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Indian

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Indian
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QAe


Vol. VI, No. 26 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 9 January 1954


CAPT Caruthers Here Defense Point Changed To Assume ComNavSta To Rupertus Point


CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN, arrived at the base last week to assume command of the Naval Station from CAPT Jack M. Howell upon the latter's departure.
Captain Caruthers is a graduate of the Naval Academy, class of 1927.
Prior to World War II he served in battleships and destroyers in the Asiatic Fleet, and in 1941 and 1942 he commanded the USS MacLeish (DD-220) while making the convoy runs in the North Atlantic.
He was with the Amphibious Forces when they made the assaults on northwest Africa, Sicily and Salerno and later on the staff of Allied Naval Command for the D-Day assualt on Normandy and the occupation of Europe.
In 1947-48 Captain Caruthers commanded the U S S Okaloosa
(APA-219), and in August 1951, during the early period of the Korean incident was assigned to the staff of Commander Naval Forces, Far East.
From there he went on to command Destroyer Squadron 9, the. famous Korean squadron known as "the Sitting Ducks," and considered one of the "hottest" DesRons in the Korean fighting.
The captain holds the Legion of Merit, the Commendation Ribbon, the French Croix de Guerre and the Commander British Empire award.
With Captain Caruthers in Guantanamo are his wife, the former Marian Gardner of El Paso, Texas, and his 8-year-old daughter Bambi. When not in school, Bambi can usually be found at the Naval Station corral romping with her new horse, Granger.


Womble Report


Stresses Morale

Washington (AFPS)-An eightpage report from the Womble Committee, a group of high ranking officers who have been studying the problems of the Armed Forces since early May, has been submitted for action to the Secretary of Defense.
The committee headed by RADM J. P. Womble, Jr., USN, was set to work at the request of the President. Its main work was to decide what corrective measures were necessary to restore the military services to a state of attractiveness as a lifetime career for inherently capable personnel.
The report just released stresses the fact that Service pay, benefits, transportation reimbursements, and retirement pay should be brought up to the level of the present cost of living. The group found that many career men were finding it impossible to cope with the increased cost of living on what the Services were allowed to *pay.
(Continued on Page Four)


General Foster and Colonel Hill display the new sign, "Rupertus Point" to be used as the new name for the old Defense Point.


The names of Defense Point and Defense Point Road were changed last week to Rupertus Point and Rupertus Point Road. The name change was approved by Commander, Naval Base on 27 November 1953.
The area was named after Major General William H. Rupertus. USMC, who had a long and illustrius career in the corps. He, as a colonel, was in command of the Marine Barracks here in 1941 when the name was officially changed to Marine Corps Base. In 1937 he was battalion commander of the 1st Battalion, Fourth Marines in Shanghai during the disorders of that year. At the same time Col. John B. Hill, present commanding officer of the Marine Barracks ,was the commander of A Company of the battalion.
While at Guantanamo Bay Colonel Rupertus was responsible for the planning and construction of the buildings and quarters now occupying the Marine Sites.
As a general he commanded the famed First Marine Division during the assaults on Cape Gloucester and Peliliu.
General Rupertus died in the spring of 1945 while serving as commandant of the Marine Corps School at Quantico, Va.
The guest of honor at the namechanging ceremony was Major General Eugene M. Foster, USA (Ret), a close personal friend of the late General Rupertus. General Foster is visiting relatives on the base.
General Foster outlined his boyhood with General Rupertus in the public schools of Washington, D. C. and told of the many times during their military career that they had occasion to meet and renew their friendship. He -ecalled the outI


standing service of General Rupertus and described him as exemplyfying the spirit that welds Marines together.
General Foster retired from service in 1951 after having served in most parts of the world, including
(Continued on Page Four)


Honor Man


Gonzalo M. Guerrero, SN, was selected honor man at the last Naval Station personnel inspection. Guerrero, from Pharr, Texas, is 28 and has 4 years naval service. He is currently assigned in the Naval Station Galley -it Bay Hill.



I


Dimes Drive Opens


For Decisive Year

This year may see the end of infantile paralysis epidemics!
The National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis has announced the opening of a "fourth front" aganist the dreaded disease, a fourth front in the form of actual polio prevention.
The first three fronts against polio were (1) polio research. (2) patient aid, and (3) professional education. Now the National Foundation has announced it is ready for the actual prevention measures. It has ready a trial vaccine which has passed all tests in the labora"'T






.fDimes



tory and is now ready to be given to humans. If this new weapon can blunt the destructive force of the virus on a human proving ground, polio will be conquered.
On these grounds the National Foundation is launching the 1954 March of Dimes to obtain the necessary $26,500,000 for polio prevention.
Here at the Naval Base, Chaplain M. 0. Stephenson has been appointed chairman of the 1954 March of Dimes appeal. Donations turned in to Chaplain Stephenson or deposited in the March of Dimes boxes located at various points around the base will be forwarded directly to the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. January 31st is the closing date of this year's appeal.
It should be pointed out that the vaccine mentioned previously is not the gamma globulin used last year and which provided temporary immunity to polio. This vaccine ready for use this year is entirely new, and scientists have high hopes of its complete success in preventing polio.
This may be the year of decision in the fight against polio. Let's all donate. Polio is no respecter of age or sex. It strikes anywhere and anytime. Early stages are hard to diagnose and the cure is long months of painful immobility. Prevention is the only hope. This year has great possibilities of dealing the death blow to infantile paralysis.


.4


am


0







Page Two



Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Telephone 9-615
Saturday, 9 January 1954


U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT Frank Bruner, USN
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
CAPT Jack M. Howell Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
LT E. A. Sandness------_._Officer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOG ------------------- Editor
Jerry Lewis,, J3 ---------------- Features
J. C. Dierks, J3------------------- Sports
Pierce Lebmhbeck ------------------- Sports
S. . Cobbs, PHSN ---------- Photographer
R. Naccarato, SN----------------Make-up
THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and financed with non-appropriated funds. THE INDIAN is a member of the Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN.
All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited.


