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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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Vol. VI, No. 34 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 27 February 1954



Carnival Tops All Previous Records


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Under SecNav To "Mr, Barry's Ethings" VADM Ballen

Continue Tour Now In Rehearsal Here For O


Thomas S. Gates, Jr., Under Secretary of the Navy, will leave Guantanamo Bay today. Mr. Gates arrived here on the 24th of February on his first stop of an extended familiarization tour of Naval and Marine commands in the Caribbean area.
During his stay on the Naval Base, Mr. Gates was conducted on official tours and observed the con(luct of major operations on the base and operations at sea.
Mr. Gates, a lifelong resident of Philadelphia, Penn., first served with the Navy when he was commissioned in the Naval Reserve and entered on active duty April 1, 1942.
During World War II, he served with Commander in Chief, Atlantic, where he helped in the organization and development of the Naval Air Intelligence Center. In the spring of 1943, he was assigned to the USS Monterey and served on board
(Continued on Page Four)


The Little Theatre's production of "Mr. Barry's Etchings" is now in rehearsal and is expected to open Monday evening, March 15th for a five night run. The current play will be the Little Theatre's 17th consecutive production in five years.
"Mr. Barry's Etchings" was first presented by Brock Pemberton at the Forty-eighth Street Theatre, New York City, on Januray 31' 1950, with a cast starring Lee Tracy, and featuring Vicki Cummings and Scott McKay.
The local production tasts in their appearance: Bob Gewertz, Betty Radcliffe, Betty Lou Tipler, Lee Douglas, Joe Knepper, Flo Schnake, Joyce Simmons, Dave Humes, Ethyl Beach, Le Grande Orr Don Macquarrie, Virginia Bertine and Ken Woodard.
Betty Radcliffe is the play's Producer, in Janicek directs


VADM John J. Ballentine in Guantanamo Bay, 25 Fe to witness an operational r inspection on board th Hornet. Admiral Ballentir frequent visitor to this Alternating with his Chief RADM Frederick N. Kivet observe all operational r inspections on board aircr riers in this area.
Admiral Ballentine will from Guantanamo Bay after the completion of hi in this area.

Averil Clark is Assistant and John Freeman is Stag ager. Property Manage Tipler has been unable t a "stuffed bird" which is as a "prop" in the play. knowing the whereabouts a bird which can be borro the run of the play ple Betty Radcliffe at 9-51 -


0


The annual giant Guantanamo
Bay Carnival for 1954 came to an end last Sunday night after a threeday run that proved far more successful in its mission than was
speculated.
Under the direction of Captain
M. A. Moon, Commanding Officer of the Dental Clinic who acted as General Chairman, and LT R. E.
Ricker, Procurement Co-ordinator, the event which was truly an 'allhands evolution' far exceeded the goals set for it when 'operationcarnival' started as early as November 1st, 1953.
Represented were all base commands, American Legion, Fleet Reserve, American Civilians, Auxiliaries and various women's clubs and organizations, also the high school and Boy and Girl Scout
troops.
Even Nature coqora cZiiiv'al.
Yieeet'iberty was extended and all hands participated in games of
skill and chance.
Sunday night alone, an estimated
3,000 to 5,000 Cubans from surrounding areas joined in the festivities and brought the approximate total of fleet and base personnel, civilians and their dependents on the grounds at any one time to a peak total of from 12,000 to 15,000.
Captain Moon is a veteran of
three such affairs. His first proved to be a highly successful festival in Memphis, the next two here in Guantanamo Bay. He stated it took about $23,000 in expenses 'before
the first hamburger was sold'.
The primary mission of the carnival is for funds to better the community, aiding Navy Relief and contributing to all recognized charities while maintaining an operating schedule with a minimum loss of productive man hours. It is also to provide recreation and entertainment for Forces Afloat, tine base personnel and dependents with
all commands fully represented in
Sj the event.
Said Captain Moon, "It was an
all-hands evolution and certainly arrived well deserving of a well-done. Cobruary, operation between each command eadiness and the organizations involved on e USS every level was excellent!" e is a Among the various commands
area. that ranked highest in the indiviof Staff, dual sales was the dental clinic, te, they consisting of 9 officers and 16 dental eadiness technicians, selling an excess of aft car- $3,000 in shares alone.
Final drawings were made Sundepart day night and the winners of the shortly various prizes were as follows: s duties Lucia Murilla, Caimanera-set
of golf clubs
J. E. Burford, U.S.S. TannerDirector portable sewing machine e Man- Leo D. Barclay, U.S.S. Roanoke
r Jack -Cushman scooter
* locate B. F. Haynes-English bicycle needed I. Avila, Villamar, 136-Air conAnoe ditioner
Anyone IW. M. Love, CA 72-12ft. deep of such . *"
wed for reeze
ase call Leonard Marsel, Special Services
(Continued on Page Four)






Page wo
n. .- THE INDIAN Stra,2 eray15


Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9-615
Saturday, 27 February 1954 -U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
RADM Edmund B. Taylor
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff

U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT william R. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sandness-------Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC-------------------Editor
H. L. Sisson, JO3--------------------News
Jerry Lewis, JO3----------------- Features
J. C. Dierks, J030-------------------Sports
Pierce Lehmbeck-------------------.Sports
F. L. Cannon, JOSN--____Photographer S. E. Cobbs, PHSN----------Photographer
R. Naccarato, SN----------------Make-up
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and finance with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


VU-10 Prop Blast


Last week, eight civil service employees were presented awards for "Meritorious Civilian Service" with "outstanding" ratings for the period of 1 April 1952 to 31 March 1953. CAPT William R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer of the Naval Station is shown with employees who received the award. From left to right: G. Darien, E. Z. Skelton, R. Sierra, CAPT Caruthers, 0. Mujica, L. D. Irving, L. J. Ulmer, R. Turcaz, and J. R. Bordatto.


On The Airwaves At WGBY


-B-0 handing oi, R In a continuing effort to bring beginning March 6. They are
ggp, d'ng officer, CDR T. our listeners in Guantanamo Bay "Gunsmoke", "Horatio HornblowHenson, LT J. Bell, ann our t i , a-m "Horatio H o
Q. Winkler departed Gtmo Tuesday metthe ono'~iitA-ngw
23 February for Chincoteauge, Vir- a re-vamped program schedule to Fans of Dean Stahlecker's "Hillginia to assist ComUtWingLant your Armed Forces Radio Station billy Jamboree" who only hear
wtasupieisetoofoe WGBY. half of the program during the
oft ou spise squadnsen V4 The Listeners have constantly asked week have asked for a special of our sister squadrons, VU-4. The fo oeavnueaddaa weekend edition of the popular
inspection team is due to return for more adventure and drama weedeiino h oua
2nspebtr a. programs on week nights so begin- show. Beginning Saturday, March
27 February. ning Monday, March 1, you'll be 6 at 2:00 P.M., Dean will bring
The 1954 carnival appeared to be able to hear two such shows in you a full hour request show of a huge success for all concerned succession, each night Monday hillbilly, folk and western music The officers and men of the squad- through Friday. Watch the daily immediately f o 11 o w i n g Jerry ron went all out to assist the program schedule in the "Papoose" Lewis's "Saturday Swing Session".
overall carnival. The ROLL-A- for the names of these shows and "Theatre Guild On The Air" has
BALL, COLOR WHEEL and the the changes in day and time. often been called the finest draCHOO CHOO have been knocked An old institution on WGBY has matic program now in weekly
down and are resting comfortable been the Saturday morning "Kiddie production. The tradition continues in the hangar. Stowage space is Show" lineup from 8:30 to 11:30. as Sinclair Lewis's "Arrowsmith" urgently needed and anyone know- In addition to such regulars as is presented in a full hour adaptaing of a dry suitable place please "Space Patrol", "Gene Autry" and tion Monday, March 1 at 9:00 P.M., contact us. VU-10 owns no real "Let's Pretend", three new shows co-starring Tyrone Power and
estate at Gtmo, we are strictly move to the Saturday morning slots Loretta Young in the leading roles. renting, leasing, or what have you.
The Mallard golf team defeated
the NSD team 17 to 7 Monday 22
February at the local links. The * match was much closer than the
score indicates, so practice not beer
is "on tap" for the Mallards. To
aid the cause "Captain Jim" Mauldin fired a neat 76, which ain't
bad for a young fellow.
All hands are practicing up on
their semaphore lately. It appears
that in the near future the majority of telephone subscribers are
going to resort to a "wig wag"
system of communications. (This
opinion is based on a 1952 Survey)
The NAS bowling alley was the
scene of the playoff Tuesday night
for the NAS-VU-10 bowling championship. In a hot contested match,
the Structural Division team of
VU-10 dusted off the Gas Crew of
NAS in the best two out of three
series. Congratulations to the
Structural keglers.
Here is the latest dope on the .. NAS-VU-10 mixed bowling league.
Any interested participants contact Chief Sharp, extension 8-720 or
9-643; Chief Sandage, 8-808; or
Chief Callan, extension 8-850 or Three base men are proudly holding certificates showing they have
9-439. Submit your names either as completed USAFI courses. Robert Sopher, SKSN, of Supply, holds a a three couple team or individually. certificate for the completion of the High School course. John H. Schmitt, After the names are all in, a meet- PR3, of Base Police, holds two, one for Latin American History and one ing will be called to iron out the for Spanish. Raymond Peoples, MM3, 5th Div. was awarded his for the wrinkles. English a4urse. The awards were made in the I&E Office last week.


