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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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Vol. VI, No. 35 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 6 March 1954


Phone Rates Hiked 'Etchings' Debut Slated PTA Hears

As of March 1st For March 1 h Curtain Program Plans


In compliance with a directive. via ComTEN, from the Bureau of Yards and Docks, the telephone rates of the Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, were raised, effective 1 March. The new rates mostly effect residential lines, residential extensions, a n d non - recurring charges such as installation, relocation, and reinstallation.
According to ENS J. G. Morgan, of the Communications Office, the rates were raised as a result of a 1952 survey taken to determine the total cost of operation of one unofficial phone. This figure was determined to be higher than the rates that were being used, and the suggested government rates were issued by the Bureau of Yards and Docks, using as their basis for determination, (1) the survey report, and (2) the corresponding rates charged by the nearest commercial telephone company of Guantanamo City, Cuba. These rates at the time were also higher than the rates of the base.
The one change which will have the greatest effect upon residents is the raise of the Main Line Residence rate from $3.00 to $5.25 per month. A general summary of all charges is as follows: Main Line Residence --------$5.25 Main Line Business --------- 9.00 Main Line Extension -------- 1.75 Main Line Extension Business_ 3.00
Non-Recurring Charges
Installation --------------- $5.00
Relocation ---------------- 4.00
Relocation in same building -_ 2.00 Reinstallation after relocation 1.25
At the present time, telephone rates in Guantanamo City for a residential telephone are $5.00, and at San Juan, Puerto Rico, and at Roosevelt Roads, the rates are $6.00 per month.



Carnival Estimate

Nears $79000
Although a complete break-
down of the final figures for the 1954 Guantanamo Bay carnival are not yet available, carnival committee members estimate the total gross receipts as $79,000 and total attendance as 25,000. A peak attendance of about 13,000
was reached on Sunday.
In 1953 the affair grossed
$61,000 with an estimated attendance of 10,000. The record for gross receipts at the carnival was made in 1952 when approximately $85,000 was taken in but the attendance for that year reached an estimated total of 18,000, about 7,000 less than this
-year. I
yt was pointed out that the
net profit from this year's carnival is yet to be determined. The final result will be published in The Indian as
soon as available.
4.- - -o-o o-o- -o-o o-4.


---ci--..............-


What happens when an eccentric engraver becomes disturbed at the expression on the face of a general whose picture is found on all U. S. fifty dollar bills? The answer is found in the Little Theater's next play, "Mr. Barry's Etchings," which opens Monday evening, March 15, for a five day run.
"General Grant was a man with a twinkle in his eye and a smile on his face," says Mr. Barry, the eccentric engraver played by VU10's Lee Douglas. You will notice, if you have the opportunity, that the picture of General Grant appearing on current American fiftydollar bills show the General with a somewhat morbid expression.
Mr. Barry's efforts to improve the General's likeness on the face of a $50.00 bill and the resulting complications form the basis of the plot for the Broadway hit of 1951 opening here next Monday. A f e m i n i n e counterfeiter, "Fifty" Ferris, played by Mrs. Joyce Simmons, attracted to Mr. Barry by the smell of printer's ink, contributes much to the play's humor and story.


ADM J. F. Wright

Assigned SACLant

Washington (AFPS)-The White House has announced that ADM Jerauld Wright, USN, will relieve ADM Lynde D. McCormick, USN, as Supreme Allied Commander, Atlantic; Commander in Chief, Atlantic; and Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, Apr. 12.
ADM McCormick will assume duties as president of the Naval War College in Newport, R. I., replacing VADM Richard L. Conolly, USN, who retired.
ADM Wright's appointment as SACLANT was approved by the North Atlantic Council in Paris. The admiral's new assignment is roughly equivalent to that held by Gen. Alfred M. Gruenther as Supreme A 11 i e d Commander in Europe.


Honorman at last week's inspection was William Grafius, YNSN, of the 8th Division.


CAPT Groverman Ou
Plans; 250 Attenc

Captain W. H. Groverma Staff Officer, Fleet Training and chairman of the Teachers Association progr mittee, was the principal at the PTA meeting held Naval Base school Tuesday
Captain Groverman spok mission of the PTA and pi a tentative method of o for the local organization. H ed out that, although the tanamo Bay group is only months old, much has been polished since its inception, e ly in the formation of the ization.
He added, "Typical Americans, however, we anxious to get on with the at hand. Our immediate appears to be the establ of a "modus operandi", or of operation."
"Basically," he continue Program to date and in mediate future is one of e for the parent and the teac
He sketched briefly the of the Naval Base school, th cial aspect of the scho scholastic flow and the levels of operation.
He cited the questionnai had been passed to parents weeks ago and said the r a study of the answers su showed that subjects con safety, spiritual education, ship and health stood hig the list for immediate atte As chairman of the Progra mittee the captain recom that future meetings be hig with talks on each of the co subjects of the questio with a talk on safety being ed by the Safety Commit the next meeting.
Approximately 250 atten meeting and the banner f parents representing certain wont to the 1st grade.


Mrs. Boyd, Mrs. Caruth Mrs. Winslow re-arrange th painted display cases "Trading Post."


lines



n, Chief Group, Parentam comspeaker at the night. e on the resented operation e pointGuana few
accomspecialorganof the are all business problem ishment method

d, "the the imlucation


Former Thrift Shop Now 'Trading Post'


Mrs. J. W. Kimbrough, Mrs. L. Bell and Mrs. M. 0. Stephenson, members of the "Trading Post" committee, decorate the interior of the building during the renovation.


her." The re-opening of the, former
control Thrift Shop under its new name, e finan- "The Trading Post," is scheduled 0ol the
various for Monday morning, March 8.
C o m p 1 e t e l y redecorated, the res that Trading Post has been painted in several a tropical motif, new display cases result of have been added and an altogether bmitted new look is in store for Post icerning customers. citizenhest on At a recent meeting of the Thrift
ntion. Shop committee it was decided that im Com- the name "Thrift Shop" should no mended longer be used. By tradition and lighted regulation the Thrift Shop operates ncerned as a function of the Navy Relief nnaires, organization, and all funds collected nnpresa from Thrift Shop sales are turned prepartee for over to the general Navy Relief
fund. However, several months ago, ded the the local shop obtained permission or most to donate its funds to worthy grades organizations and groups here on the base or in nearby Cuba. Thus, it was decided that the name "Thrift Shop" should not be used to avoid any confusion in connection with Navy Relief policies.
The Trading, Post will still be
operated by the same volunteer ladies from the base and the hours will remain the same-9 A.M. to
11:30 A.M.
Mrs. W. R. Caruthers is the
chairman of the Trading Post committee and has been directing the work of renovating the shop. All the work has been done by the
ladies.
It was pointed out that the
Trading Post needs items for sale.
The same system will be in effect -items will be received as straight donations or sold on a commission ers and basis according to the desire of the e newly donor. Base residents are urged to in the submit any unused items still in
good condition.


p0








ae ToTElDAaura,6Mrh15


Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9-615
Saturday, 6 March .1954
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff

U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT william R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A, Sandness----__Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC-------------------Editor
H. L. Sisson, J3.--------------------News
Jerry Lewis, JO ----------------- Features
J. C. Bierks, J31------------------- Sports
Pierce Lehmbeck-------------------Sports
F. L. Cannon, JOSN_- ____Photographer R. Naccarato, SN----------------Make-up
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and finance with non-appropriated funds.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS materis' appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


VU-10 Prop Blast

LT Harold E. Bailey, wife Sunny, Skipper age 8 and Susan 4 have their orders and are leaving for 10 days leave in Salisbury, N.C. prior to Harold's reporting to Tactical Air Control Squadron FOUR at Norfolk. LT Bailey has spent 2 years practically to the date in VU-10 as Training Officer, Navigation Offi6er, and our Administrative Officer. Bon Voyage to the Bailey's and it is hoped the fishing and bowling are good in your new assignment.
LT George F. Guyer reported in on 26 February from the USS Block Island. George hails from Sacramento ,Calif., has over 2 years college at USC. He steps right in as LT Bailey's relief as Adminstrative Officer. Mrs. Guyer, Randall 2, and Nicolette 5, are living in Norfolk and will join the GTMO gang as soon as housing is available.
The Mallards played a rather crowded basket ball schedule the past week. Two make-up games were played Friday and Saturday night with the league leading Marines and the Naval Station Indians respectively. The boys played good ball but ended up on the short end in both games. The Mallards are now going into a rugged practice schedule to iron out their weak points before tournament time, which begins 15 March.
In golf, the Mallard Chippers gained some very valuable ground on the lucky Naval Station team by trouncing Fleet Training Group 20% to 31 on Saturday 27 February. Only 2 points separtaes us from the top rung. Practice makes perfect.
Chief & Mrs. Cannon hit the jack pot last week when they hooked 19 red snapper. This catch doesn't include the skin-diver, equipped with an aqua-lung, who played a practical joke on Cannon by running with his line. It's always the big one-that gets away.