Hospital Notes

Heirport News: AD2 and Mrs. Robert 0. Stewart announce the birth of a son on 30 December. He has been named Warren Raymon.
Barry Alan is the son of YN1 and Mrs. William J. Phillips, born 3 January.
LTJG and Mrs. Robert G. Whitman proudly announce the birth of a daughter, named Mary Bartlett, born 4 January.
Heirport News: BM2 and Mrs. Phillips L. Light announce the birth of a daughter, Diana Lynn, 18 December. A son arrived at the home of BMC and Mrs. John M. Blount 20 December and was named John Joseph.


FTG Bulletin

Training Group personnel were brushing the cobwebs out of their eyes this week as the January arrivals poured into the harbor and the hottest training command in the Atlantic Fleet began work again. Departments have used the temporary lull to catch up on administrative tasks before swinging into training activity again.
Captain Tedder welcomed all hands returning from leave with the hope that we are all ready for a busy three months in which the Training Group will be operating at over 120% of capacity. "The operational readiness of the Atlantic Fleet depends in large part on the job we do here," Captain Tedder commented, "and I know we have the men to continue an effective training program."
Among the ships which will be in the harbor by the end of the coming week are the battleships Iowa and New Jersey; the cruiser Columbus; aircraft carriers Hornet and Wright; minelayer Pilot; minesweepers Hambleton and Gherardi; seaplane tender Valcour; fleet ocean tugs Alsea and Senaca; and submarines Conger, Sablefish, Sea Poacher, Sirago.
Destroyer types and escort include the Hank, Lind, English, Coates, Delong Borie, Bailey, Strickland, Larson, Cecil, O'Hare and Darby.
The Training Group basketball team, the "Trainers," opens its


e


THE INDIAN


01' Santa Claus, himself, appears at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum the day before Christmas along with his retinue of clowns and helpers to provide a Christmas party for Naval Station youngsters. Santa arrived by helicopter and distributed presents and goodies to the children of Naval Station personnel. He also made personal appearance at the Naval Air Station and Fleet Training Group parties. John S. Hendrix, CS1, provided invaluable assistance to Santa at the Naval Station party.


PTA Discusses School Problems


Those who attended the ParentTeachers Association meeting at the Base School last Tuesday night have a much better understanding concerning our school system, thanks to a most interesting and informative speech delivered by Mr. T. G. Scarborough, Supervising School Principal, main speaker on the program.
Mr. Scarborough explained the functions of the Naval Base School Board, and also the relationship between the Supervising Principal and the Board. He explained how teachers are employed and the many problems encountered because of turnover in the teaching faculty occasioned by the fact that most of the teachers are wives of military personnel. He stated regretfully that the school will lose 17 very good teachers this year mainly because of transfer of their husbands.
Captain W. H. Groverman, Jr.,


VU- 10 Prop Blast
Happy New Year everyone and may 1954 be a year of prosperity and peace for all.
LT R. A. Jamieson and LT J. H. Goldammer are tossing away their railroad track insignia for the gold leaf type in the very near future. Haven't seen the official notification, but I'm told it is on the base. Congratulation to Jamie and Jim.
LT Jamieson calls Orlando, Florida home. Mrs. Jamieson, Raymond Jr. 10, Cheryl 8, and Lewis 5 are presently in Orlando. They hope to join hubby and the Gtmo gang shortly. Jamie joined the Navy in August 1941 and remained on active duty until 1945. He was recalled to active duty in May 1953.
LT Goldammer hails from Grand Rapids, Michigan and Mrs. Goldammer (Gloria), Christine 6, Julie 4,

season this Tuesday, 12 January 1830 on the Marine Barracks court against the MCB-7 squad. The team will be lead by Paul Collins, YNSN, last year's second highest scorer in the league. Collins is beginning his third season with the "Trainers."


I


Chairman of the Program Coammittee, spoke on the questionnaire which was recently sent to all parents. He said that only 47 had been returned probably due to misinterpretation on how to coa-plete them. He stated that the form could be completed by merely checkmarking those subjects in which the parents were interested, and comments did not have to be made unless desired. He urged all parents to complete and return the forms in order to analyze and correlate the consensus of opinion which will enable the Excutive and Program Committees to prepare a program for the conduct of the Association that will fit the needs of the community.
Mrs. T. B. Wolfe reported that safety rules were being prepared concerning children riding on school buses.
F. R. Baker, BMC, President of the Association, presided at the meeting.


and Lynne 3 months, are residing at AV-21, Radio Point. Jim enlisted in the Navy in May 1942 and remained on active duty until 1945. He was recalled to active duty on
1 December 1952.
Our Chief Narwid dusted off LT Grego to gain a semi-final berth in the Base Golf Handicap tourniment. You have to be playing the game to take that boy.
In December, LT Henson and Chiefs Crouch, Henderson, Magarity, Pistole, and Schwichtenberg made a safari to the wilds of Western Haiti. They shot at lots of Guinea, duck, and dove, in fact brought some back. They tell me it was really roughing it down there, after wading water ranging from ankle to neck deep, letting the whiskers grow, and cactus thistles slowing the progress, they returned to the lodge to occupy the blue, green, pink, and green rooms with matching sheets!
The entertainment committee for the forthcoming squadron party report everything is in high gear and the 18th of January is the date. ORI inspection on 13 January and party on the 18th. Could it be that our planning is off ?