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THE INDIAN


T


Saturday, 27 February 1954


Sunday, 28 February 1954
Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930-2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic)

The Chaplain's Corner

It was a blessing that the poor victim mentioned in Scriptures had a Good Samaritan to look after him. Oh, the inhumanity of those
--wh--pnned-by- him! He might have died before help could reach him. There are many today just as much in need of help. There must be some Good Samaritans for that purpose. Why should we not offer our services on occasion? Whenever anyone in distress finds another coming thus to his aid he, as it were, hears Our Lord Himself coming and saying: "Be of good heart; it is I, fear ye not".
Saturday and Sunday, the 27th and 28th of February have been designated as Red Cross Sabbath and Sunday. By sharing in the great humanitarian work of the Red Cross, all can become Good Samaritans in helping those who need a helping hand. 'Tis our way of life to help our neighbor: 'tis one of our customs. Each of us, in his own way, must help his neighbor if the work of the Red Cross is to be assured the success of its campaign during the coming year.
All of us ought to give an example of the spirit of generosity. How many look to us for help? Are we going to follow the spirit of the world and turn away? Why not rather follow the spirit of the Good Samaritan, and do all we can to help those who look to us, be that need what it may?
To bring consolation to those who are sick is one of the most practical details of charity. It is also a virtue to express our condolence to those who have lost a dear one. To bring comfort to those in need has always been considered one of the most charitable of deeds. Hearts without pity care not for charity. It is all the same to them whether others suffer or not. But it was not all the same to the Good Samaritan. Whenever he meets someone in need of comfort he pours oil as it were on his wounds. This is most meritorious in the eyes of Our Lord.
William J. Spinney







Saturday, 27 February 1954


THE INDIAN


Santiago de Cuba

"City Of Sunshine"

This is the first of a group of articles dealing with the island of Cuba. The first four of the series will describe the city of Santiago de Cuba and the interest which centers about it as a factor in the history of Cuba and of the United States.

Through the eyes of the visitor, one of Cuba's most historic and interesting sites is the port of Santiago de Cuba. Founded in 1514 by Diego Velasquez, the city was an important commercial center on the Spanish Main during the days of the Galleons and pieces-of-eight and served as the embarkation point for several Spanish goldseeking expeditions to the mainland in the 16th century.
This picturesque city of 150,000 persons is located on a beautiful narrow-mouthed bay on the southern coast of the island and strangely enough, is practically ignored by tourists. The pleasure seekers and free spenders are drawn to Havana's bright lights, little realizingthat the real Cuba may be found 600 miles away, in Santiago. Here one is impressed by the lack of the artificial tourist come-ons which are so prevelant in the capital. No elaborate night clubs, no race tracks or psuedo-Cuban restaurants; but in their place a friendly, hospitable people, living a simple life among the many evidences of the island's colonial day splendor and historical past.
Santiago is built on a group of hills rolling down to the bay and is sheltered by a mountain range which encircles the surrounding countryside. The beauty of these peaks is enhanced by the presence of low hanging clouds which offer a snow-blanketed effect and cap the bluish-green tree covered slopes.
The mean temperature is tolerable, hovering around 82*F. in the winter and climbing to 880 in the summer, although ocean breezes offer some relief to those who are troubled by warm climates. Very little difference is noticed between the two seasons and the local Chamber of Commerce could easily claim the title of "the place of constant warmth and sunshine" for the city.
Santiago is a notable commercial seaport, primarily because of its proximity to the Windward Passage entrance to the Caribbean Sea. At the docks one may find vessels unloading cargoes from Europe, the Western Hemisphere and Japan or loading local products such as sugar, manganese ore, rum, tobacco, honey and molasses for world wide destination on our side of the Iron Curtain.
The historical and "old world" atmosphere of the city is particularly striking to the visitor. It is no strain on one's imagination to visualise the ghost of Governor Velasquez conferring with Hernan Cortez, who held the office of mayor, about the expedition that the latter was to lead to Mexico where gold and conquest awaited him. It was from Santiago that Cortez, sponsored and outfitted by the governor set sail in 1518. It was from the city also that Velasquez later sent a force to subdue Cortez when it became apparent that the conquistador had taken the bit in his teeth and struck out on his own.
Thus, only a few years after the voyages of Columbus, the city of Santiago de Cuba had already become known as one of the most important commercial ports in the New World.


VADM Fahrion Visits Naval Base Rabbi


VADM Frank G. Fahrion (left), ComPhibLant, chats with his hosts, CAPT W. R. Caruthers, C. 0. Naval Station and RADM E. B. Taylor, ComNavBase at a reception given in his honor by Captain Caruthers.


Jewish Services

Held In Base Chapel

Last night marked the first in a series of regularly scheduled Friday night Jewish services to be held every Friday night starting oi 7 o'clock in the Naval Base chapel under the direction of Burt Forman YN3 of MCB-8.
Burt performed similar duties in his spare time while stationed in Newfoundland, Argentia with his battalion. At present, he is the editor of the 'Bulldozer', a weekly mimeographed paper published for the battalion.
He's a graduate of Yeoman school and the Armed Forces Information School at Fort Slocum, New York.
Burt Forman wishes to extend a cordial invitation to all, whether of Jewish faith or not, to be present for Jewish services every Friday night at 7 o'clock.


A "farewell" party was held recently by the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Fleet Reserve Association for the former president of the organization, Mrs. Minnie Nixon, and other members leaving or due to depart soon. Above, left to right: Edith Garris, Mrs. Nixon, Clara Hoff.


Five Base Officers


Promoted To ICON

Last week, five lieutenants attached to commands in the Guantanamo Bay area received notice of their promotion to the rank of Lieutenant Commander.
Those promoted were, LCDR R. A. Jameison, USNR, of VU-10, LCDR Clarence A. Wreath, USN, and LCDR Robert K. Minard, Jr., both of Fleet Training Group; LCDR Joseph A. Strouhal, USN, of the Naval Station; and LCDR John W. Richmond, USNR, of the Naval Base.
All of the promotions were effective as of January, 1954. LCDR Jamieson, LCDR Wreath, LCDR Richmond, and LCDR Minard were all given their rank on 1 January 1954 while LCDR Strouhal was given his rank on 20 January 1954. For the time covered by the retroactive date, the new lieutenant commanders will receive pay due them for that rank above the amount for lieutenant.


Meetings .

Time & Place

Base Organizations may have a notice of their regular monthly meetings posted weekly by submitting in writing to the Indian the time and the place of their meetings.
Fleet Reserve Association
2000; 2nd & 4th Tuesday each
month
Community Auditorium
Ladies' Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association --------------------2000; 2nd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Room, Community
Auditorium
Little Theatre Group
2000; 1st Tuesday each month
Marina Point

The amount of sleep required by the average person 5q about a half an hour more.


Witkin Visits


U. S Naval Base


by Jerry Lewis

Rabbi Nathan Witkin is small of stature but a man of great dignity. Age, wisdom and experience have lined his face. His voice is soothing and sincere.
He is a man of vast knowledge and because of this has been assigned to the Canal Zone in the capacity of Field Director of the Jewish Welfare Board of the Armed Services Division, Caribbean Command.
He is a graduate of New York University (1925), the Theological Seminary of New York and the Rabbinical Seminary in Jerusalem. Upon visiting the holy land last summer for the first time in 18 years, he found that much has changed there in the way of modernization and progress.
A native of Lewisburg, West Virginia, the Rabbi resides in Balboa with his wife Helen and their children, Michael 15, Samuel 8, and Judith Ann 5. An older daughter, Naomi 21, is presently attending school in the United States .
In addition to his primary mission as Field Director of the National Jewish Welfare Board, he is also the head of the USO Jewish Welfare board in Balboa.
In speaking to the radio audience over WGBY's weekly presentation, 'Your Chaplain Speaks' , Rabbi Witkin built his talk around the topic, "What Is A Jew?"
He told of the modernization of an ancient religion in keeping with the swift progress and radical advancements of modern day civilization.
He quoted a great philosopher as saying, "Judaism is a civilization. It is comprised of a cultured group primarily religious, but not exclusively so, linked together with a common history, a common language of prayer, a vast literature, but above all, a sense of common destiny".
The Rabbi's tour of the Indies which brought him here, will take him to San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Trinidad. He is arranging ceremonies of observance of the high holy days called 'Passover', which commence April 17th until April 25th, to be held on all military reservations.
In keeping with the policy and mission of the Armed Forces Radio Service to promote higher morale as well as offering entertainment and aural education, WGBY brings to the air every Tuesday evening at 6:30, a Chaplain of every faith to comfort and guide military personnel while far away from home and loved ones.


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sour THE INDIAN Saturday, 27 February 1954


A Message From Garcia
by Henry Garcia

Birth and Death, alpha and omega in a person's life are regarded in Cuba the same as in the States or in any other civilized country, although in Cuba the people observe a few different ceremonies in these two important phases of what constitutes life. Incidentally, it always occurreet to me that it is pitiful that we should start our lives crying and causing others to cry. This, it seems to me, marks the boundaries of life as Crying and Suffering. It is regrettable that it should be so, especially because of the fact that we start out causing suffering and end up causing cries.
In Cuba the birth of a baby follows the same routine as in the States, except that once the stork has deposited the precious load, the happy parents invite their friends to drink "alifiado" (an alcoholic beverage composed of many aromatic roots, which they had prepared and buried in the ground since the first symptoms of an augment in the family appeared.
When a person dies, the custom is to have a "Velorio" (wake), with the presence of relatives and friends. In these wakes, usually there is a person who, between sobs and screams, tells everyone about the virtues of the deceased, and of the last time the deceased and this person dined together, and about the good old places where they used to meet. "Velorios" are "buenos" if there are lots of screams and faintings in them, and if there is plenty to eat and drink. It is a regular practice to serve either chocolate or coffee, with cheese and crackers as well as cigars to those who attend. A person enters the house, expresses his sympathies to the mourning relatives, takes a look at the corpse, and goes out from the room into the hall where he chats about politics, baseball or women until the next day.
Long ago some rich families, who thought that their social status demanded a repression of their emotions, sought the help of the "Plainideras", a group of women who could cry as few can, upon the payment of a sum of money. Thus, the "Planlideras" kept the atmosphere of sorrow, while the relatives of the deceased could calmly talk without losing their social dignity.

(Continued from Page One)
Carnival . . .
-set of golf clubs
T. Goldader, HM1, U.S.S. Hornet
-.22 cal. Savage rifle.
A. C. Taylor, U.S.S. New Jersey
-Admiral refrigerator
Williard Watson, Fire Department-Zenith Trans-Oceanic radio
Philip Preston, NSD-GE Washer-Drier Combination
Wilfred V. Ellis, Fire Department-television set
W. R. Leverett, NAS-shotgun Bernice R. Cox, CB-20-Dodge
J. N. Hickman, U.S.S. Quillback, Plymouth
Mario F. Peraza, Lima-$500 cash prize.
Although no figures were immediately available, LCDR Woodard termed it as a 'financial success, far surpassing our greatest expectations."
LT S. Plar, Assistant Officer-inCharge of the Naval Station Exchange provided the staggering figures concerning food and drink concessions. There were 60,000 cans of beer sold, 35,000 individual sandwiches, 6,500 popsicles, 2,560 pounds of hamburger patties and 27,000 pounds of ice used.


