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Indian

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Indian
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Vol. VI, No. 29 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 23 January 1954


8,000 Fleet Sailors CAPT Bull Honored as'Mayor of Wonsan' NS Depot Commended


Tax Base Facilities

Almost 8,000 fleet sailors poured ashore from the ships anchored in the harbor last week-end in what was the biggest influx of fleet personnel since the midshipmen cruise last fall.
The various exchanges, transportation, and recreational facilities were taxed to and beyond the saturation point as the sightseeing fleet men swarmed over the base.
Catching the brunt of the onslaught was the main store of the Navy Exchange. Hundreds upon hundreds jammed the store during the week-end. The biggest seller, according to an Exchange spokesman, was alligator goods followed closely by perfume and cameras. Of all things coming in as a solid fourth place best-seller were 400day clocks.
Transportation facilities were hard pressed to keep up with the tremendous amount of additional passengers. Three extra busses were added to carry the men directly to the various Exchanges throughout the base.
Hundreds of fleet men jammed the skating rink in the Fleet Recreation Area, the basketball courts were busy all week-end and the P.O. Club and the Enlisted Men's Club were filled to capacity.
The crush of visitors can, for the most part, be attributed to the four large ships of the line anchored in the bay over the week-end. The battleships New Jersey and Iowa, the carrier Hornet and the cruiser Columbus all sent liberty parties ashore. Not to be ignored, however, in computing liberty parties are 18 destroyer-type vessels along with their tenders and numerous small craft in port for the week-end.
Added to the difficulties providing for the fleet was the arrival Sunday of the USNS Thomas, the Military Sea Transport ship, with families and personnel returning from Christmas leave. Another bus was added to the regular service to carry Thomas passengers to the Exchanges during their 5-hour stay in port


1. G. Impressed


By Gtmo Supply

During the week of 11 - 15 January all supply and fiscal activities on the Naval Base were the subject of an inspection by the Inspector General of the Supply Corps represented by CAPT R. R. Thompson, SC, USN, and his inspection group. These activities included the Naval Supply Depot, NAS Supply and Fiscal Department, Commissary Store, Navy Exchange, and the Naval Station General Mess. CAPT M. E. Norcross, SC, USN, District Supply Officer for Tenth Naval District, was also present
(Continued on Page Two)


CAPT C. E. Bull, USN, Training Officer of the Fleet Training Group in Guantanamo Bay has been accorded the dubious, and somewhat mythical, title of "Mayor of Wonsan."
It all started as a joke among the various commanders of the units blockading the port of Wonsan, Korea during the fighting. As each unit would arrive to assume the blockade and patrol of the Communist held port the commandec would be given a large wooden "key to the city."
The blockade and patrol route inside Wonsan harbor sometimes took the naval units to within 2,000 yards of the Communist shore batteries. The entire route was within 8,000 yards of the shore. Thus, the blockading units were practically within the city and under the constant and "at will" fire of the Communist defenders.
CAPT Bull's group was made up of Korean Navy and Marines plus United States Navy and Marines. The Marines were stationed on a small island within 3,000 yards of the beach and required constant protection from shore fire.
Captain Bull led his patrol unit from the USS Twining (DD 540). His ships were hit several times but none serious enough to put them out of action.
A letter received by Captain Bull from RADM C. E. Olsen, Commander Blockading and Escort Force, Pacific Fleet, states that the original "key to the city" has been forwarded to the Historical Mu-


DatelineTuesday, January 19th 1954
A berthing place between VU10's 'Dog-7' and 'Dog-9' is empty today on the drone line at MacCalla Field.
The drone referred to as 'Dog-8', one of the first radio-controlled drones to operate in Guantanamo Bay, was blasted out of the sky during a nolo flight (pilotless flight) at 2:21 P.M. this afternoon by the sharp-shooting gun crews of the USS W. L. Lind, DD-703.
Dog-8, a re-converted Hellcat, one of the hardest hitting carrierclass fighter planes of World War II, went down pilotless with six hash marks on her cowling.
Painted bright red, the drones are operated by the pilot of a 'mother' plane flying close by and maneuvered with remarkable precision while acting as an aggressor for ships going through the rigid paces of simulated combat excercises.
That appears to be the end of the story but fate left and ironic twist. One week ago, this reporter planned a story about Dog-8 and her six hash marks, one for each successful nolo flight. This noon, I went to McCalla Field with intentions of photographing the old veteran. Number eight was "upstairs" at the time. I never got the picture. Dog-8 never cre back.
The plane# ided an ending for


.V.




Captain Bull displays the plaque and miniature key he received making him one of the mythical "mayors" of Wonsan, Korea.

seum of the United States Naval Academy. Accompanying the letter was a miniature plaque with a small-scale key appointing Captain Bull "mayor" of Wonsan.
The letter states, in part, "In recognition of the excellent performance of duty, and as a token of the appreciation of Commander Blockading and Escort Force, Pacific Fleet, a miniature award is being forwarded to you with my thanks, best wishes, and a hearty well done."


her own story. The termination of years of flying came about when the red Hellcat crashed into the Caribbean at 2:21 P.M.
There was something very warm and human in the feelings of the men towards that plane, the men on the deck who were responsible for the maintainence and mechanical operation and the pilots who guided her from the 'mother' plane. It was as if an old friend, who had served the navy and country well, was suddenly lost in action.
The general comment of the enlisted men when they heard the news was, "So they finally got her." "Too bad. She was a good plane."
There is hardly enough column space in the 'Indian' to relate some of the experiences of the plane and the men who were connected with her during her many months of 'robot' operation.
In carrying out the motto, "Servicio ala Floata" the drone division of Utility Squadron Ten, has served the fleet well while operating off the shores of Guantanamo Bay.
The officers and enlisted men of VU-10's drone section are well deserving of the good reputation given them and the entire squadron by the men of the ships who leave Guantanamo Bay better trained, disciplined and more knowing in the precise methods of gun-crew teamwork then when ey first entered the bay.


In I. G. Inspection

Following the recent inspection by the Inspector General of the Supply Corps and his party, during the week of 11-15 January, the following letter was presented to CDR E. W. Sutherling, SC, USN, commanding officer of the Naval Supply Depot, by CAPT R. R. Thompson, SC, USN, senior inspecting officer and representative of the Inspector General:
"To: NSD Gtmo Personnel
The splendid reputation for service which the Naval Supply Depot Guantanamo bears with its customers has a solid foundation. This foundation is anchored to the combined conscientious efforts of the NSD personnel to maintain an orderly operation and the desire to serve fully and promptly, which lead to effective and efficient supply.
The progress has been forward since my last inspection two and a half years ago. You deserve well the word which I am happy to be able to pass to your Commanding Officer for you -'Well done'.
Keep up the good workdo not become satisfied completely with your accomplishments, because, if you do, your forward progress will stop and decline will start. There remain many goals for you to accomplish."
/Signed/ Captain Thompson
Prior to departure from the Naval Base, CAPT Thompson also informed CDR Sutherling, that he considered the Naval Supply Depot to be operating in an outstanding manner. He further stated he was recommending to the Chief of the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts that Naval Supply Depot, Guantanamo Bay, be given an official commendation by that bureau in recognition of outstanding performance. This is particularly significant inasmuch as CAPT Thompson explained that only five such commendations had been awarded in the past seven years.
The Supply Depot is presently staffed by fourteen officers headed by their Commanding Officer, CDR E. W. Sutherling, SC, USN, with CDR J. W. Graham, SC, USN, as Executive Officer.
There are fifty-seven enlisted men and four hundred and eighty one civilians currently on board. Included among the civilians are nine individuals each with over thirty years of federal service.