I


Saturday, 9 January 1954


Sunday, 10 January 1954

Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630 Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930-2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN
(Catholic)


The Chaplain's Corner

In the beginning of the New Year all good people form good resolutions. They plan and purpose to reach that perfection to which they aspire. They do want to be happy with God forevermore.
Now all our purposes will be in vain; all our resolutions will be simply a waste of spiritual energy, unless they take the form of a fixed rule of life. No man accomplishes anything who does not live according to a rule. If there is one thing within us which reflects more perfectly than another the image of God, it is the regularity of life. God lives by rule. God has no change. He is the same yesterday, today, and forever. Everything God has made bears evidence of this definite character.
Everything in the universe lives according to a rule. The planets move according to a rule. The powers of nature act according to a fixed rule. Everything that comes form God lives according to a rule, except man. Man says: 'I will be a rule to myself, my caprice shall be my only rule, and I will not serve Thy rule'.
Now if there is one resolution which more than another we must make in the beginning of this New Year, it is to subject ourselves to a rule; impose upon our necks the yoke of a rule; make ourselves the salves of a rule. And then we may perhaps achieve some of that perfection that will make us like unto God, in the coming year.
We must give God some return for what he has given us. He tells the unjust servant who came to Him with the talent He had given him, wrapped up in a napkin: "Oh, unjust servant, why didst thou not put it out to the usurers, that when I came I might receive mine own with usury?" We have received from God many favors. For these we should give Him our thanks. Time is one of the gifts He has bestown upon us and we should use it wisely but well.
William J. Spinney







Saturday, 9 January 1954


Saturday, 9 January 1954 THE INDIAN


Golf Pro's Practice

What They Preach

Two golf professionals from the Tidewater area in Virginia came down to Guantanamo Bay last Sunday and gave some strictly professional advice and tips to the local linksters, then proved their advice Was sound by equalling and better-


O'Donnell and Oatman

ing the scores of two local champs. John O'Donnell from the Commissioned Officers' Club in Norfolk and Harold "Shorty" Oatman from the Naval Base Golf Club in Norfolk played the local course against Tony Grego and Wright North. O'Donnell stroked for a 69, Oatman pulled in a 76 to tie North, and Grego, missing badly on his putts came in with 78.


Before the exhibition match O'Donnell and Oatman demonstrated the proper use of the various golf clubs. O'Donnell did the explaining and Oatman showed the crowd of approximately 150 the proper grips.
Mr. O'Donnell is a former Navy chief specialist and the Maryland Open Champion. He is a 3-times winner of the Virginia Open and has qualified for 6 National Chaipionships.
"Shorty" Oatman, another Navy chief specialist, has also qualified for 6 National Championships and has won 22 PGA tournaments in the Middle Atlantic section since he has been located in the Tidewater area.


GTMO Golf Hi-Lites

By Wright North
The Annual Handicap Tournament is gradually drawing to a close with two of the strong favorites of the men's class already on the sidelines. North, 1953 base champion was eliminated in the third round by LCDR Vanderhoef. Tony Grego, 1953 ComTen champ, conceded 5 strokes to Chief Narwid and lost, one down, in the major upset of the tourney.
The semi-final matches find Chief Byrne of the hospital against Narwid and Chief "Long Jim" Mauldin of VU-10 playing Gerard. The winners of those two matches will battle it out for the Admiral Phillips cup.
The Consolation Flight was cor-n pleted on Tuesday when LT West of FTG downed Tony Totillo.
In the Ladies' Class Mrs. Jane McElroy, although conceding several strokes in each of her matches, proved once again to be, in the opinion of this writer, the best lady golfer on the station. Her final match was against Mrs. Lou Toczko who is fast becoming one of the best golfers on the station. In the Consolation Flight, Mrs. Eloise Gushanas won out over Mrs. Lucille Burke.
In the semi-final round LT Rosemary Quillan and Mrs. Ann Smith The ni
staged what is believed to be the basketba longest match in the history of the tion Are Guantanamo Golf Club. This match start o was tied on two different occas- Monday. sions, necessitating a third round play-off. The concession of five strokes to Mrs. Smith proved too much of a handicap for Miss Quillan and Mrs. Smith came in with a one-up victory on the 45th hole. For the fine sportsmanship displayed by the two ladies the Golf Committee awarded each a special prize. All of which proves that although everyone can not be a good player, anyone can be a good sport.


Women Golfers


Award Prizes


The Women's Golf Tournament luncheon was held Thursday, January 6th at the Family Restauiant of the Naval Station with over 40 lady linksters attending.
The large turnout was credited to the presentation of awards from the tournament. Mrs. Corky Henning, president of the assembly, made the awards. The Handicap Champion was Mrs. Jane McElroy and runner-up was Mrs. Lou Toczko. Consolation flight trophies went to Mrs. Eloise Gushanas, the winner, and Mrs. Lucille Burke, runner-up.
Special awards were also given to Miss Rosemary Quillan and Mrs. Ann Smith.


Ass't SecNav

To Visit Here
The Honorable R. H. Fogler, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, will arrive at the Naval Base on the 13th of January for an official visit. Mr. Fogler is making a tour of the Caribbean bases.

He: "If you don't marry me Ill commit suicide."
She: "Now, Sam, you know Pa don't want you hanging around the house."


I


I Base Fives Ready For Starting Gun


\ ~


, WPK


ght lights go up over the 11 courts in Fleet Recreaa in preparation for the f the Base League on


The base-wide basketball tournament commences next Monday 11 January, when VU-10 takes to the court against Naval Air Station and the Dental Clinic five goes against the Naval Station.
The championship tournament will commence on 15 March after the season schedule has been completed.
Games will be played on the Naval Station court on Monday and Wednesday and on the Marine Barracks court on Tuesday and Thursdays. First games will begin at 1830; second games will start 15 minutes after completion of the first. All postponed games will be played on Friday nights on the Naval Station court.
The schedule for the first week of play:
Date
11 VU-10 vs NAS


12 13

14


Dental vs NavSta Marines vs Hospital MCB-7 vs FTG VU-10 vs High School NAS vs FTG Dental vs MCB-7 NavSta vs Hospital


Naval Base High School Squad


.1


/5N



A .'