The law firm of Button, Button, Button, and Button recently added a new partner named Zipper. He replaced one of the buttons.


MAq(OC OSW)6S

by Sgt. william J. McDowell, Jr., USMC

On 11 March, 1954 the Commandant of the Marine Corps, General Lemuel C. Shepherd, Jr. will visit the Marine Barracks, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba for the first time in his long and tireless career in the Marine Corps.
After losing two games straight the Marines came out a week ago last Tuesday and beat the High School 73 to 50. The next night we again saw the Marines in action against VU-10 at the Naval Recreation Center and a very close competitive game with the Marines coming out on top 67 to 56. Last Tuesday night spectators witnessed the game of games which saw the Marines pitted against the Naval Station team, who matched point for point until the last, with the Marines coming out on top. The game with the Naval Station was an important game and was a hard fought and hard won victory for the Marines which saw little Gatti and high scoring Androvich fighting all the way. Of course, not to be outdone was that fine sportsman, high-flying Freddie Murrell. Newlymade Corporal Johnson and our Special Services entry Santos played as never before putting forth with all they had. The game saw a new face with the Marine first five, Tom Felak a man who fought hard and long to rate a place in the first five and the payoff was the big game.
Congratulations were in order to six Marine Barracks men as they received their warrents to the next highest ranks. Promoted to Sgt. were Cpl. Jesse Downey, Cpl. William G. Handschumacher, Cpl. Walter E. Smith. Promoted to Cpl. were PFC's Sterling Johnson, Jr., Richard N. Price, Ray Singer. The men were given their warrents by Col. John B. Hill, comanding officer of the Barracks, and we would all like to say congratulations to you all and the best of luck.
The Marines held a Post Dance last night and a good time was had by all. Ladies from Guantanamo City's USO Club also added to the dancers gayety.
The Marine Corps Post Exchange will be closed on Wednesday March the 10th and will be open on Thursday March the 11th.


Meetings..

Time & Place

Fleet Reserve Association --2000; 2nd & 4th Tuesday each
month
Community Auditorium
Ladies' Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association ------------------2000; 2nd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Room, Community
Auditorium
Little Theatre Group
2000; 1st Tuesday each month
Marina Point
Hospital Service Volunteers ---1000; 2nd Tuesday each month
Hospital Medical Library
American Legion Auxiliary, Unit One ------------------------1930; 3rd Tuesday each month
Girl Scout.Hut, Marina Point
Toastmasters Club No. 92 --__-_1930 each Thursday, Officers Club dining room. Toastmasters Club No. 113 -__1900 each Thursday, Marine Family Restaurant.


41,


Public Works Chips
by Vic. Gault

Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Broughton accompanied by LT and Mrs. T. H. Cushman, Jr. drove to the city of Santiago de Cuba on Monday the 22nd of February to meet Dr. and Mrs. P. H. Robertson. Mrs. Robertson is Mrs. Broughton's sister. These guests of the Broughton's flew to Santiago de Cuba from Miami after which they drove to the base where they will remain about three weeks. Before continuing their trip to the base, the party made a side trip to the little city of Banes, Cuba where they were the guests of friends at the United Fruit Company Organization. After an enjoyable three days at that city they returned to Santiago do Cuba by car and toured the city for two days and then continued to the base arriving last Sunday.
We hope Dr. and Mrs. Robertson will enjoy their visit here. The following personnel from the District Public Works Office, Tenth Naval District are spending a week on the Base: Lt. W. D. Ennis, CEC, USN; ENS. R. Linderman, CEC, USN; Mr. F. Kendall, Director of Maintenance and Engineering Division, DPWO; Mr. M. P. Doran, Director, Utilities Division, DPWO and Mr. F. Arteaga, Budget Specialist, DPWO, they are on the Base for the purpose of assisting the Public Works Department in preparing the Maintenance and Operation Budget for the Fiscal Year 1955 for the Naval Station. They were welcomed aboard by a dinner at the CPO Club sponsored by the Public Works Department supervisors. Another visitor from the DPWO, Tenth Naval District is Mr. Robert Zwick, who is in charge of the Pest Control Program for the District and is making an orientation tour of the Naval Base to become familiar with the local Pest Control Program now in operation.
The Janatorial Section which is a component part of the Buildings and Grounds Branch of the department is composed of approximately 21 janitors, including one Leadingman Janitor, Mr. Belarmino Suarez. This section provides janatorial services to all offices and various buildings under the cognizance of the Naval Station and includes Janatorial services and functions to all buildings of the Base School organization, the Fleet Training Group area, the Operations Offices and Provost Marshal's Headquarters including the Industrial Dispensary, and most activities controlled by the Naval Station Command.
The Upholstery Section of the department, which is located in the same building as the Furniture Storage and Issue Section (Building No. 13), is responsible for the operation of the upholstery shop which accomplishes all work for furniture cushions, mattresses, slip covers and such canvas work that may be required by the department. This section, under the direct supervision of Mr. William W. Stay, not only repairs all types of cushions, mattresses and slip covers, but also replaces them to fit as required. All upholstery work for vehicles is accomplished by another group of upholsterers assigned to the Transportation Division Upholstery Shop. Upholstery material, such as printed cloth, leather and imitation leather, etc., is maintained in stock by this section and is issued as required for accomplishing work on Government-owned furniture.


Sunday, 7 March 1954
Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel
Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions re not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic)




The Chaplain's Corner

An artist has the ability to place on canvas what is observed with the eye. This gift is enhanced when the eye has keenness and the color perception is sharp allowing the many shadings of color to be differentiated and their beauty transferred and held captive for others to enjoy. Not all paintings have pleasing beauty for many depict ugliness, despair, and hate, for the true artist records what is seen regardless of the consequences.
This talent does not come to every one for all persons are endowed with various abilities. However, each has the power of observation and with this power comes responsibility. All can see the factors which engender beauty, and those which cause sorrow, hate, and ugliness in the world. These are objective, obvious things in a physical universe, but there is another perspective, the inward or subjective type of "seeing". The artist employs this method of ''seeing" at times when painting, and every person, whether artist or not, has the power to look inward upon the spirit and soul of one's self.
The obligation to examine one's soul is admitted and the power to do so is a privilege but in many instances the ability to see the situation properly is lacking. Color blindness is a common thing in the natural world and is just as prevalent in the spiritual world. It is so easy to confuse the good and the bad. An advisor is needed, one whose color perception is always valid and one who is always willing to aid in selecting the better things in life. God will be that person to those who care to ask Him. He wishes the lives of His creation to to be beautiful.
James F. Agnew LT, CHC, USNR

The Golden Text for Sunday: "I am the resurrection and the life; he who believes in me, though he die, yet shall he live, and whoever lives and believes in me shall never die."-John 11: 25, 26.