~~1


Chief and Mrs. H. F. Cox and their son stand beside the new Dodge which they won at the Guantanamo Bay Carnival. Mrs. Cox was the holder of the winning share.


96 Hour Liberty

Proposed

Navy Secretary Anderson will soon have on his desk a Marine Corps sponsored change to Navy regulations which, if approved, will allow commanding officers of certain Marine and Navy units to grant 96 hour week-end liberties instead of the presently authorized 72 hour passes.
The change has the approval of the Chief of Naval Operations and the Chief of Naval Personnel and it is expected that SecNav will give the final approval.
Under the new system, really a "fat 72", personnel would leave their duty station on Friday, as usual, but instead of reporting back by 0800 Monday morning, they would be allowed to remain away until sundown Monday.
The move was proposed in an effort to cut down the alarming number of highway deaths among servicemen rushing back to their duty station in the early hours of Monday morning combined with the tremendous amount of civilians returning from week-ends to be at work by 8 A.M. Last year the Marine Corps lost 165 men on the highway and the Navy highway deaths totalled 394.

Some people are like blotters. They soak it all in, but get it all backwards.

(Continued from Page One)

Under SecNav
it for about a year. Then, in 1944, he was assigned to the staff of Rear Admiral Calvin T. Durgin and served on that staff during the invasion of southern France. He was then sent back to the Pacific where he remained until the end of the war, taking part in the Philippine liberation, the Iwo Jima campaign, and the Okinawa campaign.
For his service in the Pacific, he was awarded the Bronze Star and a Gold Star in lieu of a second Bronze Star. On release to inactive duty in 1954, Mr. Gates was promoted to tl-f rank of Commander, USNR. a


Defense Department

Orders Equalization

Of Allotment Rules

The Department of Defense has ordered that all the services standardize their allotment rules by midApril. Until now, military pay allotment rules have differed for the various services.
Hereafter, according to spokesmen from DOD, allotments are to be permitted for the following:
1. Purchase of U. S. Savings Bonds.
2. Premiums for life insurance. 3. Repayment of loans to Red Cross, Navy Relief.
4. Class Q allotments.
5. Bank savings or checking accounts.
6. Repayment of loans for purchase of a home.
7. Voluntary liquidation of indebtedness to the U.S. incurred by defaulting on notes guaranteed by the FHA or VA or by overpayment of pay and allowances made by any department of the government.


Ladies' Golf Shots
by Mary Ann Pennell

The weekly tournament of the Ladies' Golf Club vas held Wednesday the 25th. The front nine was played with score' minus handicap. It's good to see so many girls turn out for our weekly tournaments.
The following winners were each awarded a golf ball:
1st Flight-Jane McElroy and Lou Toczko
2nd Flight-Fran D y k e m a a, Helen Viafora and Mary Spears
3rd Flight-Joyce Simmons and Betty Lou Tipler
Next Wednesday we play the back nine and the tournament is a Blind Five.
Sunday, February 28th, we are having another Scotch foursome. If you'd like to play, sign up ir the golf shack. There are lots of men and women that have no one te play with, so let's all join in the fun. There will be cokes and beer on the 10th tee for all players. Call the golf shack 3:30 P.M. Saturday for your star time.





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Saturday, 27 February 1954


THE INDIAN


Special Services

To Hold Smoker

The Special Services Department wishes to announce that a Fleet boxing smoker has been tentatively scheduled for the night of 6 March. The smoker will be held at the Fleet Recreation Area with approximately ten bouts planned for the program. The recreation department has recently completed construction of a new three feet high regulation size ring so combatants may feel sure of secure footing for the bouts. All hands are invited. and are asked to share in th" puffing of the cigars and cigarettes which will be distributed throughout the audience.
Any persons wishing to aid the Special Services Officer in the capacity of a manager, trainer, or second are asked to contact LT E. A. Sandness at 9-617.


Little League

With the regular playing diamiond almost completed and the practice diamond already in use, the Little League Baseball organization has revamped its practice schedule to include all the boys at all practice sessions. Formerly the practice games were held with alphabetical divisions of boys participating, but this provided unequal numbers of boys for the teams. So, commencing this week, all boys have been asked to come out to the practice games.
Mr. R. E. Zaiser, supervisor of the Little League, pointed out that since the formation of the Little League many boys have left Guantanamo Bay creating a vacancy for more applicants. At present the enrollment provides only enough boys for approximately three teams. Applications for enrollment in the Little League may be obtained by calling Mr. Zaiser at 8-249. All boys between the ages of 7 and 12 are eligible.


Teen-Age Bowling

Contrary to popular belief, the indoor sport of bowling is not restricted to the older set. TeenAgers also prove to be pretty good keglers as the following statistics taken from the local Teen-Age League readily show.
TEAM STANDINGS
W. L.
Lehmbeck's -----9 3
MacMichael's 7 5
Beman's __-_--7 5
Huddy's ---------------- 1 11
HIGH AVERAGE (BOYS)
Pierce Lehmbeck ---------- 167.9
George MacMichael -------- 155.4
HIGH AVERAGE (GIRLS)
Luella Curran ------------ 119.3
Emmy Bruner ------------- 115.5
HIGH DOUBLE (BOYS)
Pierce Lehmbeck ---------- 395
HIGH DOUBLE (GIRLS)
Roxana Moore ------------- 243


Judo Club Needs

New Members

The Guantanamo Bay Judo Club is looking for new members who are interested in the "gentle art" of wrestling scientifically. All new candidates for the club have been urged to appear at the gymnasium in the Fleet Recreation area any week-day between the hours of 1700 and 1900.







Saud, 27Fbur 94TEIDA aeFv


NAS Fliers Dowr

In the game of the week played Tuesday night the NAS Fliers gained a full game on the leagueleading Marine Leathernecks by defeating them in a hotly contested battle, 71-55.
This victory ran the Fliers current streak to seven straight and brought them to within one and a half games of the faltering Leathernecks.
The Fliers, led by team-captain Art Hollowell, bounced off to a first quarter lead of 25-3 which later provided the margin that won the game. In the last three sessions, the Leathernecks stayed with point for point, but all too late.
Leading the winners was Hollowell who dumped 23 followed by Ring with 16.
Gatti and Santos led the losing Leathernecks as they each neted 15.
In the second game, the fourthstanding VU-10 Mallards came through to easily take the Dental Clinic by a 76-46 margin.
Led by team captain Huber, the Mallards led by 24 points at halftime and rolled or through the last sessions with little haste as they won going away.
Huber, Howerton and Lockhart led the scoring for the Mallards with 16, 12 and 11 in that order.
For the losing Clinic, the KingRose duo was reversed for once as Rose netted 23 and King 17.
CORPSMEN EDGE DENTAL
In the second game played Tuesday night the Dental Clinic, led by a 26 point performance by league-scoring leader Paul King, fought the Hospital Corpsmen to the limit only to drop the decision in a five minute overtime period, 56-55.
The Corpsmen, rolling along at an easy pace in the early sessions, found the Clinic five almost too hot to handle as they suddenly put on a scoring show in the closing minutes to end the game with score knotted at 53-53.
In the overtime period, the Corpsmen moved ahead by a 56-55 margin and then exhibited a perfect two-minute freeze to close out the contest.
Leading the Corpsmen was Bonkamp with 15 and Maddix with 12.
For the losing Clinic, the KingRose duo came through again with 26 and 22 respectively.
BRAVES SWAMP TRAINERS
In the first game Wednesday night, the Naval Station Indians and their center, Brad Bradford, made local cage history as they swamped the Fleet Training Group, 94-23.
The Indians, by taking the Trainers by the 71 points margin recorded the biggest difference in points scored in the Naval Base League history and Bradford by scoring 38 points turned in the highest single scoring performance of any cager in the League annals. Bradford scored 25 of his points in the first quarter.
For the losing Trainers, who couldn't seem to get going as they have in the past, Tapler and Zino led the scoring with 9 and 7 respectively.
MARINES DEFEAT HIGH
SCHOOL
In the opening game Thursday night the league-leading Marine Leathernecks, angry over two straight losses, came back to take it out on the High School five at a 73-50 count.
The Leathernecks, led by scoring ace Andy Androvich, came out of


i Marines 71-55
the first half with a 24 point lead and simply coasted through the last two sessions as all members of both squads saw action. This victory ran the Leathernecks league-leading edge on the second place NAS Fliers to a full game.
Androvich led the winners with 20 with the rest of the scoring pretty evenly distributed over the rest of the squad.
Lehmbeck and E. Stafford each netted 12 for the losing Pirates with player-coach McGill adding another 11.
The second scheduled game of the evening went to the Hospital via forfeit as the MCB-8 five failed to show.


Cage Schedule

Monday, 1 March
Fleet Recreation Center
NAS vs MCB-8
Dental Clinic vs High School
Tuesday, 2 March
Marine Site
VU-10 vs FTG
NavSta vs Marines Wednesday, 3 March
Fleet Recreation Center
Hospital vs FTG
Dental Clinic vs Marines
Thursday, 4 March
Marine Site
MCB-8 vs High School
NAS vs NavSta

Cage Standings


Marines --__---NAS -- .__ _-NavSta --_--__-Hospital -------VU-10 ---------MCB-7-8 -------FT G ---_______-High School ----Dental ---------


9
8
8
8
7
6
5
1
0


2
3
4
4
4
6
7
9 13


Robbery In The Air!


1
11/2 11%
2
3%
4% 7% 10


Top 10 Scorers


Player King Bradford Androvich Gatti Hollowell Heimer Zino Hallum Collins Bonkamp


Team FG
Dental 89
NavSta 70
Marines 62
Marines 62
NAS 56
High School 51 FTG 44
Hospital 50
FTG 50
Hospital 53


FT 62 45 31 32 29 32 43 30 28 it


TP AVG. 240 18.5 185 15.4 155 14.3 146 13.3 141 12.8 134 13.4 131 33.1 130 12.0 128 10.6 117 10.7


Quiz


Questions
1. How many no-hitters have been tossed by Bob Feller of the Cleveland Indians?
2. What was the first written rule of basketball?
3. What basketball star was voted the outstanding player of last year's National Invitation Tournament?
4. Against what country did the United States basketball team set an Olympic scoring record in 1952?
5. What school won the first National Invitation B a s k e t b a 11 Tournament?
Answers
1. Three-in 1940, 1946 and 1951.
2. "The ball may be thrown in any direction with one or both hands."
3. Walter Dukes of Seton Hall.
4. They defeated Chile by a score of 103 to 55, july 29, 1952.
5. Temple "Jniversity in 1938.