The High School basketball squad: back row, left to right: George MacMichael, Norman Huddy, Jim Hackworth, Edgar Heimer, Eddie Stafford, James Cavanaugh and Pierce Lehmbeck. Front row: Jack Stafford, James Dalton, Donald Moore, James Dexter, James Miles, Tony Thelan, and coach William McGill.

With four regulars returning from last year's squad, the Pirates of the Naval Base School are out to better a record of 1-17 compiled by the Pirates of '53, as they open their rough and tumble season on the evening of Wednesday, 13 January against the Mallards of VU-10.
Coach William McGill, in his first year with the Pirates, states that he is looking forward to much help from the returning four: forwards George MacMichael and Norman Huddy, center Edgar Heimer and Guard Pierce Lehmbeck. Coach McGill told the Indian that " . . . the lack of height hurts, but for the past few weeks we have been striving for good ball-handling and teamwork. Condition is a big thing, also, as we are hoping to take as much as possible in the stretch. We don't expect to 'whale the tar' out of anyone, but we do want to make the game as interesting as possible."
Coach McGill is also looking for a lot of help from forwards Eddie Stafford and Jim Hackworth. Stafford is a tall, lanky, boy from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania who should add considerably to the team's speed and Hackworth, from Tampa, Florida has plenty of that desired height. With material like this the Pirates may well round into the ideal ball club.





V


a11


Page Three


THE INDIAN







Navy-10NDPPO--Gtmo


ab


Saturday, 9 January 1954


THE INDIAN


MOVIES


Saturday, 9 January
CAPTIVE CITY
J. Forsythe J. Camden
Sunday, 10 January
WHERE'S CHARLEY?
Ray Bolger Allyn McLerie
Monday, 11 January THUNDER BIRDS
John Derek Mona Freeman
Tuesday, 12 January
YUKON GOLD
Kirby Grant Martha Hyer
Wednesday, 13 January
CIMARRON KID
Audie Murphy B. Tyler
Thursday, 14 January
INVITATION
Van Johnson Dorothy McGuire



TEENAGE- ROUND- UP

By Barbara Burke and Linda Thurston

School re-opened on the "Frantic Fourth" with all of Gtmo's teenagers bursting with news of their holidays.
Norman Huddy, Neil Hayes and A. Burek could be seen swashbuckling around the teenage hut up to their knees in soapy water last Sunday. The club was being cleaned up for the ump-teenth time. Norman, as the new president was in charge of slave driving. Cookie and crew were washing and ironing pink organdy curtains. This ordeal, by the way, was about the only time anyone did any work over the holidays.
The cheerleaders have had quite a bit of trouble with their uniforms. It looks like their attire for the first few games will have to be white shirts and shorts. Don't despair tho . . . the uniforms will be ready soon.


Chief Retires Here After 20 Years; Will Continue Ministry Work During Civilian Life in Georgia


Innis A. Claude, Jr., steward chief, retired from active naval service here recently after 20 continuous years of duty. He was transferred to the Fleet Reserve.
Chief Claud, who entered the Navy in January 1934, has served in seven Navy ships and six shore installations in his 20 years.
A minister of the Church of


A background of coral
Christmas trees which arr trees arrived on the "Yip before Christmas in time t


OPERATION BLONDE

A1Ai e T A 5
pNE& ANP I'M P~l bp SOME &tfe.5"1








WILL


Pentacostal Holiness he has carried on extensive missionary and parish work while attached to naval shore establishments; particularly in Coca, Fla., Trinidad and here in Guantanamo Bay.
Chief Claud intends to continue his parish work as a civilian and also contemplates enrollment in a trade school in Tifton, Ga.


and cactus is provided for the shipment of ived at the Naval Base for the holidays. The pee Boat", the YFR 1152 during the week o be decorated for Santa.


ICAN'T STANP ' N-' IT - 4FTS WO wrTHJ IA Y" &


Womble Report . ..
(Continued from Page One)
Money matters figured prominently in the Womble Committee report. Such things as the equalization of Regular and Reserve benefits for survivors and families, increased combat pay, and the exemption of retirement pay from income tax took up the bulk of the report.
But morale and discipline were also important in the eyes of the committee. The group urged that no fiscal policies be established without prior evaluation of the effect of the policies of the morale and effectiveness of military personnel.
The report called for better discipline, increased penalties for AWOL and desertion, more authority for officers and NCOs, loyalty down as .well as up, and the treatment of personnel as individuals-not MOS units.
Criticism of the military annoyed the committee, and the report suggested that rebuttals to such criticism receive publication. However, the group also recommended that higher standards of performnace be demanded of military personnel so that such criticism might become unwarranted.
An adequate rotation policy at all costs was recommended. The group urged a restudy of Service deployments to improve permanency, more concurrent travel and adequate housing here and abroad.
The committee urged de-emphasis of the USO and what it called "other dubious morale aids." It recommended the retention of PXs, ship stores and commissaries and asked for reduced rentals on Wherry housing units.
The group also stressed the need for equal G.I. Bill benefits for personnel remaining on active duty, particularly housing purchase loans. It called for permanent legislation to assure medical care for dependents.
The recommendations of the committee have been submitted for review by the Department of Defense which may submit them to Congress for legislation.


Rupertus Point . . .
(Continued from Page One)
China, Phillipines, France, England, Italy and many other points. At the time he retired he was Chief of Fnance, U. S. Army.
Attending the ceremony at Marine Barracks headquarters were CAPT F. L. Tedder, Commander Fleet Training Group; CAPT G. M. Holley, Chief of Staff; CAPT J. M. Howell, Commanding Officer Naval Station; and CAPT W. R. Garuthers, slated to relieve CAPT Howell as commanding officer of the Naval Station in the near future.