Page Two


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 6 March 1954






Pages Missing or
Unavailable







a


Saturday, 6 March 1954


Page Five


THE INDIAN


Marines Down Indians 78-73;


Hold Lead As Season Nears End

In one of the most exciting games of the blazing '54 season played Tuesday night, the Marine Leathernecks showed once and for all why they hold down the top spot in the local cage race as they edged the Naval Station Indians in a hard fought tussle on their home court, 78-73.
Even the fans got into the show
as the heat of this spectacular bat- ed contest, 63-60. tle grew almost to the exploding The Pirates, using a man-to-man
point on several occasions. defense, kept the pace burning for
the slower Dental five as the lead
From the very beginning the pace
was burning as the lead switched changed hands regularly with hands like clockwork, with each neither team ever moving ahead
hand lie clckwrkby more than three points at a team moving ahead by as much as by Te than point ate
nine points at times, only to have time. The breaking point came it snatched away a few minutes when the Pirates, on a couple of l nat d afield goals by player-coach McGill, later. snatched the lead and placed the
The clashing fives entered the ball in a semi-freeze to take the rough and tumble fourth session decision. with the Braves leading by six This tussle saw Paul King, league
points, but the Leathernecks, dis- scoring leader, notch his greatest playing one of the fighting finishes performance with 30 markers to that has been a major factor in run his total to 270 for the year. keeping them on top throughout Aiding hin was the number two the season, came through in the man of the Dental scoring duo, Joe closing minutes to move ahead and Rose as he added 17 more after a close out the contest leaving the siow start. bedraggled fans in a state of Center Ed Heimer led the winamazement. ners with 19 as MacMichael and
This victory will, unless a major McGill contributed 13 and 11 more upset takes place, probably prove to the Buc cause. to be the deciding factor in the MEDICS SWAMP TRAINERS title race, as the Leathernecks have The Hospital Corpsmen pushed but three easy games left along their winning streak up another their homestretch. notch in the first game Wednesday
Santos and Murrell led the win- night as they swamped the Fleet ning Marines as they dumped 19 Training Group, 78-44.
and 18 respectively. The tilt was rough and tumble
For the losing Braves, Bradford from the beginning and the Trainled the way with 26 markers and ers had to finish it with but four Young added another 19. men as they lost two by way of
MALLARDS DEFEAT personals and two by being ousted
TRAINERS for unnecessary roughness.
In the other game Tuesday night, Center Olby O'Brien led the winthe VU-10 Mallards had to come ners as he dumped 16. He was folfrom behind in the last two es- lowed by Bonkamp with 15. sions to defeat the Fleet Training Shaub led the losers as he dropGroup by a 77-73 margin. ped 14 followed by Collins with 13.
The Trainers entered the contest MARINES DOWN DENTAL
with the intentions of repeating In the second game Wednesday
their first round upset of the night, the Marines Leathernecks
Mallards and were well on their made their hold on the league-lead way in the first two quarters. How- just a little bit tighter as they ever, the Mallards, led by guard downed the Dental Clinic, 68-53, Howerton and his stabbing, needle- to leave but two games remaining like shots, came alive in the closing on their schedule. sessions to move ahead and take League scoring leader Paul King,
the contest going away. having a big third querter, almost
Howerton led the winners as he led the Clinic away from the surripped the cords for 27 markers prised Leathernecks only to have with Lockhart adding another 13. them come back in the fourth sesCollins led the Trainers with 32 sion to take the win.
Gatti led the winners as he sank
22 of them coming in the first 21 and was followed by Androvich half, and Zino added another 20. and Santos with 17 and 14 respecFLIERS OVER SEABEES tively.
In the opening game Monday King led the Clinic with 26.
night, the NAS Fliers notched their SEABEES OVER PIRATES eighth straight victory by defeat- The scene switched over to Maing the SeaBees of MCB-8, 70-46. rine Site Thursday night where the
Led by the board-handling of MCB-8 SeaBees caught a hapless
Jackson and the big right hand of crew of Pirates and sank them by Hollowell, - the Fliers had little a 79-51 margin. trouble in scoring while they held It was a game that the High the SeaBee's quick-breaking tac- Schoolers should have never lost, tics to a minimum. but bad ball-handling plus a 26
This loss closed out all hope for point performance by SeaBee guard the SeaBee's climbing out of sixth Layman along with 22 more by place and left the Fliers in the forward Stills, proved to be the thick of things as the race tightens disastrous combination. with the coming of the last week For the losing Pirates, center Ed
of play. Heimer was the bright spot as he
Jackson led the winning "fly- sank 17. He was followed by Mcboys" with 24 while Hollowell and Gill with 11. Ring sank another 16 and 15 in FLIERS OVER NAVSTA
that order. Closing out cage play for the
For the losing SeaBees it was week, the NAS Flers clinched secLayman with 15 and Stills with 10. ond place as they edged the Naval
PIRATES EDGE DENTAL Station Indians, 64-58.
In the second game Monday The Fliers had to place the ball
night, the High School Pirates in a tight freeze in the closing
notched their second win of the minutes to take the tilt as the season at the expense of the Braves' ball-hawking tactics harascellar-dwelling Dental Clinic as sed their offense through-out. they edged them in a rapidly play- Defensive standouts for the con-


Heirner (2) of the High School and King (3) of the Dental Clinic, both in the Top 10 Scorers, go up high in the air as Heimer sinks one for the Pirates in their 63-60 victory. Heimer turned in a 19 point performance, and King notched 30 points to hold on to his lead as top scorer in the league. Rose (8) of the Dental Clinic and Huddy (1) of the High School Pirates close in for possible assistance.


test were the Braves' Daugherty and Henry who, because of their hustling style, have gained the reputation of being the most dangerous front duo in the local cage scene.
Hollowell led the winners as he netted 16. He was followed by Jackson and Ring with 15 each and Allen with 13.
Bradford and Morgan led the losers with 15 each.

Cage Standings


Team
Marines NAS ___Hospital VTU-10 NavSta MCB-7-8 FTG -_-High Scho Dental -_


Won
----_- 12
-___-_-- 11
---- 10
-_ 9
-_ 9
-_ 7
-_ 5 ol ----- 2
-- 0


Lost
2
3
3
5
6
7
9
12 15


GB

1
2
3 31/2
5
7 10
12%/


Top 10 Scorers


Player King Bradford Heinmer Hollowell Androvich Gatti Collins Jackson Murrell Bonkanp


Team FG
Dental 112
NavSta 95
High School 74 NAS 75
Marines 72
Marines 72
FTG 69
HAS 59
Marines 48
Hospital 60


FT 72 65
42 36 38
34 35 33
46 15


TP AVG. 296 19.8 255 17.0 189 13.4 185 13.2 183 13.1 178 12.8 173 12.6 151 15.1
142 10.2 135 9.0


Cage Schedule

Monday, 8 March
Fleet Recreation Center
VU-10 vs Hospital FTG vs High School
Tuesday, 9 March
Marine Site
Marines vs MCB-8
NAS vs Dental Clinic Wednesday, 10 March
Fleet Recreation Center
VU-10 vs MCB-7 NAS vs Hospital
Thursday, 11 March
Marine Site
Naval Station vs High School
Marines vs FTG

A mother took her son to consult a psychiatrist. When they were shown into the consulting-room, the analyst greeted them with: "And what is the trouble with this boy ?"
"He suffers from delusions," she told him. "He thinks he's a hen."
The consultant said soothingly that patients often suffered from even more peculiar delusions, and asked how long the boy had thought he was a hen.
"About two years," she said.
"Two years!" echoed the psychiatrist. "Why didn't you bring him to see me long ago?"
"Well, frankly," admitted the mother, "we needed the eggs."






tfavY-I0:NDPPO-Gtmo


Saturday, 6 Maich 1954


THE INDIAN


The Lucky Bag
by Betty Radcliffe

The Special Services Department has something new to offer in another form of recreation. They now have a bicycle renting department
* . . they are still in the experimental stage and so at this time only have ten bicycles. These bicycles are rented out at 25# an hour on Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays from 0800 to 1700. One of the scenic routes available is the road through the golf course to Kittery and Windmill Beach as far as the stop signs. The bicycles are not allowed on the beaches. There are markers along the trail to show the way. If this experiment proves successful, the Special Service Department will acquire more bicycles. Well . . . happy cycling.
Speaking of bicycles: In 1894 a Bicycle Military Corps was organized and was made up of Cadets in the Northwestern Military Academy of Wisconsin. It was composed of sixteen bicycles each equipped with special clips for carrying rifles, etc. One of the feats of the corps was for the riders to put themselves and their bicycles, which with their military equipment weighed fifty-four pounds each, over a sixteen foot wall in two minutes and forty-eight seconds. Numerous long cross-country trips were made. On June 7, 1897, eleven cadets left Chicago carrying a message over the Mountains and the National Pike to Washington D. C. where it was delivered to the Secretary of War, on June 26, 1897.
The first bicycle velocipedes or "swift walkers" as they were then called were imported in 1819. The first one in New York City made its appearance on May 21, 1819. The Common Council met in August of that year and in solemn session passed a law "to prevent the use of velocipedes in the public places and on the sidewalks of the city of New York."


