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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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Vol. VI, No. 36 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 13 March 1954


ComCBLant Praises Deer Season Ending; Marine Corps Commandant Cites

Villamar Progress Bird HUnting ContinUes Guantanamo Marine Barracks


The Villamar Replacement Housing Unit, which has been acclaimed as one of the largest peacetime projects ever undertaken by SeaBees, with the one exception of a very similar housing unit on Guam; received a vital "shot in the arm."
Saturday, after CAPT W. B. Short, Commander, Construction Battalions, Atlantic Fleet had completed the inspection of projects of both MCB-6 and MCB-8, he addressed the latter battalion at their personnel inspection. He said that construction progress on the Villamar Housing Unit was "marvelous" and that it had "shown much improvement" since his last visit here in September 1953.
This increase and improvement in production on the housing units has been largely due to the fact that MCB-8 arrived here in Guantanamo 30 percent over quota on manpower. It is estimated that all Mobile Construction Battalions in the future will be given approximately the same manpower compliment as MCB-8 so that construetion of the housing units may be finished as soon as possible.
Also during the inspection, CDR R. G. Wetherell, Commanding Officer, MCB-8 stated that some units would be ready for occupancy shortly. However, no definite date was given. As well as the units which will be ready to move into shortly, it is estimated that several more will be completed and ready for occupancy by the time MCB-8 completes the current operation in Cuba.
The Villamar project, which is the number one project on MCB-8's Construction Plan for- this operation, has also received the aid of MCB-6 personnel who have been assigned three units as well as supplying needed manpower for MCB-S.


Donor List Shrinks

According to Chief Hospital Corpsman S. E. Reddick, volunteer blood donors are still critically needed to furnish blood in case of emergencies. Due to the small refrigeration facilities, a large supply of blood can not be kept on hand, and the only supply of blood which can be obtained in an emergency is from the blood donor list. At the present time, this list is far from being adequate in case of an emergency.
All Blood Types are needed, particularly those of Type "0" Negative; "B" Negative; and Type "AB" Negative.
Anyone wishing to help in this critical situation can help by reporting to the Clinical Laboratory, 0800 to 1630, Monday through Friday. If your type of blood is on hand in a sufficient supply, you will be placed on the "blood donor list," and when a need arises, you will be called upon to donate blood. All personnel of all commands are urged to respond to this need.


The deer season, which has been underway for the past 10 weeks, and according to reports has been very successful, will end at midnight on March 31st. All deer hunters who, as yet, have not been fortunate enough to "get your buck" still have 18 days to try with the buckshot or bow and arrow. Either can be used.
Another 18 days remain, too, for the four month season of duck hunting in Guantanamo Bay. Although duck hunting in the area has been under par in comparison with past years, it still proves to be an interesting and exciting way to spend an afternoon.
For those who would rather hunt guinea hens or Doves, the season remains open somewhat longer. Guinea hunting will be allowed until May 1st, and the dove season remains open indefinitely, at the discretion of the Base Game Warden, Colonel John B. Hill, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks.
The Naval Base has been divided into three areas to simplify hunting operations. Area number three is located on North Toro Cay. Number four consists of the land east of the Guantanamo River, and area five extends west of the Guantanamo River to the boundary fence.
Permits for hunting may be obtained by visiting the office of the Assistant Base Warden, Room 210, Naval Base Administration Building. A limited supply of twelve and sixteen gauge shotguns is available at the Ordnance Depot, and may be checked out by approval of a request submitted to Lt. E. A. Sandness, Naval Station Special Services Officer.
There are 23 voluntary Deputy Game Wardens and Game Wardens on the Naval Base. At least one Deputy Game Warden must accompany each party of two men on a hunting trip.
Approximately 168 hunting permits were issued during the months of January and February, 1954, proving that both base and fleet personnel are quick to enjoy the benefits and spoils of hunting in Cuba.
More information may be obtained by visiting the office of the Assistant Base Game Warden, LCDR J. W. Richmond, or calling 8-390. Good hunting!


SLOGAN WANTED
I I
"All the news that's fit to o print," is known all over the
world as the slogan of the
New York Times.
What about a suitable
slogan for the Indian?
Your idea, if adopted, may
be worth $5 to you. Send your suggestions to the Indian Editor, Special Services Department, N a v a 1 Station,
prior to 20 March 1954.

b |


Inspection 'Highly Satisfactory'

General Lemual C. Shephard, Jr., Commandant, U. S. Marine Corps, made an official inspection of the Marine Barracks here Wednesday and Thursday and observed that the all-around conditions and operations were "highly satisfactory."


'Paint Your Wagon'

Plays Here Tues.

The Touring Players Company of New York will present the Broadway musical comedy, "Paint Your Wagon," Tuesday evening at the Naval Station movie lyceum.
The musical enjoyed an extremely successful Broadway run and the original cast was composed of James Barton, Olga San Juan and Tony Bavaar. Dances were arranged by Agnes DeMille and the music was written by Frederick Loewe.
Highlighting the music are such selections as "I Talk to the Trees," "They Call the Wind Maria" and "Wand'rin' Star."
The Touring Players Company is in its eighth season of presenting successful Broadway hits throughout the United States and the Caribbean area. The Company is the first repertory company of its kind to be sponsored by the American National Theatre Association which has been chartered by the Congress of the United States.
The Company is presently presenting such shows as "Finian's Rainbow," "Private Lives," "Light Up the Sky." "The Skin of Our Teeth" and "Paint Your Wagon" to audiences in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

I In deference to the Touring Players Company of New York and their presentation of "Paint Your Wagon" TuesI day night at the Naval j Station movie lyceum, the
Little Theatre organization I has postponed its Tuesdays
night's presentation of "Mr.
Barry's Etchings" and will extend their play through Saturday night. All Tuesday night tickets for "Etchings"
will be honored Saturday
night.


Canadian Frigate

Visits Guantanamo

The HMS New Glascow, a frigate of the Canadian navy, arrived here in Guantanamo Bay, Thursday, 11 March, at 0800. The frigate, which is equivalent in size and mission to a destroyer escort in the United States Navy, will be in this area for a period of five days. The New Glascow, commanded by CDR A. Larue, will depart from Guantanamo Monday, 15 March at 0500.


This was the general's first visit to the Naval Base since being appointed as Marine Commandant on January 1, 1952. A previous visit was made several years ago. He is the Marine Corps' 20th commandant.


General Shephard entered the Corps in 1917 and has had a colorful career. During World War II he commanded the famed 6th Marine Division and the 9th Marine Regiment.
Just prior to his appointment as commandant, General Shephard was the Commanding General, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific. He succeeded General Clifton B. Cates as Commandant.
The General arrived at the Naval Air Station Wednesday evening and left for Key West Thursday noon.
The following dispatch was received Thursday afternoon by Col. John B. Hill, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks: From: Commandant, Marine Corps To: Commanding Officer, Marine
Barracks
Desire to extend heartiest congratulations on fine appearance and smart bearing your command X Marine Barracks, Gtmo. maintains high standards on which Marine Corps recognition is based X Shephard sends.


'Power for Peace'

Armed Forces Day Theme
President Eisenhower has proclaimed Saturday, May 15, 1954, as Armed Forces Day-a day devoted to honoring the men and women of the Armed Forces for their contributions to the preservation of personal freedom as a "power for peace."








Pe TwT


Editorial Office, 11. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9-615
Saturday, 13 March 1954
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff

U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT william R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sadness - Officer-Advisor
H. E. Davis, JOC ------------------- Editor
H. L. Sisson, J03 --------------------News
Jerry Lewis, 03 ----------------- Features
3. C. Dierks, J03 ------------------- Sports
Pierce Lehmbeck -------------------Sports
F. L. Cannon, JOSN----Photographer R. Naccarato, SN ---------------- Make-p
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.



TEENAGE-ROUND-UP
by Barbara Burke and Linda Thurston

This week with heavy hearts again we will have to say farewell to two of Gtmo's hipsters. These kats, in the persons of Jim Stuchel and Margo (from Bargo) Anderson, have made life pleasantly bearable during their stay in Cuba.
Margo has been with us for quite a while now and in her own inimitable way has always managed to start things swinging when the going got too dull. Among her various offices she holds the titles to being a cheerleader, a yearbook staff member, an Arrow staff member, a basketball and baseball enthusiast, an outstanding pool shark, and a wonderful girl.
Rounding out his two year stay, Jimmy will long be remembered for his fabulous monologues on his travels and experience in Gtmo. and for his rendition of "Hot Toddy". He was voted to be the best dancer in the high school and was the basketball manager last year. His rub-downs and his famous voice will long be remembered.
They will depart on Tuesday of this coming week, so good luck and Auf Wiedersehen.
Last week the B.A.A. came to life and gave a frantic hay ride. Starting at six-thirty, the merry makers departed from the N.B. School and headed for Windmill Beach. Thanks to the sponsorship of Mr. McGill and the truck drivers Pete Broughton and Jim Boone, the affair was a smash success.
DID YOU SEE: The pleased smiles on the faces of the high school kats as they swept the F.T.G. Trainers in the basketball game last week ... Eddie Stafford at the B.A.A. session . . . George at the N.A.S. movie . . . J. P. receiving an intriguing letter?

We finally found out what happens to your lap when you stand up-it retreats to the rear and pops up under an assumed name.

This Navy life is beginning to tell on me. Every day I look more like my identification card.


* a


ii


The young fellow holding a birthday cake on his lap is Henry Remere Greaves, who has reason to celebrate his second birthday. He is recovering from a severe kidney ailment, Nephrosis, a condition which hospital authorities stated could be fatal. Henry was brought to Guantanamo six weeks ago from Port-Au-Prince, Haiti, where his father, George Greaves, is with the Mutual Security Administration. Helping George celebrate are Mrs. Lillian North, left, and Mrs. Ralph Sierra, both Nurses Aides. Henry is well on the road to recovery and according to hospital authorities will be sent home soon.


NSO Supply Line


CDR and Mrs. J. W. Graham, along with Lynne and Billy, are anticipating a cruise on the Thomas this June. CDR Graham has received orders to report to the Ordnance Supply Office, Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania. Our new Executive Officer will be CDR Charles E. Lee who is presently on duty at the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts. CDR and Mrs. Lee and their two children will occupy quarters on Radio Point.
LCDR A. D. Suslick, our Material Division Officer, has received orders to report to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in May. His relief will be LT Philip D. Larson who is presently on duty at the Naval Supply Center, Oakland, California. Mrs. Larson and their three children will join her husband in Guantanamo as soon as housing becomes available.
Many transfers at the Depot this past week: Phillip Rongo, SN, and Donald J. Peterson, SN, are going to the USS Harwood now at Newport, Rhode Island; Roy F. Benfield, SK2 reports to Naval Air Station, Patuxent River, Maryland; Peter J. McGuire DKSN, to the USS Missouri; Marvin F. Mozee, GS-3, to the USS Gyatt, now at Norfolk, Virginia; Charles V. Clevenger, SK3, to the Naval Receiving Station, San Diego, California.
Welcome to Charles D. Hayman, DKSN, who reported in to the Depot for duty from the USS Rankin. Hope you enjoy your tour of duty here at Gtmo.
Laymond Burton, ENFN, became the proud papa of Rebecca Lynn, born on 3 March in Tucson, Arizona.
A speedy recovery is wished for Chief McGee now in the hospital.
A farewell get together was held for Mrs. Virginia Wallace, Fiscal Accounting Clerk, who resigned to return to the States with her husband who is being separated from the Navy. Good luck to the Wallaces who are planning on living on


The Lucky
by Betty Radcliffe

Mrs. Joseph W. Valia Annapolis is visiting her Mrs. E. B. Taylor. Mrs. arrived on the base with h ter and will be here unti June. Hope you enjoy y here Mrs. Valiant.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Shepp to Havana last week to Mrs. Sheppard's aunt, Mr Dias of Rodrigues who hospitalized in Havana months. After spending in Havana they drove Clara where they took p large family re-union. T Mrs. Juana Dias at her Guantanamo and returne base.
If you haven't seen Haitian Room at the Nav Family Restaurant you s it. This room is very attra quite unique in decoratio ing the walls are two v paintings done by Mrs. C only is the Haitian Room to look at; it is also air co Whether you eat in the the Haitian Room, you wi meals delicious. Each ni is a Special on the menu lieve me those Specials a special; for example, special is baked sugar ci with all the trimmings ai row night's menu is top roast sirloin of beef. Sou to me . . . oh yes, a wo wise . . . ry their famo chiff on pie.


their farm in Charlest nessee.
Mr. Joseph L. West assigned quarters in Ea Mr. West was recently n Plinia de los Santos of de Cuba.
Welcome to the new in the Fiscal Departm Jemima Sands and Mrs Marie Wilson. Mrs. Sands worked at Naval Supp Norfolk, Virginia. Mrs. a former employee of having worked here in 19


Sunday,-14 March 1954 Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630 Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930-2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic)


Bag The Chaplain's Corner
Have you ever noticed about
people that you can tell what they nt, from are like from what they like? daughter, Walk into a man's parlor and Valiant look at the magazines lying around. er daugh- Pick up a book or two off one of I May or the tables. Glance through the our visit music lying on top of the piano.
By that time you should have a ard drove fair idea of whether the man is a pick up 'highbrow' or a 'lowbrow'. s. Juana We are what we like. A strange had been thing about this question of taste for ten is that people tend to level off two days with what they like. You know to Santa how it is when you put a pan of art in a ice into a hot oven. The ice cools hey left the oven, but not before the oven home in has melted the ice; and when you d to the go back to the stove, you find a
pan of water exactly as warm as the new the air in the oven. il Station That's the way it is with marhould see ried people. After so many years ctive and of living together, the husband and n. Adorn- wife come to talk alike, think alike, ery nice even to look alike. It takes longer iase. Not in some cases, but give them enough pleasant time and they'll level off. aditioned.
Patio or That's important. It means that 11 find the the people and the things around rht there us have an influence on us, just and be- as we're bound to have an influence re pretty on them. It means that if we surtonight's round ourselves with cheap things, ired ham cheap books, vulgar pictures, or id tomor- foul mouthed friends we won't raise ped with them to our own level so much as nds good they'll pull us down to their own rd to the cheapness and vulgarity. On the us lemon other hand, if we have fine things,
good books, and good decent friends, it may well happen that they'll
keep us at their own level.
on, Ten- What is it that you like? What
are you after in life? You're drivhas been ing toward something; what is st Bargo. it? Is it money? Knowledge? arried to Power? We can give the answer Santiago to you in one word. a There is only one thing in life
employees worth our complete and wholeent; Mrs. hearted devotion. That is God. If
Audrey we seek Him morning, noon, and formerly night, if we serve Him and forget ly Depot, ourselves, we'll find a peace and joy Wilson is utterly beyond comparison with he Depot anything on this earth. 46 and 47. William J. Spinney