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PAGE 1

r Vol. VI, No. 26 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 9 January 1954 CAPT Caruthers Here Defense Point Changed To Assume ComNavSta To Rupertus Point CAPT William R. Caruthers, USN, arrived at the base last week to assume command of the Naval Station from CAPT Jack M. Howell upon the latter's departure. Captain Caruthers is a graduate of the Naval Academy, class of 1927. Prior to World War II he served in battleships and destroyers in the Asiatic Fleet, and in 1941 and 1942 he commanded the USS MacLeish (DD-220) while making the convoy runs in the North Atlantic. He was with the Amphibious Forces when they made the assaults on northwest Africa, Sicily and Salerno and later on the staff of Allied Naval Command for the D-Day assualt on Normandy and the occupation of Europe. In 1947-48 Captain Caruthers commanded the U S S Okaloosa (APA-219), and in August 1951, during the early period of the Korean incident was assigned to the staff of Commander Naval Forces, Far East. From there he went on to command Destroyer Squadron 9, the* famous Korean squadron known as "the Sitting Ducks," and considered one of the "hottest" DesRons in the Korean fighting. The captain holds the Legion of Merit, the Commendation Ribbon, the French Croix de Guerre and the Commander British Empire award. With Captain Caruthers in Guantanamo are his wife, the former Marian Gardner of El Paso, Texas, and his 8-year-old daughter Bambi. When not in school, Bambi can usually be found at the Naval Station corral romping with her new horse, Granger. Womble Report Stresses Morale Washington (AFPS)-An eightpage report from the Womble Committee, a group of high ranking officers who have been studying the problems of the Armed Forces since early May, has been submitted for action to the Secretary of Defense. The committee headed by RADM J. P. Womble, Jr., USN, was set to work at the request of the President. Its main work was to decide what corrective measures were necessary to restore the military services to a state of attractiveness as a lifetime career for inherently capable personnel. The report just released stresses the fact that Service pay, benefits, transportation reimbursements, and retirement pay should be brought up to the level of the present cost of living. The group found that many career men were finding it impossible to cope with the increased cost of living on what the Services were allowed to pay. (Continued on Page Four) Dimes Drive Opens For Decisive Year This year may see the end of infantile paralysis epidemics! The National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis has announced the opening of a "fourth front" aganist the dreaded disease, a fourth front in the form of actual polio prevention. The first three fronts against polio were (1) polio research. (2) patient aid, and (3) professional education. Now the National Foundation has announced it is ready for the actual prevention measures. It has ready a trial vaccine which has passed all tests in the laboraGeneral Foster and Colonel Hill display the new sign, "Rupertus Point" to be used as the new name for the old Defense Point. The names of Defense Point and Defense Point Road were changed last week to Rupertus Point and Rupertus Point Road. The name change was approved by Commander, Naval Base on 27 November 1953. The area was named after Major General William H. Rupertus; USMC, who had a long and illustrius career in the corps. He, as a colonel, was in command of the Marine Barracks here in 1941 when the name was officially changed to Marine Corps Base. In 1937 he was battalion commander of the 1st Battalion, Fourth Marines in Shanghai during the disorders of that year. At the same time Col. John B. Hill, present commanding officer of the Marine Barracks ,was the commander of A Company of the battalion. While at Guantanamo Bay Colonel Rupertus was responsible for the planning and construction of the buildings and quarters now occupying the Marine Sites. As a general he commanded the famed First Marine Division during the assaults on Cape Gloucester and Peliliu. General Rupertus died in the spring of 1945 while serving as commandant of the Marine Corps School at Quantico, Va. The guest of honor at the namechanging ceremony was Major General Eugene M. Foster, USA (Ret), a close personal friend of the late General Rupertus. General Foster is visiting relatives on the base. General Foster outlined his boyhood with General Rupertus in the public schools of Washington, D. C. and told of the many times during their military career that they had occasion to meet and renew their friendship. He recalled the outI standing service of General Rupertus and described him as exemplyfying the spirit that welds Marines together. General Foster retired from service in 1951 after having served in most parts of the world, including (Continued on Page Four) Honor Man Gonzalo M. Guerrero, SN, was selected honor man at the last Naval Station personnel inspection. Guerrero, from Pharr, Texas, is 28 and has 41/2 years naval service. He is currently assigned in the Naval Station Galley at Bay Hill. tory and is now ready to be given to humans. If this new weapon can blunt the destructive force of the virus on a human proving ground, polio will be conquered. On these grounds the National Foundation is launching the 1954 March of Dimes to obtain the necessary $26,500,000 for polio prevention. Here at the Naval Base, Chaplain M. O. Stephenson has been appointed chairman of the 1954 March of Dimes appeal. Donations turned in to Chaplain Stephenson or deposited in the March of Dimes boxes located at various points around the base will be forwarded directly to the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. January 31st is the closing date of this year's appeal. It should be pointed out that the vaccine mentioned previously is not the gamma globulin used last year and which provided temporary immunity to polio. This vaccine ready for use this year is entirely new, and scientists have high hopes of its complete success in preventing polio. This may be the year of decision in the fight against polio. Let's all donate. Polio is no respector of age or sex. It strikes anywhere and anytime. Early stages are hard to diagnose and the cure is long months of painful immobility. Prevention is the only hope. This year has great possibilities of dealing the death blow to infantile paralysis. ww w -0 91G