CAPT McCracken Here


For NAS Command

CAPT Reginald R. McCracken, USN, reported aboard Sunday via the USNS Pvt. W. H. Thomas, accompanied by Mrs. McCracken and their son. They are temporarily occupying Quarters AV-14, Paola Point. No date has been set for the change of command ceremonies awaiting receipt of official orders by CAPT Bruner of his detachment.


Dog-8 Flies Her Last Nolo
By Jerry Lewis


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1zdLaIL,


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Ed tor Naval Base
Spec a Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9-615

U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT Frank Bruner, USN
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT William t. Caruthers, USN
Commanding Officer
EditorialStaffLT E. A. Sandness - Officer-Advisor
H. E. Davis, JOC-------------------Editor
Jerry Lewis,, J03 ---------------- Features
J. C. Dierks, J03-------------------Sports
Pierce Lehmbeck-------------------Sports
S. E. Cobbs, PHSN----------Photographer
R. Naccarato, SN----------------Make-up
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may he re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 23 January 1954


TEENAGE- ROUND- UP
by Linda Thurston and Barbara Burke

"We've got a team, it's on the beam" was just one of the sounds that could be heard last week up around Air Station as the G.A.A. circled the place in a monster Pep Rally. The activity is just one of the big doings that the Girls' Athletic Association has been sponsoring lately.
One of the High School's old seniors of by-gone days Betty Sigler, will be hearing wedding bells in the very near future. Best of luck Betty!
Hey, all of you crazy teenagers! In case you haven't heard the Juniors are planning a "Sock Hop". This swinging dance will be held at the Little Theater on February 5th. The hours from 7:00 to 10:30 will be filled with round and square dancing. Be sure to get your tickets early for a really frantic evening.
The Sunday School class hit Yateras River last Sautrday with a magnificent splash. Pete Broughton piloted the truck load of picnicking teenagers out to the strains (and we do mean strains) of "Oh My Wonderful One" led by J. Pierce Lehmbeck. The Avila Sisters assisted by Ed Heimer gave out with a few top Cuban songs. Once there Jim Dalton turned Tarzan, and went swinging through the trees with the aid of a rope. Margo could be seen thrashing around on her "Barge" playing Cleopatra while Eunice, Nancy and Anita reported troubles with a man who was out riding horseback. Although Anita almost drowned in a foot of water, the day came to a close with everyone remarking on their wonderful times.

1. G. Impressed . . .
(Continued from Page One) to assist in the inspection.
Prior to his departure, CAPT Thompson stated that he was very favorably impressed with the supply activities at Guantanamo Bay and in particular the improvements that were quite evident since the last visit of the Inspector General Team in July 1951.
The inspection party departed on 16 January 1954 for San Juan, Puerto Rico. They will inspect supply activities at San Juan, Roosevelt Roads, and Trinidad prior to returning to Washington, D. C.


CAPT W. R. Caruthers (center) inspects the officers of his new command accompanied by CAPT J. M. Howell (left) and CDR V. J. Soballe (rear) executive officer of the Naval Station. Captain Caruthers assumed command of the Station from Captain Howell who is retiring from service after 28 years. The change of command ceremony took place on Bay Hill on January 15th.


The Commander, Utility Wing, Atlantic Fleet conducted an operational readiness inspection of Utility Squadron 10 last week and gave an "excellent" result. Left to right-CDR R. C. Spears, executive officer VU-10; CDR M. L. Dana, Drone Officer UtWingLant; CDR D. G. White, C. 0. VU-4; CAPT L. 0. Fox, Commander UtWingLant; CDR J. W. Austin, Jr. Operations Officer UtWingLant; and CDR T. B. Wolfe, commanding officer VU-10.


5:ur


Pretty Pat Wormwood adds an additional touch of beauty to the two automobiles which will be given away to the holders of the winning tickets djkig the annual Guantanamo Bay carnival next nth. Tickets are going 25( a piece and a book for $5.00. They ce purchased at any oVe various Exchanges.


105


-


cilnaay, 24 January 1954
Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630 Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930 - 2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN
(Catholic)


The Chaplain's Corner

Our ancestors from all parts of the world have left us many adages which still carry weight when brought to mind. For examples. "Procrastination is the thief of time", or "Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today", are typical sayings that have taken root in our society. At this writing we are far into the first month of a new year. Have we begun to act on the numerous resolves that we made during the last days of 1953 ? It is so easy to put off, to procrastinate, letting the days slip quietly by. It is good to check our position, yes to double check, in order that we may not deviate from our determined course. Imagine for the moment that this new year is like a journey, one that we are already launched upon. Now before getting too far away from our starting point it is advisable to take a bearing. We had planned to take certain things with us and others were to be left behind because they were too bulky or unnecessary for a trip of this nature and might prove a liability on our way. Have we done this? Have these Twenty-Three days, already spent, been used in advancing in the direction planned? Perhaps we had determined by God's grace to leave behind an inconsiderate nature or a bad temper towards those with whom we work, or maybe even the wish was to eliminate prejudice and bias in our relations to others.
And in place of these detrimental things the goal was to be unselfishness as central in our lives. God's love had been pictured as flowing through us and touching others and with this realization we knew that consideration for the other person would be paramount in daily life. This picture showed self as taking a second place but it emphasized the fact that it was a happy place for we would be serving others. It is easy to forget unless we continually look to God for guidance along this journey. He is gentle in reminding us of the dangerous habit of going off on tangents that will lead us into trouble. So before the month of January has passed let us orient ourselves with God and allow Him first place in our lives. Let us never forget that it is the little things in life that. count. It is the "Little foxes that spoil the vines".
James F. Agnew
LT, CHC, USN






S t ay 23 January 1954 THE INDIAN


North Turns Pro Cage League Enters To Enter Tourney Second Week of Play


After 27 years as an amateur golfer Wright North, manager of the Guantanamo golf course, has filed his intentions with the United States Golfers Association of America of turning pro, and will enter the Jamaica Open as a professional with the play-for-pay golfers.
During North's time as an amateur he has won several tournaments of which the Mid-Island Open of 72 holes in 1953 at Mandeville, Jamaica, was his greatest feat. He set a course record for the Mandeville club. He holds the competitive record here in Guantanamo for the local course-66. In 1948 he shot the 1st nine holes of the local course in 29-five under par.
The following year he lost out by only one stroke in the 4th Naval District championship. Later he won the Cecil Field and the Jacksonville Air Station championships.