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 13 March 1954


Pa e Two


-








Saturday. 1, March 1954


Public Works Chips
by Vic. Gault

Continuing the description of Public Works Department functions on the base, an outline of the duties of the Grounds and Maintenance Section is in order. The Grounds and Maintenance Section of the Buildings and Grounds Branch is charged with the responsibility of performing all landscaping and plant nursery work and maintenance such as mowing of lawns, cutting grass and brush around public quarters and Government buildings and structures, as well as maintenance of such public or base flower gardens that may be designated. This section maintains a plant nursery, supervised by Mr. Marcelo Cano, which is located in the golf course area, and reasonable quantities of plants and shubberies are issued to residents of the base for the purpose of beautification of the premises around their assigned quarters, upon request. Authorization for obtaining plants and shubberies from the nursery may be requested from Mr. E. Noel, Assistant Foreman, PW, whose office is located in the Maintenance Division Field Office, Building No. 13. Top soil, when available for issue, may also be obtained for the same purpose of building up and beautifying premises, and maintaining vegetable gardens where yard space permits. Issuance of top soil is not a practice of the department when large projects and constructions are underway, and issuance of plants and shubbery is curtailed to some extent at times, particularly when the "Dry Season" sets in and there is a scarcity of rain.
One of the sections under the Maintenance Division which performs duties on a continuing 7-day week basis is the Refuse Disposal Plant Section. This section collects and disposes of garbage and general refuse throughout the Base with the exception of the Marine Barracks and Naval Air Station which perform collecting functions only. All refuse is disposed of at sanitary fill operated by this section. For the purpose of handling the garbage there are assigned at present seven dump trucks and two Garbage Dumpster trucks.
The Carpentry Branch, under the supervision of a Chief Quarterman, is divided into the following two sections CARPENTRY SHOP SECTION-The carpentry Shop Section repairs and renovates furniture and fabricates all mill work required by the Construction and Maintenance Section. This section maintains a group for minor repairs of an out-side emergency nature and a Shop Stores (now under the cognizance of the Materials Branch, PWD) for the issuance of standard and special items. This section handles all glass work for the Public Works Department. All minor repairs of power tools and the sharpening of saws for the Seabees and other divisions of the department are handled by this section.


Chaplain Stephenson New

Toastmaster President

Toastmasters Club No. 92 last week elected CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN as president for the coming six months. Chaplain Stephenson succeeds CDR J. N. Lawlor.
Other officers elected include R.


Policy Committee MCB Driver Makes Music


Guides 'Indian'

An editorial council formed for the purpose of improving the Indian has been quietly functioning since 1 December 1953. Though much remains to be accomplished, the once-anemic Base newspaper is showing signs of new life, and an increasing number of complaints is being received from those who fail to receive a copy.
CDR V. J. Soballe, Executive Officer of the Naval Station, is chairman of the council, which also functions as a program committee for WGBY, and includes Chaplain M. 0. Stephenson, CDR J. N. Lawlor, Public Works Officer, and H. P. McNeal, Base Industrial Relations Officer.
A subcommittee of the council, headed by Mr. McNeal, a former newspaper editor, includes representatives from Base commands, as follows:
CDR R. C. Spears, VU-10, LCDR I. V. King, Naval Hospital, LT L. B. Dalton, Fleet Training Group, CAPT W. E. Kerrigan, Marine Barracks, LTJG R. G. Whitman, Naval Supply Depot, CWOHC T. K. Dote, Dental Clinic and CHGUN J. D. Sentz, Naval Air Station.
The sub-committee convenes at least once a month to discuss Indian improvements with Editor H. E. Davis, JOC.
Out of the discussions have grown a greater proportion of local news in the Indian, better news coverage of all commands, and a larger newspaper. Recently six pages, the Indian will be expanded to eight pages at an early date.
Readers of the Indian may also share in the improvement campaign. News tips, passed promptly to any member of the Indian subcommittee, or Editor Davis at 9-615, can be a major contribution.

Meetings. . .

Time & Place

Fleet Reserve Association ------2000; 2nd & 4th Tuesday each
month
Community Auditorium
Ladies' Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association ------------------2000; 2nd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Room, Community
Auditorium
Little Theatre Group ----------2000; 1st Tuesday each month
Marina Point
Hospital Service Volunteers ---1000; 2nd Tuesday each month
Hospital Medical Library
American Legion Auxiliary, Unit One -----------------------1930; 3rd Tuesday each month
Girl Scout Hut, Marina Point Toastmasters Club No. 92 ---1930 each Thursday, Officers Club dining room. Toastmasters Club No. 113 --1900 each Thursday, Marine Family Restaurant.
J. Hummel, First Vice-President, LCDR R. J. Mathews, Second VicePresident, John L. Sanborn, Secretary-Treasurer (re-elected), D. B. Powers, Sergeant at Arms, E. H. Cavanaugh, Deputy Governor, and L.P. Goldman, Educational Chairman.
Membership in Toastmasters Club 92 is open to officers and civilian employees with officers club privileges. The organization, which seeks improvement in public speaking, meets each Thursday evening at 1930 in the Officers Club dining room.


With Drums and Gloves


Big Huebie Herbert has a mighty useful pair of hands.
As a boxer, his hands have brought him several titles, including two All-Navy; as a musician, his hands have plucked string bass with two name bands; and in the Navy his hands carry out his rate of driver, second class in the Seabees.
Huebie is a big fellow. Stands a massive six feet, weighs in at 246 pounds (but his fighting weight is down near 220) and has a shirtsplitting chest girth of 54 inches. He was born 26 years ago in Campbell, Ohio, a suburb of Youngstown. In 1943, at the age of 15, he joined the Navy. "It's O.K. to tell that now", he said.
His first bout in the Navy was in 1946 at Pearl Harbor, where he battled his way to heavyweight championship of Pearl Harbor. In 1947 he won the Golden Gloves tournament there and later that year the Amateur Athletic Union crown. Still later in the year, at San Diego, he copped the All-Navy title. He repeated in 1948 with another All-Navy title and in the spring of 1948 he was sent to Boston to try out for the Olympic boxing team. He encountered little difficulty and went to London with them. There he fought four bouts


and was up to the semi-finals when he lost on a decision to "Chuck" Catzoni, of Sweden.
"The worst part of that" he recalled, "was that when I got home they were showing the fights in the newsreels. I had one friend who wanted to take .me to the movies all the time, just so I could see myself take a tumble."
Since the Olympics he has kept up his collection of titles, including Guam (1949) Japanese Fleet (1949) and in 1950 Pawtuxent River Naval Command and the Severn River Naval Command. By this time he was back in the U.S. on shore duty at Washington, D. C. He was loaned to the Marines at Quantico for awhile, for a series of exhibition bouts at high schools throughout the country. In 1952 he was put out of action for the season by a broken fist, but was back in action in 1953 with six bouts at the Receiving Station in Washington. In October 1953 he was assigned to MCB-6 for duty.
His bass playing took place with Big Jay McNealy's band in 1949, while he was at San Diego. He played with the band on weekends and made two records on the Alladin label, "Deacon's Hop" was one and the other a blues, "Dreamed Last Night" featured him as vocalist. After playing with Big Jay for six months he went with Spade Cooley at Cooley's ballroom, the Santa Monica, Ballroom, in city of Santa Monica, Cal. That lasted for three months before he was assigned to the East coast. He is now playing in the MCB-6 band as a drummer in the military band and plucking the string bass in the jazz combo.
The thought of turning professional boxer has often crossed his mind, but he states that he is going to take the advice of the CO of MCB-6, CDR P.J. Simmons, and keep his fighting on an amateur basis. "I have given it a lot of thought," he said "and the best thing to do is stay with the Seabees. The fight game can be a pretty dirty business if you're not careful."


f: 4


The champion women's bowling team of the Naval Base were presented trophies at a luncheon held at the Officers' Club last week. Left to right, the champion team-Emily Griffin, Betty Callan, Barbara McCollum, Nita Hayden, Sally Cohanski and Ruth McGowan.


THE INDIAN


Page Three


Saturday 13 March 19 4







THE INDIAN


Saturday, 13 March 1954


Leathernecks Snare Cage Title;


Defeat Trainers In Clincher


The Marine Leathernecks marched to their first league title Thursday night as they defeated the Fleet Training Group in a wild rout, 74-32.
The Leathernecks, who led the Naval Base Cagers from the very first night of play, had to bear down in the second round to edge out a dark horse group of Flyers from the Naval Air Station who won 12 straight games after an uneasy 'start. The Leathernecks clinched the title as they defeated the Trainers to leave no possible way for the Flyers to better their record of 14 wins and 2 losses. At the time of this writing the Flyers still had one game remaining on their schedule, and that one against the sizzling Corpsmen of the Naval Hospital.
In the Leatherneck - Trainer game, the league-leaders bounced off in typical championship form to a first quarter lead of 34-5 and simply coasted through the last three sessions as their entire bench showed in the scoring book.
Androvich and Gatti led the winners with 17 and 16 respectively.
BRAVES SWAMP PIRATES
In the opening game Thursday night, the Naval Station Indians had little trouble in defeating the Pirates of the Naval Base School, 75-47.
The game was highlighted by the halftime ceremonies in which the Pirates crowned lovely Miss Pat Wormwood queen of their 1954 basketball season.
The pace of the game itself was
burning from the very beginning N.
as the Braves pressed it all the way. Only in the closing minutes Maddix (6) of the Hospital did they let up to coast to the Corpsmen lofts one in from tho victory, asd side for two points in a recent
Bradford and Royal led the win- game with the FTG Trainers. ners with 15 each. Teammates Hart and O'Brien await
For the losing Pirates Heimer a possible rebound with Trainers and Stafford led the way with 13 Marino (14), Schub (11), and Coland 12 respectively. lins (5). The Medics trounced FTG
MEDICS OVER MALLARDS by a 78-44 margin.
Monday night in the opening
game of this, the last week of Basketball Ballet
league play, the Naval Hospital Corpsmen erased the VU-10 Mallard's hopes of snatching third place from them as they defeated the Mallards, 58-44.
The Corpsmen opened the contest by proving that the age old fundamentals of the game are still just as good as ever as they scored in amazing mechanical form to register a first quarter lead of 20-9. However, the Mallards came alive in the second session to cut the Medic lead to 10 and in the third quarter they almost overtook them only to fall behind in the fourth to take the dubbing.
This loss dropped the Mallards into a two way tie for fourth place with the Naval Station Indians.
Glenn Hallum led the winners as he dumped 17 followed by Bonkamp with 14 and Mulvihill with 11.
PIRATES EDGE TRAINERS
In the second game Monday night, the Naval Base High School, led by the 26 point performance of center Edgar Heimer, edged the Fleet Training Group in the closing minutes of play, 63-57.
The Pirates were trailing at
halftime by a 27-25 margin and at A bit of basketball ballet is the end of the third session they demonstrated for a mystified Malhad fallen behind 48-43. Then, in lard, Bob Howerton, by high scorthe fourth quarter they opened up ing forward Glenn Hallum-who with everything to move ahead of hsmre points than an angry the Trainers and enter the three- porcupine-in the Hospital rout of minute period leading by two the Mallards Monday night. points. Here, the break came as the Bucs hit four successive times home standing Marine Leatherfrom the charity line while holding necks added another win to their
Aiding Heimer in his 26 point bag of plenty as they downed the spree was Lehmbeck with 11 fol- SeaBees of MCB-8, 63-56. lowed by Stafford and McGill with The Leathernecks, after pushing 1owe by to a 40-24 halftime lead, had to
10 each. come back with every effort to
MARINES DOWN SEABEES keep down the frequent SeaBee
The scene shifted to the Marine uprisings in the closing sessions. Site cage Tuesday night, where the These uprisings brought the Sea-


Mallard team captain Huber (9) goes up and over Corpsmen defenses as he attempts to sink one from the outside in the week's opener Monday night. Standing by to snare a possible rebound are the Corpsmen's Hart
(20), O'Brien (7) and Mulvihill in deep background. Lockhart of the Mallards is also in the background. The Corpsmen took the contest, 58-44.


Ladies Golf Club










C. I


Bees to within one point of the winning Leathernecks on several occasions during the fourth quarter, but they faltered in the closing minutes to take the loss.
Androvich led the winners as he ripped the cords for 26 markers. He was followed by Gatti and Murrell with 11 each.
FLYERS SWAMP DENTAL
In the second game, the NAS Flyers went all out to defeat the Dental Clinic, 72-36, as they held league scoring leader Paul King to 8 points.
The Flyers, using a tight manto-man defense, placed defensive star Jackson on the Clinic pride and kept him tied down throughout the tilt. Meanwhile, Jackson, Allen and Hollowell were providing the needed scoring punch as they sank 16, 16 and 14 in that order.


4


Top 10


Team Dental NavSta High Sch Marines Marines FTG NAS NAS
ornies Hospital


Player King Brodford Hel mer Androvich Gatti Collins Hollowell Jackson Murrell Bomkarnp


Scores
FG FT TP AVG.
1r, 74 304 190 101 68 270 16.9 ool 92 45 228 14.:
91 41 226 14.1 82 41 205 12.8 81 41 203 12.7 81 37 198 12.4 67 31 167 15.2 53 51 157 9.8 67 15 149 9.9


Cage Standings
Team Won Lost GB
Marines ------ 14 2
NAS ---------- 12 3 11/2
Hospital ------- 10 5 3%
NavSta -------- 10 6 4
VU-10 --------- 9 6 4
MCB-7-8 -------- 7 8 6
FTG ----------- 5 11 9
High School ___- 3 13 11 Dental --------- 0 16 14


Page Four







Saturday, 6 March 1954


THE INDIAN


1,500 Boxing Fans

Witness Smoker


10 Bouts on Card
Over 1,500 fans were witness tthe first smoker since 1951 presented by the Naval Base last Saturday night in Fleet Recreation Area. Sponsored by the Naval Station Special Services Department the card featured nine bouts plus an exhibition fight by two professionals.
Two KO's
Two straight knock-outs and three TKO's highlighted the evening. Montgomery, 180, from VU-10, floored his opponent, Carleton, from the USS Salem in 1:20 of the second round and Kalegeros, 135, from The USS Nawman iced Vezina from USS Salem also in the second.
In the first bout Carnahan, 126, from USS Eaton, won a unanimous decision over Davis, 125, USS Nawman.
In the second attraction Carioscia, 125, USS Eaton, come out on top of a split decision over Richardson, 128, from the USS Eaton.
Three TKO's
The fourth fight was stopped in 55 seconds of the 2nd round and Reichel, 145, USS Salem, was declared the winner over Weathers, 147, USS Bache.
A bad cut over the eye gave Hoffer, 150, USS Salem, the decision over Watters, 148, USS Salem in 59 seconds of the second round of the 5th attraction.
Jakubek, 156, USS Basilone, was declared the winner in 1:10 of the second round over Henry, 145, USS Salem.
Fuller, 158, USS Salem, outpointed Nott, 160, USS Salem in the 7th bout of the night.
The referee, Henry Garcia, stopped the 8th bout in 50 seconds of the first round and declared Henderson, 165, USS Bache, the winner over Morris, 178, from the USS Eaton.
Exhibition Climax
The exhibition fight, the last of the card for the night, was a no-decision fight between "Monk" Reynolds a professional boxer from the USS Antietam and Pirina of the Italian Navy. Both boys showed they were well versed in giving and taking leather, and the exhibition was the highlight of the evening bringing the near capacity crowd in the stands to its feet many times during the three 3-minute rounds.
LT E. A. Sadness, Special Services Officer of the Naval Station, stated that attempts will be made to make the smoker a regular feature of the many recreational activities offered by the department.