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Pare Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 9 January 1954 #gadtan, Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Telephone 9-615 Saturday, 9 January 1954 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Frank Bruner, USN Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Jack M. Howell Commanding Officer Editorial Staff LT E. A. Sadness -Oficer-Advisor H. E. Davis, JOC-------Editor Jerry Lewis,, J013--------Features J. C. Dierks, JOP-----------Sports Pierce Lehssbeck-------Sports S. E. Cobbs, PHSNPhotographer R. Naccarato, SN--------Make-up THE INDIAN is published weekly at the Naval Station in accordance with NavExos P-35, Revised Nov. 1945, and fnanced with nonappropriatedcfunds. THE INIAN i a member c ode Armed Forces Press Service, and AFPS material appearing herein must not be reproduced without written permission. Local news may be re-printed provided credit is given to THE INDIAN. All photographs are official U. S. Navy photos unless otherwise credited. Hospital Notes Heirport News: AD2 and Mrs. Robert 0. Stewart announce the birth of a son on 30 December. He has been named Warren Raymon. Barry Alan is the son of YN1 and Mrs. William J. Phillips, born 3 January. LTJG and Mrs. Robert G. Whitman proudly announce the birth of a daughter, named Mary Bartlett, born 4 January. Heirport News: BM2 and Mrs. Phillips L. Light announce the birth of a daughter, Diana Lynn, 18 December. A son arrived at the home of BMC and Mrs. John M. Blount 20 December and was named John Joseph. FTG Bulletin Training Group personnel were brushing the cobwebs out of their eyes this week as the January arrivals poured into the harbor and the hottest training command in the Atlantic Fleet began work again. Departments have used the temporary lull to catch up on administrative tasks before swinging into training activity again. Captain Tedder welcomed all hands returning from leave with the hope that we are all ready for a busy three months in which the Training Group will be operating at over 120% of capacity. "The operational readiness of the Atlantic Fleet depends in large part on the job we do here," Captain Tedder commented, "and I know we have the men to continue an effective training program." Among the ships which will be in the harbor by the end of the coming week are the battleships Iowa and New Jersey; the cruiser Columbus; aircraft carriers Hornet and Wright; minelayer Pilot; minesweepers Hambleton and Gherardi; seaplane tender Valcour; fleet ocean tugs Alsea and Senaca; and submarines Conger, Sablefish, Sea Poacher, Sirago. Destroyer types and escort include the Hank, Lind, English, Coates, Delong Boric, Bailey, Strickland, Larson, Cecil, O'Hare and Darby. The Training Group basketball team, the "Trainers," opens its 01' Santa Claus, himself, appears at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum the day before Christmas along with his retinue of clowns and helpers to provide a Christmas party for Naval Station youngsters. Santa arrived by helicopter and distributed presents and goodies to the children of Naval Station personnel. He also made personal appearance at the Naval Air Station and Fleet Training Group parties. John S. Hendrix, CS1, provided invaluable assistance to Santa at the Naval Station party. PTA Discusses School Problems Those who attended the ParentTeachers Association meeting at the Base School last Tuesday night have a much better understanding concerning our school system, thanks to a most interesting and informative speech delivered by Mr. T. G. Scarborough, Supervising School Principal, main speaker on the program. Mr. Scarborough explained the functions of the Naval Base School Board, and also the relationship between the Supervising Principal and the Board. He explained how teachers are employed and the many problems encountered because of turnover in the teaching faculty occasioned by the fact that most of the teachers are wives of military personnel. He stated regretfully that the school will lose 17 very good teachers this year mainly because of transfer of their husbands. Captain W. H. Groverman, Jr., VU-10 Prop Blast Happy New Year everyone and may 1954 be a year of prosperity and peace for all. LT R. A. Jamieson and LT J. H. Goldammer are tossing away their railroad track insignia for the gold leaf type in the very near future. Haven't seen the official notification, but I'm told it is on the base. Congratulation to Jamie and Jim. LT Jamieson calls Orlando, Florida home. Mrs. Jamieson, Raymond Jr. 10, Cheryl 8, and Lewis 5 are presently in Orlando. They hope to join hubby and the Gtmo gang shortly. Jamie joined the Navy in August 1941 and remained on active duty until 1945. He was recalled to active duty in May 1953. LT Goldammer hails from Grand Rapids, Michigan and Mrs. Goldammer (Gloria), Christine 6, Julie 4, season this Tuesday, 12 January 1830 on the Marine Barracks court against the MCB-7 squad. The team will be lead by Paul Collins, YNSN, last year's second highest scorer in the league. Collins is beginning his third season with the "Trainers." Chairman of the Program Committee, spoke on the questionnaire which was recently sent to all parents. He said that only 47 had been returned probably due to misinterpretation on how to complete them. He stated that the form could be completed by merely checkmarking those subjects in which the parents were interested, and comments did not have to be made unless desired. He urged all parents to complete and return the forms in order to analyze and correlate the consensus of opinion which will enable the Excutive and Program Committees to prepare a program for the conduct of the Association that will fit the needs of the community. Mrs. T. B. Wolfe reported that safety rules were being prepared concerning children riding on school buses. F. R. Baker, BMC, President of the Association, presided at the meeting. and Lynne 3 months, are residing at AV-21, Radio Point. Jim enlisted in the Navy in May 1942 and remained on active duty until 1945. He was recalled to active duty on 1 December 1952. Our Chief Narwid dusted off LT Grego to gain a semi-final berth in the Base Golf Handicap tourniment. You have to be playing the game to take that boy. In December, LT Henson and Chiefs Crouch, Henderson, Magarity, Pistole, and Schwichtenberg made a safari to the wilds of Western Haiti. They shot at lots of Guinea, duck, and dove, in fact brought some back. They tell me it was really roughing it down there, after wading water ranging from ankle to neck deep, letting the whiskers grow, and cactus thistles slowing the progress, they returned to the lodge to occupy the blue, green, pink, and green rooms with matching sheets! The entertainment committee for the forthcoming squadron party report everything is in high gear and the 18th of January is the date. ORI inspection on 13 January and party on the 18th. Could it be that our planning is off'? Sunday, 10 January 1954 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. O. Stephenson, CHC, USN LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) The Chaplain's Corner In the beginning of the New Year all good people form good resolutions. They plan and purpose to reach that perfection to which they aspire. They do want to be happy with God forevermore. Now all our purposes will be in vain; all our resolutions will be simply a waste of spiritual energy, unless they take the form of a fixed rule of life. No man accomplishes anything who does not live according to a rule. If there is one thing within us which reflects more perfectly than another the image of God, it is the regularity of life. God lives by rule. God has no change. He is the same yesterday, today, and forever. Everything God has made bears evidence of this definite character. Everything in the universe lives according to a rule. The planets move according to a rule. The powers of nature act according to a fixed rule. Everything that comes form God lives according to a rule, except man. Man says: 'I will be a rule to myself, my caprice shall be my only rule, and I will not serve Thy rule'. Now if there is one resolution which more than another we must make in the beginning of this New Year, it is to subject ourselves to a rule; impose upon our necks the yoke of a rule; make ourselves the salves of a rule. And then we may perhaphs achieve some of that perfection that will make us like unto God, in the coming year. We must give God some return for what he has given us. He tells the unjust servant who came to Him with the talent He had given him, wrapped up in a napkin: "Oh, unjust servant, why didst thou not put it out to the usurers, that when I came I might receive mine own with usury?" We have received from God many favors. For these we should give Him our thanks. Time is one of the gifts He has bestown upon us and we should use it wisely but well. William J. Spinney iL ) Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 9 January 1954

