and den rubs down with alcohol. De cooties den gets drunk and kills each other t'rowin' rocks. The World Is Mine Today, upon a bus, I saw a lovely girl with golden hair, Envied her, she seemed so gay, and wished I were as fair; When suddenly she rose to leave. I saw her hobble down the aisle. She had one leg, and wore a crutch, and as she passed-a smile. OH, GOD FORGIVE ME WHEN I WHINE. I HAVE TWO LEGS. THE WORLD IS MINE! And then I stopped to buy some sweets. The lad who sold them had such charm, I talked with him-he seemed so gladIf I were late 'Twould do no harm. And as I left, he said to me: "I thank you. You have been so kind. It's nice to talk to folks like you. You see, he said, "I'm blind." OH, GOD, FORGIVE ME WHEN I WHINE. I HAVE TWO EYES. THE WORLD IS MINE! Later, walking down the street, I saw a child with eyes of blue. He stood and watched the others play; It seemed he knew not what to do. I stopped a moment, then I said: "Why don't you join the others, dear?" He looked ahead without a word, and then I knew he could not hear. OH, GOD, FORGIVE ME WHEN I WHINE. I HAVE TWO EARS. THE WORLD IS MINE! With legs to take me where I'd goWith eyes to see the sunset's glowWith ears to hear what I would knowOh, God forgive me when I whine. I'm blessed indeed. The world is mine! 6 Villamar Housing ... (Continued from Page One) which should be especially attractive to the house-wife, is equipped with stove, refrigerator, automatic hot water heater, and a laundry sink as well as space allotted for the installation of the resident's washer. The kitchen has many large cabinets for dishes, pots, pans, and canned goods; a large closet for brooms, linen, and general storage; and plenty of drawer space. Also, one corner of the kitchen is well arranged for a kitchenette. The combination living-dining room is large, well lighted, and well ventilated. It features ventilation from three sides without the burning heat of the sun coming in. A closet is located close to the front entry, it has a spacious bookcase built in, and the dining room is just a few steps from the kitchen. Most important, it offers many possibilities for homey arrangements. Upstairs, both bedrooms have cross ventilation as well as large closets. The master bedroom, or the front bedroom, has an extremely large walk-in closet while the back bedroom has a 6' x 2' closet. In view of the completion of one replacement housing unit, it has been announced by the housing director that every effort will be made to assign replacement housing on a permanent basis. However, several factors will be taken into consideration. The number of dependents will be a major consideration, and unless other factors are paramount, people with less than six months remaining on tour in Guantanamo Bay will not normally be moved to the new replacement units. Insofar as possible and consistent with problems involved, the desires of people being moved will be given every consideration. In this respect, if a family wishes to remain in Bargo, every consideration will be given their desire. In respect to moving, assistance will be given whenever possible to move plants, etc. to replacement units. NAS Crosswind by Dick Friz Admiral Sadik Alitincan, Commander-in-Chief of the Turkish Navy, will arrive at the Air Station on April 13 and will inspect the various departments on the base. He will depart on the 26th. Spring looms near, and some of the "swallows" are heading back north. The following men received orders to depart NAS Guantanamo this wee k: George Hamilton, ATAN; Billy Epley, AT3; to Corpus Christi. Thomas Ames, AL3; Delbert Holton, AM3; Galen Trapp, AK2; Stewart Atkinson, ADAN, to Norfolk. Bernard Worden, AN; Richard Elrod, AM2; Raymond Meyers, AN; James Jones, AN; to Pax River. John Rouse, AK2; James Nafziger, AK2; John Dapp, ADAN; to NAS Jax. Gordon Jacobs, AN; Julius Shafer, AM3; Robert Morley, AN to Quonset Point. George Azar, ADAN; Anthony Pawlooski, AK2 to Atlantic City ..Robert Brown. AD3 to NAF, Weeksville, and Carl Burton, ATAN to Westover Falls, Mass. Twenty two men arrived on the Thomas this week to fill the vacancies. Also aboard the Thomas were dependents of LCDR J. D. Bedford, Personnel Officer, and Chief Dowd. Six New York staters arrived 4 You Can Save $65,000 This article is for those of you who would like to enjoy the benefits of $65,000 savings account within the next 20 years. Would you like to? If so, just read on and find out how you can do it. Suppose as a civilian you work at an unusually well-paying job where you are able to put aside an average of over $200 every month. This sum would have to be what you had left over after paying for such essentials as housing, food, clothing, medical expenses, taxes and so forth. At the end of 20 years you would have banked approximately $65,000. The monthly dividend which you would receive from a savings account of this size-computed at the standard