Hunting Season Open


For Base Shooters

For about three weeks now, since December 28 to be exact, the wouldbe Carl Akeleys in the Bay area have been donning their deerstalkers' caps and dodging buck and birdshot of assorted sizes as the local hunting season rolls into high gear.
The season for deer, duck, dove and guinea hen opened on the 28th and until the first of March any one of the above named creatures can legally end up in the stew pot. The limit on deer is one buck or doe per person per season and bag limits on the fowl are set at 15, 10, and 4 birds for dove, duck, and guinea, respectively.
A word to sportsmen: Before trudging off into the bush, obtain a permit from the Assistant Game Warden. A new permit is required prior to each excursion. After picking up your hunting permit check out with the Base Provost Marshal, giving your name, rank or rating, the location of the area in which you intend to hunt, and the date and hours of your proposed outing. All hunting must be done during the daylight hours; it's too easy to mistake two legs for four after sundown. Parties are limited to three persons, one of whom must be the Base Game Warden, Assistant Warden, or Deputy Warden. Hunting weapons will be limited to shotguns.
The following local huntsmen have bagged their limit of one (leer: LT G. A. Schilling and G. DiMascola, BMC, collaborated to claim the first of the season in December of last year. W. Mickiewicz, ADC; J. W. Wilson, AOC; and J. Hise, AE1 made January 5 an unlucky day for the deer populace, the trio each bringing down an animal on that date, while ENS T. B. Green stands as the latest to demonstrate his woodsmanship, returning home with his kill on the 12th of this month.
If you've a fancy for roast duck with dressing or for a pair of antlers to cover up that crack in the wall over the door why not try your shooting eye during the next month? You can always tell about the ones that ran (or flew) away!

A pessimistic wife is one who has the pork chops cooked when her husband comes home from a hunting trip.


Moving into the second week of play in the Naval Base League, the Marine Leathernecks came to life in the last quarter and surprised just about everybody but themselves by dumping the VU-10 Mallards, 5546. Led by player-coach Freddy Murrell, who netted 23 points, the Leathernecks broke away after being dead-locked at the end of the third quarter to outscore the Mallards, 18-9, in the last session easily supplying the needed margin.
In the second game of the evening the Fliers of NAS had to bear down in the closing minutes of play to close out the Naval Base High School, 64-53. Hollowell led the way with 15 points followed closely by Meador with 14. For the High School, MacMichael sacked away 17 while Heimer contributed 13.
Tuesday night, the pace slowed up slightly as the Fleet Training Group registering its first win of the young '54 season, defeated the Dental Clinic, 59-49. For the Trainers, Zino led the way with 15 and Collins followed with 14. For the losers, it was Rose all the way with 28.
In the second game the Naval Station Indians won their third straight by handing MCB-7 its first defeat, 53-40. The Indian's "Cy" Young, scoring all 17 of his points in the first half, led the way for the Indians followed by Bradford with 14. For The SeaBees, Gill and Clark both connected for 11.
Wednesday night, the Corpsmen of the Naval Hospital made their first appearance of the week and defeated the Naval Base High School, 52-38, in a contest in which 46 fouls were registered. Hallum led the Corpsmen, having a perfect night from the free throw line and hitting eight times from the floor, with 20. For the High School, MacMichael led with 13 followed by Heimer with 12.
In the second game of the evening, the Naval Station Indians dropped their first of the season in a nip and tuck battle, 46-45. The Indians, after leading by six going into the last few minutes of play, started an early freeze but couldn't hold the ball and the Mallards cut the margin finally closing them out with a basket in the last 35 seconds. Lockhart led the way for the Mallards with 10 followed by Huber and Jantzen with 9 each. Bradford led the losing Indians with 15.

Ladies' Golf Shots
by Mary Ann Pennell

A very successful Scotch foursome was played Sunday, January 17th. The credit goes to our chairman, Mrs. Jane McElroy for her excellent planning. Everyone had such a good time-let's have more of the same. The winners:
Low score-LT and Mrs. Grego
Runner-up-LCDR D. A. Scott and Mrs. Jane McElroy
First net prize went to CDR and Mrs. J. P. Jones.
Second place was a tie between Mr. and Mrs. D. Viafora and Mr. and Mrs. Cowan.
Longest ladies' drive was won by Rosemary Quillan on the 17th. Drive nearest the pin was won by CDR R. C. Spears on the 6th.
We have been having a large turn-out for our Wednesday tournaments, and we've had some good games. Sure wish you girls I see out playing golf would join our club. We have lots of fun and none of us -e pro's, so you don't have to &mshful. If you'd like to join c rs. Ann Smith at
8-236 or wr. Lou Toczko at 9-280.


FinI


George MacMichael (7) of the Base High School drives up and around Raduski (4) of VU-10 in one of the High School's vain attempts to come from behind last Friday night. Edgar Heimer (2) is coming in to assist MacMichael.



VU-10 Mallards


THE VU-10 MALLARDS: Back row, left to right: V. L. Huber, W. R. Kirby, C. E. Loggins, H. G. Annette, H. J. Geraty, C. W. Lockhart, Nascimiento, R. D. Howarton, R. R. Morris, and M. D. Jantzen. Front row, left to right: Coach W. C. Park, E. Crouch, C. E. Cabral, J. Merling, H. G. Padulski and J. E. Heinan. Not pictured D. E. Stewart.

The VU-10 Mallards are still burning over the result of last year's final defeat at the hands of the Naval Station Indians, a loss which cost them a tie for first place and another chance at the League crown which they had worn for six years.
Coach W. C. Park thought the best remedy for the situation would be to start off on another streak beginning this year. The Mallards, led by returning veterans Huber, Geraty, Lockhart and Howerton were eager to oblige, and promptly took their first two contests, grabbing the opening game of the season from NAS, 63-56, and trouncing the High School lads a few nights later- ,6-34.
A loss to the Mari l n Monday night was discouraging, but Mallards rooters hope that it be the last one and are looking for VU-10 to be on top of the pile i arch.


Santuraay, 23 January 1954


THE INDIAN







P.,,l-1 NDPP Gtmo TEIDA audy 3Jnay15


VU-10 Prop Blast

CAPT L. 0. Fox, Commander Utility Wing, U. S. Atlantic Fleet, CDR D. G. White, Commanding Officer, VU-4 and members of the two organizations paid us a visit on Tuesday, 12 January 1954. They looked the squadron over thoroughly and observed drills of all description. It was VU-10's annual Operational Readiness Inspection. We learned a lot by their observations and constructive criticism.
The inter-command b o w I i n g league is underway in the second half competition. The Structures division seems to be the team to beat. Kegler Kiefer rolled a 204, 207, and 221 last week for a high total of 632, which is really pounding the pins in anybody's league.
The Mallard basketball team is off to an excellent start in the local league, having won their first two starts. How about a little more support. Bring your wife; she would probably enjoy getting out of the kitchen.
C. S. Minor, AM2, just returned after six months of "B" school at NATTC, Memphis. D. J. Brough, AOl, has reported aboard for duty from CAG 1, U.S.S. Roosevelt.
The All Hands party Monday night at the EM Club was quite an affair. F. 0. Brostrom, ADI, gave the crowd a bubble dance complete with bubbles. R. M. Bennett, AK2, put on a thrilling skit, Mickey Spillane type, with his saxophone as backdrop music. V. F. Vicari, AD2, kept walking across the stage appropriately dressed as the party drunk. The Home Wreckers, string ensemble composed of Morris, E. A. Cotebleovitch, T., White, R. G., VU-10, Pierson, Naval Station, and South from NAS played a number of selections, but one called "The Wreck of the PBM in MIAMI" highlighted their performance. Jerry Lewis, VU-10's gift to WGBY, acted as master of ceremonies. The entertainment was very good and a well done goes to all the performers and the committee that planned and made the party a tremendous success.