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Saturday, 9 January 1954 THE INDIAN Pasee Three Golf Pro's Practice What They Preach Two golf professionals from the Tidewater area in Virginia came down to Guantanamo Bay last Sunday and gave some strictly professional advice and tips to the local linksters, then proved their advice was sound by equalling and betterO'Donnell and Oatman ing the scores of two local champs. John O'Donnell from the Commissioned Officers' Club in Norfolk and Harold "Shorty" Oatman from the Naval Base Golf Club in Norfolk played the local course against Tony Grego and Wright North. O'Donnell stroked for a 69, Oatman pulled in a 76 to tie North, and Grego, missing badly on his putts came in with 78. Before the exhibition match O'Donnell and Oatman demonstrated the proper use of the various golf clubs. O'Donnell did the explaining and Oatman showed the crowd of approximately 150 the proper grips. Mr. O'Donnell is a former Navy chief specialist and the Maryland Open Champion. He is a 3-times winner of the Virginia Open and has qualified for 6 National Championships. "Shorty" Oatman, another Navy chief specialist, has also qualified for 6 National Championships and has won 22 PGA tournaments in the Middle Atlantic section since he has been located in the Tidewater area. GTMO Golf Hi-Lites By Wright North The Annual Handicap Tournament is gradually drawing to a close with two of the strong favorites of the men's class already on the sidelines. North, 1953 base champion was eliminated in the third round by LCDR Vanderhoef. Tony Grego, 1953 ComTen champ, conceded 5 strokes to Chief Narwid and lost, one down, in the major upset of the tourney. The semi-final matches find Chief Byrne of the hospital against Narwid and Chief "Long Jim" Mauldin of VU-10 playing Gerard. The winners of those two matches will battle it out for the Admiral Phillips cup. The Consolation Flight was completed on Tuesday when LT West of FTG downed Tony Totillo. In the Ladies' Class Mrs. Jane McElroy, although conceding several strokes in each of her matches, proved once again to be, in the opinion of this writer, the best lady golfer on the station. Her final match was against Mrs. Lou Toczko who is fast becoming one of the best golfers on the station. In the Consolation Flight, Mrs. Eloise Gushanas won out over Mrs. Lucille Burke. In the semi-final round LT Rosemary Quillan and Mrs. Ann Smith staged what is believed to be the longest match in the history of the Guantanamo Golf Club. This match was tied on two different occassions, necessitating a third round play-off. The concession of five strokes to Mrs. Smith proved too much of a handicap for Miss Quillan and Mrs. Smith came in with a one-up victory on the 45th hole. For the fine sportsmanship displayed by the two ladies the Golf Committee awarded each a special prize. All of which proves that although everyone can not be a good player, anyone can be a good sport. Women Golfers Award Prizes The Women's Golf Tournament luncheon was held Thursday, January 6th at the Family Restaurant of the Naval Station with over 40 lady linksters attending. The large turnout was credited to the presentation of awards from the tournament. Mrs. Corky Henning, president of the assembly, made the awards. The Handicap Champion was Mrs. Jane McElroy and runner-up was Mrs. Lou Toczko. Consolation flight trophies went to Mrs. Eloise Gushanas, the winner, and Mrs. Lucille Burke, runner-up. Special awards were also given to Miss Rosemary Quillan and Mrs. Ann Smith. Ass't SecNav To Visit Here The Honorable R. H. Fogler, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, will arrive at the Naval Base on the 13th of January for an official visit. Mr. Fogler is making a tour of the Caribbean bases. He: "If you don't marry me I'll commit suicide." She: "Now, Sam, you know Pa don't want you hanging around the house." I Naval Base Fives Ready For Starting Gun The night lights go up over the basketball courts in Fleet Recreation Area in preparation for the start of the Base League on Monday. The base-wide basketball tournament commences next Monday 11 January, when VU-10 takes to the court against Naval Air Station and the Dental Clinic five goes against the Naval Station. The championship tournament will commence on 15 March after the season schedule has been completed. Games will be played on the Naval Station court on Monday and Wednesday and on the Marine Barracks court on Tuesday and Thursdays. First games will begin at 1830; second games will start 15 minutes after completion of the first. All postponed games will be played on Friday nights on the Naval Station court. The schedule for the first week of play: Date 11 VU-10 vs NAS Dental vs NavSta 12 Marines vs Hospital MCB-7 vs FTG 13 VU-10 vs High School NAS vs FTG 14 Dental vs MCB-7 NavSta vs Hospital Naval Base High School Squad The High School basketball squad: back row, left to right: George MacMichael, Norman Huddy, Jim Hackworth, Edgar Heimer, Eddie Stafford, James Cavanaugh and Pierce Lehmbeck. Front row: Jack Stafford, James Dalton, Donald Moore, James Dexter, James Miles, Tony Thelan, and coach William McGill. With four regulars returning from last year's squad, the Pirates of the Naval Base School are out to better a record of 1-17 compiled by the Pirates of '53, as they open their rough and tumble season on the evening of Wednesday, 13 January against the Mallards of VU-10. Coach William McGill, in his first year with the Pirates, states that he is looking forward to much help from the returning four: forwards George MacMichael and Norman Huddy, center Edgar Heimer and Guard Pierce Lehmbeck. Coach McGill told the Indian that ..the lack of height hurts, but for the past few weeks we have been striving for good ball-handling and teamwork. Condition is a big thing, also, as we are hoping to take as much as possible in the stretch. We don't expect to 'whale the tar' out of anyone, but we do want to make the game as interesting as possible." Coach McGill is also looking for a lot of help from forwards Eddie Stafford and Jim Hackworth. Stafford is a tall, lanky, boy from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania who should add considerably to the team's speed and Hackworth, from Tampa, Florida has plenty of that desired height. With material like this the Pirates may well round into the ideal ball club. Saturday, 9 January 1954 THE INDIAN Page Three