This lovely lass is "shipshape" anyway you care to look at her. She is petite Myra Hansen, better known as Miss United States. Myra, who hails from the Windy City of Chicago, is enjoying the balmy breeze at Miami Beach, Fla. Her suit has the lastest feature for Service girls-nautical lacings.


FTG Bulletin

Commander, Destroyer Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet, Rear Admiral C. C. Hartman, observed destroyer operations this week aboard various destroyer-type vessels undergoing training under Commander, Fleet Training Group. Admiral Hartman arrived aboard the destroyer H. R. Dickson on Monday to spend the week informally inspecting the destroyer and destroyer escorts of his force operating from Guantanamo Bay.
On Wednesday he observed anti submarine w a r f a r e operations aboard the USS Roan (DD 853), flagship of Commander Destroyer Squadron 10, Captain R. F. Scott, USN.
On Thursday Admiral Hartman witnessed the Operational Readiness Inspection on board the USS Benner, a destroyer radar picket. The Benner conducted low visibility piloting out of the harbor, rearming at sea and man overboard exercises as well as the regular Battle Problem drills.
Admiral Hartman will confer Saturday with his commanding officers that are present in the Guantanamo Bay area during the scheduled operations conference. His staff arrived Friday aboard the USS Yosemite, the Admiral's regular flagship.
The Fleet Training Group Number One Bowling Team was rolling full speed this week and moved into first place in the enlisted men's Bowling League with a 54 out of a possible 60 points. With six games to go, the team has won 40 out of a possible 45 games.
Pat Spelce, BMC sharpshooter, holds the individual high game score with a 242 mark. Other team members include Murray Kramer, PNI3, Andrew Schmidt, RM1, Frank Cohanski, EMC, and Donald Green, RMC. The team will be
hurt by the loss of Kramer, who will be transferred to the States for discharge on 10 March.
Personnel Reporting
LT Edward P. McConnon, USN has reported to the Administrative Department of FTG. From Nesquehoning, Pennsylvania, Mr. McConnon will fill the Staff Secretary Billet.
Richard E. Kager, FN, USNR also has reported aboard. He cones from Washington, D. C., and presently is attached to the Administra. tive Department of the Training Group.
Advance Orders Received
Chief "Mike" Conway, Training Group Administrative Department, has received advance orders to Washington, D. C., where he will report to the Receiving Station. Chief Conway has been active in FTG athletics in his two years at Guantanamo, and will be sorely missed as the baseball season approaches.
Chief Anderson, Damage Control shiprider-instructor, has received advance orders to Madison, Wisconsin.
Ship Arrivals
The heavy cruiser USS Baltimore arrives for a period of training with the Fleet Training Group early next week. She will be followed by the light cruiser USS Worcester later in the week.

As the speaker droned on and on, a man on the dais fell asleep. The chairman leaned over and tapped him with the gavel. The mian opened one eye. "Hit me harder," he whispered, "I can still hear him."


q0


TEENAGE- ROUND- UP
by Barbara Burke and Linda Thurston
Nothing like winning a basketball game once in a while to build up your spirits. The kats and chicks were going wild about our win over the Dental Clinic this week. Poopsie Lehmbeck was so overwrought about the victory that he held a pep rally (or was it a Ditch Diggers Convention) right after the game. Then there was an all out Jam Session in the Barrett conveyance with Bill and Stuch making a cool musical "duo".
Now for the feminine side of the news. Clusters of chicks could be seen walking from Sherman Ave. to the Recreation Area before and after the game. It seems that the bus service has been halted in that direction and from the comments heard from some of the gals, we doubt very much if they'll want to undertake such a journey again. It took Margo thirty minutes of waiting at the bus stop before the realization fully dawned on her that there weren't any more running..
In the entertainment field another big dance is in the making. This time the theme will be "the first day of Spring". The Student Council plans to hold it up at "Ye 01' Faithful" Little Theater between the hours of 7:00 and 10:30. Tickets will soon be on sale at these popular prices; Stag .75 Drag $1.25.
DID YOU SEE: Norman Huddy doing his rendition of "Flu, Flu, Flu". . . . General Auto Von Graftonburg expounding on his views of the war between the States. (He's sympathetic with the Confederacy-of southern Germany.) . . . Anita getting a headache at the last ball game.... The swarms of teenagers sailing last weekend. . . ?



Hospital Notes

Heirport News
The following births have been recorded during the past two weeks: Kenneth Harris Chapman, son of SOC and Mrs. Frederick W. Chapman; Bambi Lynn Williams, daughter of AD3 and Mrs. Louie B. Williams; Shirley Ann Wilson, daughter of BM2 and Mrs. Theodore Wilson; Michael Wayne Kelly, son of SHC and Mrs. Charles L. Kelly; Robert Harold Olsen, son of ENS and Mrs. Harold L. Olsen.
New Arrival
LTJG Lucille M. Michaud (NC) USN reported aboard for duty 26 February from the U. S. Naval Hospital, Camp Lejeune, N. C.
Bowling
In the Enlisted Men's InterCommand Bowling League, the Hospital has now taken over second place with a 32 won and 4 lost record. We will bowl against FTG team No. 1 this week, present holders of first place.
Golf
The Hospital Golf Tournament is now drawing to a close with Hallum and Mills battling it out for the Championship, while Dr. Williams and Cox are the finalists in the Consolation Round.
Sea Urchins
The black sea urchin is an animal common to this area and familiar to most people-either from sight or sad experience. The spines of these animals are very brittle and have small, sharp barbs along the entire length of each spine, making it difficult, and painful, to remove them, once they have come in contact wtih the skin.


MOVIES


Lomatuua, U a
I, THE JURY
Biff Elliot Preston Foster
I, THE JURY:
This is based on a book of the same name by Mickey Spillane. A story of a private eye whose buddy is shot to death. He starts in on the task of finding the killer. After many episodes the killer turns out to be a beautiful girl who is a psychoanalyst.
Sunday, 7 March
THUNDER OVER THE PLAINS Randolph Scott Phyllis Kirk
THUNDER OVER THE PLAINS:
This story takes place in postCivil War days when carpet baggers were trying to keep the states in unrest to keep them out of the union. A union captain is sent to arrest a local "Robin Hood" and ends up revealing the carpetbaggers for what they are. Texas joins the union and he is reunited with his wife.
Monday, 8 March
MARRY ME AGAIN
Marie Wilson Robert Cummings MARRY ME AGAIN:
The story of a beautiful girl who tries to force a young returned jet pilot into marriage and succeeds. She inherits a million dollars, which annoys the young veteran who wants to support the family. She then sets up a veteran's public housing project so she will be broke again and they then continue with their plans of marriage.
Tuesday, 9 March THE GLASS WEB
Edw G. Robinson John Forsythe
THE GLASS WEB:
An actress on a popular TV show is murdered. The writer of the series is accused because of circumstantial evidence. The envious casting director pushed the case so the writer will be convicted and he can take over his job. In his anxiety to prove the other man's guilt he exposes himself as the murderer.
Wednesday, 10 March
TARZAN AND THE SHE DEVIL Lex Barker Joyce MacKenzie
TARZAN AND THE SHE DEVIL:
A beautiful adventuress is head of a gang of ivory thieves operating in East Africa. She has captured and enslaved an entire tribe of male warriors to serve as her native bearers. When the tribe's women appeal to Tarzan for help he sets out on a rescue mission and accomplishes his purpose.
Thursday, 11 March
THE JOE LOUIS STORY
Paul Stewart Hilda Simms
THE JOE LOUIS STORY:
This dramatic story of Joe Louis' life is filmed from his late teens in '32 thru his last fight with R. Marciano in 1951. It tells of his lessons in Detroit, his professional debut in 1934, and his more famous fights, including the championship win over Braddock, his fights with Max Schmeling, Walcott, etc. It also tells of his rocky marriage to Marva.