Base Bowling


Standings

Team W
FTG #1 -------- 39
Hospital --------- 29
11th Division 26 MCB-8 #3 ------28
2nd Division - 24 MCB-8 #1 ------23
FTG #2 --------22
4th Division 22
1st Division - 20 5th Division - 18 ACFP ---------- 18
NSD ------------ 16
MCB-8 #4 ------ 11
Boatshed -------- 8
6th Division -- 11 MCB-8 #5 ------ 11
F.B.P. ----------- 5


L
3
4
18
14 15 16
20 20 19 15
24 23 25 25 31 25 31


Pts. 52
40 37 36 33 32 29 28 26 25
24 21 15
14 14 13
6


Ladies' Golf Shots
by Joyce Simmons

Once again, "Ol' Man Weather" rained us out of our weekly tournament, but thanks to the generosity of the CPO Club 15 of us gals held a much-needed business meeting on Wednesday morning.
First off, I'd like to say that I have been given the job of publicity-handling for the club, succeeding Mary Ann Pennell, and I hope that I can do as good a job of keeping you posted on what the ladies are doing on the golf course in the weeks to come. We missed out on the golf news last week, but we'll list the winners for you now in the "Blind Five" tournament of March 3rd. Five holes were picked at random by our tournament chairman, Jane McElroy, and each lady's score was compiled on the total score of those holes only. The winners: 1st Flight
-Corky Henning and Eloise Gushanas tied for gross score; Mary Ann Pennell and Ann Smith tied for net score; 2nd FlightMarion Caruthers, gross score and Edna Edwards, net score; 3rd Flight-Susan Strauss, gross score and Anita Roberts, net score.
It was agreed unanimously at the business meeting that we would have a Scotch foursome played the last Sunday of each month, the first scheduled for March 29th.
Once a month the ladies will play 18 holes instead of the usual nine. Alma McCracken will be in charge of making up the threesomes a week in advance. The threesomes will be arranged so that girls in Flight 3 will not have to play against Flight 1 which is made up of the more experienced golfer.
A Ringer tournament, wherein each person is allowed to better her score on each hole through continuous playing over a 2-month period, was agreed upon. We set an entrance fee of $1.00 per person with cash prizes being given for each flight.
Probably in May we will hold a championship tournament to determine the best woman golfer on the base.
In all of our weekly tournaments, as well as our more important individual tournaments, it was agreed that there will be no more "gimme's" even if there is only an inch to go. So, watch out, gals, every stroke counts from here on in.
We also decided to hold our business meetings quarterly at which time all dues will be paid in advance.
We would like to extend a welcome to three new members; Jane Gentry, Shirley Kretchmar and Toni Winslow bringing our current membership for the club to 26. The increased enthusiasm shown by our members is making us a bigger and better club every day. Keep it up, girls, and here's hoping you all win some new golf balls.



'Calling All Umpires'

Are you qualified as a baseball umpire, and can you use some extra money ?
If the answer to both of these questions is affirmative, you may be in line for a job as umpire during the baseball season which begins a few weeks hence.
Call LT E. A. Sandness, Special Services Officer, at 9-449 for additional information.


.4


Leather pushers slug it out at the recent smoker held at the Fleet Recreation Area. Ten bouts were featured. Two knock-outs and three TKO's highlighted the evenings performance. Smokers are being pushed as a regular feature of Naval Base recreation.


A:


Barry Emerson puts a new twist into an old game as he slides safely into first base a couple feet ahead of the ball during a Little League game between the Rains and the Tigers. Regular games are being played now at the Little League diamond in Villamar avery Saturday and Sunday afternoons. Daily practice is scheduled to begin as soon as enough coaches are available.


GTMO Golf Hi-Lites
by Wright North

The last match of the first round in the Intra-Command Golf League will be completed over this weekend. NAS meets Hospital-Dental today at 1300 with FTG vs NSD to follow. The eventual winner of the first round will be decided tomorrow morning when NavSta with 72 points bumps up against the 1953 winner, VU-10, who so far has only managed to get 67 1/2 points. The 4% points difference is hardly a safe margin since there are 24 points in each match, however, NavSta needing only 10 points tomorrow seems almost a certain winner.
In other matches last week, NavSta kept their edge on the rest of the teams by defeating FTG 18% - 5%. VU-10 could only garner 16 points from Hospital-Dental while NAS was beating NSD. All players should bear in mind that caddies are consigned to intracommand teams when desired on


Saturday and Sunday. It is requested that other players desiring a caddy plan their starting time on these days at a suitable hour.
Some greens and tees are now in the process of being re-topsoiled due to the recent rains. Please observe the tee markers which may be out in front of the regular tee and be careful when hitting to a green where several men are working. This work is necessary in order to improve playing conditions.
There are plans for additional tees on the 2nd, 5th, and 10th holes. The present 4th will be retained and conditioned as a ladies' tee when the new 4th is opened. This new tee may be seen now from the rear of No. 12 and when completed will be one of the more picturesque holes on the golf course.
He can still shake his head after seeing the yellow flowers grow overnight when they were cut the day before, and he says:
Remember the yellow flowers,
In all their glaze of spring;
'Tis better you have them along
with some grass,
Than not to have anything.


9


a


Page Five







THE INDIAN


Saturday, 13 March 1954


'The Little Theatre Pres

By John Hull

Seventeen times in the last five years, people on the Naval Base and in the fleet have seen the above four words, followed by the title of a famous play. Over 25,000 people have been entertained in that time by the unique organization since its first production early in 1948. That's a lot of people, a lot of plays and a lot of entertainment from a group of fewer than 40 military and civilian personnel-and all in their off-duty time!
Monday evening, March 15, at 8:00, the curtains will part in the Little Theatre atop Marina Point and the group's latest production will begin a five night run. A cast of 13 amateur thespians will be at their best in a side-splitting comedy entitled "Mr. Barry's Etchings".
The play's plot revolves around wood and plaster. It is 8 feet tall an eccentric engraver who decides including the section of wall built to improve the appearance of Gen- around it and weighs over 200 eral Grant on his own fifty dollar pounds! It takes eight men to bills and then use them to finance maneuver it into position from the the election of an honest town scenery storage room to the stage.
government. He becomes involved It is only one of hundreds of perwith crooks, magazine reporters, manent props built by members politicians and the members of his and now stored away for future own family in his efforts to give use along with such exotic items a "phoney" world some "phoney as four plaster statues, a complete
money". table setting for eight and costumes
"Mr. Barry's Etchings" was first of all periods.
presented on Broadway in 1950 and Many improvements to the buildbecame an immediate hit with Lee ing, once a mess hall, have been Tracy in the title role. The local made by the group. The stage was production features some fine act- lengthened four feet and fire-proof ing sparked by the Fleet Training curtains hung, a complete sound Group's Lee Douglas as Mr. Barry, system installed, two refreshment and a- wonderful supporting cast. bars built and plans are under conTickets ate being sold every day sideration to improve the building's in front of the Naval Station Ex- ventilation. Late last year most of change and may also be purchased the rooms used by the Little Theafrom any member of the Little tre were painted including the
Theatre or any evening during the "Green Room" (which is blue), run at the door of the Theatre. wardrobe rooms, makeup room and The cost-only seventy-five cents! lavatories.
And what do you get for your How does one become a member
money? The results of three of the Little Theatre? It's simple. months hard work by the cast plus Regular monthly business meetings some 30 supporting members and of the group are held on the first
friends of the Little Theatre. Their Tuesday of each month with all only desire is to give you a good members present. All you have to evening's entertainment and to do do is attend two consecutive regit properly, they will go to any ular monthly meetings and you are length. For instance, one of the automatically a voting member of props called for in "Mr. Barry's the Little Theatre. Etchings" is a huge, stuffed bird. Now that you are a voting memThere was no such animal here on ber you'll want to know something the base so one member was sent of the history and organization of to Guantanamo City in quest of the group. Briefly, the Little Theaone. Another looked in Jacksonville tre was established late in 1947 while on a round-trip flight. The with a $600 loan from Naval Staresult-two stuffed birds! tion Special Services. The loan was
For another play, an overly large paid off within a short time and and ornate fireplace was needed. the Little Theatre became an ladeMembers built it themselves from pendent, self-sustaining, non-profit


. . .


Rehearsing in front of the partially completed set, Don MacQuarrie and Betty Lou Tipler run through their lines under the watchful eyes of Director Jan Janicek (left) and Assistant Director Avril Clark.


organization. A Constitution was written by the membership and approved by the Commander Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay. Officers, including a President, Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer are elected and serve for a period of six months. No one in the organization, including its' officers, receives any kind of salary or imbursement for their services and all serve according to their position and the amount of time they can spare.
Members are selected for the many jobs necessary in the production of a play by a volunteer method. Aside from acting, you can pick any number of jobs including play reading, publicity, ticket sales, stage and property crews, costume and makeup work, promoting, directing and producing, just to name a few. Many members wear several different "hats" and still find time to take an acting part in the play currently in pro-


duction.
A member can rise to a job of any importance depending on his or her own ability and willingness to work. Take, for example, the Little Theatre's last President. His name was Bob Koppit, a petty officer third class, well known., and liked by hundreds of people all over the base for his work at the local Armed Forces Radio Station, WGBY.
He joined the Little Theatre early in 1951, volunteered for and won the job of Director of "Ten Little Indians". Next he played a leading role in "You Can't Take It With You". The group voted him to office as Vice President in January, 1953, and to the position of President in July of the same year. His many contributions to the Little Theatre will always be remembered and there will always will be a "Bob Koppit" in the group. Perhaps it's you!


... . .. . .. . .. .... . ..


Some members of the cast relax in the "Green Room", painted blue, while awaiting their calls to go on stage. Informal gatherings such as this are half the fun for Little Theatre members.


0


Betty Radcliffe shakes what must be her "executive finger" at Bob Gewertz in a scene from the play. Betty's name appears three times on the program-as Producer, publicity woman and "Mrs. Taylor" in the play.


4


Page Six


a


Pave Six


N ......







Saturday, 13 March 1954


THE INDIAN


U.S. Marines Are Classified As Pillagers And

Reactionaries By The Soviet Newspaper, Red Star

"Answers to questions from the readers"
WHAT DOES THE U.S. MARINE CORPS REPRESENT?
The following article was distributed, for information, as a memorandum from the Commanding General, 2nd MAW, to all Unit Commanders, recently. The article, which appeared in the Russian newspaper RED STAR on Dec. 2, 1953, was reprinted in its entirety in the Cherry Point WINDSOCK, and is published in the Indian at the request of the Marine Barracks.
Readers of "Red Star," V. Demedenko, V. Gusev, and A. Elisseev have asked the editor what the U. S. A. Marine Corps represents.
On the left side of the chest of every American Marine is worn an emblem of an anchor entwined with a chain covering the globe. This emblem serves as a reminder that the U. S. Marines have participated in marauding raids on all parts of
the world and have been called
upon to fulfill an important reac- and old people were shot by the tionary role in the realization of barbarians of the 1st Division of the criminal aggresive schemes of the Marine Corps. the American claimants to world According to information from a
domination. foreign press, the personnel of the
Standing as a safeguard for the U. S. Marine Corps during the peimperialists, the Marine Corps has riod of the Second World War were served in shameful dishonor the numbered at nearly half a million pillaging of weak countries, small men. At the present time the Mapeople and throttling of workers. rine Corps represents itself as one
The military command of the of the best trained constituent
U. S. A. glorifies the Marine Corps parts of the Armed Forces of the in every way possible, calling it U. S. A. In its composition are "the striking fist" and the "idol" included formations, units, schools, of the American Armed Forces. educational centers and numerous
The Marine Corps actually occupies other institutions of the Marine a special position in the U. S. Corps. Armed Forces. Fulfilling the pred- Marines Part of Navy
atory schemes of American im- The Marine Corps forms a part
perialism for almost a hundred of the Navy. The general command years it has participated in large of the Corps is given to a comand small plundering campaigns. mander directly subordinate to the During that period, detachments of Naval Ministry of the U. S. A. Acthe Marines have taken part in cording to a law enacted by the
more than 250 landing operations American Congress in 1952, a and punitive expeditions on foreign member of the command of the territories. Marine Corps will participate in
Halls of Montezuma the work of the Joint Chiefs of
In the years 1846-48, Marine Staff in the decisions of questions
Corps troops participated in a directly concerning the Marine pillaging war against the Republic Corps. The operational direction of of Mexico. As a result of that units of the Marine Corps is carwar Mexico lost half of its ter- ried out by the Naval commanders ritory. In 1904 the Marine Corps or Army formations to which have ritor Ina04thMarine, Cops been attached units of the Marine plundered Panama-in 1907, Hon- Crs
duras-in 1914, Haiti, and so forth Corps.
and s on.In its composition the Marine and so on. Corps has combat formations and
In 1900 the U. S. Marine Corps units, ship detachments and garwas used for the brutal suppres- rison forces. Marines Corps dision of an anti-imperialistic up- visions are assigned to combat rising in China. In 1918-20 the units and formations of the Corps. U. S. Marmie Corps was part of Included within itself are specialthe Armed Forces of the American yrandnanymnuisnd interventionists operating against ly trained infantrymen units and Soviet Russian Siberia and Far also separate units for different
East. Detachments of the Marine purposes. Division of the Marine Corps participated directly in the Corps are organized, trained and entire group of bloody punitv supplied to carry out landing they
exhiitios against bt peatve have, as a rule, light and medium exhibitions against the peaceful atley uigtepro fte
Soviet population. In his celebrated artillery. During the period of the letters to American workers in Second World War and especially
1918 V.I. Lenin wrote "Now the during the war in Korea, units of
American millionaires, these mo the Marine Corps were widely used ern slave holders, have opened an in land theaters of military operaespecially tragic page in the bloody tions. At present, they undergo history of bloody imperialis. " combat training to a program
The First U. S. Marine Division which provides for carrying out took an active part in the aggres- landing operations in conjunction took a active martin theragsn- with Army, Navy and Aviation; sive war of American imperialism the decision of questions connected against the Korean people. The with carrying out combat for the
path of the U. S. Marine Corps seizure of Naval bases and springis marked by the ashes of cities boards on foreign territories;
cent victims providing for combat activities of
the fleet from land. In such a way
Marine 'Barbarians' the instruction of the Marine Corps
Here is one of the examples of directly provides for its preparation atrocities of the American Marine for agressive predatory acts. Corps in Korea. In November of And Some Go To Sea
1950, falling back from the city of The sea detachments are comHagaru-ri under the blows of the posed of elements of the Marine troops of the Korean People's Corps working directly on ships.
Army and the Chinese Volunteers, All line ships, aircraft carirers, Marine soldiers set fire to all cruisers and several other ships city structures and drove away have such detachments. Among
with them thousands of peaceful their tasks are first of all: police dwellers. When the long column duties, careful guarding of imof defenseless people reached the portant centers of ships, shadowing city of Kotori a bloody reprisal personnel, and also carrying out was committed against them. Eight searches and arrests. thousand Korean women, children The garrison forces perform