4


Sanny Conti (14) of the NAS Flyers stands by in a state of amazement as big Jack Jackson (7) steals the ball right off the fingertips of Leatherneck guard Andy Androvich (2) in the Flyers 71-55 romp of the league-leaders Tuesday night.


Base Bowling

Standings


Team
FTG #1 -------11th Division Hospital -------2nd Division -4th Division ----MCB-8 #2 --_MCB-8 #3 ---_FTG #2 -------MCB-8 #1 -5th Division ____. NSD. __..__..._..
1st Division -__MCB-8 #4 -___MCB-8 #5 ----Boatshed -------6th Division .-F.B.P. -.-.--_.--


W 33
24 23
21 21 19 19 18 18 16 15 16 11
9
8
8
4


L
3
15
7
12 15 11
14 18 15 11
20 17 25
21 22 28 26


Pts. 44 34 32 28 27 26
24 24 23
22 21 21 15 11 10 10
5


Women's Bowling

A gala affair is being planned for the Ladies' Bowling League banquet. Trophies will be presented to the first and second place winners, one for sportsmanship, four individual trophies for high game, high series and most improved player of the season. The time: 1:00 P.M.; the date: March 4th; the place: Officers Ilub.

4


SCUTTLEBUTT







.









. .



"I didn't know it was' loaded."

Science is resourceful. It couldn't Pry open the Pullman windows, so it air-conditioned the train.

"Mr. Chairman," said the speaker, "there are so many rude interruptions that I scarcely hear myself speaking."
"Cheer up!" shouted a voice from the back. "You aren't missing miuch!"


Saturday 27 February 1954


THE INDIAN


Page Five








Navy-1ONDPPO-Otso THE INDIAN Saturday, 27 February 1954


FTG Bulletin


The new comedy opening at the Little Theater, Mr. Barry's Etchings, will have five active participants from Fleet Training Group. Stage Manager is John Freeman, BM1, who is designing and building the sets for the Broadway hit of 1951. Freeman has been active in Little Theater productions throughout his Navy career.
LT William Tipler of the ASW Department is acting as Property Manager, and will use the latest detection techniques in locating 150 assorted items ranging from a stuffed bird to a T-man badge. His wife, Betty Lou Tipler, will play the part of Evelyn, an eligible small-town daughter of an eccentric engraver.
Mrs. Joyce Simmons, wife of LCDR W. E. Simmons, Operations Officer, will play the part of "Fifty" Ferris, a well-known and appealing counterfeiter, famous for her ability to pass bogus fifty dollar bills. The straight-laced snobbish young gentleman in the play will be played by ASW Yeoman Joe E. Knepper.
COMPHIBLANT VISIT
Vice Admiral F. G. Fahrion, commander, Amphibian Forces, U. S. Atlantic Fleet, visited the Fleet Training Group this week to observe amphibious operations, inspect training facilities available to PHIBLANT, and to provide training and indoctrination for members of the PHIBLANT staff.
Congratulations
Robert K. Minard received his promotion to the rank of LCDR this week. Mr. Minard is in the Gunnery - Seamanship Department of the Training Group. He attended Alabama Polytechnic Institute and received his degree in Engineering and Physics. He entered the Navy in 1935 as an Apprentice Seaman and was promoted through the fire controlman ratings to CPO. He was commissioned an Ensign in 1943.
Chief H. F. Cox, BMC, Damage Control Department, had a big smile on his face this week, and no wonder. His wife, Mrs. Bernice Cox, was the winner of a shiny new 1954 Dodge at the Guantanarno Bay Carnival.
Frederick W. Chapman, SOC, ASW Department, also had a new 1954 arrival an eight-pound baby boy born this week at the Naval Hospital.
Ship Arrivals
Five ships steam into Guantanamo Bay next week for training with FTG. Two heavy cruisers, the USS Macon, CA 132, and the USS Desmoines, CA 134 both arrive on Saturday, 6 March. The USS Witek, DD 848, the USS Cross, DE 448, and the submarine Chopper round out the week's arrivals.
New Personnel Report
Several new men have reported to FTG. Charles R. Collins, ETC. who hails from Norfolk, Va., has been assigned to the Electronics Department. Chief Collins said he is continually amazed at how friendly everyone seems down here.
Robert Tolliver, SN, from Salem, Ill., reported from the USS Chevalier, DDR 805. Tolliver indicates he intends to be active as a spear fisherman in spite of the fact that he found himself Sunday swimming one half mile out from Phillips Park in company with two six-foot barracuda.
Frederick Paul, BM2, from Gilman, Iowa, and Marshall D. Brinkman, SN, from Cumberland Street, Maryland, complete the arrivals.


The Lucky Bag MAquw ews wes
by Betty Radcliffe
by Sgt. William J. McDowell, Jr., USMC
Reaching way down in the bag In the past week the Intra-Post
I found this hundred and ten year bowling competition was completed. old historical item: The USS It sure was a close finish, with all Princeton was the first screw the men putting forth to win that steam war vessel ever built. She one game that might win the was constructed in Philadelphia in league. The final finish saw the 1843 under the supervision of Capt. Staff NCO's edgeout the 2nd SecRobert Stockton, U.S. Navy. Her tion Guard Platoon by one game. armament consisted of two long Other standings were: Officers and
225-pounder wrought iron guns and Brig, 1st Section Guard Platoon, twelve 42-pounder carronades, all Headquarters No. 4 and Headquarof which could be used on both ters No. 5. High Game, High Series, sides of the vessel. One of the long and High Average went to Pfe 225-pounders was a heavily rein- Felak of the 1st Section team with forced 12-inch gun weighing about a 222, 578, and a 165 respectively. 27,334 pounds. It was called the On Tuesday night the Marines
"Peacemaker". The Princeton sail- basketball team went down to ed February 28th 1844, from Wash- defeat at the hands of the Naval ington on a pleasure and trial trip Air Station. The Air Station 5 down the Potomac River, having on pushed forth with a tremendous board President Tyler and his endeavor in the first quarter rackCabinet and a distinguished party ing up 21 points to the Marines 3. of civil and military officials. On This lead was cut but rebuilt many the return trip one of the passen- times and with such a start the gers asked to have the "Peace- Marines could not rebound as was
maker" fired, to which Capt. the case in other games. What do Stockton dissented, as the gun had you say gang! Let's all get behind been exercised earlier in the day. our team and push them on to However, upon the wish expressed win in the remaining all important by the Secretary of the Navy to games. Capt. Smith formerly of let the guests have all the sport the Base Basketball Committee they wished, the gun was fired. has now taken over as Coach of It burst, injuring many persons, the Marine Basketball team. among them Capt. Stockton, and A Hearty congratulation is exkilling the Secretary of State; the tended through our column from Secretary of the Navy; Capt. Colonel John B. Hill Commanding Kennon, U.S. Navy; Virgil Maxey; Officer Marine Barracks to CapCol. David Gardner; and a servant tain W. E. Kerrigan, Master Serof the President. A Court of In- geant Pollock, Technical Sergeant quiry exonerated Capt. Stockton, Schuler and all the other men from his officers, and crew of all blame the Barracks for their outstanding in the matter. work while working the Bingo conSpeaking of war vessels; I came cession at the Carnival.
across this passage in Warren "HAVE YOU EVER WONDERED
Eyster's novel "Far From the WHY?"
Customary Skies"; this passage is The red stripes on the blue written about a Destroyer during trousers of Marine NCO's and a battle at sea. . . . "It was a play Officerscalled death. It was an old play, It is said that this is in honor the oldest the world knows, and of the blood that was shed by only the props were new. It was Marines at the Halls of Montezuma a drama written in steel on a vast and the storming of Chapulatapec. page of water in which the real NOTICE TO ALL HUNTERStragedy was acted off-stage by The Hunting season ends here at
little pieces of flesh called sailors". Guantanamo Bay on 1 March 1954.


Gathered around a 1906 edition of the Purdue University yearbook, the "Debris", are nine of the eleven former Purdue students now at Guantanamo. From left to right are: W. Schnake, Const. Inspector; R. J. Hummel, Const. Eng.; R. E. Zaiser, Design Dir.; LT D. T. Kitterman, MCB 7; Mrs. Frank Etter; LCDR C. G. Edwards, Base Provost Marshal; D. D. Johnson, HM3, MCB-7; H. C. Thurston, Civ. Eng. and J. E. Reombke, Sp. Asst. to P.W. Officer. All the civilian men are attached to Public Works Dept. The book is the property of Mrs. Etter, whose uncle was a member of the class of '06. Two other former students who were not available for the picture are LTJG Kaiser of VU-10 and Jack Bennett upd Div. NavSta.


MOVIES


Saturday, 27 February
A LION IN THE STREETS
James Cagney Barbara Hale
plus
CATTY CORNERED Sunday, 28 February
THE SWORD AND THE ROSE Richar Todd Glynis Johns
Monday, 1 March
SO BIG
Jane Wyman Starling Hayden
Tuesday, 2 March
HOT NEWS
Stanley Clements Gloria Henry
plus
ASSAULT AND MATTERY,
KANGAROO PLAIN, and
NAVY SKYROCKET


TEENAGE- ROUND-UP
by Barbara Burke and Linda Thurston

With many sad laments from various carefree teenagers, school reopened last Tuesday.
Most of the guys and gals spent their holiday recuperating from the hectic carnival weekend. But then, of course, we have to take into consideration how the other half lives. Strange creatures who romp the world and hide under such names as Anita, Phil, Johnny, Barbara P., and Sharon find life' little pleasures in tramping out to Windmill Beach. In any case, much fun was had by all.
J. P. Lehmbeck would like to thank the honorable Norman Huddv for allowing him to beat said Huddy in a game of tennis Monday afternoon. J. P. has now accomplished one of his goals of the year.
If, by any strange quirk of fate, you were gazing at the sky on February tenth, you just might have seen Mr. Stork holding on to a seven pound twelve ounce bundle as he went flying by. We were all excited to learn on a later date that this parcel, consisting of an Edward Wayne, was delivered to the home of Dixie and Bingo Blomberg. Dixie as you all remember, graduated from here last year as the vale dictorian of the Senior class. Congratulations on the new arrival. DID YOU SEE: Eddie, Jimmy, and Bill flipping out over some baby pictures. . . . Sylvia signing up for pool. . . . Certain kats making like jelly tots with a hub cap of a car. . . . Margo (the cool one) Anderson demonstrating her great abilities as a pro dancer of the Monopoly. . . . Norman telling of his wild experiences at the carnival . . . the Chemistry Class plotting to get their hands on a certain mouse who has his quarters in the lab. (He's done, man!). . . . Jimmy Miles learning thousands of chapters of Algebra and then not having a test. . . . Allen at work on a new deal. . . ?