It


Saturday, 6 March 1954




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Vol. VI, No. 35 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 6 March 1954 Phone Rates Hiked 'Etchings' Debut Slated PTA Hears As of March 1st For March 15th Curtain Program Plans In compliance with a directive. via ComTEN, from the Bureau of Yards and Docks, the telephone rates of the Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, were raised, effective 1 March. The new rates mostly effect residential lines, residential extensions, and non -recurring charges such as installation, relocation, and reinstallation. According to ENS J. G. Morgan, of the Communications Office, the rates were raised as a result of a 1952 survey taken to determine the total cost of operation of one unofficial phone. This figure was determined to be higher than the rates that were being used, and the suggested government rates were issued by the Bureau of Yards and Docks, using as their basis for determination, (1) the survey report, and (2) the corresponding rates charged by the nearest commercial telephone company of Guantanamo City, Cuba. These rates at the time were also higher than the rates of the base. The one change which will have the greatest effect upon residents is the raise of the Main Line Residence rate from $3.00 to $5.25 per month. A general summary of all charges is as follows: Main Line Residence -$5.25 Main Line Business -------9.00 Main Line Extension -------1.75 Main Line Extension Business 3.00 Non-Recurring Charges Installation ---------------$5.00 Relocation __----------_ 4.00 Relocation in same building -_ 2.00 Reinstallation after relocation 1.25 At the present time, telephone rates in Guantanamo City for a residential telephone are $5.00, and at San Juan, Puerto Rico, and at Roosevelt Roads, the rates are $6.00 per month. carnival Estimate Nears $179,000 'Although a complete breakdown of the final figures for the 1954 Guantanamo Bay carnival are not yet available, carnival committee members estimate the total gross receipts as $79,000 and total attendance as 25,000. A peak I attendance of about 13,000 was reached on Sunday. In 1953 the affair grossed $61,000 with an estimated attendance of 10,000. The record for gross receipts at the carnival was made in 1952 when approximately $85,000 was taken in but the attend-ance for that year reached an estimated total of 18,000, about 7,000 less than this year. It was pointed out that the net profit from this year's carnival is yet to be deter-mined. The final result will be published in The Indian as soon as available. .--.-.-.-~z1.-.What happens when an eccentric engraver becomes disturbed at the expression on the face of a general whose picture is found on all U. S. fifty dollar bills? The answer is found in the Little Theater's next play, "Mr. Barry's Etchings," which opens Monday evening, March 15, for a five day run. "General Grant was a man with a twinkle in his eye and a smile on his face," says Mr. Barry, the eccentric engraver played by VU10's Lee Douglas. You will notice, if you have the opportunity, that the picture of General Grant appearing on current American fiftydollar bills show the General with a somewhat morbid expression. Mr. Barry's efforts to improve the General's likeness on the face of a $50.00 bill and the resulting complications form the basis of the plot for the Broadway hit of 1951 opening here next Monday. A feminine counterfeiter, "Fifty" Ferris, played by Mrs. Joyce Simmons, attracted to Mr. Barry by the smell of printer's ink, contributes much to the play's humor and story. ADM J. F. Wright Assigned SACLant Washington (AFPS)-The White House has announced that ADM Jerauld Wright, USN, will relieve ADM Lynde D. McCormick, USN, as Supreme Allied Commander, Atlantic; Commander in Chief, Atlantic; and Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, Apr. 12. ADM McCormick will assume duties as president of the Naval War College in Newport, R. I., replacing VADM Richard L. Conolly, USN, who retired. ADM Wright's appointment as SACLANT was approved by the North Atlantic Council in Paris. The admiral's new assignment is roughly equivalent to that held by Gen. Alfred M. Gruenther as Supreme A lii e d Commander in Europe. Honorman at last week's inspection was William Graflus, YNSN, of the 8th Division. CAPT Groverman Outlines Plans; 250 Attend Captain W. H. Groverman, Chief Staff Officer, Fleet Training Group, and chairman of the ParentTeachers Association program committee, was the principal speaker at the PTA meeting held at the Naval Base school Tuesday night. Captain Groverman spoke on the mission of the PTA and presented a tentative method of operation for the local organization. He pointed out that, although the Guantanamo Bay group is only a few months old, much has been accomplished since its inception, especially in the formation of the organization. He added, "Typical of the Americans, however, we are all anxious to get on with the business at hand. Our immediate problem appears to be the establishment of a "modus operandi", or method of operation." "Basically," he continued, "the Program to date and in the immediate future is one of education for the parent and the teacher." He sketched briefly the control of the Naval Base school, the financial aspect of the school, the scholastic flow and the various levels of operation. He cited the questionnaires that had been passed to parents several weeks ago and said the result of a study of the answers submitted showed that subjects concerning safety, spiritual education, citizenship and health stood highest on the list for immediate attention. As chairman of the Program Committee the captain recommended that future meetings be highlighted with talks on each of the concerned subjects of the questionnaires, with a talk on safety being prepared by the Safety Committee for the next meeting. Approximately 250 attended the meeting and the banner for most parents representing certain grades went to the 1st grade. Mrs. Boyd, Mrs. Caruthers and Mrs. Winslow re-arrange the newly painted display cases in the "Trading Post." Former Thrift Shop Now 'Trading Post' Mrs. J. W. Kimbrough, Mrs. L. Bell and Mrs. M. 0. Stephenson, members of the "Trading Post" committee, decorate the interior of the building during the renovation. The re-opening of the, former Thrift Shop under its new name, "The Trading Post," is scheduled for Monday morning, March 8. Comp 1 ete 1 y redecorated, the Trading Post has been painted in a tropical motif, new display cases have been added and an altogether new look is in store for Post customers. At a recent meeting of the Thrift Shop committee it was decided that the name "Thrift Shop" should no longer be used. By tradition and regulation the Thrift Shop operates as a function of the Navy Relief organization, and all funds collected from Thrift Shop sales are turned over to the general Navy Relief fund. However, several months ago, the local shop obtained permission to donate its funds to worthy organizations and groups here on the base or in nearby Cuba. Thus, it was decided that the name "Thrift Shop" should not be used to avoid any confusion in connection with Navy Relief policies. The Trading. Post will still be operated by the same volunteer ladies from the base and the hours will remain the same-9 A.M. to 11:30 A.M. Mrs. W. R. Caruthers is the chairman of the Trading Post committee and has been directing the work of renovating the shop. All the work has been done by the ladies. It was pointed out that the Trading Post needs items for sale. The same system will be in effect -items will be received as straight donations or sold on a commission basis according to the desire of the donor. Base residents are urged to submit any unused items still in good condition. gAe