guard of Naval bases and other Naval objectives and carry out police duty on their territories.
Corresponding with these tasks with which they are charged by the American military command, only the most "trustworthy" persons, from most point of view of the U. S. A. ruling circles are enlisted. Its personnel are made up, in the main, of people from 18 to 25 years old with good physical qualities and only those of Anglo.Saxon descent. Access to the Marine Corps is closed to all "not 100 percent American" and first of all to negroes. Personnel of the U. S. Marine Corps treat the other troops of the armed forces of the U. S. A. with arrogance and scorn. A military reviewer of the English paper "Daily Telegraph," Lt. Gen. Martin, characterizing the Marines, wrote: "The Marines treat soldiers of the Army and sailors with contempt."
Before being assigned to regular units, Marine personnel undergo thorough training. A significant number of the officer personnel are trained in the Naval Academy at Annapolis, which is well known as a hotbed of the most reactionary Naval officer cadres. Other officers are trained in Army, Aviation, and also special educational institutions of the Marine Corps. All privates receive their intial training at educational centers. One of the largest cadre training centers for Marines is Quantico (State of Virginia).
Hate Soviets
The American command conducts unbridled anti-Soviet propaganda among the Marines. They are educated in a spirit of hate toward the Soviet Union and its Armed Forces and the countries of the people's democracies and toward all who are progressive and anti-imprerialistic. They strive to poison the soldiers and officers of the Marine Corps with the venom of military ideology and to develop in them the lowest instincts and a thirst for looting and violence. A significant place in the ideological preparation of personnel is given to eulogizing the plunderising acts of the Marines. In program songs of the Marines are glorified the pirate raids accomplished by the Marines "from the Halls of Montezuma to the shores of Tripoli," that is, from Mexico to the coast of North Africa. Frightening nicknames are given to units of the Marines. For example, the 5th Regiment of the 1st Division is well known by the nickname of "Devil Dogs."
Lost 3000 At Inchon
The U. S. Marine Corps has not once lost a battle when faced with defenseless women and children, but the armed forces of fighters battling for their rights is a different matter, as the soldiers and officers of the 1st Marine Division experienced in the crashing blows of the brave Korean warriors. In battle near Inchon and Seoul -in 1950 the Marine Division lost nearly 3000 soldiers and officers killed and wounded. The Division took an especially heavy loss in the region of Chosin; Reservoir. In this battle, lasting from 25 November to 11 of December 1950, the Marine Division lost more than 6000 men killed and wounded. Besides, a large number of division personnel suffered from frost bite. The remainder of the division barely saved itself by escaping in ships. Or course, the American "propagandists" propose to belittle the losses of the Marines. Nevertheless it was noted in the report of the Senate Committee on Armed Forces


Affairs, "the low morale of the Marines is especially discouraging when one takes into consideration the distinctive espirit de corps peculiar to members of the Marine Corps which has, existed for a long time."
The ruling circles are trying to re-establish the lost "prestige" of the Marine Corps to an even greater degree, strengthening their role as a weapon in the hands of the warmongers.


Hospital Notes

Heirport News
During the past week, the following births were recorded: Joan Marie Lowd, daughter of EN2 and Mrs. John F. Lowd; Donna Lee Hicks, daughter of AN and Mrs. Elmer J. Hicks, Jr.; and John Michael Stanovich, son of AD1 and Mrs. John J. Stanovich.
CDR Miller Detached
CDR H. W. Miller (MC) USN, was detached from this command last Saturday, after serving thirteen months on board as Chief of Dependents Service. During this period, it is interesting to note that Dr. Miller personally delivered 124 babies. He goes to Philadelphia for separation, and will resume private practice in Lancaster, Pa.
Winners
The Hospital Golf Handicap Tournament came to a close last week, after keen participation from all sides. The champion was proclaimed as Glen D. Hallum, HM2, USN, and the Consolation Champion is LTJG Wade H. Williams, Jr. (MC) USNR.
Golden Gloves Champion
While it is conceded with pride that the athletes of the Naval Hospital have made a name for themselves this year, we have the further distinction of having in our midst a Golden Gloves Champion holding six titles. Vincent R. Salvati, HN, has fought 88 Golden Gloves fights. Of this total, he has won 81 and Lost 7 each of these seven losses being by a split decision. More unusual, he has never been knocked out or knocked down in the ring.
Salvati began boxing in regular amateur bouts in December 1949. Since then, he has been awarded the 1951 Outstanding Fighter Trophy in Albany, N.Y. for the Adirondack Division of the AAU; won the Base Boxing Championship in 1951 at the Naval Training Center in Bainbridge; was in the 1952 Olympic tryouts in Kansas City, but lost out by a split decision; won the 1952 Eastern Title in the Golden Gloves competitioncovering the entire eastern U.S.; and lost the 1953 National Golden Gloves Championship in Boston by a split decision. In addition, he is to be awarded a trophy, March 23rd of this year, for being the Outstanding Athlete in the Adirondack Section of New York.
The fighter is 21 years old, a native of Troy, N.Y., and married to the former Mary Ann Bayly of Troy, N.Y.
Bowling
With only six games to go, our Enlisted Bowling Team is battling for first place with Fleet Training Group in the inter-command Bowling Tournament. We have won forty out of a possible forty-five games. The reason for this success can be understood with a few figures: the team average to date is 161.1; during the past week, a high individual single of 237 was scored by Sam Poulton; and high individual triple of 623 by Tom Hart.


m


Page Seven








Navy-1ONDPPO-Gtmo.-4659B THE INDIAN Saturday, 13 March 1954


WGBY Hi-Lites
by John Hull

The first part of a special twoweek presentation, "The Moonstone", is offered on "Suspense" beginning Friday, 19 March at 8:30 P.M. "The Moonstone", by Wilkie Collins, has been called "the first and best detective story."
Peter Lawford stars as the young Englishman who follows the instructions of his uncle's will and delivers to his young, beautiful cousin a rare stone which carries with it the threat of death. The first program is concerned with "The Loss of the Diamond", and the closing episode reveals "The Discovery of the Truth".
The popular "Symphonette" begins a new season featuring Mishel Piastro and the "Symphonette Ensemble", on Sunday, March 21 at 12:30 P.M. The orchestra will offer on each program a movement from a favorite symphony or concerto, as well as orchestral arrangements of favorite piano pieces or opera scenes, with members of the Ensemble as solo artists.
Jeff Chandler stars in the "Family Theatre" presentation of the historic tale, "The Flying Dutchman", Sunday, 21 March at 7:00. It's the story of that colorful and imaginary character seen in fancy a thousand times by sailors and men of the sea from Iceland to the Cape, from Singapore to the New World, for the "Flying Dutchman" is destined, according to legend, to sail the seas forever. Lizbeth Scott is hostess for the broadcast.
Watch the daily program schedule in the "Papoose" for your favorite programs and any changes in the schedule presented each day over your local Armed Forces Radio Service Station WGBY, 1450 on your dial.

He had a good job but his wife complained because his average income was about midnight.
* * *
They've got a new accessory for a car. It's called a silencer. Fits right over your wife's mouth.
* * *
It takes the eye only one-fortieth of a second to wink . . . the world's quickest way to get into trouble.
4: * 4:
She first married a millionaire, then an actor, then a preacher, then an undertaker.
One for money, two for the show, three to get ready and four to go.


A Message From Garcia
by Henry Garcia

"EL GUAJIRO"
There is a working class in Cuba which is often highly sung by poets and exalted by the politicians in their campaigns. This class I am going to refer briefly to is the mass of countrymen ("Guajiros", as they are called in Cuba). The "Guajiro" is a picturesque character who lives in a humble grass shack, goes to bed at nine and gets up as soon as the roosters begin to crow. He plows the land, plants the different fruits and vegetables that he will later sell at a very cheap price in the city market, and raises fowl and cattle.
The environment in which he generally lives is very poor and unsanitary. His shack does not offer adequate protection against the inclemencies of the weather, and the furniture in his home is


MAQ0C nOUSW)GS

by Sgt. William J. McDowell, Jr., USMC

It is with a great deal of pleasure that we extend a HELLO to the SgtMaj's wife, Mrs. Patty M. Litzelman, upon her arrival here at Guantanamo Bay Cuba. We hope your stay will be filled with many pleasures and one that will bring many more new friends.
Welcome aboard is extended to Sgt. Bernard R. Lee, Pfe's Francis J. Thibeault, Gerald R. Reynolds. and Pvt's William Cooper, and Richard J. Taylor who arrived on the 6th of March on the Pvt William H. Thomas.
The Marine Basketball team held down first place with another victory last Tuesday night when they played MCB-8. Androvich the high scoring man of the Marine team boosted his standing by 26 points, 8 of which were scored in the first ininute of play.
The Marine Barracks baseball team held their first workout of the season last Friday afternoon with 30 candidates answering the initial first call.
The squad went through a two hour practice session under the guidance of player coach, Capt. C. S. Smith. The squad boasts of only two returning regulars from last years team which finished second in the standings. Captain Smith and Louie Romano, the clubs second leading hitter last year and third baseman.
HAVE YOU EVER WONDERED
WHY
The Marine Corps Emblem
In 1776 the coiled rattlesnake with the words "Don't Tread On Me" and today the eagle, Western Hemisphere, and fouled anchor. The eagle is symbolic of a military organization, the hemisphere of our service all over the world and the fouled anchor of our sea traditions.


reduced to a bed, a locker, a table, and two or three chairs. His family is a large one. The children go on horseback to a school many miles away, and there is a great pride in the family when "Juanito" reads in loud voice from a book or newspaper, because the poor parents had it the hard way and never had a chance to learn.
The Cuban countryman is honest, hard-working, and above all, romantic. When the moon is gleaming brightly and the breezes carry love messages between palm trees, the "Guajiro", a born-poet, plays the guitar and sings a love song to his wife. The "old woman", surrounded by eight or ten of their children, smiles happily while she makes coffee for her man. She walks slowly . . . because once again she expects to have a baby. . . .

You haven't really had a hangover until you can't stand the noise made by a Bromo-Seltzer.


MOVIES


VU-10 Prop Blast

The squadron received a draft of nine new men on 9 March to beef up the organization. They are Jack K. Campbell PN2 from Downers Grove, Illinois; Gilbert Lagassey, AD2, from Lewiston, Maine; Charles L. Sidwell from Granby, Massachusetts; Russell H. Anderson, AM2, from Seattle, Washington; Dale W. Mountford, AT3, from Tampa, Florida; William S. Morris, AKAN, from Majestic, Kentucky; Harold Johnson; TN, from Charleston, South Carolina; Jack L. Still, SN, from Detroit, Michigan; and William B. Landon, SA, from Forest, Ohio.
The Mallard golf team met and defeated the Hospital Sunday 6 March 16 to 8 which was not enough points to overtake the strong Naval Station team. LT Grego was spotted on the course Sunday either heckling VU-10 or just watching sonic good golf. The first half of the tournament championship will be decided Sunday 14 March when the Mallards play the Naval Station. Four (4 ) points separate the two teams. If the Mallards are to win, they must win decisively over Grego's team.
Due to shortage of hot scoop in the squadron, the following poem is published to give you a brief run down of our some 38 officers and 350 enlisted men: They were salesmen, merchants,
farmersSome are fresh from school
routine,
Some sold cars and gasoline.
Either there is a wife awaiting Who keeps up domestic pride . Or a sweetheart keeping vigil And those here in whom we confide.
So we are all like neighbors
Names like Frank and Bill and Jim
Who today are men of VU-10 And the Navy's proud of them.


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Saturday, March 13
PRISONERS OF THE CASBAH
Gloria Grahame Cesar Romero
When the Emir is killed by the Grand Vizier's henchmen, the Captain of the Guards, who vowed to protect the young princess, escapes with her to temporary safety. They find refuge in the Casbah and work hand in hand with a group of thieves against the traitor.
Sunday, 14 March
FIGHTING LAWMEN
Wayne Morris Virginia Grey
Western adventure in which a marshal attempts to protect the unworthy daughter of a bank robber.
Monday, 15 March
KID FROM LEFT FIELD
Dan Dailey Anne Bancroft
Young son of one-time great baseball players thru helpful hints from dad, helps team rise to firstrate form. Conflicts arise When team manager takes credit for lad's achievements.
Tuesday, 16 March
STEEL LADY
Rod Cameron Tab Hunter
A hostile sheik orders four aerial oil spotters in the Sahara Desert to leave what promises to be a rich oil deposit. Their plane is disabled and lands. Water runs low, and when they discover a German tank, they start for a French Army post 100 miles away.
Wednesday, 17 March
Devil's Canyon
Stephan McNally Virginia Mayo
Former U.S. Marshal kills two desperadoes in self-defense and is sentenced to prison. At prison he is mistreated by prisoners whom he had sent up while he was marshal.
Thursday, 18 March
SANGAREE
Fernando Lamas Arlene Dahl
General's daughter resents contents of father's will which turns over management of plantation to doctor. Daughter and sister-in-law are both in love with doctor.
Friday, 19 March THE BIG HEAT
Glenn Ford Gloria Grahame
Sergeant resigns from the police force when blocked by higher-ups in drive to clean up gang of racketeers but works against them from outside.