Saturday, 27 February 1954


Navy-IONDPPO-Gtmo


THE INDIAN




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PAGE 1

Vol. VI, No. 34 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 27 February 1954 Carnival Tops All Previous Records Under SecNav To "Mr. Barry's Etchings" VADM Ballentine Continue Tour Thomas S. Gates, Jr., Under Secretary of the Navy, will leave Guantanamo Bay today. Mr. Gates arrived here on the 24th of February on his first stop of an extended familiarization tour of Naval and Marine commands in the Caribbean area. During his stay on the Naval Base, Mr. Gates was conducted on official tours and observed the conduct of major operations on the base and operations at sea. Mr. Gates, a lifelong resident of Philadelphia, Penn., first served with the Navy when he was commissioned in the Naval Reserve and entered on active duty April 1, 1942. During World War II, he served with Commander in Chief, Atlantic, where he helped in the organization and development of the Naval Air Intelligence Center. In the spring of 1943, he was assigned to the USS Monterey and served on board (Continued on Page Four) Now In Rehearsal The Little Theatre's production of "Mr. Barry's Etchings" is now in rehearsal and is expected to open Monday evening, March 15th for a five night run. The current play will be the Little Theatre's 17th consecutive production in five years. "Mr. Barry's Etchings" was first presented by Brock Pemberton at the Forty-eighth Street Theatre, New York City, on Januray 31, 1950, with a cast starring Lee Tracy, and featuring Vicki Cummings and Scott McKay. The local production casts in their appearance: Bob Gewertz, Betty Radcliffe, Betty Lou Tipler, Lee Douglas, Joe Knepper, Flo Schnake, Joyce Simmons, Dave Humes, Ethyl Beach, Le Grande Orr, Don Macquarrie, Virginia Bertine and Ken Woodard. Betty Radcliffe is the play's Producer, -in Janicek directs Here For ORI VADM John J. Ballentine arrived in Guantanamo Bay, 25 February, to witness an operational readiness inspection on board the USS Hornet. Admiral Ballentine is a frequent visitor to this area. Alternating with his Chief of Staff, RADM Frederick N. Kivette, they observe all operational readiness inspections on board aircraft carriers in this area. Admiral Ballentine will depart from Guantanamo Bay shortly after the completion of his duties in this area. Averil Clark is Assistant Director and John Freeman is Stage Manager. Property Manager Jack Tipler has been unable to locate a "stuffed bird" which is needed as a "prop" in the play. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of such a bird which can be borrowed for the run of the play please call Betty Radcliffe at 9-517. The annual giant Guantanamo Bay Carnival for 1954 came to an end last Sunday night after a threeday run that proved far more successful in its mission than was speculated. Under the direction of Captain M. A. Moon, Commanding Officer of the Dental Clinic who acted as General Chairman, and LT R. E. Ricker, Procurement Co-ordinator, the event which was truly an 'allhands evolution' far exceeded the goals set for it when 'operationcarnival' started as early as November 1st, 1953. Represented were all base commands, American Legion, Fleet Reserve, American Civilians, Auxiliaries and various women's clubs and organizations, also the high school and Boy and Girl Scout troops. Even Nature cooper i chiival. Fieehl1ferty was extended and all hands participated in games of skill and chance. Sunday night alone, an estimated 3,000 to 5,000 Cubans from surrounding areas joined in the festivities and brought the approximate total of fleet and base personnel, civilians and their dependents on the grounds at any one time to a peak total of from 12,000 to 15,000. Captain Moon is a veteran of three such affairs. His first proved to be a highly successful festival in Memphis, the next two here in Guantanamo Bay. He stated it took about $23,000 in expenses 'before the first hamburger was sold'. The primary mission of the carnival is for funds to better the community, aiding Navy Relief and contributing to all recognized charities while maintaining an operating schedule with a minimum loss of productive man hours. It is also to provide recreation and entertainment for Forces Afloat, base personnel and dependents with all commands fully represented in the event. Said Captain Moon, "It was an all-hands evolution and certainly well deserving of a well-done. Cooperation between each command and the organizations involved on every level was excellent!" Among the various commands that ranked highest in the individual sales was the dental clinic, consisting of 9 officers and 16 dental technicians, selling an excess of $3,000 in shares alone. Final drawings were made Sunday night and the winners of the various prizes were as follows: Lucia Murilla, Caimanera-set of golf clubs J. E. Burford, U.S.S. Tannerportable sewing machine Leo D. Barclay, U.S.S. Roanoke -Cushman scooter B. F. Haynes-English bicycle I. Avila, Villamar, 136-Air conditioner W. M. Love, CA 72-12ft. deep freeze Leonard Marsel, Special Services (Continued on Page Four) Vol. VI, No. 34 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 27 February 1954

PAGE 2

Saturday, 27 February 1954 THE INDIAN Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9-615 Saturday, 27 February 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba RADM Edmund B. Taylor Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sandness --Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC ------------Editor H. L. Sisson, J03---------------News Jerry Lewis, J03--------Features J. C. Dierks, J03-------Sports Pierce Lchmbech--------Sports F. L. Cannon, JOSN---Photographer S. E. Cobbs, PHSNPhotographer R. Naccarato, SN-------------Make-up THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and finance with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. VU-10 Prop Blast officer, CDR T. In a continuing effort to bring S ~ ~ our listeners in Guantanamo Bay Henson, LT J. Bell, and I I,: ment% th miitn rl Q. Winkler departed Gtmo Tuesday menDiVe o luinTIF 23 February for Chincoteauge, Vira re-vamped program schedule to ginia to assist ComUtWingLant your Armed Forces Radio Station with a surprise inspection of one WGBY of our sister squadrons, VU-4. The Listeners have constantly asked inspection team is due to return for more adventure and drama 27 February. programs on week nights so beginning Monday, March 1, you'll be The 1954 carnival appeared to be able to hear two such shows, in a huge success for all concerned. succession, each night Monday The officers and men of the squadthrough Friday. Watch the daily ron went all out to assist the program schedule in the "Papoose" overall carnival. The ROLL-Afor the names of these shows and BALL, COLOR WHEEL and the the changes in day and time. CH00 CR00 have been knocked An old institution on WGBY has down and are resting comfortable been the Saturday morning "Kiddie in the hangar. Stowage space is Show" lineup from 8:30 to 11:30. urgently needed and anyone knowIn addition to such regulars as lng of a dry suitable place please "Space Patrol", "Gene Autry" and contact us. VU-10 owns no real "Let's Pretend", three new shows estate at Gtmo, we are strictly move to the Saturday morning slots renting, leasing, or what have you. The Mallard golf team defeated the NSD team 17 to 7 Monday 22 .d> February at the local links. The match was much closer than the score indicates, so practice not beer ls 'on tap" for the Mallards. To aid the cause "Captain Jim" Maul din fired a neat 76, which sin't bad for a young fellow. All hands are practicing up on their semaphore lately. It appears that in the near future the majority of telephone subscribers are going to resort to a "wig wag' system of communications. (This opinion is based on a 1952 Survey) The NAS bowling alley was the scene of the playoff Tuesday night for the NAS-VU-10 bowling chami pionship. In a hot contested match, the Structural Division team of VU-10 dusted off the Gas Crew of NAS in the best two out of three series. Congratulations to the Structural keglers. Here is the latest dope on the NAS-VU-10 mixed bowling league. Any interested participants contact Chief Sharp, extension 8-720 o 9-643; Chief Sandage, 8-808; or Chief Callan, extension 8-850 or Three base men are proudly hol 9-439. Submit your names either as completed USAFI courses. Robert a three couple team or individually. certificate for the completion of the; After the names are all in, a meetPR3, of Base Police, holds two, one ing will be called to iron out the for Spanish. Raymond Peoples, MM wrinkles. English iurse. The awards were m Sunday, 28 February 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) The Chaplain's Corner e IS It was a blessing that the poor victim mentioned in Scriptures had beginning March 6. They are a Good Samaritan to look after "Gunsmoke", "Horatio Hornblowhim. Oh, the inhumanity of those Fans of Dean Stahlecker's "Hillmight have died before help could half of th ore" wo dony hear reach him. There are many today week have asked for a special just as much in need of help. There weekend edition of the popular must be some Good Samaritans show. Beginning Saturday, March for that purpose. Why should we 6 at 2:00 P.M., Dean will bring not offer our services on occasion? you a full hour request show of hillbilly, folk and western music Whenever anyone in distress finds immediately follo wing Jerry another coming thus to his aid he, Lewis's "Saturday Swing Session". as it were, hears Our Lord Him"Theatre Guild On The Air" has self coming and saying: "Be of mtic programlenthe inesweekly good heart; it is I, fear ye not". production. The tradition continues Saturday and Sunday, the 27th as Sinclair Lewis's "Arrowsmith" and 28th of February have been is presented in a fill hour adaptadesignated as Red Cross Sabbath tion Monday, March 1 at 9:00 P.M., and Sunday. By sharing in the co-starring Tyrone Power and great humanitarian work of the Loretta Young in the leading roles. Red Cross, all can become Good Samaritans in helping those who need a helping hand. 'Tis our way 'I of life to help our neighbor: 'tis x one of our customs. Each of us, in his own waymust help his neighbor if the work of the Red Cross is to be assured the success of its campaign during the coming e 1.-s. year. ding certificates showing they have Sopher, SKSN, of Supply, holds a High School course. John H. Schmitt, for Latin American History and one 3, 5th Div. was awarded his for the ade in the I&E Office last week. All of us ought to give an example of the spirit of generosity. How many look to us for help? Are we going to follow the spirit of the world and turn away? Why not rather follow the spirit of the Good Samaritan, and do all we can to help those who look to us, be that need what it may? To bring consolation to those who are sick is one of the most practical details of charity. It is also a virtue to, express our condolence to those who have lost a dear one. To bring comfort to those in need has always been considered one of the most charitable of deeds. Hearts without pity care not for charity. It is all the same to them whether others suffer or not. But it was not all the same to the Good Samaritan. Whenever he meets someone in need of comfort he pours oil as it were on his wounds. This is most meritorious in the eyes of Our Lord. William J. Spinney Last week, eight civil service employees were presented awards for "Meritorious Civilian Service" with "outstanding" ratings for the period of 1 April 1952 to 31 March 1953. CAPT William R. Caruthers, Commanding Officer of the Naval Station is shown with employees who received the award. From left to right: G. Darien, E. Z. Skelton, R. Sierra, CAPT Caruthers, O. Mujica, L. D. Irving, L. J. Ulmer, R. Turcaz, and J. R. Bordatto. O Th Ai v At WGBY Page woTEIDA T n e lrwa