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Saturday, 6 March 1954 Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9-615 Saturday, 6 March 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sandness -Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC-----------Editor H. L. Sisson, J03 -----------News Jerry Lewis, J03-------------Features J. C. Dierks, J03OS ------Sports Pierce Lehmbcck-------Sports F. L. Cannon, JOSH---Photographer R. Naccarato, SN_--Make-up THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and finance with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS materin' appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. VU-10 Prop Blast LT Harold E. Bailey, wife Sunny, Skipper age 8 and Susan 4 have their orders and are leaving for 10 days leave in Salisbury, N.C. prior to Harold's reporting to Tactical Air Control Squadron FOUR at Norfolk. LT Bailey has spent 2 years practically to the date in VU-10 as Training Officer, Navigation Officer, and our Administrative Officer. Bon Voyage to the Bailey's and it is hoped the fishing and bowling are good in your new assignment. LT George F. Guyer reported in on 26 February from the USS Block Island. George hails from Sacramento ,Calif., has over 2 years college at USC. He steps right in as LT Bailey's relief as Adminstrative Officer. Mrs. Guyer, Randall 2, and Nicolette 5, are living in Norfolk and will join the GTMO gang as soon as housing is available. The Mallards played a rather crowded basket ball schedule the past week. Two make-up games were played Friday and Saturday night with the league leading Marines and the Naval Station Indians respectively. The boys played good ball but ended up on the short end in both games. The Mallards are now going into a rugged practice schedule to iron out their weak points before tournament time, which begins 15 March. In golf, the Mallard Chippers gained some very valuable ground on the lucky Naval Station. team by trouncing Fleet Training Group 201/ to 3/z on Saturday 27 February. Only 2 points separtaes us from the top rung. Practice makes perfect. Chief & Mrs. Cannon hit the jack pot last week when they hooked 19 red snapper. This catch doesn't include the skin-diver, equipped with an aqua-lung, who played a practical joke on Cannon by running with his line. It's always the big one-that gets away. The law firm of Button, Button, Button, and Button recently added a new partner named Zipper. He replaced one of the buttons. M~q= MUS1(GS by Sgt. William J. McDowell, Jr., USMC On 11 March, 1954 the Commandant of the Marine Corps, General Lemuel C. Shepherd, Jr. will visit the Marine Barracks, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba for the first time in his long and tireless career in the Marine Corps. After losing two games straight the Marines came out a week ago last Tuesday and beat the High School 73 to 50. The next night we again saw the Marines in action against VU-10 at the Naval Recreation Center and a very close competitive game with the Marines coning out on top 67 to 56. Last Tuesday night spectators witnessed the game of games which saw the Marines pitted against the Naval Station team, who matched point for point until the last, with the Marines coming out on top. The game with the Naval Station was an important game and was a hard fought and hard won victory for the Marines which saw little Gatti and high scoring Androvich fighting all the way. Of course, not to be outdone was that fine sportsman, high-flying Freddie Murrell. Newlymade Corporal Johnson and our Special Services entry Santos played as never before putting forth with all they had. The game saw a new face with the Marine first five, Tom Felak a man who fought hard and long to rate a place in the first five and the payoff was the big game. Congratulations were in order to six Marine Barracks men as they received their warrents to the next highest ranks. Promoted to Sgt. were Cpl. Jesse Downey, Cpl. William G. Handschumacher, Cpl. Walter E. Smith. Promoted to Cpl. were PFC's Sterling Johnson, Jr., Richard N. Price, Ray Singer. The men were given their warrents by Col. John B. Hill, comanding officer of the Barracks, and we would all like to say congratulations to you all and the best of luck. The Marines held a Post Dance last night and a good time was had by all. Ladies from Guantanamo City's USO Club also added to the dancers gayety. The Marine Corps Post Exchange will be closed on Wednesday March the 10th and will be open on Thursday March the 11th. Meetings Time & Place Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd & 4th Tuesday each month Community Auditorium Ladies' Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association --------------------2000; 2nd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Room, Community .Auditorium Little Theatre Group 2000; 1st Tuesday each month Marina Point Hospital Service Volunteers 1000; 2nd Tuesday each month Hospital Medical Library American Legion Auxiliary, Unit One ---------------------------1930; 3rd Tuesday each month Girl Scout.Hut, Marina Point Toastmasters Club No. 92 1930 each Thursday, Officers Club dining room. Toastmasters Club No. 113 1900 each Thursday, Marine Family Restaurant. Public Works Chips by Vic. Gault Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Broughton accompanied by LT and Mrs. T. H. Cushman, Jr. drove to the city of Santiago de Cuba on Monday the 22nd of February to meet Dr. and Mrs. P. H. Robertson. Mrs. Robertson is Mrs. Broughton's sister. These guests of the Broughton's flew to Santiago de Cuba from Miami after which they drove to the base where they will remain about three weeks. Before continuing their trip to the base, the party made a side trip to the little city of Banes, Cuba where they were the guests of friends at the United Fruit Company Organization. After an enjoyable three days at that city they returned to Santiago do Cuba by car and toured the city for two days and then continued to the base arriving last Sunday. We hope Dr. and Mrs. Robertson will enjoy their visit here. The following personnel from the District Public Works Office, Tenth Naval District are spending a week on the Base: Lt. W. D. Ennis, CEC, USN; ENS. R. Linderman, CEC, USN; Mr. F. Kendall, Director of Maintenance and Engineering Division, DPWO; Mr. M. P. Doran, Director, Utilities Division, DPWO and Mr. F. Arteaga, Budget Specialist, DPWO, they are on the Base for the purpose of assisting the Public Works Department in preparing the Maintenance and Operation Budget for the Fiscal Year 1955 for the Naval Station. They were welcomed aboard by a dinner at the CPO Club sponsored by the Public Works Department supervisors. Another visitor from the DPWO, Tenth Naval District is Mr. Robert Zwick, who is in charge of the Pest Control Program for the District and is making an orientation tour of the Naval Base to become familiar with the local Pest Control Program now in operation. The Janatorial Section which is a component part of the Buildings and Grounds Branch of the department is composed of approximately 21 janitors, including one Leadingman Janitor, Mr. Belarinino Suarez. This section provides janatorial services to all offices and various buildings under the cognizance of the Naval Station and includes janatorial services and functions to all buildings of the Base School organization, the Fleet Training Group area, the Operations Offices and Provost Marshal's Headquarters including the Industrial Dispensary, and most activities controlled by the Naval Station Command. The Upholstery Section of the department, which is located in the same building as the Furniture Storage and Issue Section (Building No. 13), is responsible for the operation of the upholstery shop which accomplishes all work for furniture cushions, mattresses, slip covers and such canvas work that may be required by the department. This section, under the direct supervision of Mr. William W. Stay, not only repairs all types of cushions, mattresses and slip covers, but also replaces them to fit as required. All upholstery work for vehicles is accomplished by another group of upholsterers assigned to the Transportation Division Upholstery Shop. Upholstery material, such as printed cloth, leather and imitation leather, etc., is maintained in stock by this section and is issued as required for accomplishing work on Government-owned furniture. Sunday, 7 March 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: S at u r d a y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions -re not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) The Chaplain's Corner An artist has the ability to place on canvas what is observed with the eye. This gift is enhanced when the eye has keenness and the color perception is sharp allowing the many shadings of color to be differentiated and their beauty transferred and held captive for others to enjoy. Not all paintings have pleasing beauty for many depict ugliness, despair, and hate, for the true artist records what is seen regardless of the consequences. This talent does not come to every one for all persons are endowed with various abilities. However, each has the power of observation and with this power comes responsibility. All can see the factors which engender beauty, and those which cause sorrow, hate, and ugliness in the world. These are objective, obvious things in a physical universe, but there is another perspective, the inward or subjective type of "seeing". The artist employs this method of "seeing" at times when painting, and every person, whether artist or not, has the power to look inward upon the spirit and soul of one's self. The obligation to examine one's soul is admitted and the power to do so is a privilege but in many instances the ability to see the situation properly is lacking. Color blindness is a common thing in the natural world and is just as prevalent in the spiritual world. It is so easy to confuse the good and the bad. An advisor is needed, one whose color perception is always valid and one who is always willing to aid in selecting the better things in life. God will be that person to those who care to ask Him. He wishes the lives of His creation to to be beautiful. James F. Agnew LT, CHC, USNR The Golden Text for Sunday: "I am the resurrection and the life; he who believes in me, though he die, yet shall he live, and whoever lives and believes in me shall never die."