Air Station Notes

LTJG Malcolm R. McCann, USNR, reported recently and effective 1 February he will be assigned duty as Special Services Officer, relieving LT George H. Leach in that capacity. LT Leach will in turn relieve LT C. W. Sholes, Jr., as Flight Control Officer upon the latter's detachment in February.
BOSN W. C. Lawrence is "sweating out" his orders to parts or ports unknown. His relief has been ordered in, but the good 'Boats' has not been ordered out. We're glad to have you stick around, however, Boats.
LCDR N. F. Vanderhoef is in Jamaica with the golf 'pros' of the Base. Keep up the good work, Van!
Lou Serig, Suprv. Adm. Asst., has had many, many inquiries of old time base personnel regarding the present whereabouts of his son Jack, former popular Agent Cashier in the Disbursing Office. For their information it is now Private Jack, USA, and he is stationed at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., undergoing a course of instruction in the Army Finance School. He attained an outstanding overall average and he has been requested to remain at the school as an instructor. Since he has been selected for Officer's Candidate School, he must determine which course to follow. His wife, Lou, is presently at the home of her parents in Havana, anxiously awaiting the arrival of "Dr. Stork", whose visit was due 15 January but apparently he was grounded or delayed in transit. Jack expects to be home about 4 February to get acquainted with his sonhe hopes. "Grandpa Lou" and Mrs. Sonig plan visiting then at that time also to become acquainted with the grand-son.
Ward, another son, who visited here during the summer of '51, is now at Pensacola undergoing Flight Training as a Naval Aviation Cadet.

"Have you seen those 3-D glasses?"
"No. How much beer do they hold?"


The entertainers at the VU-10 All-Hands party-McManus, Sweitkata, Stevens, Meierotto, Wilson, Barkman, Bennett, Brostrom, Vicari. Bottom row: White, Morris, Cotchaleovitch and Jerry Lewis who emceed the affair.


Don McNeill has a dentist friend who told him: "Making bridges is nothing compared with getting the patients to come across."


A naval base is where the sailors are full of life, happiness and the pursuit :;f liberty.


FTG Bulletin

FTG Bulletin
Admiral L. D. McCormick, Commander in Chief Atlantic Fleet, inspected the Fleet Training Group facilities during the past week, including electronics installations at Fleet Training Center on Crane Hill and the new FTG building.
Admiral McCormick visited airships and fleet units, including the USS Hornet, undergoing training under the direction of FTG.
LCDR George A. Gardes has reported to the Fleet Training Group to relieve CDR R. W. Gash as head of the CIC Department. Mr. Gardes has been captain of the USS Harveson, which has been operating in the Eastern Air Defense System. Recently, as Captain of the Harveson, Mr. Gardes was assigned duty on the Flight Route of the President for the Big Three Conference in Bermuda.
Mr. Gardes will reside at Evans Point 722 A with his wife, Mrs. Jeanne M. Gardes and his four children George A. Jr., Susan, and twins Paul S. and Ann L. Gardes.
Golf
The Training Group golfers take on the VU-10 team for a return match today in an effort to avenge a recent 16-14 loss to the Squadron team. Scheduled to carry the Training Group Colors are Captain Bull and Captain Houston, CDR Manning, CDR Gash, CDR King, CDR Gentry, LCDR Simmons, LCDR Skadowski, LT West, LT Mosely, LT Minard, LTJG Bates, LTJG Treffinger, Chief Monte, Chief Dykeman, Smith, SN, Harmer, YN1, and Kramer, PNI3.
Hobby of the Month
Many Training Group Personnel have outside interests, ranging from photography to model airplanes. One of the most unusual such interests has been shown by Richard I. Anderson, GM 1, FTG Barracks, who is engaged in growing an avocado tree. In four months time under careful grooming by Anderson, the tree has grown to eight inches. Each week it is carefully taken out from a shelf built over Anderson's bunk and presented to all hands for inspection. FTG title for the Unusual Hobby of the Month is awarded to Gunners Mate Anderson and his Avocado Tree.
Personals
FTG extends a welcome to Mrs. Mildred Irene Kuba, wife of LT M. F. Kuba, and their children Linda and Francis, and to Mrs. Jane V. Gentry, wife of CDR Gentry, and their daughter Jane. New Building Nears Completion The new section of the FTG Building is rapidly nearing completion and is expected to be ready for occupancy next week. Personnel who have been working in restricted quarters will find plenty of room when the new space becomes available.
Ships Arriving
Ships scheduled to arrive at Guantanamo for visits or training in the next seven days include the Aircraft Carrier Leyte, the Light Cruiser Roanoke, and ComDesLant ships Parle, C. H. Roan, Eaton, and Bache.

"I'm not going to school tomorrow." said little Johnny.
"Why not?" asked his mother.
"It's no use." he replied. "I can't read and I can't write-and they won't let me talk."

Tipsy gentleman: "Hi, babe, do you speak to strangers?"
Sweet young thing: "Certainly not!"
Tipsy gentleman: "Then shut up."


The Lucky
by Betty Radcliffe


Bag


Several years ago a family moved to the base, bringing with them their young daughter. This little girl received the honor of having a section of the base named after her; that section was Paola Point.
In early 1916 Mrs. Copeland and her baby daughter, Paola, came to Guantanamo Bay to be with Mrs. Copeland's husband Lt. D. Graham Copeland. To arrive here it was necessary to travel by boat from Key West, Fla. to Havana. In Havana they boarded a train and journeyed to Santiago; from there they came by tugboat, the only available transportation to the base.
The Copelands were one of seven families living here at that time. Their house was one of four that was located on what is now known as Hospital Hill. Two other houses occupied by Marine officers were located at Fisherman's Point.
There was a small commissary here to provide for the families. Fresh fruits and vegetables were brought over from Cuba. The families raised chickens to provide themselves with eggs. Bread was a very serious problem and Mrs. Copeland recalls that her Chinese cook made fresh bread with yeast that he made h i m s e l f from potatoes.
Water, of course, was scarce, it was transported by rail from Guantanamo to Caimanera and then by water barge to the base.
There was one doctor in charge of a small hospital, and when necessary, he was assisted by his wife, who was a nurse.
Recreation consisted mainly of horseback riding and a movie once a week at Fisherman's Point. The only way to get from Hospital Hill to Fisherman's Point and the movie was by boat.
For an evenings entertainment of dancing and a few drinks, it was necessary to go to Caimanera, as the base was "dry" in those days.
To get to the city of Guantanamo you rode from Caimanera on what Mrs. Copeland smilingly referred to as a "Toonerville Trolley".
When Mrs. Copeland left with her family, after spending about a year here in Guantanamo, she never dreamed she would one day return; but now, some thirty six years later, she is back again, this time to visit her daughter, Mrs. Paola Groverman. As Mrs. Copeland gazes at the surrounding mountains, the only really familiar sight, she smiles at her memories of yesteryear in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.