interest rate of two-anda-half percent per year-would be about $137. Now let's see what would happen if you had spent these 20 years in Service ending up as an E-7. During this time you wouldn't have to contribute to a pension fund, you would have received added allotments for you wife and children, and you would have had many of your essential expenses covered by Service benefits. A check of the latest table for retirement pay shows that you would receive a monthly retirement income of $137 a monthor the same amount that you would get from a savings account of $65,000. Stop and think about this before you get out of Service. You'll go a long way before you will find a deal that will match up to this one. (AFPS) Spare Time (Continued from Page One) his bunk. At the present time, John is well into Introductory Sociology and has applied for the college level GED test. In regards to his scholastic studies, John says that it is surprising as to the small number of persons who have taken advantage of the educational opportunities offered by the Information and Education Office. He states that as far as the course being difficult, "the courses are constructed so as to make the examinations comparatively easy." at Guantanamo on Tuesday, the last stop in an over water navigational training flight in the Naval Air Reserve Program. The group, part of the Weekend Warriors of Unit 835 at Schenectady, N. Y., flew down in F-G's (Corsairs). Sport Briefs Team NAS No. 1, captained by CHGUN Sentz won the second half of the American League race in the Officer's Bowling League. NAS No. 2 won the 1st half play off in the National League, so there is a strong possibility that the two may meet for the title after the rolloffs. Sentz's team includes: LCDR Bedford, LT Jack Hamilton, Dr. A. D. Nelson, BOSN A. Hould and CHGUN Sentz and Mrs. Sentz Jose, the Cuban coffee brewer in the Ad Building, has a new job polishing the Basketball Tournament Championship Trophy and the League Runner-up Trophy, both presented to NAS at M o n d a y night's Banquet .Ten New Krisscraft boats will be launched for NAS (Leeward included) as soon as the fibre glass coating can be applied ...the boats will have the latest model Evinrude 7% h.p. motors. Fishes' school won't keep long now! Saturday, 3 April 1954 THE INDIAN

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gay,3 Apil 154 TE INIANPasre Secvn A Message From Garcia by Henry Garcia Love, the whole world round, is the same thing: walking with head in the clouds and feet on earth with a body that has two heads, foui arms, four legs and two hearts. Love has been defined as "the only sentiment which ennobles and justifies the human existence", "tremor of hearts and fire of bodies, etc., etc. But, whatever you call it, love-genuine, true, pure love-is a boon, a benediction, something that we have to be grateful to God for, and whichever might be its manifestations, it commands respect and admiration. In Cuba the love-making technique (if we may use this rather cynical expression) differs slightly from the one used in the States. Of course it sometimes takes just one look to fall in love, but the steps to be taken after the "tic" is felt should, in most cases, follow the routine which is customary in the country or place where the wooeing is to be done. In a peaceful and quite Cuba village, for instance, the boy who has a special liking for a girl throws a pebble at her feet. If she picks it up and returns it, a marriage is most likely to take place, but if she ignores the pebble, it means that the boy will have to find himself some other girl. Although, due to the influence of our American neighbors some of the customs and traditions of the Cuban people are disappearing, we still have, in some small villages, girls who refuse to date any man unless they have a reason to believe that the man with whom they go out will marry them. Incidentally, "taking her out" means in this case taking also two or three additional members of her family who thus vouch that her honor has not in the least been smeared ...because to them a respectable girl should only allow a man to kiss her after he has become her husband. When a couple is in love, the man visits her home and talks to her father about it. Not always is he accepted on the first visit, because the proud father thinks that if he consents too soon to the marriage the boy will get the idea that the girl's parents were too eager to get rid of her. Consequently, he will have to try a few more times, until he is finally accepted as a prospective member of the family. The couple then exchange engagement rings, which are worn on the left hand until they marry. After the marriage, they move the rings to the right hand. "Breaking it off" is not so easy. ..The boy would have to give account to the girl's family about what has happened between the two, and only after he has given acceptable