PAGE 3

Saturday, 27 February 1954 THE INDIAN age bree Santiago de Cuba "City Of Sunshine" This is the first of a group of articles dealing with the island of Cuba. The first four of the series will describe the city of Santiago de Cuba and the interest which centers about it as a factor in the history of Cuba and of the United States. Through the eyes of the visitor, one of Cuba's most historic and interesting sites is the port of Santiago de Cuba. Founded in 1514 by Diego Velasquez, the city was an important commercial center on the Spanish Main during the days of the Galleons and pieces-of-eight and served as the embarkation point for several Spanish goldseeking expeditions to the mainland in the 16th century. This picturesque city of 150,000 persons is located on a beautiful narrow-mouthed bay on the southern coast of the island and strangely enough, is practically ignored by tourists. The pleasure seekers and free spenders are drawn to Havana's bright lights, little realizing. that the real Cuba may be found 600 miles away, in Santiago. Here one is impressed by the lack of the artificial tourist come-ons which are so prevelant in the capital. No elaborate night clubs, no race tracks or psuedo-Cuban restaurants; but in their place a friendly, hospitable people, living a simple life among the many evidences of the island's colonial day splendor and historical past. Santiago is built on a group of hills rolling down to the bay and is sheltered by a mountain range which encircles the surrounding countryside. The beauty of these peaks is enhanced by the presence of low hanging clouds which offer a snow-blanketed effect and cap the bluish-green tree covered slopes. The mean temperature is tolerable, hovering around 82*F. in the winter and climbing to 88' in the summer, although ocean breezes offer some relief to those who are troubled by warm climates. Very little difference is noticed between the two seasons and the local Chamber of Commerce could easily claim the title of "the place of constant warmth and sunshine" for the city. Santiago is a notable commercial seaport, primarily because of its proximity to the Windward Passage entrance to the Caribbean Sea. At the docks one may find vessels unloading cargoes from Europe, the Western Hemisphere and Japan or loading local products such as sugar, manganese ore, rum, tobacco, honey and molasses for world wide destination on our side of the Iron Curtain. The historical and "old world" atmosphere of the city is particularly striking to the visitor. It is no strain on one's imagination to visualise the ghost of Governor Velasquez conferring with Hernan Cortez, who held the office of mayor, about the expedition that the latter was to lead to Mexico where gold and conquest awaited him. It was from Santiago that Cortez, sponsored and outfitted by the governor set sail in 1518. It was from the city also that Velasquez later sent a force to subdue Cortez when it became apparent that the conquistador had taken the bit in his teeth and struck out on his own. Thus, only a few years after the voyages of Columbus, the city of Santiago de Cuba had already become known as one of the most important commercial ports in the New World. VADM Fahrion Visits Naval Base Rabbi Witkin Visits U. S. Naval Base VADM Frank G. Fahrion (left), ComPhibLant, chats with his hosts, CAPT W. R. Caruthers, C. 0. Naval Station and RADM E. B. Taylor, ComNavBase at a reception given in his honor by Captain Caruthers. Jewish Services Held In Base Chapel Last night marked the first in a series of regularly scheduled Friday night Jewish services to be held every Friday night starting at 7 o'clock in the Naval Base chapel under the direction of Burt Forman YN3 of MCB-8. Burt performed similar duties in his spare time while stationed in Newfoundland, Argentia with his battalion. At present, he is the editor of the 'Bulldozer', a weekly mimeographed paper published for the battalion. He's a graduate of Yeoman school and the Armed Forces Information School at Fort Slocum, New York. Burt Forman wishes to extend a cordial invitation to all, whether of Jewish faith or not, to be present for Jewish services every Friday night at 7 o'clock. A "farewell" party was held recently by the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Fleet Reserve Association for the former president of the organization, Mrs. Minnie Nixon, and other members leaving or due to depart soon. Above, left to right: Edith Garris, Mrs. Nixon, Clara Hoff. Five Base Officers Promoted To LCOR Last week, five lieutenants attached to commands in the Guantanamo Bay area received notice of their promotion to the rank of Lieutenant Commander. Those promoted were, LCDR R. A. Jameison, USNR, of VU-10, LCDR Clarence A. Wreath, USN, and LCDR Robert K. Minard, Jr., both of Fleet Training Group; LCDR Joseph A. Strouhal, USN, of the Naval Station; and LCDR John W. Richmond, USNR, of the Naval Base. All of the promotions were effective as of January, 1954. LCDR Jamieson, LCDR Wreath, LCDR Richmond, and LCDR Minard were all given their rank on 1 January 1954 while LCDR Strouhal was given his rank on 20 January 1954. For the time covered by the retroactive date, the new lieutenant commanders will receive pay due them for that rank above the amount for lieutenant. Meetings. .. Time & Place Base Organizations may have a notice of their regular monthly meetings posted weekly by submitting in writing to the Indian the time and the place of their meetings. Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd & 4th Tuesday each month Community Auditorium Ladies' Auxiliary Fleet Reserve Association 2000; 2nd Tuesday each month Girl Scout Room, Community Auditorium Little Theatre Group 2000; 1st Tuesday each month Marina Point The amount of sleep required by the average person is about a half an hour more. by Jerry Lewis Rabbi Nathan Witkin is small of stature but a man of great dignity. Age, wisdom and experience have lined his face. His voice is soothing and sincere. He is a man of vast knowledge and because of this has been assigned to the Canal Zone in the capacity of Field Director of the Jewish Welfare Board of the Armed Services Division, Caribbean Command. He is a graduate of New York University (1925), the Theological Seminary of New York and the Rabbinical Seminary in Jerusalem. Upon visiting the holy land last summer for the first time in 18 years, he found that much has changed there in the way of modernization and progress. A native of Lewisburg, West Virginia, the Rabbi resides in Balboa with his wife Helen and their children, Michael 15, Samuel 8, and Judith Ann 5. An older daughter, Naomi 21, is presently attending school in the United States In addition to his primary mission as Field Director of the National Jewish Welfare Board, he is also the head of the USO Jewish Welfare board in Balboa. In speaking to the radio audience over WGBY's weekly presentation, 'Your Chaplain Speaks' Rabbi Witkin built his talk around the topic, "What Is A Jew?" He told of the modernization of an ancient religion in keeping with the swift progress and radical advancements of modern day civilization. He quoted a great philosopher as saying, "Judaism is a civilization. It is comprised of a cultured group primarily religious, but not exclusively so, linked together with a common history, a common language of prayer, a vast literature, but above all, a sense of common destiny". The Rabbi's tour of the Indies which brought him here, will take him to San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Trinidad. He is arranging ceremonies of observance of the high holy days called 'Passover', which commence April 17th until April 25th, to be held on all military reservations. In keeping with the policy and mission of the Armed Forces Radio Service to promote higher morale as well as offering entertainment and aural education, WGBY brings to the air every Tuesday evening at 6:30, a Chaplain of every faith to comfort and guide military personnel while far away from home and loved ones. Saturday, 27 February 1954 age hred THE INDIAN