-John 11: 25, 26. Page Two THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 6 March 1954 THE INDIAN Page Five Marines Down Indians 78-73; Hold Lead As Season Nears End In one of the most exciting games of the blazing '54 season played Tuesday night, the Marine Leathernecks showed once and for all why they hold down the top spot in the local cage race as they edged the Naval Station Indians in a hard fought tussle on their home court, 78-73. Even the fans got into the show as the heat of this spectacular bated contest, 63-60. tle grew almost to the exploding The Pirates, using a man-to-man point on several occasions. defense, kept the pace burning for Fromthever beinnng he ace the slower Dental five as the lead From the very beginning the pace was burning as the lead switched changed hands regularly with hands like clockwork, with each neither team ever moving ahead team moving ahead by as much as tim Te hheaking point ame nine points at times, only to have when The Praes, on cpe its a e field goals by player-coach McGill, The snatched the lead and placed the Th lsig fvsetrdhe ball in a semi-freeze to take the rough and tumble fourth session decision. with the Braves leading by six This tussle saw Paul King, league points, but the Leathernecks, diescoring leader, notch his greatest playing one of the fighting finishes performance with 30 markers to that has been a major factor in run his total to 270 for the year. keeping them on top throughout Aiding bin was the number two the season, came through in the 'an of the Dental scoring duo, Joe closing minutes to move ahead and Rose as he added 17 more after a close out the contest leaving the glow start. bedraggled fans in a state of Center Ed Heimer led the winamazement. hers with 19 as MacMichael and This victory will, unless a major McGill contributed 13 and 11 more upset takes place, probably prove to the Buc cause. to be the deciding factor in the MEDICS SWAMP TRAINERS title race, as the Leathernecks have The Hospital Corpsmen pushed but three easy ganes left along their winning streak up another their homestretch. notch in the first game Wednesday Santos and Murrell led the winnight as they swamped the Fleet ning Marines as they dumped 19 Training Group, 78-44. and 18 respectively. The tilt was rough and tumble For the losing Braves, Bradford from the beginning and the Trainled the way with 26 markers and ers had to finish it with but four Young added another 19. men as they lost two by way of MALLARDS DEFEAT personals and two by being ousted TRAINERS for unnecessary roughness. In the other game Tuesday night, Center Olby O'Brien led the winthe VU-10 Mallards had to come ners as he dumped 16. He was folfrom behind in the last two seslowed by Bonkamp with 15. sions to defeat the Fleet Training Shaub led the losers as he dropGroup by a 77-73 margin. ped 14 followed by Collins with 13. The Trainers entered the contest MARINES DOWN DENTAL with the intentions of repeating In the second game Wednesday their first round upset of the night, the Marines Leathernecks Mallards and were well on their made their hold on the league-lead way in the first two quarters. Howjust a little bit tighter as they ever, the Mallards, led by guard downed the Dental Clinic, 68-53, Howerton and his stabbing, needleto leave but two games remaining like shots came alive in the closing on their schedule. sessions to move ahead and take League scoring leader Paul King, the contest going away. having a big third querter, almost Howerton led the winners as he led the Clinic away from the surripped the cords for 27 markers prised Leathernecks only to have with Lockhart adding another 13. them come back in the fourth sesSallnoslesion to take the win. Coins ed thegTra ig th 32, Gatti led the winners as he sank 22af them iomn ide another firs 21 and was followed by Androvich aand Santos with 17 and 14 respecFLIERS OVER SEABEES tively. In the opening game Monday King led the Clinic with 26. night, the NAS Fliers notched their SEABEES OVER PIRATES eighth straight victory by defeatThe scene switched over to Maing the SeaBees of MCB-8, 70-46. rine Site Thursday night where the Led by the board-handling of MCB-8 SeaBees caught a hapless Jackson and the big right hand of crew of Pirates and sank them by Hollowell, the Fliers had little a 79-51 margin. trouble in scoring while they held It was a game that the High the SeaBee's quick-breaking tacSchoolers should have never lost, tics to a minimum. but bad ball-handling plus a 26 This loss closed out all hope for point performance by SeaBee guard the SeaBee's climbing out of sixth Layman along with 22 more by place and left the Fliers in the forward Stills, proved to be the thick of things as the race tightens disastrous combination. with the coming of the last week For the losing Pirates, center Ed of play. Heimer was the bright spot as he Jackson led the winning "flysank 17. He was followed by Mcboys" with 24 while Hollowell and Gill with 11. Ring sank another 16 and 15 in FLIERS OVER NASTA that order. Closing out cage play for the For the losing SeaBees it was week, the NAS Flers clinched seLayman with 15 and Stills with 10. nd place as they edged the Naval PIRATES EDGE DENTAL Station Indians, 64-58. In the second game Monday The Fliers had to place the ball night, the High School Pirates in a tight freeze in the closing notched their second win of the minutes to take the tilt as the season at the expense of the Braves' ball-hawking tactics harascellar-dwelling Dental Clinic as sed their offense through-out. they edged them in a rapidly playDefensive standouts for the conHeimer (2) of the High School and King (3) of the Dental Clinic, both in the Top 10 Scorers, go up high in the air as Heimer sinks one for the Pirates in their 63-60 victory. Heimer turned in a 19 point performance, and King notched 30 points to hold on to his lead as top scorer in the league. Rose (8) of the Dental Clinic and Huddy (1) of the High School Pirates close in for possible assistance. test were the Braves' Daugherty and Henry who, because of their hustling style, have gained the reputation of being the most dangerous front duo in the local cage scene. Hollowell led the winners as he netted 16. He was followed by Jackson and Ring with 15 each and Allen with 13. Bradford and Morgan led the losers with 15 each. Cage Standings Team Won Marines --------12 NAS ----------11 Hospital ------10 VU-10---------9 NavSta ---------9 MCB-7-8 --------7 FTG ------------5 High School -2 Dental----------0 Lost 2 3 3 5 6 7 9 12 15 GB 1 2 3 3/2 5 7 10 122 Top 10 Scorers Player King Bradford Heimer Hollowell Androvich Gatti Collins Jackson Murrell Bonkamp Team FG Dental 112 NavSta 95 High School 74 NAS 75 Marines 72 Marines 72 FTG 69 NAS 59 Marines 48 Hospital 60 FT 72 65 42 36 38 34 35 33 46 15 TP AVG. 296 19.8 255 17.0 189 13.4 185 13.2 183 13.1 178 12.8 173 12.6 151 15.1 142 10.2 135 9.0 Cage Schedule Monday, 8 March Fleet Recreation Center VU-10 vs Hospital FTG vs High School Tuesday, 9 March Marine Site Marines vs MCB-8 NAS vs Dental Clinic Wednesday, 10 March Fleet Recreation Center VU-10 vs MCB-7 NAS vs Hospital Thursday, 11 March Marine Site Naval Station vs High School Marines vs FTG A mother took her son to consult a psychiatrist. When they were shown into the consulting-room, the analyst greeted them with: "And what is the trouble with this boy?" "He suffers from delusions," she told him. "He thinks he's a hen." The consultant said soothingly that patients often suffered from even more peculiar delusions, and asked how long the boy had thought he was a hen. "About two years," she said. "Two years!" echoed the psychiatrist. "Why didn't you bring him to see me long ago?" "Well, frankly," admitted the mother, "we needed the eggs." THE INDIAN Page Five Saturday, 6 March 1954