reasons can he escape from it without trouble. Because the angry parent's fists or knife are the Cuban substitute for the "Breach of Promise" suit, which does not exist in Cuba. Salt-You remind me of the wild sea waves. Gal-Because I am so restless and unconquered? Salt-No. because you're all wet and you make me sea sick. "Repeat the words the defendant used," said counsel for the plaintiff in a case of slander. "I'd rather not," said the witness timidly; "they were hardly words to tell a gentleman." "I see," said counsel. "Then whisper them to the judge." Two beneficial suggestion checks and a Meritorious Civilian Service Award were recently presented by the Commanding Officer, Naval Station, to employees of this activity. In the above picture appear (left to right) Oscar Ventura, CAPT W. R. Caruthers, C. 0. Naval Station, Decoroso Pena, Emilio Soto Palermo and the Executive Secretary of the Committee on Awards to Civilian Employees, Mr. Garcia. Winners of the Ben. Sugg. checks were Messrs. Ventura and Pena. The Meritorious Award was presented to Mr. Soto Palermo. Public Works Chips by Vic. Gault A going away party, which will long be remembered, was given to the Roembke's, Jim and Anita, last Monday night at the CPO Club. Practically every supervisor of the department as well as representatives of other departments of the Base were present to give this popular couple a splendid send off. After drinks and a succulent dinner, which was enjoyed by all of the guests, "Chris" Agdamag, who incidentally made all arrangements in connection with the party, ably assisted by Mrs. Narwid, acted as MC of the evening and introduced the speakers who were charged with the pleasant duty of remimsing on their experience while connected with the department, working with Jim Roembke or their experience in social contacts with the Roembke family during Jim's tenure of duty on the base. The speakers of the evening were in the order listed. Mr. Goldman, who spoke of Jim as a co-worker, Mr. Thurston, who has worked with Jim both here on the base as well as in the States, spoke of him as a supervisor, Mr. McNeal, who spoke very glowingly about Jim's social activities and civic leadership during his stay on the Base, CDR Lawlor, who made a nice speech and mentioned some of the high qualities possessed and demonstrated by Jim in his duties here as Civil Engineer of the department, Mr. Adams, who spoke of Jim's activities as a student and Mr. Ward, who spoke of his high qualities as a true and faithful friend. Mr. Roembke then took over the "mike" and thanked all of those present as well as his Cuban friends not present for their cooperation and understanding, and mentioned that he really did not know that he was that much appreciated. After the speeches every one enjoyed dancing to the excellent music furnished by the Naval Base Band, Unit No. 197. The party lasted until approximately 2300 and a nice time was had by all. Mrs. W. H. Mathews, who resides in the Villamar Housing area is Hospital Notes Heirport News Only two births were recorded during the past week: A daughter, Liloni Delores Harrell, to SD3 and Mrs. Namaan R. Harrell; and a daughter, Linda Louise Driver, to HM1 and Mrs. E. L. Driver. New Arrivals Two new men reported aboard this week, having come down on the Thomas. G. E. Deveny, HM3, from the Receiving Station, Brooklyn; and W. A. Dal, HN, from the U. S. Naval Hospital, Charleston. Go Pullman CWOHC H. W. Colt and family arrived at the Naval Base on 25 March. Arriving in Miami from Portsmouth, New Hampshire, they took the overnight car ferry from Miami to Havana and drove through Cuba. Mr. Colt states that the trip was very interesting and very likely something a person can well remember for "the rest of his life." Any one who would care to make this trip may secure pertinent data from Mr. Colt at the Personnel Office, Naval Hospital. (Note: He does not recommended this trip to any one over 25, or without the pioneer spirit.) Thanks The Blood Donor List is beginning to grow, but many more names are needed. Let's not let it return to the recent low level. enjoying the visit of her mother, Mrs. Collins, who has been on the base visiting Mr. and Mrs. Mathews since last month. Mrs. Collins flew to the base from Montreal, Canada by way of Camaguey, Cuba. This is Mrs. Collins' second visit to the base and she says that she really enjoys her visits here because of the pleasant tropical climate and because of the nice friends that she has made during her stay. She plans to make side trips to other islands of the Caribbean area prior to her return to Canada, and expects to remain here for approximately three months longer. TEENAGEROUND-UP By Barbara Burke Here it is Saturday again, and tonight up at the Little Theater, a frantic dance is going to be held. The purpose of this rollicking affair is to raise money for the year-book. Tickets will be on sale at