Navy--10NDPP0-Gtmno.-689B


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 13 March 1954




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9& Vol. VI, No. 36 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 13 March 1954 ComCBLant Praises Deer Season Ending; Marine Corps Commandant Cites Villamar Progress Bird Hunting Continues The Villamar Replacement Housing Unit, which has been acclaimed as one of the largest peacetime projects ever undertaken by SeaBees, with the one exception of a very similar housing unit on Guam, received a vital "shot in the arm." Saturday, after CAPT W. B. Short, Commander, Construction Battalions, Atlantic Fleet had completed the inspection of projects of both MCB-6 and MCB-8, he addressed the latter battalion at their personnel inspection. He said that construction progress on the Villamar Housing Unit was "marvelous" and that it had "shown much improvement" since his last visit here in September 1953. This increase and improvement in production on the housing units has been largely due to the fact that MCB-8 arrived here in Guantanamo 30 percent over quota on manpower. It is estimated that all Mobile Construction Battalions in the future will be given approximately the same manpower compliment as MCB-8 so that construction of the housing units may be finished as soon as possible. Also during the inspection, CDR R. G. Wetherell, Commanding Officer, MCB-8 stated that some units would be ready for occupancy shortly. However, no definite date was given. As well as the units which will be ready to move into shortly, it is estimated that several more will be completed and ready for occupancy by the time MCB-8 completes the current operation in Cuba. The Villamar project, which is the number one project on MCB-8's Construction Plan for this operation, has also received the aid of MCB-6 personnel who have been assigned three units as well as supplying needed manpower for MCB-8. Donor List Shrinks According to Chief Hoipital Corpsman S. E. Reddick, volunteer blood donors are still critically needed to furnish blood in case of emergencies. Due to the small refrigeration facilities, a large supply of blood can not be kept on hand, and the only supply of blood which can be obtained in an emergency is from the blood donor list. At the present time, this list is far from being adequate in case of an emergency. All Blood Types are needed, particularly those of Type "0" Negative; "B" Negative; and Type "AB" Negative. Anyone wishing to help in this critical situation can help by reporting to the Clinical Laboratory, 0800 to 1630, Monday through Friday. If your type of blood is on hand in a sufficient supply, you will be placed on the "blood donor list," and when a need arises, you will be called upon to donate blood. All personnel of all commands are urged to respond to this need. The deer season, which has been underway for the past 10 weeks, and according to reports has been very successful, will end at midnight on March 31st. All deer hunters who, as yet, have not been fortunate enough to "get your buck" still have 18 days to try with the buckshot or bow and arrow. Either can be used. Another 18 days remain, too, for the four month season of duck hunting in Guantanamo Bay. Although duck hunting in the area has been under par in comparison with past years, it still proves to be an interesting and exciting way to spend an afternoon. For those who would rather hunt guinea hens or Doves, the season remains open somewhat longer. Guinea hunting will be allowed until May 1st, and the dove season remains open indefinitely, at the discretion of the Base Game Warden, Colonel John B. Hill, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks. The Naval Base has been divided into three areas to simplify hunting operations. Area number three is located on North Toro Cay. Number four consists of the land east of the Guantanamo River, and area five extends west of the Guantanamo River to the boundary fence. Permits for hunting may be obtained by visiting the office of the Assistant Base Warden, Room 210, Naval Base Administration Building. A limited supply of twelve and sixteen gauge shotguns is available at the Ordnance Depot, and may be checked out by approval of a request submitted to Lt. E. A. Sandness, Naval Station Special Services Officer. There are 23 voluntary Deputy Game Wardens and Game Wardens on the Naval Base. At least one Deputy Game Warden must accompany each party of two men on a hunting trip. Approximately 168 hunting permits were issued during the months of January and February, 1954, proving that both base and fleet personnel are quick to enjoy the benefits and spoils of hunting in Cuba. More information may be obtained by visiting the office of the Assistant Base Game Warden, LCDR J. W. Richmond, or calling 8-390. Good hunting! SLOGAN WANTED "All the news that's fit to print," is known all over the world as the slogan of the New York Times. What about a suitable slogan for the Indian? Your idea, if adopted, may be worth $5 to you. Send your suggestions to the Indian Editor, Special Services Department, N a v a l Station, prior to 20 March 1954. Guantanamo Marine Barracks Inspection 'Highly Satisfactory' General Lemual C. Shephard, Jr., Commandant, U. S. Marine Corps, made an official inspection of the Marine Barracks here Wednesday and Thursday and observed that the all-around conditions and operations were "highly satisfactory." 'Paint Your Wagon' Plays Here Tues. The Touring Players Company of New York will present the Broadway musical comedy, "Paint Your Wagon," Tuesday evening at the Naval Station movie lyceum. The musical enjoyed an extremely successful Broadway run and the original cast was composed of James Barton, Olga San Juan and Tony Bavaar. Dances were arranged by Agnes DeMille and the music was written by Frederick Loewe. Highlighting the music are such selections as "I Talk to the Trees," "They Call the Wind Maria" and "Wand'rin' Star." The Touring Players Company is in its eighth season of presenting successful Broadway hits throughout the United States and the Caribbean area. The Company is the first repertory company of its kind to be sponsored by the American National Theatre Association which has been chartered by the Congress of the United States. The Company is presently presenting such shows as "Finian's Rainbow," "Private Lives," "Light Up the Sky." "The Skin of Our Teeth" and "Paint Your Wagon" to audiences in San Juan, Puerto Rico. In deference to the Touring Players Company of New York and their presentation of "Paint Your Wagon" Tuesday night at the Naval Station movie lyceum, the Little Theatre organization has postponed its Tuesday night's presentation of "Mr. Barry's Etchings" and will extend their play through Saturday night. All Tuesday night tickets for "Etchings" will be honored Saturday night. Canadian Frigate Visits Guantanamo The HMS New Glascow, a frigate of the Canadian navy, arrived here in Guantanamo Bay, Thursday, 11 March, at 0800. The frigate, which is equivalent in size and mission to a destroyer escort in the United States Navy, will be in this area for a period of five days. The New Glascow, commanded by CDR A. Larue, will depart from Guantanamo Monday, 15 March at 0500. This was the general's first visit to the Naval Base since being appointed as Marine Commandant on January 1, 1952. A previous visit was made several years ago. He is the Marine Corps' 20th commandant. General Shephard entered the Corps in 1917 and has had a colorful career. During World War II he commanded the famed 6th Marine Division and the 9th Marine Regiment. Just prior to his appointment as commandant, General Shephard was the Commanding General, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific. He succeeded General Clifton B. Cates as Commandant. The General arrived at the Naval Air Station Wednesday evening and left for Key West Thursday noon. The following dispatch was received Thursday afternoon by Col. John B. Hill, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks: From: Commandant, Marine Corps To: Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks Desire to extend heartiest congratulations on fine appearance and smart bearing your command X Marine Barracks, Gtmo. maintains high standards on which Marine Corps recognition is based X Shephard sends. 'Power for Peace' Armed Forces Day Theme President Eisenhower has proclaimed Saturday, May 15, 1954, as Armed Forces Day-a day devoted to honoring the men and women of the Armed Forces for their contributions to the preservation of personal freedom as a "power for peace." 0

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THE INDIAN Pa e5' Two Saturday, 13 March 1954 Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9-615 Saturday, 13 March 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. SandnessOfficer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC-------------Editor H. L. Sisson, J03----------News Jersy Lewis, J03-----------Features J. C. Dierks, 103---------Spurts Fierce Lrhmbech-------Sports F. L. Cannon, JOSNPhotographer R. Naccarato, SN ------Make-up THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. TEENAGEROUNDUP by Barbara Burke and Linda Thurston This week with heavy hearts again we will have to say farewell to two of Gtmo's hipsters. These kats, in the persons of Jim Stuchel and Margo (from Bargo) Anderson, have made life pleasantly bearable during their stay in Cuba. Margo has been with us for quite a while now and in her own inimitable way has always managed to start things swinging when the going got too dull. Among her various offices she holds the titles to being a cheerleader, a yearbook staff member, an Arrow staff member, a basketball and baseball enthusiast, an outstanding pool shark, and a wonderful girl. Rounding out his two year stay, Jimmy will long be remembered for his fabulous monologues on his travels and experience in Gtmo. and for his rendition of "Hot Toddy". He was voted to be the best dancer in the high school and was the basketball manager last year. His rub-downs and his famous voice will long be remembered. They will depart on Tuesday of this coming week, so good luck and Auf Wiedersehen. Last week the B.A.A. came to life and gave a frantic hay ride. Starting at six-thirty, the merry makers departed from the N.B. School and headed for Windmill Beach. Thanks to the sponsorship of Mr. McGill and the truck drivers Pete Broughton and Jim Boone, the affair was a smash success. DID YOU SEE: The pleased smiles on the faces of the high school kats as they swept the F.T.G. Trainers in the basketball game last week .Eddie Stafford at the B.A.A. session ...George at the N.A.S. movie ...J. P. receiving an intriguing letter? We finally found out what happens to your lap when you stand up-it retreats to the rear and pops up under an assumed name. This Navy life is beginning to tell on me. Every day I look more like my identification card. The young fellow holding a birthday cake on his lap is Henry Remere Greaves, who has reason to celebrate his second birthday. He is recovering from a severe kidney ailment, Nephrosis, a condition which hospital authorities stated could be fatal. Henry was brought to Guantanamo six weeks ago from Port-Au-Prince, Haiti, where his father, George Greaves, is with the Mutual Security Administration. Helping George celebrate are Mrs. Lillian North, left, and Mrs. Ralph Sierra, both Nurses Aides. Henry is well on the road to recovery and according to hospital authorities will be sent home soon. NSO Supply Line CDR and Mrs. J. W. Graham, along with Lynne and Billy, are anticipating a cruise on the Thomas this June. CDR Graham has received orders to report to the Ordnance Supply Office, Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania. Our new Executive Officer will be CDR Charles E. Lee who is presently on duty at the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts. CDR and Mrs. Lee and their two children will occupy quarters on Radio Point. LCDR A. D. Suslick, our Material Division Officer, has received orders to report to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in May. His relief will be LT Philip D. Larson who is presently on duty at the Naval Supply Center, Oakland, California. Mrs. Larson and their three children will join her husband in Guantanamo as soon as housing becomes available. Many transfers at the Depot this past week: Phillip Rongo, SN, and Donald J. Peterson, SN, are going to the USS Harwood now at Newport, Rhode Island; Roy F. Benfield, SK2 reports to Naval Air Station, Patuxent River, Maryland; Peter J. McGuire DKSN, to the USS Missouri; Marvin F. Mozee, GS-3, to the USS Gyatt, now at Norfolk, Virginia; Charles V. Clevenger, SK3, to the Naval Receiving Station, San Diego, California. Welcome to Charles D. Hayman, DKSN, who reported in to the Depot for duty from the USS Rankin. Hope you enjoy your tour of duty here at Gtmo. Laymond Burton, ENFN, became the proud papa of Rebecca Lynn, born on 3 March in Tucson, Arizona. A speedy recovery is wished for Chief McGee now in the hospital. A farewell get together was held for Mrs. Virginia Wallace, Fiscal Accounting Clerk, who resigned to return to the States with her husband who is being separated from the Navy. Good luck to the Wallaces who are planning on living on The Lucky by Betty Radcliffe Mrs. Joseph W. Valia Annapolis is visiting her Mrs. E. B. Taylor. Mrs arrived on the base with h ter and will be here unti June. Hope you enjoy y here Mrs. Valiant. Mr. and Mrs. W. Shepp to Havana last week to Mrs. Sheppard's aunt, M Dias of Rodrigues who hospitalized in Havana months. After spending in Havana they drove Clara where they took large family re-union. Mrs. Juana Dias at her Guantanamo and return base. If you haven't seen Haitian Room at the Nav Family Restaurant you it. This room is very attr quite unique in decoratio ing the walls are two paintings done by Mrs. C only is the Haitian Room to look at; it is also air ce Whether you eat in the the Haitian Room, you wi meals delicious. Each ni is a Special on the men lieve me those Specials special; for example, special is baked sugar c with all the trimmings a row night's menu is to roast sirloin of beef. So to me ...oh yes, a wc wise ...try their fam chiffon pie. their farm in Charles nessee. Mr. Joseph L. West assigned quarters in Ea Mr. West was recently Plinia de los Santos of de Cuba. Welcome to the new in the Fiscal Departm Jemima Sands and Mr Marie Wilson. Mrs. Sand worked at Naval Supp Norfolk, Virginia. Mrs. a former employee of having worked here in 19 Sunday, 14 March 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) Bag The Chaplain's Corner Have you ever noticed about people that you can tell what they nt, from are like from what they like? daughter, Walk into man's parlor and a look .the magazines lying around. er daughPick up a book or two off one of l May or the tables. Glance through the your visit music lying on top of the piano. By that time you should have a ard drove fair idea of whether the man is a pick up 'highbrow' or a 'lowbrow'. rs. Juana We are what we like. A strange had been thing about this question of taste for ten is that people tend to level off two days with what they like. You know to Santa how it is when you put a pan of part in a ice into a hot oven. The ice cools They left the oven, hut not before the oven home in has melted the ice; and when you ed to the go back to the stove, you find a pan of water exactly as warm as the new the air in the oven. al Station That's the way it is with marhould see red people. After so many years active and of living together, the husband and n. AdornnAdrwife come to talk alike, think alike, very nice even to look alike. It takes longer chase. Not in some cases, but give them enough pleasant time and they'll level off. nditioned. Patioo Patio or That's important. It means that ll find the the people and the things around ght there us have an influence on us, just u and beas we're bound to have an influence tre pretty on them. It means that if we surtonight's round ourselves with cheap things, ured ham cheap hooks, vulgar pictures, or nd tomorfoul mouthed friends we won't raise ped with them to our own level so much as funds good they'll pull us down to their own rd to the cheapness and vulgarity. On the ous lemon other hand, if we have fine things, good hooks, and good decent friends, it may well happen that they'll keep us at their own level. ton, TenWhat is it that you like? What are you after in life? You're drivhas been ing toward something; what is st Bargo. it? Is it money? Knowledge? married to Power? We can give the answer Santiago to you in one word. There is only one thing in life employees worth our complete and wholeent; Mrs. hearted devotion. That is God. If s. Audrey we seek Him morning, noon, and s formerly night, if we serve Him and forget ly Depot, ourselves, we'll find a peace and joy Wilson is utterly beyond comparison with the Depot anything on this earth. 46 and 47. William J. Spinney gae w