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Navy-10NDPPO-Gtmo m THE INDIAN Saturday, 9 January 1954 MOVIES Saturday, 9 January CAPTIVE CITY J. Forsythe J. Camden Sunday, 10 January WHERE'S CHARLEY? Ray Bolger Allyn McLerie Monday, 11 January THUNDER BIRDS John Derek Mona Freeman Tuesday, 12 January YUKON GOLD Kirby Grant Martha Hyer Wednesday, 13 January CIMARRON KID Audie Murphy B. Tyler Thursday, 14 January INVITATION Van Johnson Dorothy McGuire TEENAGE-ROUND-UP By Barbara Burke and Linda Thurston School re-opened on the "Frantic Fourth" with all of Gtmo's teenagers bursting with news of their holidays. Norman Huddy, Neil Hayes and A. Burek could be seen swashbuckling around the teenage hut up to their knees in soapy water last Sunday. The club was being cleaned up for the ump-teenth time. Norman, as the new president was in charge of slave driving. Cookie and crew were washing and ironing pink organdy curtains. This ordeal, by the way, was about the only time anyone did any work over the holidays. The cheerleaders have had quite a bit of trouble with their uniforms. It looks like their attire for the first few games will have to be white shirts and shorts. Don't despair tho ...the uniforms will be ready soon. Chief Retires Here After 20 Years; Will Continue Womble Report Ministry Work During Civilian Life in Georgia Innis A. Claude, Jr., steward chief, retired from active naval service here recently after 20 continuous years of duty. He was transferred to the Fleet Reserve. Chief Claud, who entered the Navy in January 1934, has served in seven Navy ships and six shore installations in his 20 years. A minister of the Church of Pentacostal Holiness he has carried on extensive missionary and parish work while attached to naval shore establishments; particularly in Coca, Fla., Trinidad and here in Guantanamo Bay. Chief Claud intends to continue his parish work as a civilian and also contemplates enrollment in a trade school in Tifton, Ga. A background of coral and cactus is provided for the shipment of Christmas trees which arrived at the Naval Base for the holidays. The trees arrived on the "Yippee Boat", the YFR 1152 during the week before Christmas in time to be decorated for Santa. (Continued from Page One) Money matters figured prominently in the Womble Committee report. Such things as the equalization of Regular and Reserve benefits for survivors and families, increased combat pay, and the exemption of retirement pay from income tax took up the bulk of the report. But morale and discipline were also important in the eyes of the committee. The group urged that no fiscal policies be established without prior evaluation of the effect of the policies of the morale and effectiveness of military personnel. The report called for better discipline, increased penalties for AWOL and desertion, more authority for officers and NCOs, loyalty down as .well as up, and the treatment of personnel as individuals-not MOS units. Criticism of the military annoyed the committee, and the report suggested that rebuttals to such criticism receive publication. However, the group also recommended that higher standards of performnace be demanded of military personnel so that such criticism might become unwarranted. An adequate rotation policy at all costs was recommended. The group urged a restudy of Service deployments to improve permanency, more concurrent travel and adequate housing here and abroad. The committee urged de-emphasis of the USO and what it called "other dubious morale aids." It recommended the retention of PXs, ship stores and commissaries and asked for reduced rentals on Wherry housing units. The group also stressed the need for equal G.I. Bill benefits for personnel remaining on active duty, particularly housing purchase loans. It called for permanent legislation to assure medical care for dependents. The recommendations of the committee have been submitted for review by the Department of Defense which may submit them to Congress for legislation. Rupertus Point .. (Continued from Page One) China, Phillipines, France, England, Italy and many other points. At the time he retired he was Chief of Fnance, U. S. Army. Attending the ceremony at Marine Barracks headquarters were CAPT F. L. Tedder, Commander Fleet Training Group; CAPT G. M. Holley, Chief of Staff; CAPT J. M. Howell, Commanding Officer Naval Station; and CAPT W. R. Garuthers, slated to relieve CAPT Howell as commanding officer of the Naval Station in the near future. II I