the door, so come on up and support your school's activities. A very weird happening took place last week. Four chicks piled into Pat's car after play rehearsal and left for the Naval Station Lyceum. Unknown to the girls, a brown grasshopper had decided to bum a ride too. Before long his presence was discovered, and much to the amazement of the pedestrians, all havoc broke loose. It was quite a sight to see four doors fly open and four flying females come sailing out of each one. As the saying goes, though, "all that starts well, ends well" (maybe it doesn't go quite that way) and the unwelcome party was quickly disposed of. On tap next Saturday is the G. A. A. beach party. At the last meeting a vote taken to decide where and when. All were in favor of taking a truck loaded with hay out to the Yateras beach. The truck will leave the school at 8:00 A.M. NSD Supply Line Two beaming faces here at NSD this week-LT Woolard and Chief Johnson-and both from North Carolina. LT Woolard's family arrived Monday on the Thomas. Mrs. Woolard, Ken Jr. and Roddy are all settled in their quarters at RP726B. Chief and Mrs. Johnson were assigned quarters at 110 Villamar, They will have no more daily round-trips to Guantanamo City. After a tour of stateside duty, Glen and Marta Elena have returned to her native country. Her home town is Santiago de Cuba. Welcome aboard to Vernon D. Mushler, EN1, who reported to the Depot from the USS LST 1164. Mrs. Muehler and son, George, are patiently waiting in Fall River, Massachusetts, until quarters become available in Guantanamo. LCDR and Mrs. W. J. Sheehan accompanied by their sons, Pat, Mike and Tom are on the round robin trip to Panama. Reminder to Mr. Sheehan's neighbor-please remember to water Bill's vegetable garden! N f Pauay, 3 April 1954 PageS THE INDIAN

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y, 3 MOVIES MA410e Mns WGBY Hi-Lites by John Hull See -Worthy Saturday, 3 April CHARGE AT FEATHER RIVER Guy Madison Frank Lovejoy Helen Westcott Vera Miles Frontiersman Guy Madison is assigned to the task of rescuing two white girls who have been held captive by the Indians for five years. Sunday, 4 April ALL THE BROTHERS WERE VALIANT Ann Blyth Robert Taylor Stewart Granger Betta St. John The story of two brothers who are rival captains of sailing ships. They have no love for each other but when one learns the other is lost at sea while drunk, he sets out to clear the family name. Monday, 5 April GERALDINE John Carroll Mala Powers Jim Backus Stan Freberg A musical comedy about Tin Pan Alley and its inhabitants. Tuesday, 6 April OUTLAW WOMEN Marie Windsor Richard Rober Carla Balenda Julie Cougan Law and order are brought by men into a western town run by women. Women cannot vote so the men have their say. Wednesday, 7 April SAILOR OF THE KING Jeffrey Hunter Michael Rennie Wendy Miller Bernard Lee Story of a navy man and his son, both battle heroes of World War II. Thursday, 8 April JULIUS CAESAR Marlon Brando James Mason John Gielgud Louis Calhern One of Shakespeare's more popular plays. Plot concerns the overthrow of a dictator and the motives of the persons immediately concerned. Friday, 9 April AFFAIR IN MONTE CARLO Merle Oberon Richard Todd Leo Genn Stephan Murray Wealthy novelist, visiting in Monte Carlo, tells friends story of love at first sight between wealthy young widow and handsome gambler. by Sgt. William J. McDowell, Jr., USMC We would like to take this time to say "HELLO" to Mrs. Dorothy Jean Schuler and her daughter Elizabeth Susan. Mrs. Schuler arrived on the 29th of March from Rapid City South Dakota where she was waiting for transportation to join her husband TSgt. G. 0. Schuler who is stationed here at Marine Barracks. Also we say welcome aboard to Pfe Richard M. Melver who has joined us here at the Barracks. Departing for the States this week was Cpl Joseph C. Beal who was transferred to the 2nd Marine Division at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Cpl Beal, will spend his leave at Cumberland Ky. So-long and lots of Luck to you at Camp Lejeune. Basketball trophies were awarded to members of the Marine Championship Team last Monday by RADM E. B. Taylor at the Basketball banquet. Members of the Staff NCO Club elected new Officers and a board of governors; they are as follows: M/Sgt. Alphonse J. Lembo President; M/Sgt. Anthony Krekman, Vice -President; S/Sgt. Joseph Bonsignore, Secretary; Members of the board of governors: T/Sgt. Andrew P. Gradus, S/Sgt. Ottis D. Williams, S/Sgt. Richard W. Dwyer, S/ Sgt. Robert C. Rauch. On the 21st of February 1945 units of the 28th Marine Regiment captured Mount Suribachi and thus eliminated enemy fire on the landing beaches and secured an observation post dominating the entire island. The raising of the flag was recorded in what was to become the most famous combat photograph of the war. In honor of this occasion a Memorial Statue will be