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Saturda 13 March 1954TE Public Works Chips by Vic. Gault Continuing the description of Public Works Department functions on the base, an outline of the duties of the Grounds and Maintenance Section is in order. The Grounds and Maintenance Section of the Buildings and Grounds Branch is charged with the responsibility of performing all landscaping and plant nursery work and maintenance such as mowing of lawns, cutting grass and brush around public quarters and Government buildings and structures, as well as maintenance of such public or base flower gardens that may be designated. This section maintains a plant nursery, supervised by Mr. Marcelo Cano, which is located in the golf course area, and reasonable quantities of plants and shubberies are issued to residents of the base for the purpose of beautification of the premises around their assigned quarters, upon request. Authorization for obtaining plants and shubberies from the nursery may be requested from Mr. E. Noel, Assistant Foreman, PW, whose office is located in the Maintenance Division Field Office, Building No. 13. Top soil, when available for issue, may also be obtained for the same purpose of building up and beautifying premises, and maintaining vegetable gardens where yard space permits. Issuance of top soil is not a practice of the department when large projects and constructions are underway, and issuance of plants and shubbery is curtailed to some extent at times, particularly when the "Dry Season" sets in and there is a scarcity of rain. One of the sections under the Maintenance Division which performs duties on a continuing 7-day week basis is the Refuse Disposal Plant Section. This section collects and disposes of garbage and general refuse throughout the Base with the exception of the Marine Barracks and Naval Air Station which perform collecting functions only. All refuse is disposed of at sanitary fill operated by this section. For the purpose of handling the garbage there are assigned at present seven dump trucks and two Garbage Dumpster trucks. The Carpentry Branch, under the supervision of a Chief Quarterman, is divided into the following two sections CARPENTRY SHOP SECTION-The carpentry Shop Section repairs and renovates furniture and fabricates all mill work required by the Construction and Maintenance Section. This section maintains a group for minor repairs of an out-side emergency nature and a Shop Stores (now under the cognizance of the Materials Branch, PWD) for the issuance of standard and special items. This section handles all glass work for the Public Works Department. All minor repairs of power tools and the sharpening of saws for the Seabees and other divisions of the department are handled by this section. Chaplain Stephenson New Toastmaster President Toastmasters Club No. 92 last week elected CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC,. USN as president for the coming six months. Chaplain Stephenson succeeds CDR J. N. Lawlor. Other officers elected include R. Policy Committee MCB Driver Makes Music Guides 'Indian' An editorial council formed for the purpose of improving the Indian has been quietly functioning since 1 December 1953. Though much remains to be accomplished, the once-anemic Base newspaper is showing signs of new life, and an increasing number of complaints is being received from those who fail to receive a copy. CDR V. J. Soballe, Executive Officer of the Naval Station, is chairman of the council, which also functions as a program committee for WGBY, and includes Chaplain M. 0. Stephenson, CDR J. N. Lawlor, Public Works Officer, and H. P. McNeal, Base Industrial Relations Officer. A subcommittee of the council, headed by Mr. McNeal, a former newspaper editor, includes representatives from Base commands, as follows: CDR R. C. Spears, VU-10, LCDR I. V. King, Naval Hospital, LT L. B. Dalton, Fleet Training Group, CAPT W. E. Kerrigan, Marine Barracks, LTJG R. G. Whitman, Naval Supply Depot, CWOHC T. K. Dote, Dental Clinic and CHGUN J. D. Sentz, Naval Air Station. The sub-committee convenes at least once a month to discuss Indian improvements with Editor H. E. Davis, JOC. Out of the discussions have grown a greater proportion of local news in the Indian, better news coverage of all commands, and a larger newspaper. Recently six pages, the Indian will be expanded to eight pages at an early date. Readers of the Indian may also share in the improvement campaign. News tips, passed promptly to any member of the Indian subcommittee, or Editor Davis at 9-615, can be a major contribution. Meetings. .. Time & Place Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd & 4th Tuesday each month Community Auditorium Ladies' Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association -----------------2000; 2nd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Room, Community Auditorium Little Theatre Group ---------2000; 1st Tuesday each month Marina Point Hospital Service Volunteers 1000; 2nd Tuesday each month Hospital Medical Library American Legion Auxiliary, Unit One -----------------------1930; 3rd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Hut, Marina Point Toastmasters Club No. 92 1930 each Thursday, Officers Club dining room. Toastmasters Club No. 113 1900 each Thursday, Marine Family Restaurant. J. Hummel, First Vice-President, LCDR R. J. Mathews, Second VicePresident, John L. Sanborn, Secretary-Treasurer (re-elected), D. B. Powers, Sergeant at Arms, E. H. Cavanaugh, Deputy Governor, and L. P. Goldman, Educational Chairman. Membership in Toastmasters Club 92 is open to officers and civilian employees with officers club privileges. The organization, which seeks improvement in public speaking, meets each Thursday evening at 1930 in the Officers Club dining room. With Drums and Gloves Big Huebie Herbert has a mighty useful pair of hands. As a boxer, his hands have brought him several titles, including two All-Navy; as a musician, his hands have plucked string bass with two name bands; and in the Navy his hands carry out his rate of driver, second class in the Seabees. Huebie is a big fellow. Stands a massive six feet, weighs in at 246 pounds (but his fighting weight is down near 220) and has a shirtsplitting chest girth of 54 inches. He was born 26 years ago in Campbell, Ohio, a suburb of Youngstown. In 1943, at the age of 15, he joined the Navy. "It's O.K. to tell that now", he said. His first bout in the Navy was in 1946 at Pearl Harbor, where he battled his way to heavyweight championship of Pearl Harbor. In 1947 he won the Golden Gloves tournament there and later that year. the Amateur Athletic Union crown. Still later in the year, at San Diego, he copped the All-Navy title. He repeated in 1948 with another All-Navy title and in the spring of 1948 he was sent to Boston to try out for the Olympic boxing team. He encountered little difficulty and went to London with them. There he fought four bouts and was up to the semi-finals when he lost on a decision to "Chuck" Catzoni, of Sweden. "The worst part of that" he recalled, "was that when I got home they were showing the fights in the newsreels. I had one friend who wanted to take jne to the movies all the time, just so I could see myself take a tumble." Since the Olympics he has kept up his collection of titles, including Guam (1949) Japanese Fleet (1949) and in 1950 Pawtuxent River Naval Command and the Severn River Naval Command. By this time he was back in the U.S. on shore duty at Washington, D. C. He was loaned to the Marines at Quantico for awhile, for a series of exhibition bouts at high schools throughout the country. In 1952 he was put out of action for the season by a broken fist, but was back in action in 1953 with six bouts at the Receiving Station in Washington. In October 1953 he was assigned to MCB-6 for duty. His bass playing took place with Big Jay McNealy's band in 1949, while he was at San Diego. He played with the band on weekends and made two records on the Alladin label, "Deacon's Hop" was one and the other a blues, "Dreamed Last Night" featured him as vocalist. After playing with Big Jay for six months he went with Spade Cooley at Cooley's ballroom, the Santa Monica, Ballroom, in city of Santa Monica, Cal. That lasted for three months before he was assigned to the East coast. He is now playing in the MCB-6 band as a drummer in the military band and plucking the string bass in the jazz combo. The thought of turning professional boxer has often crossed his mind, but he states that he is going to take the advice of the CO of MCB-6, CDR P. J. Simmons, and keep his fighting on an amateur basis. "I have given it a lot of thought," he said "and the best thing to do is stay with the Seabees. The fight game can be a pretty dirty business if you're not careful." The champion women's bowling team of the Naval Base were presented trophies at a luncheon held at the Officers' Club last week. Left to right, the champion team-Emily Griffin, Betty Callan, Barbara McCollum, Nita Hayden, Sally Cohanski and Ruth McGowan. THE INDIAN Page Three Saturday 13 March 4

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Pane Four THE INDIAN Satueday, 13 March 1954 Leathernecks Snare Cage Title; Defeat Trainers In Clincher The Marine Leathernecks marched to their first league title Thursday night as they defeated the Fleet Training Group in a wild rout, 74-32. The Leathernecks, who led the Naval Base Cagers from the very first night of play, had to bear down in the second round to edge out a dark horse group of Flyers from the Naval Air Station who won 12 straight games after an uneasy start. The Leathernecks clinched the title as they defeated the Trainers to leave no possible way for the Flyers to better their record of 14 wins and 2 losses. At the time of this writing the Flyers still had one game remaining on their schedule, and that one against the sizzling Corpsmen of the Naval Hospital. In the Leatherneck -Trainer game, the league-leaders bounced off in typical championship form to a first quarter lead of 34-5 and simply coasted through the last three sessions as their entire bench showed in the scoring book. Androvich and Gatti led the winners with 17 and 16 respectively. BRAVES SWAMP PIRATES In the opening game Thursday night, the Naval Station Indians had little trouble in defeating the Pirates of the Naval Base School, 75-47. The game was highlighted by the halftime ceremonies in which the Pirates crowned lovely Miss Pat Wormwood queen of their 1954 basketball season. The pace of the game itself was burning from the very beginning as the Braves pressed it all the o te Hospital way. Only in the closing minutes game~lft ofe this, thtat eko did they let up to coast to the se lfto victory, side o points in a recent Bradford and Royal led the wingame with the FTG Trainers. ners with 15 each. Teammates Hart and O'Brien await For the losing Pirates Heimer a possible rebound with Trainers and Stafford led the way with 13 Marino (14), Schub (11), and Coland 12 respectively. lins (5). The Medics trounced FTG MEDICS OVER MALLARDS b 84 agn Monday night in the opening game of this, the last week of Basketball Ballet league play, the Naval Hospital Corpsmen erased the VU-10 Maliard's hopes of snatching third place from them as they defeated the Mallards, 58-44. The Corpsmen opened the contest by proving that the age ol fundamentals of the game are sti just as good as ever as they scored in amazing mechanical form tolac register a first quarter lead of 20-9. However, the Mallards came alive in the second session to cut the Medic lead to 10 and in the third quarter they almost overtook them only to fall behind in the fourth to take the dubbing. This loss dropped the Mallards into a two way tie for fourth place with the Naval Station Indians. Glenn Hallum led the winners as he dumped 17 followed by Bonkamp with 14 and Mulvihill with 11. PIRATES EDGE TRAINERS In the second game Monday night, the Naval Base High School, led by the 26 point performance of center Edgar Heimer, edged the Fleet Training Group in the closing minutes of play, 63-57. The Pirates were trailing at halftime by a 27-25 margin and at bit o aetball b al the end of the third session they dmo or a m ie Malhad fallen behind 48-43. Then, in l ard H en Higho the fourth quarter they opened up ig forw Gen n anum-wh with everything to move ahead of the Trainers and enter the threeporcupine-in the Hospital rout of minute period leading by two the Mallards Monday night. points. Here, the break came as the Bucs hit four successive times home standing Marine Leatherfrom the charity line while holding necks added another win to their the Trainers scoreless. Aiigtimrihis2eon bag of plenty as they downed the Aiding Heimer in his 26 point Saeso C-,6-6 spree was Lehmbeck with 11 folSe ees MCsh6-6 lowed by Stafford and McGill with Leatherneae hing 10 each. come back with every effort to MARINES DOWN SEABEES keep down the frequent SeaBee The scene shifted to the Marine uprisings in the closing sessions. Site cage Tuesday night, where the These uprisings brought the SeaMallard team captain Huber (9) goes up and over Corpsmen defenses as he attempts to sink one from the outside in the week's opener Monday night. Standing by to snare a possible rebound are the Corpsmen's Hart (20), O'Brien (7) and Mulvihill in deep background. Lockhart of the Mallards is also in the background. The Corpsmen took the contest, 58-44. Ladies Golf Club Bees to within one point of the winning Leathernecks on several occasions during the fourth quarter, but they faltered in the closing minutes to take the loss. Androvich led the winners as he ripped the cords for 26 markers. He was followed by Gatti and Murrell with 11 each. FLYERS SWAMP DENTAL In the second game, the NAS Flyers went all out to defeat the Dental Clinic, 72-36, as they held league scoring leader Paul King to 8 points. The Flyers, using a tight manto-man defense, placed defensive star Jackson on the Clinic pride and kept him tied down throughout the tilt. Meanwhile, Jackson, Allen and Hollowell were providing the needed scoring punch as they sank 16, 16 and 14 in that order. Top 10 Scores Player Team FG FT TP AVG. King Dental 115 74 304 19.0 Bradford NavSta 101 68 270 16.9 Heimer High School 92 45 228 14.3 Androvich Marines 91 43 226 14.1 Gatti Marines 82 41 205 12.8 Collins FTC 81 41 203 12.7 Hollowell NAS 81 37 198 12.4 Jackson NAS 67 33 167 15.2 Murrell Marnies 53 51 157 8.8 Bomkamp Hospital 67 15 149 9.9 Cage Standings Team Won Lost GB Marines --------14 2 NAS -----------12 3 11/2 Hospital -10 5 3% NavSta --------10 6 4 VU-10 --------9 6 4 MCB-7-8 ------7 8 61/2 FTG ----------5 11 9 High School 3 13 11 Dental _.--0 16 14 THE INDIAN Saturday, 13 March 1954 Page Four