MOVIES

Saturday, 23 January THE NAKED SPUR
James Stewart Robert Ryan
Janet Leigh Ralph Meeker
Sunday, 24 January
I'LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS Doris Day Danny Thomas
Frank Lovejoy Patricia Wymore
Monday, 25 January
MILLION DOLLAR MERMAID Esther Williams Victor Mature
Walter Pigeon David Bryan
Tuesday, 26 January
STOP YOU'RE KILLING ME Broderick Crawford Claire Trevor Virginia Gibson Bill Hayes


vy-10NDPPO-Gtmo


Saturday, 23 January 1954


THE INDIAN




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C)MCM 6 C.dmm I U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 23 January 1954 8,000 Fleet Sailors CAPT Bull Honored as'Mayor of Wonsan' N S Deot Commended Tax Base Facilities Almost 8,000 fleet sailors poured ashore from the ships anchored in the harbor last week-end in what was the biggest influx of fleet personnel since the midshipmen cruise last fall. The various exchanges, transportation, and recreational facilities were taxed to and beyond the saturation point as the sightseeing fleet men swarmed over the base. Catching the brunt of the onslaught was the main store of the Navy Exchange. Hundreds upon hundreds jammed the store during the week-end. The biggest seller, according to an Exchange spokesman, was alligator goods followed closely by perfume and cameras. Of all things coming in as a solid fourth place best-seller were 400day clocks. Transportation facilities were hard pressed to keep up with the tremendous amount of additional passengers. Three extra busses were added to carry the men directly to the various Exchanges throughout the base. Hundreds of fleet men jammed the skating rink in the Fleet Recreation Area, the basketball courts were busy all week-end and the P.O. Club and the Enlisted Men's Club were filled to capacity. The crush of visitors can, for the most part, be attributed to the four large ships of the line anchored in the bay over the week-end. The battleships New Jersey and Iowa, the carrier Hornet and the cruiser Columbus all sent liberty parties ashore. Not to be ignored, however, in computing liberty parties are 18 destroyer-type vessels along with their tenders and numerous small craft in port for the week-end. Added to the difficulties providing for the fleet was the arrival Sunday of the USNS Thomas, the Military Sea Transport ship, with families and personnel returning from Christmas leave. Another bus was added to the regular service to carry Thomas passengers to the Exchanges during their 5-hour stay in port. 1. G. Impressed By Gtmo Supply During the week of 11 -15 January all supply and fiscal activities on the Naval Base were the subject of an inspection by the Inspector General of the Supply Corps represented by CAPT R. R. Thompson, SC, USN, and his inspection group. These activities included the Naval Supply Depot, NAS Supply and Fiscal Department, Commissary Store, Navy Exchange, and the Naval Station General Mess. CAPT M. E. Norcross, SC, USN, District Supply Officer for Tenth Naval District, was also present (Continued on Page Two) DatelineTuesday, January 19th 1954 A berthing place between VU10's 'Dog-7' and 'Dog-9' is empty today on the drone line at MacCalla Field. The drone referred to as 'Dog-8', one of the first radio-controlled drones to operate in Guantanamo Bay, was blasted out of the sky during a nolo flight (pilotless flight) at 2:21 P.M. this afternoon by the sharp-shooting gun crews of the USS W. L. Lind, DD-703. Dog-8, a re-converted Hellcat, one of the hardest hitting carrierclass fighter planes of World War II, went down pilotless with six hash marks on her cowling. Painted bright red, the drones are operated by the pilot of a 'mother' plane flying close by and maneuvered with remarkable precision while acting as an aggressor for ships going through the rigid paces of simulated combat excercises. That appears to be the end of the story but fate left and ironic twist. One week ago, this reporter planned a story about Dog-8 and her six hash marks, one for each successful nolo flight. This noon, I went to McCalla Field with intentions of photographing the old veteran. Number eight was "upstairs" at the time. I never got the picture. Dog-8 never came back. The plane, ided an ending for CAPT C. E. Bull, USN, Training Officer of the Fleet Training Group in Guantanamo Bay has been accorded the dubious, and somewhat mythical, title of "Mayor of Wonsan." It all started as a joke among the various commanders of the units blockading the port of Wonsan, Korea during the fighting. As each unit would arrive to assume the blockade and patrol of the Communist held port the commanden would be given a large wooden "key to the city." The blockade and patrol route inside Wonsan harbor sometimes took the naval units to within 2,000 yards of the Communist shore batteries. The entire route was within 8,000 yards of the shore. Thus, the blockading units were practically within the city and under the constant and "at will" fire of the Communist defenders. CAPT Bull's group was made up of Korean Navy and Marines plus United States Navy and Marines. The Marines were stationed on a small island within 3,000 yards of the beach and required constant protection from shore fire. Captain Bull led his patrol unit from the USS Twining (DD 540). His ships were hit several times but none serious enough to put them out of action. A letter received by Captain Bull from RADM C. E. Olsen, Commander Blockading and Escort Force, Pacific Fleet, states that the original "key to the city" has been forwarded to the Historical Muher own story. The termination of years of flying came about when the red Hellcat crashed into the Caribbean at 2:21 P.M. There was something very warm and human in the feelings of the men towards that plane, the men on the deck who were responsible for the maintainence and mechanical operation and the pilots who guided her from the 'mother' plane. It was as if an old friend, who had served the navy and country well, was suddenly lost in action. The general comment of the enlisted men when they heard the news was, "So they finally got her." "Too bad. She was a good plane." There is hardly enough column space in the 'Indian' to relate some of the experiences of the plane and the men who were connected with her during her many months of 'robot' operation. In carrying out the motto, "Servicio ala Floata" the drone division of Utility Squadron Ten, has served the fleet well while operating off the shores of Guantanamo Bay. The officers and enlisted men of VU-10's drone section are well deserving of the good reputation given them and the entire squadron by the men of the ships who leave Guantanamo Bay better trained, disciplined and more knowing in the precise methods of gun-crew teamwork then when .ey first entered the bay. In I. G, Inspection Following the recent inspection by the Inspector General of the Supply Corps and his party, during the week of 11-15 January, the following letter was presented to CDR E. W. Sutherling, SC, USN, commanding officer of the Naval Supply Depot, by CAPT R. R. Thompson, SC, USN, senior inspecting officer and representative of the Inspector General: "To: NSD Gtmo Personnel The splendid reputation for service which the Naval Supply Depot Guantanamo bears with its customers has a solid foundation. This foundation is anchored to the combined conscientious efforts of the NSD personnel to maintain an orderly operation and the desire to serve fully and promptly, which lead to effective and efficient supply. The progress has been forward since my last inspection two and a half years ago. You deserve well the word which I am happy to be able to pass to your Commanding Officer for you -'Well done'. Keep up the good workdo not become satisfied completely with your accomplishments, because, if you do, your forward progress will stop and decline will start. There remain many goals for you to accomplish." /Signed/ Captain Thompson Prior to departure from the Naval Base, CAPT Thompson also informed CDR Sutherling, that he considered the Naval Supply Depot to be operating in an outstanding manner. He further stated he was recommending to the Chief of the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts that Naval Supply Depot, Guantanamo Bay, be given an official commendation by that bureau in recognition of outstanding performance. This is particularly significant inasmuch as CAPT Thompson explained that only five such commendations had been awarded in the past seven years. The Supply Depot is presently staffed by fourteen officers headed by their Commanding Officer, CDR E. W. Sutherling, SC, USN, with CDR J. W. Graham, SC, USN, as Executive Officer. There are fifty-seven enlisted men and four hundred and eighty one civilians currently on board. Included among the civilians are nine individuals each with over thirty years of federal service. CAPT McCracken Here For NAS Command CAPT Reginald R. McCracken, USN, reported aboard Sunday via the USNS Pvt. W. H. Thomas, accompanied by Mrs. McCracken and their son. They are temporarily occupying Quarters AV-14, Paola Point. No date has been set for the change of command ceremonies awaiting receipt of official orders by CAPT Bruner of his detachment. Vol. VI, No. 29 Dog-8 Flies Her Last Nolo By Jerry Lewis ,z~cLian~ Captain Bull displays the plaque and miniature key he received making him one of the mythical "mayors" of Wonsan, Korea. seum of the United States Naval Academy. Accompanying the letter was a miniature plaque with a small-scale key appointing Captain Bull "mayor" of Wonsan. The letter states, in part, "In recognition of the excellent performance of duty, and as a token of the appreciation of Commander Blockading and Escort Force, Pacific Fleet, a miniature award is being forwarded to you with my thanks, best wishes, and a hearty well done."