unveiled on November 10th 1954, the 179th anniversary of the birth of the United States Marine Corps. This monument to all Marines stands 134 feet high and covers a seven and one half acre tract of land. it was financed entirely by donations from members of the U.S. Marine Corps. The monument will be erected in Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia and will be seen from almost any part of the Capitol. It will also be one of the largest bronze cast statues in the area. The Commanding officer wishes to extend a "Well-Done" to the officers and men of Marine Barracks for their 100% contribution to this memorial. A field meet will be held today with plenty of chicken and beer for all hands of the Barracks and there will be plenty of baseball, volleyball and other sports. The big news this week is BASEBALL as WGBY begins an expanded coverage of the coming baseball season including major league exhibition games, season openers, local league play-by-play and a new local "Sportscast". The AFRS "Parade of Sports" from New York has already taken over a two hour block, seven days a week, in order to bring you the major league pre-season exhibition games from the "grapefruit league", plus interviews with the stars, rookies and managers of the teams in training. The major league season starts on Tuesday, 13 April, with the Yankees playing the Washington Senators at Griffith Stadium. The nation's top sportscasters, plus the AFPS New York sports staff, will bring you baseball all season long over the "Parade of Sports". Navy Chief Hal Davis brings a new "Sportscast" to the air five times a week beginning Monday. 5 April at 6:30 P.M. Along with the major league news you'll hear the latest developments in the Base league, plus interviews with the base team coaches. Now under construction at the Fleet Recreation Area Diamond number one is a new baseball broadcast booth and from it you'll hear the top games played locally during the season, brought to you by Chief Davis and the WGBY staff. Watch the daily program schedule in the "Papoose" for your favorite programs and any changes in the schedule presented each day over your local Armed Forces Radio Service Station, WGBY 1450 on your dial. EnameL Echi ngs Now that the Officers Bowling League is over we are proud to mention that Cab-Mar-Den (CableMarines-Dental) team placed a close second in both the first and second half of the American League. Our Dr. Lyons and Mr. Dote, with Dr. Pepin, were the Dental representatives-thanks for the old pepper in there. They enjoyed teaming up with Mrs. Housson, CAPT Miles and team captain "Kelly" Marabella. Official word is out that Captain W. D. F. Stagner, (DC), USN is to be the new commanding Officer of our Naval Dental Clinic here in GTMO-come this July. May we extend an advanced welcome to the Captain and his family. Captain Stagner is now District Dental Officer, 8th Naval District (at New Orleans). Don't let a dry tooth brush cause you to have water under your bridge. Swab your choppers. Donna Gardner, as see-worthy a young miss as we've seen lately, waves from the rigging of one of the craft entered in the Sunshine Sailing Regatta in Miami, Fla. Donna was named the queen of the event. FTG Bulletin Notice to all snakes: Beware! Fleet Training Group Master-atArms Chief W. I. Hamm is on the loose. Walking out in Villamar last week, Chief Hamm observed a five and one-half-foot boa constrictor coiled by the side of the road. Picking up the nearest available weapon, a four foot two-by-four board, Chief Hamm polished off the snake in short order, and is now on the lookout for any others foolish enough to sun bathe while he is about. FTG Families Repot It was a big week for seven FTG personnel, whose families arrived in the Guantanamo area. FTG extends a welcome to Mrs. Elizabeth Saunders, wife of LT George Saunders of the Operations Department, and daughters Alva and Gail; to Mrs. Katharine M. Rostan, wife of LT David Rostan of the CIC Department; to Mrs. Bebe Miles, wife of LT Bernard L. Miles, also in the CIC Department; to Mrs. Marjorie Bates, wife of LTJG George M. Bates, Personnel Officer and Administrative Department Division Officer; and to Mrs. May Clay, wife of Chief Clay, Damage Control shiprider-instructor. Mr. and Mrs. Saunders will live on Radio Point Road, Mr. and Mrs. Bates and Mr. and Mrs. Rostan will live in Villamar, Mr. and Mrs. Miles will live at Oil Point while Chief and Mrs. Clay have housing in Bargo. Two GM1's from the FTG Gunnery Department, C. Thornall and H. Burgess have brought their families to Caimanera while awaiting housing on the Base. Congratulations William Emmet Yarbrough, EM2, TAD to Base Police, is the proud father of a 6-pound 12-ounce baby boy, Timothy Lamar Yarbrough, born March 17 at the Naval Hospital. Nav DPro-atmo.-4824A Saturday 3 April 1r,54 THE INDIAN


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