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Saturday, 6 March 1954 THE INDIAN Page Five 1,500 Boxing Fans Witness Smoker 10 Bouts on Card Over 1,500 fans were witness tthe first smoker since 1951 presented by the Naval Base last Saturday night in Fleet Recreation Area. Sponsored by the Naval Station Special Services Department the card featured nine bouts plus an exhibition fight by two professionals. Two KO's Two straight knock-outs and three TKO's highlighted the evening. Montgomery, 180, from VU-10, floored his opponent, Carleton, from the USS Salem in 1:20 of the second round and Kalegeros, 135, from The USS Nawman iced Vezina from USS Salem also in the second. In the first bout Carnahan, 126, from USS Eaton, won a unanimous decision over Davis, 125, USS Nawman. In the second attraction Carioscia, 125, USS Eaton, come out on top of a split decision over Richardson, 128, from the USS Eaton. Three TKO's The fourth fight was stopped in 55 seconds of the 2nd round and Reichel, 145, USS Salem, was declared the winner over Weathers, 147, USS Bache. A bad cut over the eye gave Hoffer, 150, USS Salem, the decision over Watters, 148, USS Salem in 59 seconds of the second round of the 5th attraction. Jakubek, 156, USS Basilone, was declared the winner in 1:10 of the second round over Henry, 145, USS Salem. Fuller, 158, USS Salem, outpointed Nott, 160, USS Salem in the 7th bout of the night. The referee, Henry Garcia, stopped the 8th bout in 50 seconds of the first round and declared Henderson, 165, USS Bache, the winner over Morris, 178, from the USS Eaton. Exhibition Climax The exhibition fight, the last of the card for the night, was a no-decision fight between "Monk" Reynolds a professional boxer from the USS Antietam and Pirina of the Italian Navy. Both boys showed they were well versed in giving and taking leather, and the exhibition was the highlight of the evening bringing the near capacity crowd in the stands to its feet many times during the three 3-minute rounds. LT E. A. Sandness, Special Services Officer of the Naval Station, stated that attempts will be made to make the smoker a regular feature of the many recreational activities offered by the department. Base Bowling Standings Team W FTG #1 --------39 Hospital ---------29 11th Division 26 MCB-8 #3 -28 2nd Division -24 MCB-8 #1-23 FTG #2 ------22 4th Division -22 1st Division -20 5th Division -18 ACFP ----------18 NSD -----------16 MCB-8 #4 -11 Boatshed -------8 6th Division -11 MCB-8 #5 -11 F.B.P. ----------5 L 3 4 18 14 15 16 20 20 19 15 24 23 25 25 31 25 31 Pts. 52 40 37 36 33 32 29 28 26 25 24 21 15 14 14 13 6 Ladies' Golf Shots by Joyce Simmons Once again, "Ol' Man Weather" rained us out of our weekly tournament, but thanks to the generosity of the CPO Club 15 of us gals held a much-needed business meeting on Wednesday morning. First off, I'd like to say that I have been given the job of publicity-handling for the club, succeeding Mary Ann Pennell, and I hope that I can do as good a job of keeping you posted on what the ladies are doing on the golf course in the weeks to come. We missed out on the golf news last week, but we'll list the winners for you now in the "Blind Five" tournament of March 3rd. Five holes were picked at random by our tournament chairman, Jane McElroy, and each lady's score was compiled on the total score of those holes only. The winners: 1st Flight -Corky Henning and Eloise Gushanas tied for gross score; Mary Ann Pennell and Ann Smith tied for net score; 2nd FlightMarion Caruthers, gross score and Edna Edwards, net score; 3rd Flight-Susan Strauss, gross score and Anita Roberts, net score. It was agreed unanimously at the business meeting that we would have a Scotch foursome played the last Sunday of each month, the first scheduled for March 29th. Once a month the ladies will play 18 holes instead of the usual nine. Alma McCracken will be in charge of making up the threesomes a week in advance. The threesomes will be arranged so that girls in Flight 3 will not have to play against Flight 1 which is made up of the more experienced golfer. A Ringer tournament, wherein each person is allowed to better her score on each hole through continuous playing over a 2-month period, was agreed upon. We set an entrance fee of $1.00 per person with cash prizes being given for each flight. Probably in May we will hold a championship tournament to determine the best woman golfer on the base. In all of our weekly tournaments, as well as our more important individual tournaments, it was agreed that there will be no more "gimme's" even if there is only an inch to go. So, watch out, gals, every stroke counts from hereon in. We also decided to hold our business meetings quarterly at which time all dues will be paid in advance. We would like to extend a welcome to three new members; Jane Gentry, Shirley Kretchmar and Toni Winslow bringing our current membership for the club to 26. The increased enthusiasm shown by our members is making us a bigger and better club every day. Keep it up, girls, and here's hoping you all win some new golf balls. 'Callin Are you umpire, an money? If the a questions be in line ing the begins a fe Call LT Services C ditional in Leather pushers slug it out at the recent smoker held at the Fleet Recreation Area. Ten bouts were featured. Two knock-outs and three TKO's highlighted the evenings performance. Smokers are being pushed as a regular feature of Naval Base recreation. Barry Emerson puts a new twist into an old game as he slides safely into first base a couple feet ahead of the ball during a Little League game between the Rams and the Tigers. Regular games are being played now at the Little League diamond in Villamar every Saturday and Sunday afternoons. Daily practice is scheduled to begin as soon as enough coaches are available. GTMO Golf Hi-Lites by Wright North The last match of the first round in the Intra-Command Golf League will be completed over this weekend. NAS meets Hospital-Dental today at 1300 with FTG vs NSD to follow. The eventual winner of the first round will be decided tomorrow morning when NavSta with 72 points humps .up agnast the 1953 winner, VU-10, who so far has only managed to get 67Y/ g All Umpires' points. The points difference is are 24points ineach match, however, NavSta needing only 10 points qualified as a baseball tomorrow seems almost a certain d can you use some extra winner. In other matches last week, answer to both of these NavSta kept their edge on the rest is affirmative, you may of the teams by defeating FTC for a job as umpire dur181 -51. VU-10 could only garner baseball season which 16 points from Hospital-Dental w weeks hence. while NAS was beating NSD. All E. A. Sandness, Special players should bear in mind that officer, at 9-449 for adcaddies are consigned to intraareh 2 points inm eac mahnhow formation, command teams when desired on 181 % 9U-0cudonygre Saturday and Sunday. It is requested that other players desiring a caddy plan their starting time on these days at a suitable hour. Some greens and tees are now in the process of being re-topsoiled due to the recent rains. Please observe the tee markers which may be out in front of the regular tee and be careful when hitting to a green where several men are working. This work is necessary in order to improve playing conditions. There are plans for additional tees on the 2nd, 5th, and 10th holes. The present 4th will be retained and conditioned as a ladies' tee when the new 4th is opened. This new tee may be seen now from the rear of No. 12 and when completed will be one of the more picturesque holes on the golf course. He can still shake his head after seeing the yellow flowers grow overnight when they were cut the day before, and he says: Remember the yellow flowers, In all their glaze of spring; 'Tis better you have them along with some grass, Than not to have anything. Saturday, 6 March 1954 THE INDIAN Page Five

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Page Six TEIDA audy 3Mrh15 'The Little Theatre Presents By John Hull Seventeen times in the last five years, people on the Naval Base and in the fleet have seen the above four words, followed by the title of a famous play. Over 25,000 people have been entertained in that time by the unique organization since its first production early in 1948. That's a lot of people, a lot of plays and a lot of entertainment from a group of fewer than 40 military and civilian personnel-and all in their off-duty time! Monday evening, March 15, at 8:00, the curtains will part in the Little Theatre atop Marina Point and the group's latest production will begin a five night run. A cast of 13 amateur thespians will be at their best in a side-splitting comedy entitled "Mr. Barry's Etchings". The play's plot revolves around wood and plaster. It is 8 feet tall an eccentric engraver who decides including the section of wall built to improve the appearance of Genaround it and weighs over 200 eral Grant on his own fifty dollar pounds! It takes eight men to bills and then use them to finance maneuver it into position from the the election of an honest town scenery storage room to the stage. government. He becomes involved It is only one of hundreds of perwith crooks, magazine reporters, manent props built by members politicians and the members of his and now stored away for future own family in his efforts to give use along with such exotic items a "phoney" world some "phoney as four plaster statues, a complete money". table setting for eight and costumes "Mr. Barry's Etchings" was first of all periods. presented on Broadway in 1950 and Many improvements to the buildbecame an immediate hit with Lee ing, once a mess hall, have been Tracy in the title role. The local made by the group. The stage was production features some fine actlengthened four feet and fire-proof ing sparked by the Fleet Training curtains hung, a complete sound Group's Lee Douglas as Mr. Barry, system installed, two refreshment and awonderful supporting cast. bars built and plans are under conTickets are being sold every day sideration to improve the building's in front of the Naval Station Exventilation. Late last year most of change and may also be purchased the rooms used by the Little Theafrom any member of the Little tre were painted including the Theatre or any evening during the "Green Room" (which is blue), run at the door of the Theatre. wardrobe rooms, makeup room and The cost-only seventy-five cents! lavatories. And what do you get for your How does one become a member money? The results of three of the Little Theatre? It's simple. months hard work by the cast plus Regular monthly business meetings some 30 supporting members and of the group are held on the first friends of the Little Theatre. Their Tuesday of each month with all only desire is to give you a good members present. All you have to evening's entertainment and to do do is attend two consecutive regit properly, they will go to any ular monthly meetings and you are length. For instance, one of the automatically a voting member of props called for in "Mr. Barry's the Little Theatre. Etchings" is a huge, stuffed bird. Now that you are a voting memThere was no such animal here on ber you'll want to know something the base so one member was sent of the history and organization of to Guantanamo City in quest of the group. Briefly, the Little Theaone. Another looked in Jacksonville tre was established late in 1947 while on a round-trip flight. The with a $600 loan from Naval Staresult-two stuffed birds! tion Special Services. The loan was For another play, an overly large paid off within a short time and and ornate fireplace was needed. the Little Theatre became an indeMembers built it themselves from pendent, self-sustaining, non-profit ... Rehearsing in front of the partially completed set, Don MacQuarrie and Betty Lou Tipler run through their lines under the watchful eyes of Director Jan Janicek (left) and Assistant Director Avril Clark. organization. A Constitution was written by the membership and approved by the Commander Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay. Officers, including a President, Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer are elected and serve for a period of six months. No one in the organization, including its' officers, receives any kind of salary or imbursement for their services and all serve according to their position and the amount of time they can spare. Members are selected for the many jobs necessary in the production of a play by a volunteer method. Aside from acting, you can pick any number of jobs including play reading, publicity, ticket sales, stage and property crews, costume and makeup work, promoting, directing and producing, just to name a few. Many members wear several different "hats" and still find time to take an acting part in the play currently in production. A member can rise to a job of any importance depending on his or her own ability and willingness to work. Take, for example, the Little Theatre's last President. His name was Bob Koppit, a petty officer third class, well known, and liked by hundreds of people all over the base for his work at the local Armed Forces Radio Station, WGBY. He joined the Little Theatre early in 1951, volunteered for and won the job of Director of "Ten Little Indians". Next he played a leading role in "You Can't Take It With You". The group voted him to office as Vice President in January, 1953, and to the position of President in July of the same year. His many contributions to the Little Theatre will always be remembered and there will always will be a "Bob Koppit" in the group. Perhaps it's you! Some members of the cast relax in the "Green Room", painted blue, Betty Radcliffe shakes what must be her executivev iihger" at Bob while awaiting their calls to go on stage. Informal gatherings such as Gewertz in a scene from the play. Betty's name appears three times on the this are half the fun for Little Theatre members. program-as Producer, publicity woman and "Mrs. Taylor" in the play. 0 6 Saturday, 13 March 1954 THE INDIAN Page Six