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*utg TH amoN auda,2uFbury15 A Message From Garcia by Henry Garcia Birth and Death, alpha and omega in a person's life are regarded in Cuba the same as in the States or in any other civilized country, although in Cuba the people observe a few different ceremonies in these two important phases of what constitutes life. Incidentally, it always occurred to me that it is pitiful that we should start our lives crying and causing others to cry. This, it seems to me, marks the boundaries of life as Crying and Suffering. It is regrettable that it should be so, especially because of the fact that we start out causing suffering and end up causing cries. In Cuba the birth of a baby follows the same routine as in the States, except that once the stork has deposited the precious load, the happy parents invite their friends to drink "alifiado" (an alcoholic beverage composed of many aromatic roots, which they had prepared and buried in the ground since the first symptoms of an augment in the family appeared. When a person dies, the custom is to have a "Velorio" (wake), with the presence of relatives and friends. In these wakes, usually there is a person who, between sobs and screams, tells everyone about the virtues of the deceased, and of the last time the deceased and this person dined together, and about the good old places where they used to meet. "Velorios" are "buenos" if there are lots of screams and faintings in them, and if there is plenty to eat and drink. It is a regular practice to serve either chocolate or coffee, with cheese and crackers as well as cigars to those who attend. A person enters the house, expresses his sympathies to the mourning relatives, takes a look at the corpse, and goes out from the room into the hall where he chats about politics, baseball or women until the next day. Long ago some rich families, who thought that their social status demanded a repression of their emotions, sought the help of the "Plafnideras", a group of women who could cry as few can, upon the payment of a sum of money. Thus, the "Plafiideras" kept the atmosphere of sorrow, while the relatives of the deceased could calmly talk without losing their social dignity. (Continued from Page One) Carnival -set of golf clubs T. Goldader, HM1, U.S.S. Hornet -.22 cal. Savage rifle. A. C. Taylor, U.S.S. New Jersey -Admiral refrigerator Williard Watson, Fire Department-Zenith Trans-Oceanic radio Philip Preston, NSD-GE Washer-Drier Combination Wilfred V. Ellis, Fire Department-television set W. R. Leverett, NAS-shotgun Bernice R. Cox, CB-20-Dodge J. N. Hickman, U.S.S. Quillback, Plymouth Mario F. Peraza, Lima-$500 cash prize. Although no figures were immediately available, LCDR Woodard termed it as a 'financial success, far surpassing our greatest expectations." LT S. Plar, Assistant Officer-inCharge of the Naval Station Exchange provided the staggering figures concerning food and drink concessions. There were 60,000 cans of beer sold, 35,000 individual sandwiches, 6,500 popsicles, 2,560 pounds of hamburger patties and 27,000 pounds of ice used. Chief and Mrs. H. F. Cox and their son stand beside the new Dodge which they won at the Guantanamo Bay Carnival. Mrs. Cox was the holder of the winning share. 96 Hour Liberty Proposed Navy Secretary Anderson will soon have on his desk a Marine Corps sponsored change to Navy regulations which, if approved, will allow commanding officers of certain Marine and Navy units to grant 96 hour week-end liberties instead of the presently authorized 72 hour passes. The change has the approval of the Chief of Naval Operations and the Chief of Naval Personnel and it is expected that SecNav will give the final approval. Under the new system, really a "fat 72", personnel would leave their duty station on Friday, as usual, but instead of reporting back by 0800 Monday morning, they would be allowed to remain away until sundown Monday. The move was proposed in an effort to cut down the alarming number of highway deaths among servicemen rushing back to their duty station in the early hours of Monday morning combined with the tremendous amount of civilians returning from week-ends to be at work by 8 A.M. Last year the Marine Corps lost 165 men on the highway and the Navy highway deaths totalled 394. Some people are like blotters. They soak it all in, but get it all backwards. (Continued from Page One) Under SecNav .. it for about a year. Then, in 1944, he was assigned to the staff of Rear Admiral Calvin T. Durgin and served on that staff during the invasion of southern France. He was then sent back to the Pacific where he remained until the end of the war, taking part in the Philippine liberation, the Iwo Jima campaign, and the Okinawa campaign. For his service in the Pacific, he was awarded the Bronze Star and a Gold Star in lieu of a second Bronze Star. On release to inactive duty in 1954, Mr. Gates was promoted to ti'ogrrank of Commander, USNR. Defense Department Orders Equalization Of Allotment Rules The Department of Defense has ordered that all the services standardize their allotment rules by midApril. Until now, military pay allotment rules have differed for the various services. Hereafter, according to spokesmen from DOD, allotments are to be permitted for the following: 1. Purchase of U. S. Savings Bonds. 2. Premiums for life insurance. 3. Repayment of loans to Red Cross, Navy Relief. 4. Class Q allotments. 5. Bank savings or checking accounts. 6. Repayment of loans for purchase of a home. 7. Voluntary liquidation of indebtedness to the U.S. incurred by defaulting on notes guaranteed by the FHA or VA or by overpayment of pay and allowances made by any department of the government. Ladies' Golf Shots by Mary Ann Pennell The weekly tournament of the Ladies' Golf Club vas held Wednesday the 25th. The front nine was played with scored minus handicap. It's good to see so many girls turn out for our weekly tournaments. The following winners were each awarded a golf ball: 1st Flight-Jane McElroy and Lou Toczko 2nd Flight-Fran D y k em a n, Helen Viafora and Mary Spears 3rd Flight-Joyce Simmons and Betty Lou Tipler Next Wednesday we play the back nine and the tournament is a Blind Five. Sunday, February 28th, we are having another Scotch foursome. If you'd like to play, sign up ir the golf shack. There are lots of men and women that have no one to play with, so let's all join in the fun. There will. be cokes and beer on the 10th tee for all players. Call the golf shack 3:30 P.M. Saturday for your star time. Special Services To Hold Smoker The Special Services Department wishes to announce that a Fleet boxing smoker has been tentatively scheduled for the night of 6 March. The smoker will be held at the Fleet Recreation Area with approximately ten bouts planned for the program. The recreation department has recently completed construction of a new three feet high regulation size ring so combatants may feel sure of secure footing for the bouts. All hands are invited, and are asked to share in thpuffing of the cigars and cigarettes which will be distributed throughout the audience. Any persons wishing to aid the Special Services Officer in the capacity of a manager, trainer, or second are asked to contact LT E. A. Sandness at 9-617. Little League With the regular playing diamond almost completed and the practice diamond already in use, the Little League Baseball organization has revamped its practice schedule to include all the boys at all practice sessions. Formerly the practice games were held with alphabetical divisions of boys participating, but this provided unequal numbers of boys for the teams. So, commencing this week, all boys have been asked to come out to the practice games. Mr. R. E. Zaiser, supervisor of the Little League, pointed out that since the formation of the Little League many boys have left Guantanamo Bay creating a vacancy for more applicants. At present the enrollment provides only enough boys for approximately three teams. Applications for enrollment in the Little League may be obtained by calling Mr. Zaiser at 8-249. All boys between the ages of 7 and 12 are eligible. Teen-Age Bowling Contrary to popular belief, the indoor sport of bowling is not restricted to the older set. TeenAgers also prove to be pretty good keglers as the following statistics taken from the local Teen-Age League readily show. TEAM STANDINGS W. L. Lehmbeck's --------9 3 MacMichael's 7 5 Beman's -----------7 5 Huddy's --------------1 11 HIGH AVERAGE (BOYS) Pierce Lehmbeck -----------167.9 George MacMichael 155.4 HIGH AVERAGE (GIRLS) Luella Curran ----------119.3 Emmy Bruner _----_----_ 115.5 HIGH DOUBLE (BOYS) Pierce Lehmbeck --395 HIGH DOUBLE (GIRLS) Roxana Moore _---------_ 243 Judo Club Needs New Members The Guantanamo Bay Judo Club is looking for new members who are interested in the "gentle art" of wrestling scientifically. All new candidates for the club have been urged to appear at the gymnasium in the Fleet Recreation area any week-day between the hours of 1700 and 1900. P THE INDIAN Saturday, 27 February 1954

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Saudy 27Fbur 94TEIDA aeFv NAS Fliers Dowr In the game of the week played Tuesday night the NAS Fliers gained a full game on the leagueleading Marine Leathernecks by defeating them in a hotly contested battle, 71-55. This victory ran the Fliers current streak to seven straight and brought them to within one and a half games of the faltering Leathernecks. The Fliers, led by team-captain Art Hollowell, bounced off to a first quarter lead of 25-3 which later provided the margin that won the game. In the last three sessions, the Leathernecks stayed with point for point, but all too late. Leading the winners was Hollowell who dumped 23 followed by Ring with 16. Gatti and Santos led the losing Leathernecks as they each neted 15. In the second game, the fourthstanding VU-10 Mallards came through to easily take the Dental Clinic by a 76-46 margin. Led by team captain Huber, the Mallards led by 24 points at halftime and rolled or through the last sessions with little haste as they won going away. Huber, Howerton and Lockhart led the scoring for the Mallards with 16, 12 and 11 in that order. For the losing Clinic, the KingRose duo was reversed for once as Rose netted 23 and King 17. CORPSMEN EDGE DENTAL In the second game played Tuesday night the Dental Clinic, led by a 26 point performance by league-scoring leader Paul King, fought the Hospital Corpsmen to the limit only to drop the decision in a five minute overtime period, 56-55. The Corpsmen, rolling along at an easy pace in the early sessions, found the Clinic five almost too hot to handle as they suddenly put on a scoring show in the closing minutes to end the game with score knotted at 53-53. In the overtime period, the Corpsmen moved ahead by a 56-55 margin and then exhibited a perfeet two-minute freeze to close out the contest. Leading the Corpsmen was Bonkamp with 15 and Maddix with 12. For the losing Clinic, the KingRose duo came through again with 26 and 22 respectively. BRAVES SWAMP TRAINERS In the first game Wednesday night, the Naval Station Indians and their center, Brad Bradford, made local cage history as they swamped the Fleet Training Group, 94-23. The Indians, by taking the Trainers by the 71 points margin recorded the biggest difference in points scored in the Naval Base League history and Bradford by scoring 38 points turned in the highest single scoring performance of any cager in the League annals. Bradford scored 25 of his points in the first quarter. For the losing Trainers, who couldn't seem to get going as they have in the past, Tapler and Zino led the scoring with 9 and 7 respectively. MARINES DEFEAT HIGH SCHOOL In the opening game Thursday night the league-leading Marine Leathernecks, angry over two straight losses, came back to take it out on the High School five at a 73-50 count. The Leathernecks, led by scoring ace Andy Androvich, came out of t Marines 71-55 the first half with a 24 point lead and simply coasted through the last two sessions as all members of both squads saw action. This victory ran the Leathernecks league-leading edge on the second place NAS Fliers to a full game. Androvich led the winners with 20 with the rest of the scoring pretty evenly distributed over the rest of the squad. Lehmbeck and E. Stafford each netted 12 for the losing Pirates with player-coach McGill adding another 11. The second scheduled game of the evening went to the Hospital via forfeit as the MCB-8 five failed to show. Cage Schedule Monday, 1 March Fleet Recreation Center NAS vs MCB-8 Dental Clinic vs High School Tuesday, 2 March Marine Site VU-10 vs FTG NavSta vs Marines Wednesday, 3 March Fleet Recreation Center Hospital vs FTG Dental Clinic vs Marines Thursday, 4 March Marine Site MCB-8 vs High School NAS vs NavSta Cage Standings Marines ---------9 2 NAS ------------8 3 1 NavSta ---------8 4 11/2 Hospital -------8 4 1% VU-10 ----------7 4 2 MCB-7-8 --------6 6 3%/ FTG ------------5 7 4/ High School -1 9 7/2 Dental ----------0 13 10 Top 10 Scorers Player King Bradford Androvich Gatti Hollowell Heimer Zino Hallum Collins Bomkamp Team FG Dental 89 NavSta 70 Marines 62 Marines 62 NAS 56 High School 51 FTG 44 Hospital 50 FTG 50 Hospital 53 FT 62 45 31 32 29 32 43 30 28 11 TP AVG. 240 18.5 185 15.4 155 14.1 146 13.3 141 12.8 134 13.4 131 13.1 130 12.0 128 10.6 117 10.7 Questions 1. How many no-hitters have been tossed by Bob Feller of the Cleveland Indians? 2. What was the first written rule of basketball? 3. What basketball star was voted the outstanding player of last year's National Invitation Tournament? 4. Against what country did the United States basketball team set an Olympic scoring record in 1952? 5. What school won the first National Invitation B a s k e t b a 11 Tournament? Answers 1. Three-in 1940, 1946 and 1951. 2. "The ball may be thrown in any direction with one or both hands." 3. Walter Dukes of Seton Hall. 4. They defeated Chile by a score of 103 to 55,Euly 29, 1952. 5. Temple Jniversity in 1938. Robbery In The Air! Sammy Conti (14) of the NAS Flyers stands by in a state of amazement as big Jack Jackson (7) steals the ball right off the fingertips of Leatherneck guard Andy Androvich (2) in the Flyers 71-55 romp of the league-leaders Tuesday night. Base Bowling SCUTTLEBUTT Standings Team W FTG #1 --------33 11th Division 24 Hospital --------23 2nd Division 21 4th Division -21 MCB-8 #2 -19 MCB-8 #3 -19 FTG #2 --------18 MCB-8 #1 -18 5th Division -16 NSD 15 1st Division -16 MCB-8 #4 -11 MCB-8 #59 Boatshed --------8 6th Division8 F.B.P. ----------4 L 3 15 7 12 15 11 14 18 15 11 20 17 25 21 22 28 26 Pts. 44 34 32 28 27 26 24 24 23 22 21 21 15 11 10 10 5 Women's Bowling A gala affair is being planned for the Ladies' Bowling League banquet. Trophies will be presented to the first and second place winners, one for sportsmanship, four individual trophies for high game, high series and most improved player of the season. The time: 1:00 P.M.; the date: March 4th; the place: Officer lub. "I didn't know it was loaded." Science is resourceful. It couldn't pry open the Pullman windows, so it air-conditioned the train. "Mr. Chairman," said the speaker, "there are so many rude interruptions that I scarcely hear myself speaking." "Cheer up!" shouted a voice from the back. "You aren't missing much!" Saturday 27 February 1954 Page Five THB INDIAN