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age o Editor01 Ofie U S. Naval ease Special Service Department Flees Recreation Center Telephone 9-g15 SatI1,rlov 99 r.U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Frank Bruner, USN Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sandness --Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC ---Editor Jerry Lewis,, J03 --Features J. C. Dierks, J3 ---Sports Pierce Lehmbeck ---Sports S. E. Cobbs, PHSNPhotographer R. Naccarato, SN--Make-up THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. TEENAGE-ROUND-UP by Linda Thurston and Barbara Burke "We've got a team, it's on the beam" was just one of the sounds that could be heard last week up around Air Station as the G.A.A. circled the place in a monster Pep Rally. The activity is just one of the big doings that the Girls' Athletic Association has been sponsoring lately. One of the High School's old seniors of by-gone days Betty Sigler, will be hearing wedding bells in the very near future. Best of luck Betty! Hey, all of you crazy teenagers! In case you haven't heard the Juniors are planning a "Sock Hop". This swinging dance will be held at the Little Theater on February 5th. The hours from 7:00 to 10:30 will be filled with round and square dancing. Be sure to get your tickets early for a really frantic evening. The Sunday School class hit Yateras River last Sautrday with a magnificent splash. Pete Broughton piloted the truck load of picnicking teenagers out to the strains (and we do mean strains) of "Oh My Wonderful One" led by J. Pierce Lehmbeck. The Avila Sisters assisted by Ed Heimer gave out with a few top Cuban songs. Once there Jim Dalton turned Tarzan, and went swinging through the trees with the aid of a rope. Margo could be seen thrashing around on her "Barge" playing Cleopatra while Eunice, Nancy and Anita reported troubles with a man who was out riding horseback. Although Anita almost drowned in a foot of water, the day came to a close with everyone remarking on their wonderful times. I. G. Impressed .. (Continued from Page One) to assist in the inspection. Prior to his departure, CAPT Thompson stated that he was very favorably impressed with the supply activities at Guantanamo Bay and in particular the improvements that were quite evident since the last visit of the Inspector General Team in July 1951. The inspection party departed on 16 January 1954 for San Juan, Puerto Rico. They will inspect supply activities at San Juan, Roosevelt Roads, and Trinidad prior to returning to Washington, D. C. CAPT W. R. Caruthers (center) inspects the officers of his new command accompanied by CAPT J. M. Howell (left) and CDR V. J. Soballe (rear) executive officer of the Naval Station. Captain Caruthers assumed command of the Station from Captain Howell who is retiring from service after 28 years. The change of command ceremony took place on Bay Hill on January 15th. The Commander, Utility Wing, Atlantic Fleet conducted an operational readiness inspection of Utility Squadron 10 last week and gave an "excellent" result. Left to right-CDR R. C. Spears, executive officer VU-10; CDR M. L. Dana, Drone Officer UtWingLant; CDR D. G. White, C. 0. VU-4; CAPT L. 0. Fox, Commander UtWingLant; CDR J. W. Austin, Jr. Operations Officer UtWingLant; and CDR T. B. Wolfe, commanding officer VU-10. Pretty Pat Wormwood adds an additional touch of beauty to the two automobils which will be given away to the holders of the winning tickets d v the annual Guantanamo Bay carnival next nth. Tickets are goin \ 25" a piece and a book for $5.00. They c purchased at any o 6 various Exchanges. --stlay, 24 January 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) The Chaplain's Corner Our ancestors from all parts of the world have left us many adages which still carry weight when brought to mind. For examples. "Procrastination is the thief of time", or "Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today", are typical sayings that have taken root in our society. At this writing we are far into the first month of a new year. Have we begun to act on the numerous resolves that we made during the last days of 1953 ? It is so easy to put off, to procrastinate, letting the days slip quietly by. It is good to check our position, yes to double check, in order that we may not deviate from our determined course. Imagine for the moment that this new year is like a journey, one that we are already launched upon. Now before getting too far away from our starting point it is advisable to take a bearing. We had planned to take certain things with us and others were to be left behind because they were too bulky or unnecessary for a trip of this nature and might prove a liability on our way. Have we done this? Have these Twenty-Three days, already spent, been used in advancing in the direction planned? Perhaps we had determined by God's grace to leave behind an inconsiderate nature or a bad temper towards those with whom we work, or maybe even the wish was to eliminate prejudice and bias in our relations to others. And in place of these detrimental things the goal was to be unselfishness as central in our lives. God's love had been pictured as flowing through us and touching others and with this realization we knew that consideration for the other person would be paramount in daily life. This picture showed self as taking a second place but it emphasized the fact that it was a happy place for we would be serving others. It is easy to forget unless we continually look to God for guidance along this journey. He is gentle in reminding us of the dangerous habit of going off on tangents that will lead us into trouble. So before the month of January has passed let us orient ourselves with God and allow Him first place in our lives. Let us never forget that it is the little things in life that count. It is the "Little foxes that spoil the vines". James F. Agnew LT, CHC, USN THE INDIAN Saturday, 23 January 1954