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Page Seven THE INDIAN Saturday, 13 March 1954 U.S. Marines Are Classified As Pillagers And Reactionaries By The Soviet Newspaper, Red Star "Answers to questions from the readers" WHAT DOES THE U.S. MARINE CORPS REPRESENT? The following article was distributed, for information, as a memorandum from the Commanding General, 2nd MAW, to all Unit Commanders, recently. The article, which appeared in the Russian newspaper RED STAR on Dec. 2, 1953, was reprinted in its entirety in the Cherry Point WINDSOCK, and is published in the Indian at the request of the Marine Barracks. Readers of "Red Star," V. Demedenko, V. Gusev, and A. Elisseev have asked the editor what the U. S. A. Marine Corps represents. On the left side of the chest of every American Marine is worn an emblem of an anchor entwined with a chain covering the globe. This emblem serves as a reminder that the U. S. Marines have participated in marauding raids on all parts of the world and have been called upon to fulfill an important reacand old people were shot by the tionary role in the realization of barbarians of the 1et Division of the criminal aggresive schemes of the Marine Corps. the American claimants to world According to information from n domination. foreign press, the personnel of the Standing as a safeguard for the U. S. Marine Corps during the peimperialists, the Marine Corps has nod of the Second World War were served in shameful dishonor the numbered at nearly half a million pillaging of weak countries, small men. At the present time the Mapeople and throttling of workers. rine Corps represents itself as one The military command of the of the best trained constituent U. S. A. glorifies the Marine Corps parts of the Armed Forces of the in every way possible, calling it U. S. A. In its composition are "the striking fist" and the "idol" included formations, units, schools, of the American Armed Forces. educational centers and numerous The Marine Corps actually occupies other institutions of the Marine a special position in the U. S. Corps. Armed Forces. Fulfilling the predMarines Part of Navy atory schemes of American imThe Marine Corps forms a part perialism for almost a hundred of the Navy. The general command years it has participated in large of the Corps is given to a comand small plundering campaigns. manner directly subordinate to the During that period, detachments of Naval Ministry of the U. S. A. Acthe Marines have taken part in cording to a law enacted by the more than 250 landing operations American Congress in 1952, a and punitive expeditions on foreign member of the command of the territories. -Marine Corps will participate in Halls of Montezuma the work of the Joint Chiefs of In te yers 146-4, Maine Staff in the decisions of questions In the years 1846-48, Marine drcl ocrig te Mrn Corps troops participated in a Crps. T operaina diectino pillaging war against the Republic units The Marin Corsi cr of Mexico. As a result of that war Mexico lost half of its terred out by the Naval commanders ritory. In 1904 the Marine Corps or Army formations to which have ritnr Pnmai 90,Hn been attached units of the Marine plundered Panama-in 1907, HenCrs duras-in 1914, Haiti, and so forth Inrs c and so on. Cr hs combat tin and In 1900 the U. S. Marine Corps units s cm nt s and was used for the brutal suppresris s. arins Cop dision of an anti-imperialistic upvisions are aine to t rising in China. In 1918-20 the ations o corps. U. S. Marine Corps was part of Included witin f are spa the Armed Forces of the American interventionists operating against l a infantrymen units and Soviet Russian Siberia and Far also separate units for different East. Detachments of the Marine purposes. Division of the Mane Corps participated directly in the eniegru f loypunitive supplied to carry out landing they entire group of bloody punitv have, sarllgtadmdu exhibitions against the peaceful atil le igt prd ofdthe Soviet population. In his celebrated Sen Word War and e ca letters to American workers in 1918 V. I. Lenin wrote "Now the during the war in Korea, units Americanthe Marine Corps were widely used Amrianmllinres, thoeed man in land theaters of military operaern slave holders, have opened an tin.A prsthe udrg especially tragic page in the bloody combat trning to a program history of bloody imperialism." which provides for The First U. S. Marine Division povds cryn u The irs U. .MrineDivsio landing operations in conjunction took an active part in the aggressive war of American imperialism t dcso of ques tion against the Korean people. The th carin outcome forete path of the U. S. Marine Corps sizur of Nvl ba and srn is marked by the ashes of cities boar on foren terire and villages and blood of innobad n frin triois cent victims. providing for combat activities of centvictmsthe fleet from land. In such a way Marine 'Barbarians' the instruction of the Marine Corps Here is one of the examples of directly provides for its preparation atrocities of the American Marine for aggressive predatory acts. Corps in Korea. In November of And Some Go To Sea 1950, falling back from the city of The sea detachments are comHagaru-ri under the blows of the posed of elements of the Marine troops of the Korean People's Corps working directly on ships. Army and the Chinese Volunteers, All line ships, aircraft carriers, Marine soldiers set fire to all cruisers and several other ships city structures and drove away have such detachments. Among with them thousands of peaceful their tasks are first of all: police dwellers. When the long column duties, careful guarding of imof defenseless people reached the portent centers of ships, shadowing city of Kotori a bloody reprisal personnel, and also carrying out was comitted against them. Eight searches and arrests. thousand Korean women, children The garrison forces perform guard of Naval bases and other Naval objectives and carry out police duty on their territories. Corresponding with these tasks with which they are charged by the American military command, only the most "trustworthy" persons, from most point of view of the U. S. A. ruling circles are enlisted. Its personnel are made up, in the main, of people from 18 to 25 years old with good physical qualities and only those of Anglo.Saxon descent. Access to the Marine Corps is closed to all "not 100 percent American" and first of all to negroes. Personnel of the U. S. Marine Corps treat the other troops of the armed forces of the U. S. A. with arrogance and scorn. A military reviewer of the English paper "Daily Telegraph," Lt. Gen. Martin, characterizing the Marines, wrote: "The Marines treat soldiers of the Army and sailors with contempt." Before being assigned to regular units, Marine personnel undergo thorough training. A significant number of the officer personnel are trained in the Naval Academy at Annapolis, which is well known as a hotbed of the most reactionary Naval officer cadres. Other officers are trained in Army, Aviation, and also special educational institutions of the Marine Corps. All privates receive their intial training at educational centers. One of the largest cadre training centers for Marines is Quantico (State of Virginia). Hate Soviets The American command conducts unbridled anti-Soviet propaganda among the Marines. They are educated in a spirit of hate toward the Soviet Union and its Armed Forces and the countries of the people's democracies and toward all who are progressive and anti-imprerialistic. They strive to poison the soldiers and officers of the Marine Corps with the venom of military ideology and to develop in them the lowest instincts and a thirst for looting and violence. A significant place in the ideological preparation of personnel is given to eulogizing the plunderising acts of the Marines. In program songs of the Marines are glorified the pirate raids accomplished by the Marines "from the Halls of Montezuma to the shores of Tripoli," that is, from Mexico to the coast of North Africa. Frightening nicknames are given to units of the Marines. For example, the 5th Regiment of the 1st Division is well known by the nickname of "Devil Dogs." Lost 3000 At Inchon The U. S. Marine Corps has not once lost a battle when faced with defenseless women and children, but the armed forces of fighters battling for their rights is a different matter, as the soldiers and officers of the 1st Marine Division experienced in the crashing blows of the brave Korean warriors. In battle near Inchon and Seoul -in 1950 the Marine Division lost nearly 3000 soldiers and officers killed and wounded. The Division took an especially heavy loss in the region of Chosin; Reservoir. In this battle, lasting from 25 November to 11 of December 1950, the Marine Division lost more than 6000 men killed and wounded. Besides, a large number of division personnel suffered from frost bite. The remainder of the division barely saved itself by escaping in ships. Or course, the American "propagandists" propose to belittle the losses of the Marines. Nevertheless it was noted in the report of the Senate Committee on Armed Forces Affairs, "the low morale of the Marines is especially discouraging when one takes into consideration the distinctive espirit de corps peculiar to members of the Marine Corps which has, existed for a long time." The ruling circles are trying to re-establish the lost "prestige" of the Marine Corps to an even greater degree, strengthening their role as a weapon in the hands of the warmongers. Hospital Notes Heirport News During the past week, the following births were recorded: Joan Marie Lowd, daughter of EN2 and Mrs. John F. Lowd; Donna Lee Hicks, daughter of AN and Mrs. Elmer J. Hicks, Jr.; and John Michael Stanovich, son of AD1 and Mrs. John J. Stanovich. CDR Miller Detached CDR H. W. Miller (MC) USN, was detached from this command last Saturday, after serving thirteen months on board as Chief of Dependents Service. During this period, it is interesting to note that Dr. Miller personally delivered 124 babies. He goes to Philadelphia for separation, and will resume private practice in Lancaster, Pa. Winners The Hospital Golf Handicap Tournament came to a close last week, after keen participation from all sides. The champion was proclaimed as Glen D. Hallum, HM2, USN, and the Consolation Champion is LTJG Wade H. Williams, Jr. (MC) USNR. Golden Gloves Champion While it is conceded with pride that the athletes of the Naval Hospital have made a name for themselves this year, we have the further distinction of having in our midst a Golden Gloves Champion holding six titles. Vincent R. Salvati, HN, has fought 88 Golden Gloves fights. Of this total, he has won 81 and Lost 7 each of these seven losses being by a split decision. More unusual, he has never been knocked out or knocked down in the ring. Salvati began boxing in regular amateur bouts in December 1949. Since then, he has been awarded the 1951 Outstanding Fighter Trophy in Albany, N.Y. for the Adirondack Division of the AAU; won the Base Boxing Championship in 1951 at the Naval Training Center in Bainbridge; was in the 1952 Olympic tryouts in Kansas City, but lost out by a split decision; won the 1952 Eastern Title in the Golden Gloves competitioncovering the entire eastern U.S.; and lost the 1953 National Golden Gloves Championship in Boston by a split decision. In addition, he is to be awarded a trophy, March 23rd of this year, for being the Outstanding Athlete in the Adirondack Section of New York. The fighter is 21 years old, a native of Troy, N.Y., and married to the former Mary Ann Bayly of Troy, N.Y. Bowling With only six games to go, our Enlisted Bowling Team is battling for first place with Fleet Training Group in the inter-command Bowling Tournament. We have won forty out of a possible forty-five games. The reason for this success can be understood with a few figures: the team average to date is 161.1; during the past week, a high individual single of 237 was scored by Sam Poulton; and high individual triple of 623 by Tom Hart.

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Navy-S5NDPPO-Gtmo.-4655B THE INDIAN Saturday, 13 March 1954 WGBY Hi-Lites by John Hull The first part of a special twoweek presentation, "The Moonstone", is offered on "Suspense" beginning Friday, 19 March at 8:30 P.M. "The Moonstone", by Wilkie Collins, has been called "the first and best detective story." Peter Lawford stars as the young Englishman who follows the instructions of his uncle's will and delivers to his young, beautiful cousin a rare stone which carries with it the threat of death. The first program is concerned with "The Loss of the Diamond", and the closing episode reveals "The Discovery of the Truth". The popular "Symphonette" begins a new season featuring Mishel Piastro and the "Symphonette Ensemble", on Sunday, March 21 at 12:30 P.M. The orchestra will offer on each program a movement from a favorite symphony or concerto, as well as orchestral arrangements of favorite piano pieces or opera scenes, with members of the Ensemble as solo artists. Jeff Chandler stars in the "Family Theatre" presentation of the historic tale, "The Flying Dutchman", Sunday, 21 March at 7:00. It's the story of that colorful and imaginary character seen in fancy a thousand times by sailors and men of the sea from Iceland to the Cape, from Singapore to the New World, for the "Flying Dutchman" is destined, according to legend, to sail the seas forever. Lizbeth Scott is hostess for the broadcast. Watch the daily program schedule in the "Papoose" for your favorite programs and any changes in the schedule presented each day over your local Armed Forces Radio Service Station WGBY, 1450 on your dial. He had a good job but his wife complained because his average income was about midnight. They've got a new accessory for a car. It's called a silencer. Fits right over your wife's mouth. It takes the eye only one-fortieth of a second to wink ...the world's quickest way to get into trouble. She first married a millionaire, then an actor, then a preacher, then an undertaker. One for money, two for the show, three to get ready and four to go. A Message From Garcia by Henry Garcia "EL GUAJIRO" There is a working class in Cuba which is often highly sung by poets and exalted by the politicians in their campaigns. This class I am going to refer briefly to is the mass of countrymen ("Guajiros", as they are called in Cuba). The "Guajiro" is a picturesque character who lives in a humble grass shack, goes to bed at nine and gets up as soon as the roosters begin to crow. He plows the land, plants the different fruits and vegetables that he will later sell at a very cheap price in the city market, and raises fowl and cattle. The environment in which he generally lives is very poor and unsanitary. His shack does not offer adequate protection against the inclemencies of the weather, and the furniture in his home is MAQinC 00es by Sgt. William J. McDowell, Jr., USMC It is with a great deal of pleasure that we extend a HELLO to the SgtMaj's wife, Mrs. Patty M. Litzelman, upon her arrival here at Guantanamo Bay Cuba.-We hope your stay will be filled with many pleasures and one that will bring many more new friends. Welcome aboard is extended to Sgt. Bernard R. Lee, Pfe's Francis J. Thibeault, Gerald R. Reynolds. and Pvt's William Cooper, and Richard J. Taylor who arrived on the 6th of March on the Pvt William H. Thomas. The Marine Basketball team held down first place with another victory last Tuesday night when they played MCB-8. Androvich the high scoring man of the Marine team boosted his standing by 26 points, 8 of which were scored in the first minute of play. The Marine Barracks baseball team held their first workout of the season last Friday afternoon with 30 candidates answering the initial first call. The squad went through a two hour practice session under the guidance of player coach, Capt. C. S. Smith. The squad boasts of only two returning regulars from last years team which finished second in the standings. Captain Smith and Louie Romano, the clubs second leading hitter last year and third baseman. HAVE YOU EVER WONDERED WHY The Marine Corps Emblem In 1776 the coiled rattlesnake with the words "Don't Tread On Me" and today the eagle, Western Hemisphere, and fouled anchor. The eagle is symbolic of a military organization, the hemisphere of our service all over the world and the fouled anchor of our sea traditions. reduced to a bed, a locker, a table, and two or three chairs. His family is a large one. The children go on horseback to a school many miles away, and there is a great pride in the family when "Juanito" reads in loud voice from a book or newspaper, because the poor parents had it the hard way and never had a chance to learn. The Cuban countryman is honest, hard-working, and above all, romantic. When the moon is gleaming brightly and the breezes carry love messages between palm trees, the "Guajiro", a born-poet, plays the guitar and sings a love song to his wife. The "old woman", surrounded by eight or ten of their children, smiles happily while she makes coffee for her man. She walks slowly ...because once again she expects to have a baby. You haven't really had a hangover until you can't stand the noise made by a Bromo-Seltzer. MOVIES VU-10 Prop Blast The squadron received a draft of nine new men on 9 March to beef up the organization. They are Jack K. Campbell PN2 from Downers Grove, Illinois; Gilbert Lagassey, AD2, from Lewiston, Maine; Charles L. Sidwell from Granby, Massachusetts; Russell H. Anderson, AM2, from Seattle, Washington; Dale W. Mountford, AT3, from Tampa, Florida; William S. Morris, AKAN, from Majestic, Kentucky; Harold Johnson; TN, from Charleston, South Carolina; Jack L. Still, SN, from Detroit, Michigan; and William B. Landon, SA, from Forest, Ohio. The Mallard golf team met and defeated the Hospital Sunday 6 March 16 to 8 which was not enough points to overtake the strong Naval Station team. LT Grego was spotted on the course Sunday either heckling VU-10 or just watching some good golf. The first half of the tournament championship will be decided Sunday 14 March when the Mallards play the Naval Station. Four (41/2) points separate the two teams. If the Mallards are to win, they must win decisively over Grego's team. Due to shortage of hot scoop in the squadron, the following poem is published to give you a brief run down of our some 38 officers and 350 enlisted men: They were salesmen, merchants, farmersSome are fresh from school routine, Some sold cars and gasoline. Either there is a wife awaiting Who keeps up domestic pride Or a sweetheart keeping vigil And those here in whom we confide. So we are all like neighbors Names like Frank and Bill and Jim Who today are men of VU-10 And the Navy's proud of them. Spring is just around the corner and June McCall gets in practice with a 1954 model bathing suit. 4 Saturday, March 13 PRISONERS OF THE CASBAH Gloria Grahame Cesar Romero When the Emir is killed by the Grand Vizier's henchmen, the Captain of the Guards, who vowed to protect the young princess, escapes with her to temporary safety. They find refuge in the Casbah and work hand in hand with a group of thieves against the traitor. Sunday, 14 March FIGHTING LAWMEN Wayne Morris Virginia Grey Western adventure in which a marshal attempts to protect the unworthy daughter of a bank robber. Monday, 15 March KID FROM LEFT FIELD Dan Dailey Anne Bancroft Young son of one-time great baseball players thru helpful hints from dad, helps team rise to firstrate form. Conflicts arise when team manager takes credit for lad's achievements. Tuesday, 16 March STEEL LADY Rod Cameron Tab Hunter A hostile sheik orders four aerial oil spotters in the Sahara Desert to leave what promises to be a rich oil deposit. Their plane is disabled and lands. Water runs low, and when they discover a German tank, they start for a French Army post 100 miles away. Wednesday, 17 March Devil's Canyon Stephan McNally Virginia Mayo Former U.S. Marshal kills two desperadoes in self-defense and is sentenced to prison. At prison he is mistreated by prisoners whom he had sent up while he was marshal. Thursday, 18 March SANGAREE Fernando Lamas Arlene Dahl General's daughter resents contents of father's will which turns over management of plantation to doctor. Daughter and sister-in-law are both in love with doctor. Friday, 19 March THE BIG HEAT Glenn Ford Gloria Grahame Sergeant resigns from the police force when blocked by higher-ups in drive to clean up gang of racketeers but works against them from outside. Navy-10NDPPO-Gtmo.-4689B THE INDIAN Saturday, 13 March 1954