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Navy-10XDPPO-Gtmo THE INDIAN Saturday, 6 March 1954 The Lucky Bag by Betty Radcliffe The Special Services Department has something new to offer in another form of recreation. They now have a bicycle renting department ...they are still in the experimental stage and so at this time only have ten bicycles. These bicycles are rented out at 250 an hour on Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays from 0800 to 1700. One of the scenic routes available is the road through the golf course to Kittery and Windmill Beach as far as the stop signs. The bicycles are not allowed on the beaches. There are markers along the trail to show the way. If this experiment proves successful, the Special Service Department will acquire more bicycles. Well ...happy cycling. Speaking of bicycles: In 1894 a Bicycle Military Corps was organized and was made up of Cadets in the Northwestern Military Academy of Wisconsin. It was composed of sixteen bicycles each equipped with special clips for carrying rifles, etc. One of the feats of the corps was for the riders to put themselves and their bicycles, which with their military equipment weighed fifty-four pounds each, over a sixteen foot wall in two minutes and forty-eight seconds. Numerous long cross-country trips were made. On June 7, 1897, eleven cadets left Chicago carrying a message over the Mountains and the National Pike to Washington D. C. where it was delivered to the Secretary of War, on June 26, 1897. The first bicycle velocipedes or "swift walkers" as they were then called were imported in 1819. The first one in New York City made its appearance on May 21, 1819. The Common Council met in August of that year and in solemn session passed a law "to prevent the use of velocipedes in the public places and on the sidewalks of the city of New York." This lovely lass is "shipshape" anyway you care to look at her. She is petite Myra Hansen, better known as Miss United States. Myra, who hails from the Windy City of Chicago, is enjoying the balmy breeze at Miami Beach, Fla. Her suit has the lastest feature for Service girls-nautical lacings. FTG Bulletin Commander, Destroyer Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet, Rear Admiral C. C. Hartman, observed destroyer operations this week aboard various destroyer-type vessels undergoing training under Commander, Fleet Training Group. Admiral Hartman arrived aboard the destroyer H. R. Dickson on Monday to spend the week informally inspecting the destroyer and destroyer escorts of his force operating from Guantanamo Bay. On Wednesday he observed anti submarine w a r f a r e operations aboard the USS Roan (DD 853), flagship of Commander Destroyer Squadron 10, Captain R. F. Scott, USN. On Thursday Admiral Hartman witnessed the Operational Readiness Inspection on board the USS Benner, a destroyer radar picket. The Benner conducted low visibility piloting out of the harbor, rearming at sea and man overboard exercises as well as the regular Battle Problem drills. Admiral Hartman will confer Saturday with his commanding officers that are present in the Guantanamo Bay area during the scheduled operations conference. His staff arrived Friday aboard the USS Yosemite, the Admiral's regular flagship. The Fleet Training Group Number One Bowling Team was rolling full speed this week and moved into first place in the enlisted men's Bowling League with a 54 out of a possible 60 points. With six games to go, the team has won 40 out of a possible 45 games. Pat Spelce, BMC sharpshooter, holds the individual high game score with a 242 mark. Other team members include Murray Kramer, PNI3, Andrew Schmidt, RM1, Frank Cohanski, EMC, and Donald Green, RMC. The team will be hurt by the loss of Kramer, who will be transferred to the States for discharge on 10 March. Personnel Reporting LT Edward P. McConnon, USN has reported to the Administrative Department of FTG. From Nesquehoning, Pennsylvania, Mr. McConnon will fill the Staff Secretary Billet. Richard E. Kager, FN, USNR also has reported aboard. He comes from Washington, D. C., and presently is attached to the Administra tive Department of the Training Group. Advance Orders Received Chief "Mike" Conway, Training Group Administrative Department, has received advance orders to Washington, D. C., where he will report to the Receiving Station. Chief Conway has been active in FTG athletics in his two years at Guantanamo, and will be sorely missed as the baseball season approaches. Chief Anderson, Damage Control shiprider-instructor, has received advance orders to Madison, Wisconsin. Ship Arrivals The heavy cruiser USS Baltimore arrives for a period of training with the Fleet Training Group early next week. She will be followed by the light cruiser USS Worcester later in the week. As the speaker droned on and on, a man on the dais fell asleep. The chairman leaned over and tapped him with the gavel. The man opened one eye. "Hit me harder," he whispered, "I can still hear him." TEENAGEROUNDUP by Barbara Burke and Linda Thurston Nothing like winning a basketball game once in a while to build up your spirits. The kats and chicks were going wild about our win over the Dental Clinic this week. Poopsie Lehmbeck was so overwrought about the victory that he held a pep rally (or was it a Ditch Diggers Convention) right after the game. Then there was an all out Jam Session in the Barrett conveyance with Bill and Stuch making a cool musical "duo". Now for the feminine side of the news. Clusters of chicks could be seen walking from Sherman Ave. to the Recreation Area before and after the game. It seems that the bus service has been halted in that direction and from the comments heard from some of the gals, we doubt very much if they'll want to undertake such a journey again. It took Margo thirty minutes of waiting at the bus stop before the realization fully dawned on her that there weren't any more running. In the entertainment field another big dance is in the making. This time the theme will be "the first day of Spring". The Student Council plans to hold it up at "Ye 01' Faithful" Little Theater between the hours of 7:00 and 10:30. Tickets will soon be on sale at these popular prices; Stag .75 Drag $1.25. DID YOU SEE: Norman Huddy doing his rendition of "Flu, Flu, Flu". ..General Auto Von Graftonburg expounding on his views of the war between the States. (He's sympathetic with the Confederacy-of southern Germany.) Anita getting a headache at the last ball game. The swarms of teenagers sailing last weekend. .? Hospital Notes Heirport News The following births have been recorded during the past two weeks: Kenneth Harris Chapman, son of SOC and Mrs. Frederick W. Chapman; Bambi Lynn Williams, daughter of AD3 and Mrs. Louie B. Williams; Shirley Ann Wilson, daughter of BM2 and Mrs. Theodore Wilson; Michael Wayne Kelly, son of SHC and Mrs. Charles L. Kelly; Robert Harold Olsen, son of ENS and Mrs. Harold L. Olsen. New Arrival LTJG Lucille M. Michaud (NC) USN reported aboard for duty 26 February from the U. S. Naval Hospital, Camp Lejeune, N. C. Bowling In the Enlisted Men's InterCommand Bowling League, the Hospital has now taken over second place with a 32 won and 4 lost record. We will bowl against FTG team No. 1 this week, present holders of first place. Golf The Hodpital Golf Tournament is now drawing to a close with Hallum and Mills battling it out for the Championship, while Dr. Williams and Cox are the finalists in the Consolation Round. Sea Urchins The black sea urchin is an animal common to this area and familiar to most people-either from sight or sad experience. The spines of these animals are very brittle and have small, sharp barbs along the entire length of each spine, making it difficult, and painful, to remove them, once they have come in contact wtih the skin. MOVIES I, THE JURY Biff Elliot Preston Foster I, THE JURY: This is based on a book of the same name by Mickey Spillane. A story of a private eye whose buddy is shot to death. He starts in on the task of finding the killer. After many episodes the killer turns out to be a beautiful girl who is a psychoanalyst. Sunday, 7 March THUNDER OVER THE PLAINS Randolph Scott Phyllis Kirk THUNDER OVER THE PLAINS: This story takes place in postCivil War days when carpet baggers were trying to keep the states in unrest to keep them out of the union. A union captain is sent to arrest a local "Robin Hood" and ends up revealing the carpetbaggers for what they are. Texas joins the union and he is reunited with his wife. Monday, 8 March MARRY ME AGAIN Marie Wilson Robert Cummings MARRY ME AGAIN: The story of a beautiful girl who tries to force a young returned jet pilot into marriage and succeeds. She inherits a million dollars, which annoys the young veteran who wants to support the family. She then sets up a veteran's public housing project so she will be broke again and they then continue with their plans of marriage. Tuesday, 9 March THE GLASS WEB Edw G. Robinson John Forsythe THE GLASS WEB: An actress on a popular TV show is murdered. The writer of the series is accused because of circumstantial evidence. The envious casting director pushed the case so the writer will be convicted and he can take over his job. In his anxiety to prove the other man's guilt he exposes himself as the murderer. Wednesday, 10 March TARZAN AND THE SHE DEVIL Lex Barker Joyce MacKenzie TARZAN AND THE SHE DEVIL: A beautiful adventuress is head of a gang of ivory thieves operating in East Africa. She has captured and enslaved an entire tribe of male warriors to serve as her native bearers. When the tribe's women appeal to Tarzan for help he sets out on a rescue mission and accomplishes his purpose. Thursday, 11 March THE JOE LOUIS STORY Paul Stewart Hilda Simms THE JOE LOUIS STORY: This dramatic story of Joe Louis' life is filmed from his late teens in '32 thru his last fight with R. Marciano in 1951. It tells of his lessons in Detroit, his professional debut in 1934, and his more famous fights, including the championship win over Braddock, his fights with Max Schmeling, Walcott, etc. It also tells of his rocky marriage to Marva. q