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Saturday, 23 January 1954 THE INDIAN North Turns Pro Cage League Enters To Enter Tourney Second Week of Play After 27 years as an amateur golfer Wright North, manager of the Guantanamo golf course, has filed his intentions with the United States Golfers Association of America of turning pro, and will enter the Jamaica Open as a professional with the play-for-pay golfers. During North's time as an amateur he has won several tournaments of which the Mid-Island Open of 72 holes in 1953 at Mandeville, Jamaica, was his greatest feat. He set a course record for the Mandeville club. He holds the competitive record here in Guantanamo for the local course-66. In 1948 he shot the 1st nine holes of the local course in 29-five under par. The following year he lost out by only one stroke in the 4th Naval District championship. Later he won the Cecil Field and the Jacksonville Air Station championships. Hunting Season Open For Base Shooters For about three weeks now, since December 28 to be exact, the wouldbe Carl Akeleys in the Bay area have been donning their deerstalkers' caps and dodging buck and birdshot of assorted sizes as the local hunting season rolls into high gear. The season for deer, duck, dove and guinea hen opened on the 28th and until the first of March any one of the above named creatures can legally end up in the stew pot. The limit on deer is one buck or doe per person per season and bag limits on the fowl are set at 15, 10, and 4 birds for dove, duck, and guinea, respectively. A word to sportsmen: Before trudging off into the bush, obtain a permit from the Assistant Game Warden. A new permit is required prior to each excursion. After picking up your hunting permit check out with the Base Provost Marshal, giving your name, rank or rating, the location of the area in which you intend to hunt, and the date and hours of your proposed outing. All hunting must be done during the daylight hours; it's too easy to mistake two legs for four after sundown. Parties are limited to three persons, one of whom must be the Base Game Warden, Assistant Warden, or Deputy Warden. Hunting weapons will be limited to shotguns. The following local huntsmen have bagged their limit of one (leer: LT G. A. Schilling and G. DiMascola, BMC, collaborated to claim the first of the season in December of last year. W. Mickiewicz, ADC; J. W. Wilson, AOC; and J. Hise, AEl made January 5 an unlucky day for the deer populace, the trio each bringing down an animal on that date, while ENS T. B. Green stands as the latest to demonstrate his woodsmanship, returning home with his kill on the 12th of this month. If you've a fancy for roast duck with dressing or for a pair of antlers to cover up that crack in the wall over the door why not try your shooting eye during the next month? You can always tell about the ones that ran (or flew) away! A pessimistic wife is one who has the pork chops cooked when her husband comes home from a hunting trip. Moving into the second week of play in the Naval Base League, the Marine Leathernecks came to life in the last quarter and surprised just about everybody but themselves by dumping the VU-10 Mallards, 5546. Led by player-coach Freddy Murrell, who netted 23 points, the Leathernecks broke away after being dead-locked at the end of the third quarter to outscore the Mallards, 18-9, in the last session easily supplying the needed margin. In the second game of the evening the Fliers of NAS had to bear down in the closing minutes of play to close out the Naval Base High School, 64-53. Hollowell led the way with 15 points followed closely by Meador with 14. For the High School, MacMichael sacked away 17 while Heimer contributed 13. Tuesday night, the pace slowed up slightly as the Fleet Training Group registering its first win of the young '54 season, defeated the Dental Clinic, 59-49. For the Trainers, Zino led the way with 15 and Collins followed with 14. For the losers, it was Rose all the way with 28. In the second game the Naval Station Indians won their third straight by handing MCB-7 its first defeat, 53-40. The Indian's "Cy" Young, scoring all 17 of his points in the first half, led the way for the Indians followed by Bradford with 14. For The SeaBees, Gill and Clark both connected for 11. Wednesday night, the Corpsmen of the Naval Hospital made their first appearance of the week and defeated the Naval Base High School, 52-38, in a contest in which 46 fouls were registered. Hallum led the Corpsmen, having a perfect night from the free throw line and hitting eight times from the floor, with 20. For the High School, MacMichael led with 13 followed by Heimer with 12. In the second game of the evening, the Naval Station Indians dropped their first of the season in a nip and tuck battle, 46-45. The Indians, after leading by six going into the last few minutes of play, started an early freeze but couldn't hold the ball and the Mallards cut the margin finally closing them out with a basket in the last 35 seconds. Lockhart led the way for the Mallards with 10 followed by Huber and Jantzen with 9 each. Bradford led the losing Indians with 15. Ladies' Golf Shots by Mary Ann Pennell A very successful Scotch foursome was played Sunday, January 17th. The credit goes to our chairman, Mrs. Jane McElroy for her excellent planning. Everyone had such a good time-let's have more of the same. The winners: Low score-LT and Mrs. Grego Runner-up-LCDR D. A. Scott and Mrs. Jane McElroy First net prize went to CDR and Mrs. J. P. Jones. Second place was a tie between Mr. and Mrs. D. Viafora and Mr. and Mrs. Cowan. Longest ladies' drive was won by Rosemary Quillan on the 17th. Drive nearest the pin was won by CDR R. C. Spears on the 6th. We have been having a large turn-out for our Wednesday tournaments, and we've had some good games. Sure wish you girls I see cut playing golf would join our club. We have lots of fun and none of us aye pro's, so you don't have to shful. If you'd like to join c rs. Ann Smith at 8-236 or Y Lou Toczko at 9-280. --~ George MacMichael (7) of the Base High School drives up and around Raduski (4) of VU-10 in one of the High School's vain attempts to come from behind last Friday night. Edgar Heimer (2) is coming in to assist MacMichael. VU-10 Mallards THE VU-10 MALLARDS: Back row, left to right: V. L. Huber, W. R. Kirby, C. E. Loggins, H. G. Annette, H. J. Geraty, C. W. Lockhart, Nascimiento, R. D. Howarton, R. R. Morris, and M. D. Jantzen. Front row, left to right: Coach W. C. Park, E. Crouch, C. E. Cabral, J. Merling, H. G. Padulski and J. E. Heinan. Not pictured D. E. Stewart. The VU-10 Mallards are still burning over the result of last year's final defeat at the hands of the Naval Station Indians, a loss which cost them a tie for first place and another chance at the League crown which they had worn for six years. Coach W. C. Park thought the best remedy for the situation would be to start off on another streak beginning this year. The Mallards, led by returning veterans Huber, Geraty, Lockhart and Howerton were eager to oblige, and promptly took their first two contests, grabbing the opening game of the season from NAS, 63-56, and trouncing the High School lads a few nights later >6-34. A loss to the Mari )n Monday night was discouraging, but Mallards rooters hope that it be the last one and are looking for VU-10 to be on top of the pile arch. Saturaay, 23 January 1954 THE INDIAN