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Navy-1ONDPPO--GtIDO THE INDIAN Saturday, 27 February 1954 FTG Bulletin The new comedy opening at the Little Theater, Mr. Barry's Etchings, will have five active participants from Fleet Training Group. Stage Manager is John Freeman, BM1, who is designing and building the sets for the Broadway hit of 1951. Freeman has been active in Little Theater productions throughout his Navy career. LT William Tipler of the ASW Department is acting as Property Manager, and will use the latest detection techniques in locating 150 assorted items ranging from a stuffed bird to a T-man badge. His wife, Betty Lou Tipler, will play the part of Evelyn, an eligible small-town daughter of an eccentric engraver. Mrs. Joyce Simmons, wife of LCDR W. E. Simmons, Operations Officer, will play the part of "Fifty" Ferris, a well-known and appealing counterfeiter, famous for her ability to pass bogus fifty dollar bills. The straight-laced snobbish young gentleman in the play will be played by ASW Yeoman Joe E. Knepper. COMPHIBLANT VISIT Vice Admiral F. G. Fahrion, commander, Amphibian Forces, U. S. Atlantic Fleet, visited the Fleet Training Group this week to observe amphibious operations, inspect training facilities available to PHIBLANT, and to provide training and indoctrination for members of the PHIBLANT staff. Congratulations Robert K. Minard received his promotion to the rank of LCDR this week. Mr. Minard is in the Gunnery -Seamanship Department of the Training Group. He attended Alabama Polytechnic Institute and received his degree in Engineering and Physics. He entered the Navy in 1935 as an Apprentice Seaman and was promoted through the fire controlman ratings to CPO. He was commissioned an Ensign in 1943. Chief H. F. Cox, BMC, Damage Control Department, had a big smile on his face this week, and no wonder. His wife, Mrs. Bernice Cox, was the winner of a shiny new 1954 Dodge at the Guantanamo Bay Carnival. Frederick W. Chapman, SOC, ASW Department, also had a new 1954 arrival an eight-pound baby boy born this week at the Naval Hospital. Ship Arrivals Five ships steam into Guantanamo Bay next week for training with FTG. Two heavy cruisers, the USS Macon, CA 132, and the USS Desmoines, CA 134 both arrive on Saturday, 6 March. The USS Witek, DD 848, the USS Cross, DE 448, and the submarine Chopper round out the week's arrivals. New Personnel Report Several new men have reported to FTG. Charles R. Collins, ETC. who hails from Norfolk, Va., has been assigned to the Electronics Department. Chief Collins said he is continually amazed at how friendly everyone seems down here. Robert Tolliver, SN, from Salem, Ill., reported from the USS Chevalier, DDR 805. Tolliver indicates he intends to be active as a spear fisherman in spite of the fact that he found himself Sunday swimming one half mile out from Phillips Park in company with two six-foot barracuda. Frederick Paul, BM2, from Gilman, Iowa, and Marshall D. Brinkman, SN, from Cumberland Street, Maryland, complete the arrivals. The Lucky Bag by Betty Radcliffe Reaching way down in the bag I found this hundred and ten year old historical item: The USS Princeton was the first screw steam war vessel ever built. She was constructed in Philadelphia in 1843 under the supervision of Capt. Robert Stockton, U.S. Navy. Her armament consisted of two long 225-pounder wrought iron guns and twelve 42-pounder carronades, all of which could be used on both sides of the vessel. One of the long 225-pounders was a heavily reinforced 12-inch gun weighing about 27,334 pounds. It was called the "Peacemaker". The Princeton sailed February 28th 1844, from Washington on a pleasure and trial trip down the Potomac River, having on board President Tyler and his Cabinet and a distinguished party of civil and military officials. On the return trip one of the passengers asked to have the "Peacemaker" fired, to which Capt. Stockton dissented, as the gun had been exercised earlier in the day. However, upon the wish expressed by the Secretary of the Navy to let the guests have all the sport they wished, the gun was fired. It burst, injuring many persons, among them Capt. Stockton, and killing the Secretary of State; the Secretary of the Navy; Capt. Kennon, U.S. Navy; Virgil Maxey; Col. David Gardner; and a servant of the President. A Court of Inquiry exonerated Capt. Stockton, his officers, and crew of all blame in the matter. Speaking of war vessels; I came across this passage in Warren Eyster's novel "Far From the Customary Skies"; this passage is written about a Destroyer during a battle at sea. .."It was a play called death. It was an old play, the oldest the world knows, and only the props were new. It was a drama written in steel on a vast page of water in which the real tragedy was acted off-stage by little pieces of flesh called sailors". by Sgt. William J. McDowell, Jr., USMC In the past week the Intra-Post bowling competition was completed. It sure was a close finish, with all the men putting forth to win that one game that might win the league. The final finish saw the Staff NCO's edgeout the 2nd Section Guard Platoon by one game. Other standings were: Officers and Brig, 1st Section Guard Platoon, Headquarters No. 4 and Headquarters No. 5. High Game, High Series, and High Average went to Pfc Felak of the 1st Section team with a 222, 578, and a 165 respectively. On Tuesday night the Marines basketball team went down to defeat at the hands of the Naval Air Station. The Air Station 5 pushed forth with a tremendous endeavor in the first quarter racking up 21 points to the Marines 3. This lead was cut but rebuilt many times and with such a start the Marines could not rebound as was the case in other games. What do you say gang! Let's all get behind our team and push them on to win in the remaining all important games. Capt. Smith formerly of the Base Basketball Committee has now taken over as Coach of the Marine Basketball team. A Hearty congratulation is extended through our column from Colonel John B. Hill Commanding Officer Marine Barracks to Captain W. E. Kerrigan, Master Sergeant Pollock, Technical Sergeant Schuler and all the other men from the Barracks for their outstanding work while working the Bingo concession at the Carnival. "HAVE YOU EVER WONDERED WHY?" The red stripes on the blue trousers of Marine NCO's and OfficersIt is said that this is in honor of the blood that was shed by Marines at the Halls of Montezuma and the storming of Chapulatapec. NOTICE TO ALL HUNTERSThe Hunting season ends here at Guantanamo Bay on 1 March 1954. Gathered around a 1906 edition of the Purdue University yearbook, the "Debris", are nine of the eleven former Purdue students now at Guantanamo. From left to right are: W. Schnake, Const. Inspector; R. J. Hummel, Const. Eng.; R. E. Zaiser, Design Dir.; LT D. T. Kitterman, MCB 7; Mrs. Frank Etter; LCDR C. G. Edwards, Base Provost Marshal; D. D. Johnson, HM3, MCB-7; H. C. Thurston, Civ. Eng. and J. E. Reombke, Sp. Asst. to P.W. Officer. All the civilian men are attached to Public Works Dept. The book is the property of Mrs. Etter, whose uncle was a member of the class of '06. Two other former students who were not available for the picture are LTJG Kaiser of VU-10 and Jack Bennett yid Div. NavSta. b, 4 MOVIES Saturday, 27 February A LION IN THE STREETS James Cagney Barbara Hale plus CATTY CORNERED Sunday, 28 February THE SWORD AND THE ROSE Richar Todd Glynis Johns Monday, 1 March SO BIG Jane Wyman Starling Hayden Tuesday, 2 March HOT NEWS Stanley Clements Gloria Henry plus ASSAULT AND MATTERY, KANGAROO PLAIN, and NAVY SKYROCKET TEENAGE-ROUND-UP by Barbara Burke and Linda Thurston With many sad laments from various carefree teenagers, school reopened last Tuesday. Most of the guys and gals spent their holiday recuperating from the hectic carnival weekend. But then, of course, we have to take into consideration how the other half lives. Strange creatures who romp the world and hide under such names as Anita, Phil, Johnny, Barbara P., and Sharon find life's little pleasures in tramping out to Windmill Beach. In any case, much fun was had by all. J. P. Lehmbeck would like to thank the honorable Norman Huddv for allowing him to beat said Huddy in a game of tennis Monday afternoon. J. P. has now accomplished one of his goals of the year. If, by any strange quirk of fate, you were gazing at the sky on February tenth, you just might have seen Mr. Stork holding on to a seven pound twelve ounce bundle as he went flying by. We were all excited to learn on a later date that this parcel, consisting of an Edward Wayne, was delivered to the home of Dixie and Bingo Blomberg. Dixie as you all remember, graduated from here last year as the vale dictorian of the Senior class. Congratulations on the new arrival. DID YOU SEE: Eddie, Jimmy, and Bill flipping out over some baby pictures. .Sylvia signing up for pool. ...Certain kats making like jelly tots with a hub cap of a car. ...Margo (the cool one) Anderson demonstrating her great abilities as a pro dancer of the Monopoly. Norman telling of his wild experiences at the carnival ...the Chemistry Class plotting to get their hands on a certain mouse who has his quarters in the lab. (He's done, man!). ...Jimmy Miles learning thousands of chapters of Algebra and then not having a test. ...Allen at work on a new deal. ..? Saturday, 27 February 1954 Navy-10NDPPO-GItmo THE INDIAN