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vvy-10NDPPO-Gtmo THE INDIAN Saturday, 23 January 1954 VU -10 Prop Blast CAPT L. 0. Fox, Commander Utility Wing, U. S. Atlantic Fleet, CDR D. G. White, Commanding Officer, VU-4 and members of the two organizations paid us a visit on Tuesday, 12 January 1954. They looked the squadron over thoroughly and observed drills of all description. It was VU-10's annual Operational Readiness Inspection. We learned a lot by their observations and constructive criticism. The inter-command b o w ii n g league is underway in the second half competition. The Structures division seems to be the team to beat. Kegler Kiefer rolled a 204, 207, and 221 last week for a high total of 632, which is really pounding the pins in anybody's league. The Mallard basketball team is off to an excellent start in the local league, having won their first two starts. How about a little more support. Bring your wife; she would probably enjoy getting out of the kitchen. C. S. Minor, AM2, just returned after six months of "B" school at NATTC, Memphis. D. J. Brough, AO1, has reported aboard for duty from CAG 1, U.S.S. Roosevelt. The All Hands party Monday night at the EM Club was quite an affair. F. O. Brostrom, AD1, gave the crowd a bubble dance complete with bubbles. R. M. Bennett, AK2, put on a thrilling skit, Mickey Spillane type, with his saxophone as backdrop music. V. F. Vicari, AD2, kept walking across the stage appropriately dressed as the party drunk. The Home Wreckers, string ensemble composed of Morris, E. A. Cotchleovitch, T., White, R. G., VU-10, Pierson, Naval Station, and South from NAS played a number of selections, but one called "The Wreck of the PBM in MIAMI" highlighted their performance. Jerry Lewis, VU-10's gift to WGBY, acted as master of ceremonies. The entertainment was very good and a well done goes to all the performers and the committee that planned and made the party a tremendous success. Air Station Notes LTJG Malcolm R. McCann, USNR, reported recently and effective 1 February he will be assigned duty as Special Services Officer, relieving LT George H. Leach in that capacity. LT Leach will in turn relieve LT C. W. Sholes, Jr., as Flight Control Officer upon the latter's detachment in February. BOSN W. C. Lawrence is "sweating out" his orders to parts or ports unknown. His relief has been ordered in, but the good 'Boats' has not been ordered out. We're glad to have you stick around, however, Boats. LCDR N. F. Vanderhoef is in Jamaica with the golf 'pros' of the Base. Keep up the good work, Van! Lou Serig, Suprv. Adm. Asst., has had many, many inquiries of old time base personnel regarding the present whereabouts of his son Jack, former popular Agent Cashier in the Disbursing Office. For their information it is now Private Jack, USA, and he is stationed at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., undergoing a course of instruction in the Army Finance School. He attained an outstanding overall average and he has been requested to remain at the school as an instructor. Since he has been selected for Officer's Candidate School, he must determine which course to follow. His wife, Lou, is presently at the home of her parents in Havana, anxiously awaiting the arrival of "Dr. Stork", whose visit was due 15 January but apparently he was grounded or delayed in transit. Jack expects to be home about 4 February to get acquainted with his sonhe hopes. "Grandpa Lou" and Mrs. Serig plan visiting them at that time also to become acquainted with the grand-son. Ward, another son, who visited here during the summer of '51, is now at Pensacola undergoing Flight Training as a Naval Aviation Cadet. "Have you seen those 3-D glasses?" "No. How much beer do they hold?" The entertainers at the VU-10 All-Hands party-McManus, Sweitkata, Stevens, Meierotto, Wilson, Barkman, Bennett, Brostrom, Vicari. Bottom row: White, Morris, Cotchaleovitch and Jerry Lewis who emceed the affair. Don McNeill has a dentist friend A naval base is where the sailwho told him: "Making bridges Analbseiwhrtesiis nothing compared with getting ors are full of life, happiness and the patients to come across." the pursuit of liberty. FTG Bulletin FTG Bulletin Admiral L. D. McCormick, Commander in Chief Atlantic Fleet, inspected the Fleet Training Group facilities during the past week, including electronics installations at Fleet Training Center on Crane Hill and the new FTG building. Admiral McCormick visited airships and fleet units, including the USS Hornet, undergoing training under the direction of FTG. LCDR George A. Gardes has reported to the Fleet Training Group to relieve CDR R. W. Gash as head of the CIC Department. Mr. Gardes has been captain of the USS Harveson, which has been operating in the Eastern Air Defense System. Recently, as Captain of the Harveson, Mr. Gardes was assigned duty on the Flight Route of the President for the Big Three Conference in Bermuda. Mr. Gardes will reside at Evans Point 722 A with his wife, Mrs. Jeanne M. Gardes and his four children George A. Jr., Susan, and twins Paul S. and Ann L. Gardes. Golf The Training Group golfers take on the VU-10 team for a return match today in an effort to avenge a recent 16-14 loss to the Squadron team. Scheduled to carry the Training Group Colors are Captain Bull and Captain Houston, CDR Manning, CDR Gash, CDR King, CDR Gentry, LCDR Simmons, LCDR Skadowski, LT West, LT Mosely, LT Minard, LTJG Bates, LTJG Treffinger, Chief Monte, Chief Dykeman, Smith, SN, Harmer, YN1, and Kramer, PNI3. Hobby of the Month Many Training Group Personnel have outside interests, ranging from photography to model airplanes. One of the most unusual such interests has been shown by Richard I. Anderson, GM 1, FTG Barracks, who is engaged in growing an avocado tree. In four months time under careful grooming by Anderson, the tree has grown to eight inches. Each week it is carefully taken out from a shelf built over Anderson's bunk and presented to all hands for inspection. FTG title for the Unusual Hobby of the Month is awarded to Gunners Mate Anderson and his Avocado Tree. Personals FTG extends a welcome to Mrs. Mildred Irene Kuba, wife of LT M. F. Kuba, and their children Linda and Francis, and to Mrs. Jane V. Gentry, wife of CDR Gentry, and their daughter Jane. New Building Nears Completion The new section of the FTG Building is rapidly nearing completion and is expected to be ready for occupancy next week. Personnel who have been working in restricted quarters will find plenty of room when the new space becomes available. Ships Arriving Ships scheduled to arrive at Guantanamo for visits or training in the next seven days include the Aircraft Carrier Leyte, the Light Cruiser Roanoke, and ComDesLant ships Parle, C. H. Roan, Eaton, and Bache. "I'm not going to school tomorrow." said little Johnny. "Why not?" asked his mother. "It's no use." he replied. "I can't read and I can't write-and they won't let me talk." Tipsy gentleman: "Hi, babe, do you speak to strangers?" Sweet young thing: "Certainly not!" Tipsy gentleman: "Then shut up." The Lucky Bag by Betty Radcliffe Several years ago a family moved to the base, bringing with them their young daughter. This little girl received the honor of having a section of the base named after her; that section was Paola Point. In early 1916 Mrs. Copeland and her baby daughter, Paola, came to Guantanamo Bay to be with Mrs. Copeland's husband Lt. D. Graham Copeland. To arrive here it was necessary to travel by boat from Key West, Fla. to Havana. In Havana they boarded a train and journeyed to Santiago; from there they came by tugboat, the only available transportation to the base. The Copelands were one of seven families living here at that time. Their house was one of four that was located on what is now known as Hospital Hill. Two other houses occupied by Marine officers were located at Fisherman's Point. There was a small commissary here to provide for the families. Fresh fruits and vegetables were brought over from Cuba. The families raised chickens to provide themselves with eggs. Bread was a very serious problem and Mrs. Copeland recalls that her Chinese cook made fresh bread with yeast that he made himse l f from potatoes. Water, of course, was scarce, it was transported by rail from Guantanamo to Caimanera and then by water barge to the base. There was one doctor in charge of a small hospital, and when necessary, he was assisted by his wife, who was a nurse. Recreation consisted mainly of horseback riding and a movie once a week at Fisherman's Point. The only way to get from Hospital Hill to Fisherman's Point and the movie was by boat. For an evenings entertainment of dancing and a few drinks, it was necessary to go to Caimanera, as the base was "dry" in those days. To get to the city of Guantanamo you rode from Caimanera on what Mrs. Copeland smilingly referred to as a "Toonerville Trolley". When Mrs. Copeland left with her family, after spending about a year here in Guantanamo, she never dreamed she would one day return; but now, some thirty six years later, she is back again, this time to visit her daughter, Mrs. Paola Groverman. As Mrs. Copeland gazes at the surrounding mountains, the only really familiar sight, she smiles at her memories of yesteryear in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. MOVIES Saturday, 23 January THE NAKED SPUR James Stewart Robert Ryan Janet Leigh Ralph Meeker Sunday, 24 January I'LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS Doris Day Danny Thomas Frank Lovejoy Patricia Wymore Monday, 25 January MILLION DOLLAR MERMAID Esther Williams Victor Mature Walter Pigeon David Bryan Tuesday, 26 January STOP YOU'RE KILLING ME Broderick Crawford Claire Trevor Virginia Gibson Bill Hayes THE INDIAN Saturday, 23 January 1954


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